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    A-C 
  • Abandon Shipping:
    • Season 3 shows Catra at her worst as she seriously damages or destroys every relationship she has. To recap: She backstabbed Entrapta, framed her for treason and had her exiled to Beast Island (Catrapta); physically threatened Scorpia when she voiced a problem with the aforementioned (Scorptra); indirectly caused the death of Glimmer's mother (Glitra); and spitefully tried to destroy reality and everyone in it just to spite Adora once and for all - all while blaming Adora for making her do it, an act that finally made her oldest friend give up on trying to save her (Catradora). While a lot of fans are still optimistic, and the shipping mass exodus isn't quite as bad as it could have been, the general consensus is that Catra is too toxic and self-destructive for a healthy relationship. This was completely reversed in Season 5 with Catra going through a redemption arc which leads to Catradora becoming an Official Couple at the end of the series.
      • Scorptra gets a second torpedo after Scorpia tells Catra to her face that she's a bad friend and abandons the Horde entirely to rescue Entrapta. This too is reversed by Catra making up with Scorpia in Season 5.
    • Character designer Geiger confirmed that Entrapta's rough age is late 20s or early 30s. This torpedoed any ships with the main cast of teenagers, outside of a few stragglers who still deny that Entrapta is an adult.
  • Adorkable:
    • Due to Adora's inexperience regarding the outside world, she's very enthusiastic and awkward, and it comes off as very endearing. Her reaction to seeing a horse for the first time says it all. Also when she's been infected and she essentially becomes drunk. She's very adorkable during that time.
    Adora: (with quiet awe) It's majestic.
    • Glimmer's cute design and her energetic personality place her directly into this trope.
    • Bow tends to geek-out a lot, especially about First Ones tech.
    • Despite her intimidating appearance and the fact that she allied with the Horde, Scorpia is a genuinely sweet, playful and slightly ditzy woman with an awkward crush on Catra.
    • Sea Hawk. Just, Sea Hawk.
    • Hilariously enough, Hordak ends up like this when dealing with Entrapta, as he noticeably fumbles and struggles to say thank you to her for upgrading his suit to help him deal with his degenerative condition.
    • Likewise, Wrong Hordak is a sweet, slightly dim clone, every bit as bumbling and enthusiastic as his Evil Overlord counterpart is cold and cruel. He encounters the outside world with the enthusiasm of a child, and is utterly endearing as a result.
    • It turns out Light Hope's creepy Knight Templar persona is the result of reprogramming. When her system was rebooted and she was running at sub 40%, she was quite emotive and expressive, seeming to have great fun in learning and using her capabilities as they uploaded.
  • Alternative Character Interpretation:
    • The memories Adora and Catra go through in Episode 11. Given Light Hope's instructions to Adora to give up all her friends, and the fact she appears as soon as Catra betrays Adora, perhaps she was using them to try to drive the two apart. The Reveal in Season 4 that Light Hope has been manipulating Adora so that she would activate the Heart of Etheria to destroy the First Ones' enemies gives a lot of credence to this theory.
    • Some fans have also theorized that Hordak might have been much more aware of Catra and Shadow Weaver's actions than he let on, and subtly pushed them against each other so that they wouldn't join forces and overthrow him, leaving Catra an Unwitting Pawn through most of the story.
    • Scorpia's possible Transparent Closet case. Given what's seen of the Horde's mentality (no displays of physical weakness), some think Scorpia is determined to be Catra's "best friend" because, thanks to being raised by the Horde, she doesn't actually know she's got a romantic crush. This may have been torpedoed by a photograph in Season 4 showing she Has Two Mommies.
    • Micah, Adora, Catra, Glimmer — did Shadow Weaver ever truly care for any of them, or does she just like being a controlling mentor/parental figure and needs others to play the part in her power fantasies? All four of those relationships have evidence one way or the other. For what it's worth, Catra and Adora both call her out as the latter in Season 5, but then in the finale she goes and performs a Heroic Sacrifice to save them. As part of said Heroic Sacrifice, Shadow Weaver takes off her mask and looks upon Catra and Adora as herself as she tells them she's proud of them. Did she truly mean it, or was she just giving them the small bit of peace that she could provide before she died? Or was it one last selfish act to try and redeem her reputation in the eyes of her "children"? Noelle leans toward it being some of both.
    • Should Hordak be seen as an evil man because of his conquest and tyranny, or is he less culpable because he's a product of indoctrination and oppression? As a clone in Horde Prime's army, Hordak was born into a hyper-militaristic culture in which conquest was his only reason for existing, and any dissent would have gotten him killed. After the revelations of "Destiny, Part 2", the degree to which he had/has free will and to which he's acting on his programming is also up for debate.
    • In Season 4, when Hordak leads troops from the frontlines, is he doing so because he genuinely enjoys being back on the battlefield, or because he's hoping to see Entrapta? Is it a little of both? Similarly, in Season 4 Hordak never does anything to protect the crystal powering his exoskeleton, allowing Catra to defeat him twice by ripping it out. Is that due to his inability to adapt to new situations, him not wanting to modify one of Entrapta's last creations (particularly one she defined as her greatest work yet), or a sign of his increasing desperation leading him not to care about his own safety?
    • Hordak's lair is dark, dirty, and industrial, a stark contrast to the bright, clean, sleek designs of Horde Prime's technology. Does Hordak fashion his lair in this manner because he lacks the materials and ability to make it more aesthetically pleasing, or because he was always intent on getting back to Horde Prime and this was just a temporary base of operations? Or perhaps Hordak subconsciously made his base look as different from Horde Prime's as he could as a reflection of his independence and estrangement.
    • Catra in general inspires a lot of this by the end of Season 4. Was her telling Horde Prime about the Heart of Etheria yet another attempt to earn validation by getting in the good graces of the most powerful person around, or was it actually a desperate maneuver aimed at saving herself, Glimmer, and all of Etheria from otherwise certain death? Did Double Trouble's Breaking Speech actually get her to recognize her self-destructive and toxic tendencies, leading to her protecting Etheria, or did it just drive her further into nihilistic fascism, leading her to allying with Horde Prime? Season 5 seems to indicate Catra only agreed to serve Horde Prime out of fear for her own life.
    • Did Double Trouble ever care about Catra, at least a little? They seem to genuinely enjoy her company, but remind her that they're here mainly because they're getting paid, and, true to their word, they defect for a better offer later on. Furthermore, was their Breaking Speech to Catra just to further twist the knife, or were they being honest when they said it was For Your Own Good, laying down some very brutal truths about Catra's flaws because someone had to — albeit, enjoying it a little too much while they did it? For whatever it's worth, DT's voice actor has said on their Twitter that they believe DT does care about her, at least enough to be honest.
    • Light Hope. We do find out that she and Mara had a friendship, but her benevolent personality was violently overridden by the First Ones' reprogramming so that she can activate the Heart Of Etheria, but the parts of her that are good have been attempting to resist. That being said, why did she really choose Adora? It depends on which programming of her took the initiative—was it the remnants of her benevolent self that chose Adora because she needed the new She-Ra to be strong-willed enough to be able to destroy her when the time comes? Or was it her reprogrammed self following her creators' directive to find the next She-Ra to activate the Heart of Etheria?
    • Is Entrapta an Asexual nerd who just really likes tech or an Extreme Omnisexual Lovable Sex Maniac with Robosexual leanings? There are definite indications of the latter in season 5 but since this show is for kids, it's never explicit. This can be a bit divisive among autistic fans with some arguing that the former interpretation is based on ableist stereotypes.
  • And You Thought It Would Fail: Before it first came out, many weren't thrilled about a new She-Ra series due to the original show's 80s origins, while others found the new show's aesthetic too childish, not at all helped when the first promotional images were released and a number of people on the internet called the show out for pandering to the "woke crowd". To make matters worse, it would be released during a decade of reboots that had polarizing reception. However, after the first set of episodes was released, it rapidly found an audience that appreciated the more serialized storytelling and emphasis on characterization compared to the original, along with a more mature tone, leading many to call this new series better than the original. In a decade that saw a trend of poorly recieved reboots, this series broke that streak. The only other reboot series to have broken that trend was Ducktales 2017.
  • Angst? What Angst?:
    • Adora comes to terms rather quickly with the fact that the people who raised her from infancy are evil and everything they ever taught her is a lie, though it could be because she focuses her angst on her ever-worsening relationship with Catra, who chooses to remain with the Horde despite being somewhere between Adora's best friend and love interest.
    • Entrapta manages to stay perfectly cheerful despite all the times she got thrown through the wringer in this series, like her believing her comrades left her to die and not even holding much of a grudge against them for it, and getting sent to Beast Island just because Catra was jealous. However, "Destiny, Part 1" subverts this: when Entrapta is demoralized by the signal, all of the sorrow she feels over failed friendships rises to the surface, showing that she does have angst, but represses it most of the time.
  • Author's Saving Throw: Spinnerella and Netossa finally start playing a bigger role in Season 4, after only scant appearances in the first half of the series (despite being widely advertised as the show's canonical sapphic couple). Season 5 expands both their personalities and their relationship, starring one of the most important subplots of the season.
  • Awesome Music:
    • The theme song does a great job establishing the themes of strength, friendship, and the girl power vibes of the show, on top of being pretty catchy. Bonus points for the extended theme, "Warriors".
    • Speaking of "Warriors," the trailer for the final season has AJ Michalka (Catra's VA) singing a downright haunting Moody Trailer Cover Song version.
    • In terms of score, "Promise", the first piece of music heard in the series which is basically the Catradora Leitmotif. The piece is used in many of their pivotal moments such as when Catra lets Adora fall in Season 1, the fight between Adora and Catra in The Portal, Catra sacrificing herself to save Glimmer (and by extension, Adora), and when they finally share their big damn kiss is simultaneously heart-wrenching and triumphant.
    • The score throughout "The Battle For Bright Moon" is triumphant and exciting, and is frequently used throughout the show as the theme of the Rebellion.
    • "No Princess Left Behind" is synthy and intense, working really well as the show's stealth music.
    • "Transformation" is used whenever Adora transforms into She-Ra and is a triumphant piece that's made even better during its reprise in Season 5.
    • "Corridors" is a hauntingly beautiful piece that slowly builds up to a crescendo when Catra finally makes the decision to help Glimmer escape.
  • Base-Breaking Character:
    • Catra proved to be one of the show's most divisive characters. While initially well-liked due to being interesting, sympathetically villainous, and having Foe Romance Subtext with Adora, her increasingly awful actions came to divide the fandom. While some defend her as a complex Tragic Villain due to her abusive upbringing and troubled life, and love her redemption, seeing it as cathartic, relatable, and progressive, with some going further than that and treating her as never being a villain at all, others came to hate her due to her relationship with Adora growing violent to an extent many felt was Romanticized Abuse and increasingly cruel and spiteful acts, and feel that her redemption happened too quickly, along with the way she tends to be the focus of the show, especially in its later seasons. Neither of these issues are quieted by Noelle Stevenson's admitted love of Catra or the large number of fans solely interested in her and her relationship with Adora.
    • Swift Wind is a contender for most divisive character. Many people find his singing, constant Anvilicious dialogue and general obnoxiousness to be quite irritating. Swift Wind's Off-Model, Uncanny Valley animation doesn't really help his case either. On the other hand, many fans like how he sometimes helps Adora emotionally, and they find his bombastic personality endearing rather than annoying. Swift Wind also seems to be divisive amongst the crew of She-Ra, since Geiger said on Twitter that they hate Swift Wind more than the fans did.
    • Some fans despise Hordak as a villainous conqueror who has caused untold suffering on Etheria, while expressing disgust at the romantic tension between Hordak and Entrapta. Other fans sympathize with Hordak due to his struggles with chronic illness, horrific upbringing in Horde Prime's empire/cult, and tenderness toward Entrapta.
    • Glimmer in Season 4 gets hit hard with this, after activating the Heart of Etheria. Her detractors accuse her of having acted rashly and impulsively, ignoring the advice of her two best friends and, worst of all, listening to Shadow Weaver. This was not aided by the fact she also claims Adora is Driven by Envy and the fact she orders against saving Entrapta from Beast Island. Her fans, on the other hand, say that the only thing Glimmer knew for certain about the Heart was that it was a big reservoir of magic, and she had no way of knowing that activating it would attract Horde Prime's attention. As the queen of Bright Moon, making use of a valuable resource to win a war was a perfectly reasonable course of action. As for her not listening to Adora and Bow, they had both shown very little concern for Glimmer's feelings regarding the war effort, despite Glimmer being both their supreme commander and their friend.
  • Big-Lipped Alligator Moment: The midpoint episode of Season 4 ends with a random shot of Horde Prime smiling at the camera, which is obviously there because the season was originally going to be split in half like the last one (until it became clear how unpopular the format was).
  • Broken Base:
    • In the same vein as Cassandra's in Tangled: The Series, whether or not Catra's redemption was well done. For a lot of people, it was a powerful piece of Character Development that put them through the grinder before successfully redeeming them as intended, making them deeply sympathetic and demonstrating how nobody is beyond atonement. For as many others, it was overly rushed favoritism that robbed the character of moral complexity or straight up turned them a Karma Houdini with no more than a slap on the wrist, by failing to fully acknowledge the scope of some of the terrible things they did, such as causing Angella to sacrifice herself, making them Unintentionally Unsympathetic.
    • Somewhat related to the above, the finale, particularly the Catradora romance. For obvious reasons it made a large part of the fanbase ecstatic, especially since many of them watched the show just for that pairing. But those same factors created a surpring number of detractors. For Catra herself is an incredibly divisive figure, to the point that many detractors used to be in the supportive group. Those who don't love the character and believe that Adora reciprocating her feelings at the end of her Redemption Quest was a case of of Throw the Dog a Bone, instead feel their increasingly cruel behavior and treatment of Adora pushed the ship into Romanticized Abuse territory, that said character's redemption was too rushed, and not enough to bring it back out of said territory. A lot of fans who were interested in the show for its other aspects believe that Catradora's focus at the end came at the expense of everything else.
    • Catra and Hordak's fans often conflict rather fiercely, with both being quite divisive. Most fans of Catra argue that she's a more interesting and sympathetic character, that she's cool and compelling, and that the narrative glosses over Hordak's crimes and potential mistreatment of Catra, while Hordak's fans often feel that he's a more compelling villain whose plotline is stolen from him by Catra, his angst is undermined by the show's focus on Catra, aren't happy that he loses every fight he has with her in what they feel is unrepentant shilling, and feel that the show seriously underuses Hordak. This isn't helped by their shipping tendencies, as Catradora fans often see Entrapta and Hordak's relationship as being creepy due to what is often seen as a power imbalance, whereas Entrapdak fans are quick to shoot back that they feel Hordak and Entrapta's relationship is built on mutual respect, trust, and encouragement, whereas Catra and Adora's relationship is toxic due to Catra's torment of Adora.
    • Although Double Trouble is well-liked as a character, their handling is divisive within among the show's LGBT fanbase, particularly trans and non-binary persons. Some very much appreciate having non-binary representation in a show aimed at younger audiences, particularly a character with an active role in the plot, not defined by sexuality and treated as being effective and even cool. Others are less thrilled, seeing Double Trouble's nonhuman status as essentially making them a glorified case of Bizarre Alien Sexes and seeing their role as an amoral trickster - namely one that can use their appearance to fool people into believing they're someone they're not - as playing into the belief that trans people are faking their identity to manipulate people.
    • While the character is well-liked, the show's handling of Entrapta became this over time. Supporters often point to the fact the show treated her as nuanced, the characters call her out for her misdeeds instead of her being Easily Forgiven, and the fact it makes an effort to make her a sympathetic neurodivergent character who, despite some moral ambiguity, ultimately sides with the heroes and aids them in concluding the conflict, which many felt was an admirable message and good representation for neurodivergent audiences. However, its detractors feel that the show was too unfavorable toward Entrapta, noting that the Princesses had tendencies toward her which could be perceived as ableist or cruel, such as ignoring and talking down to her even as she tries to aid them, and feel that the show placed emphasis on how Entrapta should change herself to earn their friendship despite their prior treatment of her while their own issues are never pointed out. Some think this carries the potentially negative message that neurodivergent people should change themselves to gain the friendship of neurotypical people.
  • Catharsis Factor:
    • Catra managing to defeat Shadow Weaver and destroy her connection to her powers, after all the abuse she had been out through by her.
    • Seeing the berserk She-Ra overpower Catra in "White Out" and even put genuine fear into her can be very satisfying to watch, especially after her cruel manipulations and smug attitude in "Ties That Bind".
    • In the Season 3 finale Adora finally gives Catra the Shut Up, Hannibal! she's long had coming. Our last look at Catra in the season is of her running with her tail between her legs and a massive Oh, Crap! expression, as Adora gives her a Death Glare that makes clear she's done trying to get through to her.
    • Double Trouble's absolutely scathing and completely accurate dressing down of Catra in the final episode of Season 4. They shapeshift into everyone she's ever had a relationship with and brutally tell Catra that she is the problem, and drives people away with her toxicity. Catra is understandably devastated by this, but it's also pretty cathartic seeing someone finally call her out on her behavior and actually make it stick.
    • After all the abuse Catra heaped on Scorpia for four seasons, it's nice to see the possessed Scorpia lightning blast Catra over the horizon.
    • On a similar vein to the Scorpia point, considering the fact that Catra is the reason the Horde was able to take Salineas over, there's something so satisfying about watching chipped!Mermista attempting to drown Catra.
    • After seeing the damage Horde Prime had inflicted on all the characters, it was cathartic to watch Hordak turn on him and kill his physical body. Then, when Horde Prime's consciousness possessed Hordak's body, it was cathartic to see She-Ra exorcise Horde Prime, freeing Hordak and destroying Horde Prime's spirit forever.
  • "Common Knowledge": Among certain circles in the fandom, the idea that the Horde's soldiers are all kidnapped children, and that Adora specifically is among them, is commonly touted as a reason to hate Hordak. The reality is that the series never actually clarifies where the Horde's influx of children come from, with outside statements and implications in the show itself leaning more toward the idea that the Horde actually takes in orphans and abandoned children, with Catra in particularly having essentially been dropped on their doorstep and taken in according to Word of God, and while Adora is initially led to believe Hordak kidnapped her, this turns out to be a lie, with him having actually saved her life. Much of this is likely owed to the original series, where Hordak did kidnap Adora and the Horde was much worse.
  • Complete Monster: Horde Prime, true ruler of the Horde, is an ancient being who exists by stealing the bodies of his clones who he breeds to be mindlessly loyal drones, any hint of individuality or imperfection resulting in erasure. Having exterminated countless worlds in the name of order, Prime is only swayed from destroying Etheria by the realization he can use it as a weapon, sending his discarded "brother" Hordak to have his identity erased. Later brainwashing Catra, Horde Prime tries to force Catra's suicide before Adora when she resists, using those he controls as weapons against their loved ones. Seeking to activate the Heart, Prime launches attacks on Etheria with threats to destroy the world, ending by trying to have Hordak himself kill his beloved Entrapta when she tries to warn him of the consequences. Finally activating the Heart, Horde Prime gleefully attempts to annihilate the entire universe as the ultimate culmination of order and his twisted ego.
  • Crack Ship: Bow/Adam, which started getting traction after some fan artists theorized about Adam's possible reboot design. The two get shipped despite Adam's existence in this continuity still being up for grabs.
  • Crazy Awesome: Entrapta has a manic personality and slightly creepy appearance, and she's also probably the greatest expert in First Ones technology in the entire show, not to mention that she makes her interrogation an absolute nightmare for her captors by constantly slipping out of her bonds and playing with their weapons. Even more so in Season 2, when she breaks into Hordak's sanctum, starts tinkering with his projects, and then lectures him about what he's doing wrong. Hordak is so taken aback and impressed by her complete lack of fear that he ends up making her his assistant. Entrapta manages to top even that in Season 4, which reveals that she not only survived but thrived on Beast Island, mostly resisting the signal, marveling at the abundance of First Ones technology, and building herself a mecha, all while maintaining her exuberant demeanor.
  • Creepy Awesome:
    • Shadow Weaver, who is an initially unrepentant Hate Sink and child abuser, not to mention having disturbing and dark sorcerous powers. This particular interpretation makes her one of the most interesting and delightfully nightmarish presences on the show.
    • The corrupted version of Catra is a piece of living, breathing Nightmare Fuel, but also looks extremely cool and serves as the culmination to massive build-up.
    • Horde Prime is a dangerous and disturbing narcissistic figure with heavy overtones of Religious Horror. Thanks, however, to the amazing performance Keston John puts in and the sheer level to which he outdoes every other villain in terms of heinousness, he's generally one of the best-received aspects of the fifth season.
    • All of the chipped civilians of Etheria, but special mention goes to Mermista, Micah and Scorpia.
  • Creepy Cute: Unlike his original model, this Imp's appearance can cross into the uncanny valley, especially given his more human features. He's still adorable to look at, however, particularly when Hordak is cuddling him.
  • Crossover Ship:
    • From RWBY, there are not so common pairings like Double Trouble and Neo and Scorpia and Tyrian.
    • Catra is also paired with Rayla from The Dragon Prince, though more as friends than lovers. This is likely partly due to The Dragon Prince writers Tweeting that they would be friends if they met.
    • Catra would probably befriend Amity due to their similar issues and complicated relationships with Adora and Luz. Glimmer and Eda would probably bond due to their respective recklessness and develop a relationship similar to what Eda has with Luz. Lilith and Angella would bond over having to deal with relatives like them.
    • Catra would probably bond with Lotor due to their respective issues, complicated relationships with Allura and Adora and how they nearly destroyed their realities for their own reasons. Scorpia would also probably bond with Lotor's lieutenants, especially Ezor due to their upbeat and positive personalities. Seeing Kosmos and Melog interact would be cute.
    • Netossa and Spinnerella would likely be friends with Sailor Uranus and Sailor Neptune from Sailor Moon, due to being gay couples and their similar competitive streaks.
    • People have started shipping Adora and Catra with Anne and Sasha from Amphibia due to the similarities in their relationships.
    • People sometimes ship Swift Wind with Celestia and Luna from My Little Pony: Friendship Is Magic.
  • Cry for the Devil: Shadow Weaver's death is still quite emotional to watch no matter how horrible she was, and one can't help but feel even a little sorry for her. Shadow Weaver is the equivalent of a tired old dog who's dying, yet still seeks affection and love. Noelle Stevenson even states Shadow Weaver does care about Adora, Catra, Glimmer, and Micah, but because she has never known anything but hatred and selfishness, it never works out, and it's something she ultimately confronts in the end. Shadow Weaver made the choice to sacrifice herself knowing that there is no place for her and can never redeem herself. She's at least become aware she wasted her whole life with her obsession with power, and tells Catra not to make the same mistakes she did. Shadow Weaver makes peace with this.

    D-F 
  • Darkness-Induced Audience Apathy: From Season 3 onward, a good number of people had this reaction towards Catra's arc. Almost every episode ended with her descending further into villainy, and her increasingly dangerous and destructive behaviour made it hard to root for her to be saved. In fact, they felt it was in Adora's best interest to give up on trying to save Catra after nearly destroying reality.
  • Die for Our Ship: A lot of Catradora shippers really hate it whenever Adora is shipped with anybody that's not Catra.
  • Draco in Leather Pants:
    • Catra is a fan favorite. The writers made her deliberately sympathetic, and often pit her against the unilaterally detestable Shadow Weaver, so Catra naturally appears more sympathetic by contrast. That said, Catra is also incredibly selfish and vindictive and with almost no sympathy for anyone, with her moments of kindness to others being just that - moments - and she openly cares very little that the Horde goes around destroying the world and killing innocent people. Even after she tries to destroy Etheria and all life on it including herself just to deny Adora victory, you will still find fans who think she is justified in her actions. That being said, she does show clear unhappiness once she reaches the top of the food chain, has her sanity gradually chipped away due to a mixture of guilt and paranoia, and undergoes heaps of Character Development and a Heel–Face Turn in Season 5.
    • There are certain fans who completely whitewash Entrapta's Face–Heel Turn and claim that she's purely duped by the Horde and won't need any actual redemption, ignoring the effects of Catra's deliberate manipulations and/or claiming Hordak was the one who manipulated her. They also downplay or erase the dark side of her Chaotic Neutral and For Science! tendencies. Some of them also argue based on her Ambiguous Disorder that she's autistic, and hence isn't morally responsible for any of her actions... which is pretty dodgy if you actually are autistic or sympathize with autistic people from a more thoughtful perspective.
    • Hordak. While he's certainly deliberately sympathetic (Especially in the way he bonds with Entrapta), some fans forget that Hordak is very much not a good person and try to whitewash or ignore his villainous deeds, although many of his fans certainly understand that he's a villain and like him plenty anyways. The show ends with him redeeming himself, which has only intensified debate over whether the writers themselves give him this treatment.
    • There are even some fans (admittedly only a very small minority) who downplay Shadow Weaver's relentlessly self-serving behaviour and insist that deep down, she cares for Adora and/or Catra... even though she's proven herself entirely willing to sacrifice both if it gets her what she wants. After the series ended, a portion of fans arose that saw her as only slipping into villainy due to her time with the Horde. While the series does grant Shadow Weaver more sympathy and nuance as Light Spinner, and she was a Well-Intentioned Extremist originally, the series makes it quite clear that she was slipping into evil either way, and the first thing she does with her newfound power is murder Norwyn, meaning she's already somewhat evil even before joining the Horde.
  • Ensemble Dark Horse:
    • The silent lizard man Rogelio has been gaining a lot of attention for his cool design and his seemingly kind and friendly, possibly romantic, relationship with Kyle.
    • Kyle also seems to be fairly popular in general due to being an Adorkable Butt-Monkey, his I Just Want to Have Friends attitude in "No Princess Left Behind", and just generally seeming to be too nice to be part of the Horde. A few people have subscribed to the idea of him becoming this series' version of He-Man, although that character was never in the show for legal reasons.
    • Many fans have latched onto newly revealed villain Double Trouble, despite how little information we have on them. It helps that their design is very cute, and they seem to be a Large Ham. Plus, the other actors get to ruthlessly mock their own characters whenever Double Trouble turns into them. And of course, being a canon non-binary character who absolutely no one ever misgenders, referring to them with the proper pronouns as if it's the most natural thing in the world. Their alter ego, Flutterina also has a sizable fanbase.
    • Season 5 introduced Wrong Hordak, a Horde clone who was disconnected from the hivemind and rescued by the Rebellion, revealing an adorkable, bumbling Nice Guy whom the fandom latched onto instantly.
    • Multiple random Horde clones have received fan followings and headcanons revolving around them, mainly due to their unique personalities, humor value, and their characterizations and sympathetic existence nicely averting What Measure Is a Mook? via showing the audience how oppressed they are by Prime. The two most popular tend to be the Horde clone that prolysetizes at the Rebellion about Prime and is shushed by Scorpia in "Horde Prime," and the clone that grows vicious and overzealous in mere seconds in "Corridors."
  • Epileptic Trees:
    • One of the silhouettes of Etheria's princesses Light Hope shows Adora caught fans' eyes due to its resemblance to Catra. Cue several "Catra is a princess that was kidnapped young" theories.
    • The appearance of Tung Lashor has led several people to theorize that the Snakemen, in particular King Hiss, exist in this universe. This was eventually Jossed by Stevenson herself in an interview, confirming the Snakemen as a faction were off-limits.
    • In the Season 3 finale, when Angella goes off to help Adora, Micah starts to tell her something before he's consumed by the World-Wrecking Wave. The fans immediately went with the assumption that he, too, had regained his memories, and was trying to tell Angella that he's actually alive. This ends up confirmed.
    • The reveal of Horde Prime led to an explosion of speculation about other He-Man characters making the jump. Prior to his inclusion it was believed that every He-Man character was off limits due to copyright. However, it's relevant to point out that Horde Prime made his debut in the original She-Ra series and can also be considered a She-Ra villain, perhaps more so than a He-Man villain.
  • Evil Is Cool:
    • Catra, whose interesting and rounded character traits, cleverness, and combat skill rendered them among the most popular characters in the show even as her villainy comes to make her miserable.
    • Hordak is a fresh, pragmatic take on the Evil Overlord who has a cool voice and an intimidating design. He only became cooler with the revelation that he's a seriously determined individual and that he had Hidden Depths.
    • Double Trouble, a non-binary shapeshifter and master actor, who relishes their role as an agent of chaos with pure, sadistic glee and ends up one of the only characters to never truly be defeated.
    • Horde Prime exemplifies this more than any other character in the show, partly because he's the one character in the show to be completely irredeemable. He's the kind of evil espouses the traits that made Emperor Palpatine and Thanos great villains, namely the former's cold, calculating, efficiency, not to mention his ruthlessness, and the latter's imposing figure with Dark Messiah characterization and his menacing Badass Fingersnap. As such, while the other villains are gradually humanized, all of Horde Prime's screentime is devoted to making him as despicably awesome as possible, all delivered by a chillingly effective Cold Ham performance that Keston John effortlessly distinguishes from Hordak.
  • Evil Is Sexy:
    • Catra is very attractive to many audience members due to being a scrappy catgirl. This only intensified when she grew older as the show went on, and her outifts exposed a bit more skin.
    • Hordak absolutely exploded in this audience reaction around the third season, when some of his Hidden Depths were revealed and he first shed his armor for a long period of time, revealing a figure many found more attractive than they did before. His relationship with Entrapta and Keston John's shocking performance absolutely did not hurt.
    • Double Trouble, whose occasional flirtatiousness, pure control of any situation, and Jacob Tobia's voice led them to develop a fair number of admirers.
    • Horde Prime, despite looking strange, is a fairly muscular figure with an exposed chest, whose voice is like a more refined version of Hordak's. Notably, this is clearly also his opinion of himself.
  • Fandom Rivalry:
    • With the Voltron: Legendary Defender due to parts of the Voltron fanbase becoming embittered by some of the plot directions that Voltron took. In particular, the topic of LGBT+ representation is a big point of contention, due to Voltron killing off an Advertised Extra gay character in Season 7 while She-Ra introduced LGBT+ representation as early as Season 1. Likewise, much of Voltron's notorious shipping wars have carried over, with ships like Catra/Adora drawing comparisons to Keith/Lance. On the other side, Voltron fans believe that She-Ra is actually filtering their own fandom, as many of the toxic Keith/Lance shippers that started the issues with that fandom are moving to She-Ra to ship Catra/Adora. It is fortunate for those fans that that ship had the support of the show's creators and was the ultimate endgame of the series.
    • Many fans of original She-Ra and current She-Ra do not get along at all. Nostalgia is a major factor, but this is also likely due to controversial remarks made by Noelle Stevenson with further rivalry fueled by Melendy Britt's vocal criticisms of the new series.
    • The announcement of both Masters of the Universe Revelation and a full reboot of He-Man and the Masters of the Universe has created a divide concerning the use of He-Man. Fans of Princesses of Power have wanted to see the creative team’s take on He-Man, Skeletor, and the rest of the Eternia cast of characters, while those looking forward to Revelation and the reboot do not want this version of She-Ra anywhere near either production, particularly as Revelation is supposed to be an adult-targeted production that producer Kevin Smith has described as "Metal". Several fans meanwhile have suggested the opposite, a version of She-Ra in Revelation or the reboot divorced from the Princesses of Power version. The presence of not one, but two new He-Man series separate from Princesses of Power has also been interpreted by She-Ra fans as Mattel actively attempting to ignore and bury a series that they lack control over and doesn't sell merchandise to the degree they desire for a co-production. Interestingly, the rivalry does not extend to the creative team, with Smith praising Princesses of Power on his podcast, and Noelle Stevenson half-jokingly suggesting a crossover in the vein of the old He-Man/She-Ra Christmas Special.
      • The divide with fans of Masters of the Universe deepened when Mattel began releasing She-Ra toys, specifically toys of the original She-Ra as part of their Masters of the Universe Origins toy line, along with figures of Hordak which were also based on his original incarnation. This is particularly notable as Mattel briefly released a line of dolls based on Princesses of Power only to quickly discontinue it following extremely poor sales. The focus on the original versions of the characters as part of a mass-market release (as opposed to a limited collector targeted release like the Super 7 line of figures) has heightened fears Mattel wants to ignore this incarnation of She-Ra and replace it in the public eye with a version made internally.
    • Also gets this with Tangled: The Series, especially with regards to Catra's and Cassandra's villain arcs and their redemptions after both fandoms watches the other's show. Both characters followed a similar arc where they have deep-seated jealousy of the protagonist and feel like they've always been cast aside for them. It culminates both characters committing a horrible betrayal against the protagonist and all their villainous actions are out of spite and pettiness over the fact. While it is generally agreed that both characters' redemptions had their flaws, especially since both did vile things throughout the series, the debate is over which character's redemption was relatively done better. In Catra's case, supporters will point out hers was well done due to the fact that she was at least given the opportunity to improve herself and get much needed character development. Additionally, fans of She-Ra would observe that Cassandra had absolutely no problem embracing evil and only redeemed herself after Zhan Tiri deprived her of her power, thus she only became "good" again because something bad happened to her personally, not because of a moral dilemma, while Catra still cared about Adora deep down and made the conscious choice to pull a Heroic Sacrifice to save Adora after seeing just how badly she messed up. Fans of Tangled however, will typically point out how unhealthy it was for Catra to enter into a relationship with Adora in the end because of how toxic and mentally unstable she has shown herself to be much like Cassandra, and felt Cassandra and Rapunzel going their separate ways is a route that should've been taken by Catra and Adora.
  • Fandom-Specific Plot: A lot of people have started writing stories or making fanart in an attempt to connect He-Man to this continuity, despite his character currently being Exiled from Continuity due to legal reasons.
  • Fanfic Fuel: The series ending certainly encourages this, with Noelle Stevenson saying in interviews that what happens next is up to the fans.
    • The Best Friend Squad going back off into space, what adventures will they have? Will it be the start of another epic story, or slice-of-life fun? Will they meet the remnants of the First Ones? Learn of Adora's parentage and Eternia? Meet He-Man? Maybe they will find a way to save Angella? Will they meet the Magicats and is Catra one of them? The possibilities are almost endless.
    • With Horde Prime dead and Entrapta's virus collapsing the Horde Hive Mind in the series finale, we now have hundreds of horde drones stranded on Etheria (possibly throughout the rest of the universe) who now have to fend for themselves, now possessing individual thoughts and feelings for the first time. It doesn't help that the Horde's invasion campaign would sour the rest of Etheria's sentient life against them and one lone Horde Drone (Hordak) single-handedly started an empire, so it is likely that the outcome would be interesting and potentially destructive.
    • The last episode confirmed a lot of different pairings as canon, this caused a slew of married life AU fics to hit the internet. Future kids fanart and stories have also become pretty popular.
    • The Horde and the Rebellion are, after the finale, forced to find peace, with every prominent Horde member undergoing some degree of redemption. This means fanfics like Horde leaders dealing with the consequences of their crimes, the characters repairing Etheria together, and the remaining conflicts between the two factions, are all popular premises.
  • Fanon:
    • A lot of people like to think of Sea Hawk as bisexual, due to his interactions with both Bow and Mermista. Mermista is sometimes subjected to the same interpretation due to her interactions with She-Ra and Sea Hawk. They've earned the titles Bisexual King and Queen as a result.
    • A few people see Bow as a trans boy, due to his underclothes in "Shadows of Mystacor" resembling a binder. His soft facial features and build add fuel to the fire, a lot of fans at first thought he was a slightly masculine woman rather than a slightly feminine man. The fact that his Day in the Limelight is an extended metaphor for a Coming-Out Story (with him "coming out" to his parents as a warrior rather than a scholar) just added more fuel to the fire.
      • Sometimes the same fanon is extended to Perfuma, who is sometimes believed to be a trans girl and portraying her friendship with Bow as solidarity among trans people. A Tumblr post by character designer Rae Geiger revealed that Geiger intended Perfuma to be read as a transgender woman.
      • Some fans also headcanon Hordak as a transgender man. His father figure cast him out of his home and later ridiculed him as an "abomination". Hordak also chose a new name for himself. Hordak's backstory codes well to that of a transgender youth kicked out of his home by a transphobic parent. His narrow waist and curvy hips and thighs also add to the speculation.
      • As of Season 5, you can add Peekablue to the list; he's a Gender Flip of a character from the original, is a Bishōnen, has a similar body type to Hordak, and looks like he might be wearing a binder under his suit. Then again, we never actually see Peekablue—just Double Trouble impersonating him to feed their acting jones.
    • The belief that Entrapta's autistic was quite popular even before her character sheet for Season 4 outright confirmed this, as did a tweet from showrunner Noelle Stevenson.
    • Many fans headcanon Hordak as genderfluid, given that he wears a backless dress underneath his armor. Plenty of fanart, including that of character designer Rae Geiger, depicts Hordak in feminine attire.
    • The Star Sisters of the original show are turned into the Star Siblings with one of them (Jewelstar) being a man, whose actor is trans. This naturally led to a ton of people figuring the character is too. Character designer Rae Geiger stated on Tumblr that Jewelstar was a transgender man.
    • Some fans theorize that Horde Prime is an ancient eldritch abomination who decided to use Hordak's species as vessels and slaves. He has survived for millennia by possessing the bodies of Galactic Horde clones, he considers using Catra as his next vessel but decides against it because her body would not survive long, he requires clone life force to survive, and his consciousness takes the form of a black and green shadow when She-Ra exorcises him from Hordak's body.
    • Ever since the first season aired, there has been much speculation regarding Adora and Catra's relationship back when they were both cadets in the Horde: on one hand, a share of fans considered them best friends, on the other many saw them as an Official Couple that had a devastating break up when Adora switched sides. The ending of the series shows that both interpretations were half-right. Adora and Catra really were Just Friends, but both had always been in love with the other for years and never acted upon their feelings for different reasons: Catra never expressed how she felt, while Adora pushed her feelings down and very likely couldn't have put a name on them anyway.
    • The fanfiction short story, Don't Go, is considered by most of the fandom to be canon. This is in part because of the mass speculation that the story is actually written by Noelle Stevenson themselves, and for how much it adds to Catra's redemption arc.
    • Although Word of God has never confirmed one way or another what species Catra is most fans headcanon her being a member of the Magicats.
    • While the show itself seems to disprove this theory since She-Ra has a Healing Factor, quite a lot of fanfic writers like the idea of Adora having scars on her back from when Catra clawed at her in the Season 1 finale.
  • Foe Yay:
    • Catra and Adora have a very close relationship both before and after Adora defects. Many scenes center around Catra's feelings of betrayal and Adora's lingering feelings towards her. They even have a romantic dance together at princess prom.
    • Glimmer and Catra is also a popular ship. Despite their lack of history compared to Adora, Catra loves riling up Glimmer in the same borderline flirty way, and Glimmer has canonically imagined Catra as a sexy Femme Fatale. The Season 4 finale, in which Glimmer and Catra are taken captive on board Horde Prime's ship, has increased the popularity of the ship.
  • Friendly Fandoms:
    • With Steven Universe fans, unsurprisingly, due to the heavy emphasis on LGBT science fiction/fantasy characters and themes, and even similar color palettes in their artwork. There are also the similarities between Spinel and Catra, with both suffering from abandonment issues to the point of attempted omniside. Once Horde Prime gets some screen time, there are a lot of comparisons between him and White Diamond as well.
    • With The Dragon Prince, another show that attracted former Voltron: Legendary Defender fans that were disillusioned with the fandom of that show. This was helped when the twitter account for The Dragon Prince released crossover sketches made by their artists of the characters of both shows interacting, specifically, Catra and Rayla befriending each other, as well as Soren and Sea Hawk arm wrestling.
    • With Castlevania (2017), given the parallels between the romance of Vlad Dracula Ţepeş and Lisa, and the friendship between Hordak and Entrapta.
    • There's also a nice overlap with the Elena of Avalor fandom, another show with Aimee Carrero voicing the lead character who's an Action Girl and a princess. It's also garnered some comparison between Adora & Catra and Elena & Esteban due to Adora/Elena having to accept Catra/Esteban as their enemy after the latter parties' self-destructive tendencies causes severe and irreversible damage all because they loathed being Always Second Best to the former parties.
    • With Ducktales 2017, as both shows are reboots of popular shows from The '80s. Heck, even Noelle Stevenson was a storyboard writer for DT17's Pilot Movie, and wrote one of the episodes of the first season before moving on to She-Ra. In both reboots, Adaptational Diversity is at the forefront.
    • There's an overlap between fans of this show and fans of the Carmen Sandiego reboot, due to the similarities between them.
    • It also popularly shares a fandom with Tangled: The Series, which again, is a show about a heroic princess and her friends while also having Les Yay with her (former) best friend. Even more so when it was revealed that not unlike Catra, Cassandra secretly despised being Always Second Best to Rapunzel and shared the same abusive parental figure with her, eventually leading to her betrayal in search of achieving her own destiny, only to find herself conflicted about being evil and her estrangement from her ex-best friend. A lot of fans even note how accurate Cassandra's Villain Song "Crossing The Line" is in describing Catra, from how the titular princess is blessed and gets everything, all the way to the burning of bridges with her best friend. And much like Catra, Cassandra is left with nothing after driving everyone who once cared about her away and is given a very brutal "The Reason You Suck" Speech by a shapeshifting being who manipulated her, and she's too broken to even care what happens that she practically begs the hero to just give up on her. Interestingly, both Catra's and Cassandra's redemption are notorious for being divisive and have received criticism for being rushed and ignore the scope of the severe damage they both caused.
    • Despite the major Fandom Rivalry between the shows, there are some fans of Voltron: Legendary Defender who actually do like this show, most notably due to the parallels between Haggar and Shadow Weaver in terms of their sympathetic backstories before they went from good to evil along with characteristic parallels between Coran of the reboot and SPOP's Sea Hawk, or Shiro and Scorpia.
    • With The Owl House as Luz and Amity are noted to have similarities to Adora and Catra, with the latter having feelings of inadequacy, and having a prickly demeanor towards the protagonist, yet can’t bring herself to hate her. Plus, there’s some degree of Les Yay between them. Interestingly, it’s worth noting that Noelle Stevenson’s wife Molly Ostertag is a staff writer for the show. Even more amusing, both shows had the lead couple (Catra and Adora for She-Ra and Amity and Luz for The Owl House) dancing in prom with one of them wearing a tux and their dance together being the Signature Scene involving the Official Couple of the show! Both shows having big LGBT elements definitely helps.
    • With Kipoandthe Ageof Wonderbeasts, thanks to having very similar themes and style. It also helps that the series was ending just as Kipo premiered and that Kipo herself shares a VA with Glimmer.
    • Gets this a bit with Amphibia, as both shows have a female protagonist in a magical land with a toxic ex-best friend serving the Big Bad's right hand who is trying to conquer said land.
      • To a lesser extent, there's some viewers who see Anne and Sasha's relationship as somewhat similar to Catra and Adora's. With a few people actually starting to ship them.
      • Of course, Marcy has netted comparisons with Entrapta, as both are quirky science-minded and show signs of having ADHD and Autism
    • The fandom has managed to get along well with the fandom of Hazbin Hotel due to similar themes of redemption, gender identity, abuse, among some. Not to mention that some find Double Trouble to be similar to Angel Dust.
    • Has developed a friendship with the Cleopatra in Space fandom, as both have tons of WLW/Les Yay moments.
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    G-I 
  • Growing the Beard:
    • While Seasons 1 and 2 were not seen as bad by any means, they were criticized for not treading any new ground, feeling too similar to shows like Avatar: The Last Airbender. By Season 3, more unique aspects of the characters and world started to be more visible, along with exploring darker themes not usually covered by shows for all ages and showing the consequences standard character archetypes can bring.
    • Within Season 1 itself, after several episodic and relatively light-hearted episodes following the series premiere, "In the Shadows of Mysticor" was the first episode to really dive into Shadow Weaver's emotionally abusive parenting of Adora and how her upbringing in the Fright Zone has damaged her as a young adult. Such themes of emotional abuse and how to cope with it would define the show's run.
  • Harsher in Hindsight:
    • After the Season 3 finale, in which Glimmer loses her mother, a line from an earlier episode becomes way harsher: in Season 3 Episode 4, Glimmer, arguing with her mother, says: "What's the point? You'll always be around, telling me what I can't do."
    • The Season 3 finale where Adora loses all sympathy for Catra due to her self-destructive tendencies and denounces her actions as unforgivable is harder to watch after the release of the first half of Elena of Avalor Season 3, where Aimee Carrero's other character Elena finds out about her cousin Esteban's past treachery and also loses sympathy for him, and his self-destructive tendencies cause all bridges to be burnt between them regardless of how badly he wants to be forgiven. Suffice it to say, Elena's and Adora's expressions towards their respective loved ones' betrayals are almost identical. What hurt about said betrayals was that Adora/Elena loved this person (though Adora revealed this much later on), and that made it hard for them to forgive. In other words, both of Aimee Carrero's characters will be dealing with a fallout with an estranged loved one around the same time. In Season 4, Adora gives Catra a talk similar to one Elena gave to Esteban during their last "amicable" about how hurtful her actions have been, both to her and to a lot of people, and how she will do what it takes to make sure no one gets hurt again, even if it means casting her aside. Just like Catra, Esteban’s instinct is to run and hide from the people he hurt when things go south for him. Sure enough, Adora does eventually find it in her to forgive Catra, and so does Elena for Esteban, and that happens after Catra/Esteban hit rock bottom and and decide to make a Heroic Sacrifice for their loved ones.
    • After Season 4, it's jarring to realize that the Etherian Horde was a more humane offshoot of Horde Prime's galactic army, which is staffed by drone-clones who are not permitted free will, individuality, or even names. For all of its evil actions and human rights violations, the Etherian Horde allowed its soldiers to have individuality, free will, friendships, and leisure time, and never practiced the kind of mental violation that Horde Prime inflicts on his clones.
    • Several of Hordak's lines, physical details, and behaviors are harsher in hindsight after the revelations of "Destiny, Part 2".
      • In Hordak's flashback in "Huntara", if one looks closely, one can see that the other clones have green eyes, in contrast to Hordak's red eyes. Hordak's eyes turn green again when he is reassimilated back into the Galactic Horde in Season 5. His red eyes may have signaled that he was malfunctioning.
      • In "The Price of Power", Hordak tells a unit of Horde soldiers that "There is nothing I do not know," meaning that his minions should never even try to lie to him. This line is much more ominous after "Destiny, Part 2", after Horde Prime forcibly enters Hordak's mind and learns all his secrets. There is nothing Horde Prime does not know about his clones. It's especially sinister after Horde Prime and clones proclaim that Horde Prime knows all and sees all in Season 5.
      • In "Razz", Hordak tells Shadow Weaver, "If you have failed to condition [Catra] properly, you have no one but yourself to blame." In "Destiny, Part 2", Horde Prime arranges for Hordak to be "reconditioned". Hordak thinks of childrearing as conditioning because he himself was not raised, but was conditioned as a mass-produced clone.
      • Hordak's first outfit looks like standard Evil Overlord attire. Viewers later learn that this outfit was a clone uniform recolored in black and red while the other clones wear white and gray versions of the same armor, in keeping with Horse Prime's claims that he brings light and casts out all shadows.
      • Worse, in "Light Spinner" we see Hordak without any armor on as machinery performs maintenance on his ports and re-attaches the armor. His bulky appearance is purely superficial as the armor is hiding a frail upper body with significant muscle loss, to the point that there's a gap between the ulna and radius bones in his forearms. When a piece of the machinery glitches and scrapes across his body he cries out and swats the equipment away in pain. When he retrieves the little tube of machinery without any armor on, his middle and ring fingers are unable to wrap around it properly and his expression goes wide-eyed, then turns shameful and resigned.
      • The small tube in question has prongs sticking out of it. Then "Destiny, Part 2" reveals that Horde Prime's "dreadlocks" are actually cables with prongs on the ends that he uses to interface with his clones via their neck ports. The broken cable might well have reminded Hordak of Prime, who cast him out to die when Hordak couldn't hide his physical "defect" anymore.
      • Several fans noticed that Hordak punishes minions and attacks opponents without ever putting his hands on them. Horde Prime violates Hordak's mind by touching Hordak's face with his hand and lifted him up by the neck before casting him out for his physical defect. Coupled with Prime's other uncomfortable touching of Glimmer, Catra, and his clone attendants, Hordak's inhibitions about hurting others with his hands might be due to more than just hiding his physical fragility.
      • In the Season 5 trailer, Horde Prime's clones are equipped with arm cannons as weapons. The arm cannon that Hordak built for himself in Season 4 was a larger version of the weaponry he used while fighting in Horde Prime's army.
    • After The Reveal in the series finale that Catra and Adora harboured feelings for each other the entire time and never acted upon them for their respective reasons, all while thinking that the other didn't feel the same, makes every single interaction they have up until Catra's Heel–Face Turn quite painful to watch, as they're literally two broken girls who want nothing more than being with each other.
      • It also makes Double Trouble's "The Reason You Suck" Speech all the more brutal, as they clearly saw through Catra's facade the entire time. Bringing her palm up to cup "Adora"'s cheek, something Catra has probably always longed to do, only helped them drive home how she's done nothing but push away the literal love of her life. No wonder she sobs when they do it.
  • Heartwarming in Hindsight: In February 2019, a She-Ra cosplayer proposed marriage to her girlfriend, who was cosplaying as Catra. Which Noelle Stevenson and the official Twitter retweeted to express her happiness. In the series finale, Catra and Adora became an Official Couple.
  • He Really Can Act: As Hordak's role increases, Keston John puts on a surprisingly powerful performance, particularly as Hordak lays out his desperate, obsessive Freudian Excuse and subsequently bonds with Entrapta. This is proved twicefold in Season 5, when Keston plays quadruple duty as Hordak, Horde Prime, Wrong Hordak, and various clones, each one distinct in their own way.
  • He's Just Hiding!:
    • A lot of fans theorized King Micah was still alive somehow, just separated from his family. The Season 3 finale comes within a hair's breadth of confirming this, and Season 4 confirms it outright, when the main characters find him on Beast Island. It helps that the exact same thing happened to Micah in the original show.
    • Similarly, many fans assume Angella's Heroic Sacrifice won't be permanent. Mostly because the show's careful to specify that she's "trapped between dimensions" without actually saying she's dead. But this wasn't undone and she remains trapped by the show's end.
  • Idiosyncratic Ship Naming:
    • The Rogelio/Kyle ship is sometimes nicknamed "Repkyle", as it was named before Rogelio's name was revealed.
    • "Adora Has Two Hands" for the One True Threesome ship between Adora, Catra and Glimmer.note 
  • It Was His Sled: Adora and Catra getting together in the final season, and especially their kiss, spread through the internet like wildfire. It would be downright impossible to discuss the show without bringing it up.

    J-M 
  • Jerkass Woobie:
    • Catra. Though her actions become more and more villainous as the show goes on, it's hard not to sympathize with the character, especially during the first two seasons, the first half of season three, the final three episodes of season four, and season five. Her upbringing was terrible, having always been treated as second fiddle to Adora and suffering both emotional and physical abuse under Shadow Weaver's thumb, receiving death threats even as a small child. She craves approval from the worst people in her life, suffers from immense trust and abandonment issues, and constantly self-sabotages her own happiness as a result of those things.
    • Hordak. He was a clone of another warlord, Horde Prime, but was eventually discovered to have a physical defect and sent to die in battle for being "worthless". Everything he does is to prove his brother made a mistake. His body is thin and sickly outside the suit and he is slowly dying. He also gains a genuine friendship with Entrapta that is tarnished after Catra lies about her betraying him. In Season 4, when he finally meets the man he has spent decades in unwavering service to, Prime berates him, diminishes his accomplishments, mindwipes him, and tosses him aside with starkly casual cruelty—in under a minute.
    • Glimmer shifts to this in Season 4. Even as she drives the Best Friends Squad away from her and becomes domineering and hostile towards the Alliance as a whole, it's clear that there's a lot of grief and pain in her motivations, and she wants the rift between her and the others to close... she just doesn't see how much of the rift is her own fault, and the manipulations of Shadow Weaver and Double Trouble aren't helping on any of those scores. Most obvious when Scorpia gives her an impulsive hug towards the end of the season... and when she lets go, Glimmer is still clinging to her like a drowning woman to a life preserver.
  • Jerks Are Worse Than Villains:
    • While Catra's support of the Horde and willingness to help them take over Etheria was fine with much of the fanbase, Catra became divisive not because she's evil, but because her treatment of her friends and Adora grew to be too much for them and too akin to outright abuse.
    • For a subset of fans, particularly dedicated Entrapdak fans, the Princesses' rather begrudging attitude toward working with Entrapta is a much worse crime than Hordak and Entrapta's attempts to conquer Etheria, with many even praising the two for giving each other unconditional love and support. This is mostly owed to the fact that much of the Horde's deeds are fantastical supervillainy, while neurodivergent people being mistreated is a common thing in the real world.
  • Just Here for Godzilla:
    • There are those who want to hear Aimee Carrero voice another princess.
    • Catra became a major reason to watch the show early on, with many viewers latching onto the sympathetic villain's actions and finding the character's arc surrounding her abusive childhood and quest for power much more engaging than heroine Adora's. Plus, she's a cute catgirl and her snarky attitude often made her scenes a joy to watch, even as her behavior and decisions become more vile and unforgivable in later episodes.
    • Season 4 drew a lot of attention by offering a scene-stealing, Chaotic Neutral nonbinary mercenary with enough theatre kid energy to punch a hole in the planet crust in the form of Double Trouble.
    • Quite a few people came in, both before and after the finale, due to the Foe Romance Subtext between Catra and Adora, which was rather open for a two-woman relationship in a childrens' show, and this only doubled after said subtext became text in the final season, with the two ending up together.
    • To a lesser extent, many came to the show just because of Hordak and Entrapta's human/alien romance, which to many fans of human/alien romances was the highlight of the show. Many felt the same way about the fact it was a villain/villain romance at all, a well-liked trope that had been falling out of favor before the show was released.
  • Launcher of a Thousand Ships: Adora, Catra and Sea Hawk have been shipped with basically every same-age-range character in the series and beyond. Catra, in particular, cemented her status as this with Season 2, after which the Glitra and Scorptra ships catapulted from niche pairings to near-fandom mainstream almost immediately; Adora, meanwhile, has been shipped with virtually every member of the Princess Alliance, plus Catra, Scorpia and Huntara.
  • LGBT Fanbase:
    • Unsurprisingly. The show has a large amount of queer representation, with romantic subtext between the two leads (plus a number of other side characters of the same sex), Bow being raised by two men, Scorpia having lesbian mothers (though assumably deceased) and a lesbian couple among the princesses. The fact that a large number of background characters at the princess prom seem to have same-sex dates also upped the ante.
    • Hordak and Entrapta have developed a substantial fanbase among ace and trans fans, since Hordak codes very well to being a trans person and their love is clearly present yet mostly not too physical.
    • Double-Trouble, who is non-binary, has gotten an immense amount of love from the fanbase for being a heavily layered character whose role is just seeing sparks fly.
  • Love to Hate: Double Trouble falls into this for being a criminal scumbag, but is a unique character with a unique talent that many are willing to put up with them.
  • Magnificent Bastard: Double Trouble is an amoral, cheerful mercenary who delights in chaos. Effortlessly tricking Catra as an "audition", Double Trouble infiltrates the Princess Alliance to weaken them, playing all they find against one another to weaken the alliance. Upon being caught, Double Trouble simply switches sides and sabotages the Horde to escape punishment, even delivering a bout of "tough love" to make Catra realize her toxic personality before leaving after they decide they have had enough sport.
  • Memetic Badass: Fans (particularly Entrapdak shippers) began to joke that Entrapta would be the one to defeat Horde Prime following the events of the Season 4 finale, due to her going into Violently Protective Girlfriend mode upon learning about his "reconditioning" of Hordak.
  • Memetic Loser: Adora herself, though in a fairly tongue-in-cheek way; much of the fandom likes to portray her as a rather oblivious "dumb jock" who can't read social cues and customs well due to her upbringing in the Horde. The shipping fandom, in particular, delights in portraying Adora as confused by flirting and crushes. Her lack of knowledge of horses in the prologue has led to a fandom Running Gag in which she doesn't know what any animals are (not helped by one of the tie-in books, which has her take a little while to remember what a duck is). Again, this is generally applied either in a lighthearted, jokey way or as a sympathetic extension of her Fish out of Water nature in Bright Moon.
  • Memetic Molester: Horde Prime has been getting this treatment from the fandom since his debut in Season 4 due to his smarmy demeanor, creepy body language, habit of touching others in a manner that feels predatory, and dehumanization of his clones, including Hordak.
  • Memetic Mutation:
    • Due to the controversy around She-Ra's Adaptational Modesty, it's become a common joke to point out that She-Ra actually had one of the more tasteful costumes in the original franchise, at least in comparison to He-Man and Skeletor.
    • "I'm eleven, so shut the fuck up."explanation 
    • "Seriously, Kyle?!" explanation 
    • She-Ra said Gay Rights explanation 
    • Let's go, lesbians! explanation 
    • Shadow Weaver's A+ parenting explanation 
      • As of Season 5, her death has created a new wave of memes, either that she did it because she was drunk (as she was seen holding a goblet in the scene right before), it was one final attempt to screw with Catra and Adora, or that she's such a horrible mother that doing one selfless thing caused her to spontaneously combust.
    • Entrapta evades taxes explanation 
    • I ship Catra x therapyexplanation 
    • "HOW DO YOU LOSE A WOMAN?!" "You forget to cherish her." has become pretty much synonymous with Scorpia's Heel–Face Turn.
    • BOOB WINDOW explanation 
    • Husband and wife explanation 
    • Oh my God they were lab partners explanation 
    • "You should've seen your face. You were like, 'Aah, nooo, betrayal!'" explanation 
    • "Sparkles, PLEASE just eat your food..."explanation 
    • Genocide jello explanation 
    • The HOE Projectexplanation 
    • Robosexual Entrapta explanation 
    • Glimmer is the only member of the Best Friends Squad with a braincell.
    • Lesbian Jesus Explanation (spoilers!) 
    • SHE-RA FUCKING SPRINTED Explanation (spoilers!) 
      • Related to the above, "Everybody say: thank you Noelle".
    • Is she... ya know... a friend of Mara?explanation 
    • Adora is a good thing.explanation 
    • Best. Selfie. Ever. explanation 
    • Horde Prime drinks Mountain Dew and eats lime Jello. explanation 
    • Catra Applesauce Meowmeow explanation 
  • Misaimed Fandom: There is not supposed to be a "right" side in Catra and Hordak's struggle for control of the Horde. Both of them are depicted as having sympathetic traits and seriously vile misdeeds to their name, with neither necessarily being worse than the other and both being driven to evil by their own tragic pasts, consistently hurting one another and the people around them. While they're Not So Different, that didn't stop fans who liked one and not the other from insisting that one of them was the better side in the conflict.
  • Misblamed: A livestream with the show's crew a few months after the show ended went disastrously wrong and they ended up being accused of numerous offensive statements. But while the crew themselves were responsible for some of them (most notably a joke about Bow's siblings all having rhyming names including a farmer named Sow which brought up slavery implications), the majority (like Hordak and Entrapta being "perfect representation" for autism and the use of the slur "d*ke") were from viewer statements or the chat's moderator.
  • Moe:
    • Glimmer, for her frequently Adorkable behavior, cutesy powers, and her tendency to wear her heart on her sleeve makes her very endearing. Bonus points for being the most traditional princess in the series.
    • Many fans love Scorpia for many of the same reason and for being such a supportive friend to Catra (even if the latter doesn't want to admit it) and being more of a hugger than a fighter. Like Glimmer, she's also very Adorkable .
  • Moral Event Horizon:
    • Every time the audience learns something new about Adora and Catra's childhood, Shadow Weaver gets worse. There's no unanimous agreement on which specific act of emotional or physical cruelty crossed the line, but there are enough to choose from that nearly everyone agrees it definitely happened somewhere. Defecting did not change this, especially since the show adamantly refuses to treat it as a Heel–Face Turn; all it did was add Glimmer fans to the population of Adora and Catra fans already baying for her blood.
    • For some viewers, Catra's Suicidal Cosmic Temper Tantrum where she tried to wipe out all of reality, herself included, just to one-up Adora (the woman she supposedly loves), and caused Queen Angella to sacrifice herself was just too much, and they found this character's later Redemption Quest a case of Unintentionally Unsympathetic, if not Why Would Anyone Take Him Back?
    • Horde Prime is not only a conqueror of entire galaxies, but he created an army of drone-clones who are little more than slaves without free will or individuality. When he reconditions (that is, mind-rapes) Hordak, his evil is undeniable.
  • My Real Daddy: Fans consider Josie Campbell, Shane Lynch, and Rae Geiger to be the architects of Hordak and the Entrapdak ship, rather than showrunner Noelle Stevenson.

    N-R 
  • Narm Charm: An inevitable holdover from the source material to be sure, but characters still have bluntly descriptive names like Catra or Castaspella, and The Horde, despite being written with enough nuance to not think of themselves as evil, still live in a place called The Fright Zone. Still doesn't make the characters themselves any less endearing or The Horde any less menacing or three-dimensional.
    • Shows up In-Universe in the episode "Roll With It," where Glimmer declares the fantasy sequence parodying the original show "kind of amazing."
  • Never Live It Down: Because of the Rule of Funny, Adora will forever be remembered for the events of "System Failure" and "White Out", where she basically got drunk because a magical virus infected her sword.
  • No Such Thing as Bad Publicity: Netflix is somewhat notorious for not spending much time or money to promote their shows beyond announcing release dates. A lot of She-Ra's online buzz came from people angry that the show was being made for one reason or another, and those that argued against them. This led to many viewers checking the show out just to see what all the hubbub was about.
  • One True Threesome:
    • A number of fans of the Glimmadora ship, wanting to avoid an ugly bout of Ship-to-Ship Combat with the more popular Catradora, have popularized a three-way ship between Adora, Glimmer and Catra (see Idiosyncratic Ship Naming).
    • The Best Friends Squad, Adora, Bow and Glimmer, are often pushed just a little bit closer together than their canonical very close friendship - particularly since Glimmer has had at least a little Ship Tease with both of them.
    • Their villainous mirror image, the Super Pal Trio (Catra, Scorpia and Entrapta) are not unheard of as a ship, although after the third season it's likely hit some issues since Catra backstabbed Entrapta and threatened Scorpia.
    • Scortrapdak (Scorpia x Entrapta x Hordak) has slowly gained fans after Season 4.
    • After season 5,Hordak x Entrapta x Wrong Hordak gained some popularity as well
  • Paranoia Fuel: In Season 5, Horde Prime implants chips into various people of Etheria to control them, with it not being obvious right away. Anyone could be under his control and you wouldn't realise it until it's too late. Even you could have a chip just waiting to take over you.
  • Popular with Furries:
    • Catra, what with her much more obvious feline characteristics this time around. This became a subject of minor controversy when some of the writing staff revealed that Catra indeed has a full-body covering of very fine fur, in addition to her ears, eyes and tail, leading to debates of varying degrees of seriousness over whether, in light of this information, being a Catra fan does indeed make one a furry.
    • Rogelio, among scalies, has become quite popular for being a buff Lizard Folk character. His implied interest/relationship with Kyle has also become popular among scalies as a side-effect.
  • Portmanteau Couple Name:
    • "Catradora" for Catra + Adora.
    • "Glimmadora" for Glimmer + Adora.note 
    • "Scorptra" for Catra + Scorpia.
    • "Bowtrapta" for Bow + Entrapta.
    • "Kygelio" for Kyle + Rogelio.
    • "Glow" or "Glimbow" for Glimmer + Bow.
    • "Seabow" or "Bowhawk" for Bow + Sea Hawk
    • "Seamista" or "Merhawk" for Sea Hawk + Mermista
    • "Glitra" for Glimmer + Catra.
    • In addition to the Idiosyncratic name listed above, there are numerous competing name combinations for Adora + Catra + Glimmer, though the most accepted one appears to be "Glitradora."
    • "Entrapdak" and "Hordapta" for Hordak + Entrapta.
    • "PrimeDak" for Horde Prime + Hordak.
    • "Catrouble" for Catra + Double Trouble
    • "Pertara" for Perfuma + Huntara
    • "Scorfuma" for Scorpia + Perfuma
  • Realism-Induced Horror:
    • Shadow Weaver's treatment of her adoptive children, manipulating them, favoring Adora over Catra, and generally being despicable and cruel to them, have become memorable as among the creepiest and darkest themes the series is willing to take on. The consequences it has on both of them, especially Catra, who received the brunt of the abuse, are depicted in a way which can easily disturb viewers.
    • Catra's treatment of Adora is this. Catra is Adora's former best friend. Adora constantly begs Catra to join the Rebellion, and in spite of the fact Catra would be far happier and healthier there, she refuses, lashes out, and torments Adora; Shadow Weaver's conditioning is too hard to shake, and she and Adora were too codependent for her not to see Adora's leaving as a betrayal. It's a harrowing, heartbreaking experience for both parties.
    • Hordak turns out to have a medical condition, which caused him to be shunned and cast out of his home by his paternal figure, Horde Prime. It codes very heavily to a disabled or trans person being rejected by their society and feeling internalized guilt due to their upbringing.
    • Horde Prime and the Galactic Horde perhaps epitomize this. They are a dangerous force with heavy religious connotations. Their leader is a charismatic figure with No Sense of Personal Space, who uses Cold-Blooded Torture (which simultaneously resembles a baptism, and religiously-motivated conversion therapy designed to "cure" LGBT+ people) and abusive brainwashing to keep their people in line to fuel their narcissism. It was outright stated that Horde Prime was based on "suicide cult" leaders such as Jim Jones.
  • Ron the Death Eater:
    • Adora's use by Shadow Weaver as a "Golden Child" to undercut Catra's self-worth is very widely acknowledged in the fandom. However some go further and blame Adora herself for internalizing Shadow Weaver's "I only punish Catra when you cannot keep her in line" head-games and neither being eloquent enough to get her old bunk-mate to defect nor able to drag her kicking and screaming to Bright Moon once she saw what was really going on.
    • The Princess Alliance in general are dismissed by parts of fandom as elitist isolationists who are indifferent toward the general populace of Etheria, the Horde's rank and file, the insufficiently pretty/normal/humanoid, and/or Adora herself (as opposed to "The She-Ra"). Parts of this are supported by the lack of a Princess Alliance before Adora came along, Frosta's insistence on isolation because the Horde poses her nation no direct threat, Perfuma and her people refusing to fight until the Horde is literally placing them under siege, Scorpia's words about why she's rejected by the princesses (which might be true, but is also very likely heavily biased from the point of view of someone raised by the Horde and is not born out by actual events in the show), and the fact that Perfuma and Mermista use Entrapta's apparent death as an excuse to back out of the Princess Alliance and go back to isolating themselves. It must be noted, however, that the reason the princesses were so isolationist was due to the failure of the last rebellion, which included heavy losses leaving mostly teenagers or children in charge of their kingdoms, and the end of Season 4 shows that the princesses actually accept Scorpia without issues, even encouraging to reclaim her Runestone.
    • Glimmer is already a flawed character, who can be jealous, temperamental, reckless and ruthless, but also kind, brave and ultimately heroic. However, some segments of the fanbase insist on interpreting her as some sort of wildly unempathetic borderline monster who goes out of her way to be cruel to Catra. (It is probably not a coincidence that these segments are generally Catra stans and hardcore Catradora shippers.)
    • An interesting variation. Hordak most certainly is a villain, but you will find people who would rather gloss over his more sympathetic aspects, portray him as an irredeemable monster, and argue against the sympathy the show gives him. Many of them were not overjoyed when Hordak made a Heel–Face Turn in Season 5.
  • Rooting for the Empire:
    • Thanks to Catra, Scorpia, and later Entrapta being the main face of the Horde entering Season 2, many a fan expressed the desire to see them win against the Rebellion. Especially since many fans considered certain members of the Rebellion to be underdeveloped or just plain annoying. Season 3 only increased this segment of the fanbase, as Hordak became a more sympathetic character, as did Season 4 by adding fan favorite Double Trouble to the Horde's side. Season 5 subverts it when Horde Prime takes charge and all of these characters end up defecting from the Horde.
    • Many Entrapdak fans feel that Entrapta should have remained with the Horde, as her experimentation, dubious ethics, and quirks were not only tolerated there but rewarded, feeling that she was at least clearly happy while she was a villain alongside Hordak, who despite all his cruelty genuinely cared about her. This subset of fans tends to overlap with the ones who wanted to see the Horde win.

    S-W 
  • Ship Mates:
    • Glimmer/Adora and Catra/Scorpia go together a lot.
    • Catra/Adora content often features Glimmer/Bow as a side ship (and vice versa).
  • Ships That Pass in the Night: There's a fairly large following for Castaspella/Juliet (the Bright Moon general with a sidecut and scar).
  • Ship-to-Ship Combat: The show managed to spend a long time without any infighting, in large part in an attempt to avoid the same things that ruined the Voltron fandom. However, history repeated itself starting with Season 3 and some cracks began to emerge within the shipping fandom, often over the same types of causes and again often involving the Fan-Preferred Couple (in this case Catra/Adora) on one side attacking others.
    • One with the rather unlikely contestant of Hordak/Entrapta, considering the ships don't even compete. Some Catra/Adora shippers make excuses for the ship's toxicity while accusing the Hordak/Entrapta ship of being toxic (given that Hordak is a conqueror, tyrant, AND Entrapta's superior). Some have even accused Hordak/Entrapta shippers of condoning pedophilia, stemming from a misconception that Entrapta is a teen (when creators have stated that she is actually in her late 20s or 30s). Some Hordak/Entrapta shippers fought back by accusing the former of fetishizing or whitewashing an unhealthy relationship.
    • Some fans look askance at Catra/Scorpia shipping because of the age difference between the teenage Catra and the seemingly adult Scorpia, though Scorpia’s age has never been confirmed.
    • A fringe of Catra/Adora shippers are openly hostile to Glimmer/Adora, mostly on Twitter, which tends to raise the hackles of those who are sympathetic to the ship or to Glimmer in general.
  • Shocking Moments: As an extremely popular show dedicated to complex characters and elaborate interpersonal relationships, She-Ra has plenty of twists, turns, and shocking events.
    • Hordak revealing in "Huntara" that he's just a clone of Horde Prime, who he plans to summon to Etheria, and revealing his true nature as an outright Tragic Villain. Suffice it to say that many didn't see that coming and it changed the game for both Hordak's character and the show itself.
    • Season three's final episodes bring quite the shake-up to the series, mainly due to the change in Catra and Adora's relationship. Catra snaps from dealing with another of Shadow Weaver's rounds of abuse, tases Entrapta and has her exiled to Beast Island, opens the portal, and begins warping reality with full consciousness that she could wipe it out, not caring anymore and absolutely desperate to finally one-up Adora. In the process, Angella pulls a Heroic Sacrifice and Adora finally decides against trying to redeem Catra, instead calling her out, defeating her, and returning reality to normal. It became a Signature Scene very quickly and sets the stage for their final arc.
    • "Hero" has Mara revealing that Etheria itself is a weapon drawing on the planet's natural magic reserves, that she never went mad at all but locked everything away in Despondos to save everyone, and that the power of She-Ra is a key to the planet's weapon.
    • The last two episodes of the fourth season hit hard, delivering shock after shock. These range from Double Trouble revealing the truth about Entrapta to Hordak, leading Hordak and Catra to an emotionally-charged fight that devastates the Fright Zone to Adora breaking the Sword of Protection upon realizing it's a weapon of the First Ones and that her life was a lie, as well as Double Trouble brutally deconstructing Catra and utterly breaking her spirit to the biggest shock of all: Horde Prime arrives, mind-wipes Hordak, kills the conflict entirely, and takes Hordak, Catra, and Glimmer into space as he prepares to conquer Etheria.
    • Catra finally redeeming herself against all odds in "Corridors."
    • Adora summoning the true power of She-Ra, manifesting a new sword and a new outfit, all using The Power of Love in "Save the Cat."
    • Hordak regaining his memories and turning on Horde Prime to save Entrapta, declaring his individuality and freeing himself in "Heart, Part 2." Does a moment of such clear finality end there, though? No. Horde Prime possesses Hordak's body and declares, in one final fit of rage, that he's going to wipe out everyone, himself included, with the Heart, just to spite Etheria for their defiance of him.
    • Shadow Weaver of all people pulling a Heroic Sacrifice to save Catra and Adora in "Heart, Part 2."
    • Catra and Adora declaring their love for one another, resolving five seasons of tension, miscommunication and struggle between the two of them, and saving Etheria with The Power of Love in "Heart, Part 2." The fanbase was lit on fire by this moment, and with good reason.
    • Even after the biggest moments in "Heart, Part 2," She-Ra hands out one last surprise: When Adora was a baby, Hordak saved her with no reason but his own kindness, saying a fond "I remember you" after she saves his life from Horde Prime's possession, causing things to come full-circle and reuniting him with Entrapta.
  • Signature Scene: Quite a few:
    • The tension-filled scene in "Princess Prom" where Catra and Adora dance, especially when Catra dips her, is very popular, especially among Catradora shippers.
    • The final scene in "The Promise" where Catra confronts Adora and lets her fall instead of helping her up, both due to the emotional score playing in the background and it finally cementing the fact that Catra and Adora are enemies from now on.
    • The scene in Season 1's finale where the heroes stand in a line, glow the colors of the rainbow and a rainbow wave splashes behind them is also popular, which fans saying "it's the gay agenda" and "the villains were defeated by the power of gay".
    • Adora’s Death Glare towards Catra and subsequent fallout after she almost destroyed reality at the end of Season 3. It marks the end of Adora and Catra being on any sort of “amicable” terms whatsoever, and leads Adora into the dilemma where part of her wants Catra back, and another part of her feels the need to move on.
    • In the final episode, Adora and Catra's Anguished Declaration of Love and kiss, noted by numerous critics to be a rare time in a western animated show of long-simmering same-sex romance subtext actually being made totally explicit onscreen.
  • Some Anvils Need to Be Dropped:
    • You don't have to absolve someone of their wrongdoings to forgive them. Pain from someone who has badly wronged you can last a long time, but forgiveness is about letting go of your own animosity towards them. Adora was deeply wounded by how Catra was willing to go as far has hurt the ones she loves to satisfy her Inferiority Superiority Complex, but Adora was able to find healing by accepting that that battle is over, and having the willingness to be there for Catra once she's ready to get her life together.
    • It is okay to push away someone who (has) hurt(s) you but still miss them (and sometimes, still love them). Adora admits she still loved and missed Catra, but Catra made a choice to hurt her, and Adora had to make a hard compromise to look past the friend she was before in order to protect the freedoms and lives of those Catra was hurting.
  • Strangled by the Red String: Bow and Glimmer got this both ways. Writers and cast were describing them as Like Brother and Sister right up until the final season was about to be released, but a couple of episodes made it seem like Glimmer had an unrequited crush. Then, when they actually did hook up in the series finale, so little had changed about their relationship from the times it was described as Like Brother and Sister over the course of the season that many people felt like it came out of nowhere with less than half an hour of show left, making it a fumble from the other end. Word of God states that while there was always interest among the crew for it, they weren't sure if they were actually going to have their relationship be romantic or not until the last second, which may explain this.
  • Strawman Has a Point:
    • Queen Angella in Season 3, Episode 4. Here she is portrayed in the wrong, by both the narrative and the cinematography, for scolding Glimmer's constant impulsiveness, her lack of planning, and refusal to communicate with the rest of the Rebellion. However, these traits are part of why Catra was able to capture Adora and the sword to begin with.
    • While she is far from a strawman, Glimmer in Season 4 is clearly intended to be in the wrong, with her showing clear regret about her actions in Season 5. Nevertheless, while she did make mistakes, she never really did anything that wasn't entirely justified, especially considering that she was the leader of one side in a war. Adora told her about a great reservoir of magic easily accessible and says they shouldn't do anything about it despite it easily being a potential tiebreaker in the war. Listening to Shadow Weaver was a clear mistake, but Adora and Bow kept expecting her to listen to them, even though they knew she felt ignored. Using She-Ra as a distraction was a bit coldhearted, but also a perfectly valid tactic in a war.
  • They Changed It, Now It Sucks!:
    • The new character designs caused a large amount of controversy, with Adaptational Modesty being the main subject for Adora/She-Ra herself.
    • Some fans of the original series had this reaction when it was revealed that Flutterina was just an alter-ego that Double Trouble made up to trick the rebellion.
  • They Copied It, So It Sucks!: While the show has received glowing reviews, a point of agreement among critics is the fact that the show's Achilles' heel is that it is treading ground that was already threaded and done better by other shows, especially Avatar: The Last Airbender. In particular, the plot lines regarding Light Hope wanting Adora to leave her friends behind to train for the position of She-Ra and the broken Legacy of the Chosen are a bit too reminiscent of ATLA. As the series has progressed and gotten time to flesh out its story however, this mindset has begun to die down.
  • They Wasted a Perfectly Good Character:
    • Netossa and Spinnerella were the only members of the Princess Alliance before Adora joined the Rebellion, yet they didn't say or do anything until the battle at Bright Moon, and haven't done much since; even in the fourth season, their focus episode was largely focused on Glimmer's arc. We know little beyond them that they're in a relationship, that Spinnerella likes vegetarian snacks, and that Netossa is fairly competitive. As Bow himself puts it in Season 1 Episode 4 " "We're not really sure what they do." Averted in Season 5, when Netossa and Spinnerella receive much more screen time.
    • Huntara was a big Ensemble Dark Horse from the original series and has the powerhouse casting of Geena Davis. She makes a big impression for a couple of episodes, then disappears without explanation. She then only appears in a single episode in Season 4 (and a short cameo in the series finale), though at least this time she does get proper closure.
    • Season 5 has been criticized by some fans for squandering multiple characters:
      • Double Trouble was a fan favorite who played a major role in the events of Season 4 due to their shapeshifting abilities and fondness for chaos. Aside from a minor side plot in "Perils of Peekablue", Double Trouble plays no role in the events of Season 5.
      • In Seasons 1-3, Imp's ability to access hidden spaces, record any sound he heard, and cause mischief shaped major events in the Fright Zone, but he only appears a handful of times in Season 4 and only makes a brief cameo in Season 5. "Huntara" implies that he is a clone of Hordak, but his genetic connection to the Galactic Horde and emotional connection to Hordak never becomes relevant in Season 5.
      • Lonnie, Kyle, and Rogelio, who were previously recurring supporting characters in Seasons 1-4, don't appear at all in Season 5 until a short scene in the finale, and don't interact with Adora or Catra.
      • Razz had firsthand knowledge of the First Ones' conquest of Etheria and the unique ability to interact with people in the past and present, but none of it ever comes into play in Season 5. She appears for five seconds at the end of "Heart, Part 2".
      • Many Hordak fans were disappointed that he only appeared a handful of times in Season 5, despite his rich potential for character development, knowledge that could have been useful to the Rebellion, and position in the Galactic Horde that could have been used to show viewers more of clone life.
      • Micah gets so little to do in S5 that it's hard to tell why they even brought him back in the first place. He gets one episode to do anything, it's early in the season, then he's chipped, and his reunion with Glimmer afterwards is given about four seconds - his relationship with Frosta, who he's not even related to, is given more screentime.
      • Mermista and Scorpia are chipped about mid-season and don't get to do much afterwards.
  • They Wasted a Perfectly Good Plot:
    • As well-done as a lot of fans felt Catra's redemption was in Season 5 due to happening early enough that she has time to truly reckon with a lot of the people she hurt and make amends, one glaring omission is that her being responsible for Angella's death due to opening the portal is never brought up. It's not even clear if Glimmer knows it was her rather than Hordak himself. Nor is her role in the destruction of Salineas dealt with.
    • Despite Hordak being supposedly the main villain of the show for the first four seasons, and turning out to have an extremely close relationship to Adora, as the one who saved them as a child, Adora and Hordak only have two interactions in the entire show, with Catra consistently being Adora's nemesis and Hordak almost never interacting with any of the heroes.
    • The Horde's conquest during Season 4 is almost entirely offscreen. Besides a couple scenes, there are no sequences of the Horde planning or truly engaging the conquest, and none of the Rebellion responding, with each side essentially being self-contained. This is despite the fact it's the central conflict of the show. By the time we see any of the characters truly having it out with the other faction, Horde Prime's arrived and the war may as well be over for both sides.
    • Hordak mentions having faced every single Princess but Entrapta on the battlefield. Nobody else mentions it, and it's never shown to the audience despite the fact their battles must have been nothing short of awesome.
    • Despite the series revolving around Adora's and Catra's tumultuous relationship, delving even into their backstory in the Horde, the one piece of backstory a lot of fans would've wanted to know but was never shown or discussed in the show was how they first met. Fortunately, Noelle would reveal how they met in a stream. Catra was dropped off at the Horde and Adora saw her and claimed her as her best friend by the time Shadow Weaver found out.
  • Trans Audience Interpretation: Bow and Perfuma are often interpreted by fans as a trans man and a trans woman respectfully.
  • Uncanny Valley: Swift Wind's facial expressions can be a little... off. Maybe because of having human expressions on a horse's face.
  • Unexpected Character: In Season 3 Horde Prime, after previously being thought to be Exiled from Continuity as a He-Man character.
  • Unintentionally Sympathetic:
    • Some people find Angella sympathetic, since she blames herself for her husband's death, the first rebellion crashed and burned, and her relationship with her daughter is strained. These same people see Angella as the Only Sane Man of the Rebellion, because she is much more cautious and much more strategic than her impulsive daughter. These fans also think that Angella's seemingly controlling behavior is reasonable, considering that Glimmer is sole heir to Bright Moon and that Bright Moon is at war. This became even more so after her Heroic Sacrifice at the end of Season 3. Before she sacrifices herself, she admits to Adora that she was a coward hiding behind her castle walls while a bunch of kids fought for her. However, many fans perceived that statement as her internalizing Glimmer's feelings and unnecessarily putting herself down. Seriously, she led a Rebellion against a great evil after everyone else gave up, just because she wasn't actively fighting in the war like Glimmer and Micah, doesn't make her a coward, just brave for different reasons.
    • In "Launch," the Princesses call Entrapta out for not being a good friend and for not caring about the consequences of her actions. The latter is an entirely reasonable point and a lesson Entrapta needs to learn, but many were quick to point out that the former is not entirely true. While Entrapta tended to be awkward due to her lack of social skills, many of her attempts to befriend the Princesses were genuine and she only received the appreciation she wanted after changing for the Princesses, not to mention the fact she never even gets to tell the Princesses she thought they abandoned her and didn't know they thought she was dead. While seemingly unempathetic, Entrapta is also still risking her life to try and save Glimmer, who during her breakdown tried to delay Entrapta's own rescue. The selflessness of this is never acknowledged. In addition, plenty of fans felt that the show's attempts to make the audience see her deeds as a serious betrayal fell flat, as most other Horde characters aren't taken to task nearly as much and Entrapta only did what she did after, from her perspective, the people she was trying to befriend left her to die.
    • Kyle was initially written as a sort of Deconstructed Character Archetype to The Everyman trope, although the crew behind the show doesn't seem to understand the whole point of the everyman archetype. Word of God states that Kyle was meant to be a Joke Character. Among the kids who are raised to be child soldiers for the Horde, Kyle is pretty weak and gets a hard time from everyone, including his teammates. He also tends to be an easy scapegoat and is blamed whenever something goes wrong. But he is surprisingly very optimistic and humble despite the situation he's in, and is always trying his best despite his shortcomings. Most egregious is when he confides and befriends Bow when the latter is taken prisoner by the Horde and is literally thrown away when the Rebellion comes to rescue Bow.
  • Unintentionally Unsympathetic: Many feel that the Princesses' treatment of Entrapta verges on bullying. While their interactions with her are mostly Played for Laughs, they tend to be very dismissive and rude toward Entrapta despite Entrapta's awkward yet genuine attempts at forming friendships with them, with Perfuma putting her on a leash multiple times and the Princesses often singling her out even when Entrapta had done little to nothing wrong, with it being implied that this is part of why Entrapta was so quick to defect to the Horde when the time came. This peaked for many with the Princesses' factually-based yet hostile rant toward her in "Launch" when Entrapta, while certainly not spotless in the affair, was under the impression they didn't care about her and gets no such moment to point out that they tended to be overly harsh on her, with Mermista even congratulating her while calling her a "weirdo," which many find a lackluster resolution considering the emotional turmoil Entrapta had gone through. Overall, many fans feel Both Sides Have a Point in the matter and are disappointed that the show places all the burden on Entrapta to change and little to none on the Princesses to be more supportive friends.
  • Unnecessary Makeover: A good number of fans weren’t happy that Catra in the latter half of Season 5 loses her mane-like hair and red headpiece, as those are considered iconic to the character.
  • Viewer Gender Confusion:
    • With his soft facial features, navel-bearing outfit, slim build, and intense eyebrows and a soft blush that make it look like he's wearing eyeliner and makeup, a number of fans have admitted to mistakenly thinking Bow had been Gender Flipped at first. He does look like a rather butch woman, and many of the other girls on the show have Boyish Short Hair, so it's an easy mistake to make.
    • Lonnie has a rather androgynous design that can make her look like a short male. She's female.
    • In Season 3, the unnamed lizard person who travels the desert with Huntara and the goat-woman is stout, wears gender-neutral clothing, and has no secondary sex characteristics. She's revealed to be a woman when other characters refer to her with feminine pronouns, but she could easily be mistaken for a man.
    • In Season 4, Grox has a beard and a burly build. Even though she is voiced by Gray Griffin and other characters refer to her with feminine pronouns, her appearance makes her gender ambiguous.
    • Before their identity as non-binary was confirmed, a good percentage of people believed Double Trouble was female due to their androgynous design. Some dubs do indeed portray DT as female.
  • What an Idiot!:
    • Princess Frosta is charged of hosting the Princess Prom in her Kingdom, and wishes to adhere to the event's traditions as much as possible as a means of garnering respect as a ruler, such as the "No Weapons Allowed" and "All Princesses and Plus Ones Welcome" rules. During the Prom, Catra and Scorpia, the latter being a princess and was thus invited, arrive and Adora warns her that the both of them are soldiers for The Horde, whose armies Frosta was isolating herself and her kingdom to avoid in the first place.
      You'd Expect: Her to make an exception to the rules and kick the two of them out, and realize that this is a sign that The Horde might not be as far off from invading as she thinks and consider taking Adora up on her offer to join the Princess Alliance for the sake of getting extra support.
      Or At Least: Ask her guards to keep a close eye on Catra and Scorpia and report any suspicious actions to her, and maybe allow Adora to have her Sword of Protection on hand in case they try to steal it or to deter the two of them from trying anything.
      Or Better Yet: Never send someone who works for The Horde an invite to begin with.
      Instead: Due to wanting to uphold tradition and to be seen as a competent and respectable ruler, she allows them to stay with absolutely no supervision and even admonishes Adora for her well-founded suspicions despite her having much more experience dealing with The Horde, Catra in particular.
      As A Result: Her Kingdom suffers serious damage as a result of the Heat Bombs Scorpia planted, Glimmer and Bow get captured by The Horde, and the Sword of Protection is also taken, depriving not only the rebellion but also her of a valuable weapon against Horde Attacks.
      Even Worse: She seemingly never considers that this is due to her own incompetence and bias against Adora for accidentally insulting her, seemingly never apologizing for her actions and not joining the Princess Alliance to rescue Glimmer and Bow, only joining in the Season Finale when it looks all of Etheria, including her Kingdom, is going to be affected.
      To Be Fair Though: One must keep in mind that Frosta isn't an adult or even a teenager. She's 11 years old when this all happens having ascended to the throne, meaning her parents are dead, at the tender age of eight. Her childhood was stolen from her, her social skills are horrifically stunted and she's so desperate to prove herself that she follows the Prom's rules to the letter and views any undermining of them or her authority as a very personal attack. Adora wasn't exactly a calm detective either, hurling wild accusations, rummaging through the trash and flat out attacking Catra over a simple provocation. To Frosta, who rules over a neutral territory, revoking Adora's invitation is a perfectly reasonable reaction. The damage to her kingdom was also temporary as using the Fractal Flake to boost her magic allows her to completely reverse the damage and the kidnapping of Bow and Glimmer isn't even her problem because she's not allied with the alliance.
  • What Do You Mean, It's for Kids?: For a show rated "Y7" it doesn't pull its punches with dark and mature themes. Things like child abuse, death, and post-traumatic stress disorder are played completely straight and explored in great detail. The psychological horror of Season 4 in particular is spectacularly intense for a kids show, with influences from R-rated media like Annihilation.
  • The Woobie:
    • Glimmer and her saddening Friendless Background. Not at all helped by the feeling that she is a constant disappointment to her mom and their estranged relationship following her father's presumed death.
    • Queen Angella, who is clearly still grieving the loss of her husband and has a pile of trouble with her teenage daughter.
    • Kyle. The poor boy is the Horde's Chew Toy that gets blamed for literally everything and gets in trouble for the tiniest of mistakes. Granted, he's laughably incompetent at literally everything, but Bow showing him basic kindness is more than the Horde did for him in years.
      • Eventually subverted to a degree when Kyle earns the respect of Lonnie and Rogelio with an act of true heroism, getting them to admit that they always cared about him a lot more than they let on.
    • Frosta. She assumed the throne as a child, cultivates a stoic and humorless exterior in order to be taken seriously as a monarch, and doesn't have space to just be a kid until she joins the rebellion. She idolizes Glimmer and is clearly hurt when Glimmer yells at her.
    • Bow, in Season 4. With Glimmer and Adora spending most of the season at loggerheads, he ends up feeling like he's the only person putting in any actual work to keep the Best Friends Squad functional, and he spends most of the latter half of the season running along the edge of giving up entirely. Dude needs a hug.
    • Adora. She was subjected to emotional abuse from an early age, exhibits symptoms of PTSD, had to leave her entire life behind in the opening two-parter, has watched her former best friend descend from "kind of a jerk" to "active threat to her and her loved ones", watched the only non-terrible parental figure she's ever had sacrifice herself for her, suffered a devastating breakdown in her new closest friendship, and been forced to destroy one of the most important things to her when it turned out it was just another tool to control her. Per Word of God, her overprotective and controlling streak is because, thanks to Shadow Weaver's A+ parenting, she believes she has to constantly prove her right to exist.
    • Horde Prime's clones. He creates them to be fanatically obedient slaves, denies them any autonomy or individuality, monitors their minds from a distance, possess them, draws nourishment from their life force, and mindwipes them if they develop identities (as he does with Hordak in "Destiny, Part 2" and "Corridors"). Their existence is a bleak one.
    • Wrong Hordak. He was born into Horde Prime's army of clone-slaves, experiences distress when his connection to the hive mind is severed, and goes through a painful existential crisis when he realizes that Horde Prime is a tyrant.

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