Follow TV Tropes

Following

YMMV / Daredevil (2015)

Go To


  • Actor Shipping: Rosario Dawson and Charlie Cox got a little bit of this, frequently appearing in interviews together, which is a strange decision given the fact that Dawson is only an Advertised Extra.
  • Alternative Character Interpretation:
    • Vanessa Marianna is a Pandora's box. Was she an average woman whose love corrupted Wilson Fisk? Is she a Manipulative Bitch who is only interested in Fisk for his violence, power and vision? A mix of all the above? Not that Fisk would mind if she was the second, considering the kind of person he is. Season 3 seems to suggest it was the "mix" type, since Fisk's desires to keep her safe are what drive him to make the deal with the FBI to snitch on the Albanians, and when Vanessa does finally return, it is she, and not Fisk, who orders the assassination of Nadeem.
    • Advertisement:
    • Daredevil is the first superhero in the MCU to fight crime on the streets unlike all of the Avengers (and S.H.I.E.L.D.), who face threats on a larger scale. While they fill different niches, is he a better hero than them, even the most genuine hero of them all? As the series premiered shortly before Avengers: Age of Ultron, which has them partying in the swanky Avengers Tower far removed from the grit of the streets, one might well ask if the Avengers Tower is just an "ivory tower".
    • Conversely, Matt is shown to be willing to cripple and torture his enemies (though only the ones who truly show they deserve it), and characters discuss within the show whether this is a case of I Did What I Had to Do or if he's really just venting his own sadistic impulses out. It's left ultimately up to interpretation if Matt's crusade is really about justice or revenge.
    • Advertisement:
    • Wilson Fisk killing Anatoly and betraying the Russians. Is this an act purely motivated by anger, or Fisk always hated working with the Russians? In the next episode, Fisk mentions that sooner or later he would betray the Russians, since they were "too unpredictable". Considering the fact that they were primarily engaged in human trafficking, Fisk has a very valid point.
    • The Punisher is a major character in Season 2, and all the Alternative Character Interpretation that defines his character comes with him.
    • The diner scene in ".380" makes for plenty of interpretation. Was Frank telling Karen that it's better to put up with being hurt by someone you love than not have them at all? Or was he telling Karen to understand that pain is inevitable in a relationship as people simply aren't perfect and things won't always be perfect between them?
    • Advertisement:
    • Gao and Leland's disapproval of Fisk dating Vanessa is non-disputable. What's open to interpretation is their reasons: did they see Fisk being weaker because he's dating Vanessa, or were they just worried since Fisk took a more public approach and got over his shyness, making their secret agenda much more difficult to hide (especially since Gao and Nobu are members of the Hand, which operates in the shadows)?
    • Karen's nightmare of Fisk appearing in her apartment after killing James Wesley is open to interpretation. Is it Karen’s unconscious actually saying that killing Wesley was actually easier after killing someone else (given the mysterious past about her brother that's hinted at in season 2 and finally revealed in season 3)? Is she terrified of Fisk or is she terrified of becoming like Fisk, able to kill without any hesitation?
    • In the Season 3 finale, Daredevil repeatedly stops Bullseye from killing Vanessa, despite knowing that Vanessa was guilty of conspiring to murder Agent Nadeem. Was it simply out of his typical instincts to defend the helpless, or was he trying to keep her alive for pragmatic reasons? After all, if Vanessa died, Matt would have no real leverage on Fisk to keep him from telling the world Daredevil's true identity.
      • Although Matt only uses her as leverage after beating Fisk and refusing to kill him when Matt came fully intending to kill Fisk. So it's likely the former or a mix of both..
  • Angst? What Angst?: A retroactive example. In season 1, Matt sets Nobu on fire during their fight. Whether or not he believes Nobu survived is left ambiguous until Season 2 confirms that he believes Nobu dead. You'd think given the focus on his Thou Shalt Not Kill rule, he would have some angst over that one time he burned a guy to death, even if it wasn't his intention.
  • Ass Pull: Near the end of Season 3, Agent Nadeem is finally able to testify to everything he's seen while under Fisk's thumb to a grand jury, with the DA's backing. Despite Kingpin sending a hitsquad to stop him, Matt is able to get him there in time, and unharmed. Except in a blatant writing cheat, it turns out Kingpin has subverted the entire grand jury by threatening their families. He accomplishes this despite not knowing that the grand jury would be hearing any testimony against him until maybe 10 minutes before it starts and the episode making it clear he wasn't expecting this turn of events.
  • Author's Saving Throw:
    • After Season 1 received several complaints about how little we got to see Matt and Foggy acting as lawyers, Season 2 has a much stronger focus on their day jobs as they defend Frank Castle. Foggy in particular gets a lot more moments to shine and break free of Matt's shadow.
    • Season 2 features quite a few references to Jessica Jones, after that show's first season got knocked for mostly operating like it was in a vacuum from Daredevil.note 
    • The Daredevil costume we saw in the Season 1 finale was mostly well received, though many thought the helmet/mask let the ensemble down by way of looking too puffed up and generally out of proportion (giving a "pig nose" effect from certain angles, for instance). Early in Season 2, the old mask is damaged in a fight with Frank Castle, so Melvin builds Matt a new one that looks much better.
    • Many felt that not having Fisk as the main villain hurt season 2 as it tried to introduce new villains who just couldn't meet the bar set by Fisk and by Kilgrave. Season 3 ultimately returned back to Fisk being the main threat, and one-upped this by also introducing Bullseye.
    • Many people criticized season 2 for being too focused on newcomers Frank and Elektra, and on being more focused on setting up a spinoff and a crossover show than on the main characters. For season 3, new showrunner Erik Oleson completely did away with crossover elements and wrote the season as a very standalone season that uses a "Deep POV" structure to revolve around six main characters: Matt, Karen, Foggy, Fisk, Dex, and Nadeem.
    • Some fans criticized The Defenders for not showing the rest of Karen's reaction to Matt revealing his secret to her, and for season 2 ending the scene with a fadeout after Matt says "I'm Daredevil". The first episode of Season 3 ultimately gives Karen a flashback that shows the rest of the scene. The flashback scene was reportedly Charlie Cox's idea, and he and Deborah Ann Woll both were very insistent on doing the scene.
    • Season 3 picks up several plot threads that seemed to be completely dropped in Season 2 to the fans' confusion, like Karen's Dark and Troubled Past and her guilt over killing Wesley.
    • As noted under Unintentionally Unsympathetic, many fans thought Jack Murdock's Death by Origin Story in season 1 came off as less noble than intended, making it seem like he was prioritizing his own ego over his son's well being. Season 3 acknowledges this, revealing Matt himself perceived it in much the same way, and portraying Jack as more of a good but flawed man who made a bad decision rather than a hero.
  • Award Snub:
    • The show not being nominated for Best Drama Series at the 2015 Emmys.
    • Charlie Cox and Vincent D'Onofrio were not recognized for their performances.
    • Jon Bernthal was snubbed for an Emmy nomination at the 2016 Emmys, despite the acclaim for his performance.
    • The showstopping single take prison fight from Season 3 couldn't be submitted for consideration for a Best Stunts Emmy, as the clips had to be a maximum of three minutes long.
  • Base-Breaking Character:
    • Half the fanbase considers Karen Page to be The Scrappy, calling her subplots boring filler and citing her reckless decisions in her relentless pursuit of justice against Wilson Fisk, particularly her indirect role in Ben Urich's death. The other half finds her more likable than many other characters in the MCU, citing her kind-hearted nature in an otherwise very dark series and her bullheaded pursuit of justice. Further development in the second and third seasons, along with her parts in The Defenders (2017) and The Punisher (2017) series, also won some viewers over to the character.
    • Foggy Nelson also gets this. Some find his tendency for light-hearted jokes to be lame, that the time given to his and Karen's budding relationship is a bad mix of Romantic Plot Tumor and Give Geeks a Chance, and consider him a huge wet blanket due to his constant attempts to make Matt stop being Daredevil when the audience wants to see Matt being Daredevil. Others find him charming, and that his Plucky Comic Relief balances out the otherwise dark tones of the show. His supporters also cite his actions in "Nelson v. Murdock" to be heartbreaking, and also point to his fears for Matt's safety as legitimate reasons to want Matt to give up Daredevil.
    • Leland Owlsley is largely well liked for being an entertaining Deadpan Snarker, but a number of fans are bugged at the changes made to his comic self. A number of fans are hoping it'll be a case of Decomposite Character, though, given the frequent mention of his son 'Lee'.
    • Elektra Natchios. While supporters point to Elodie Yung's strong performance and chemistry with Charlie Cox, detractors have a lot of complaints with the character. Her backstory and costume (even after receiving a new one from Melvin) are radically different from the comics (fortunately, she does get her comics costume in The Defenders (2017)). She also gets hate from fans of the Punisher, who feel she was pulling the attention away from him to the Hand sideplot, even barging in on Matt's life frequently to drag him out at night.
  • Cant Un Hear It: Charlie Cox's well-acclaimed portrayal of Matt Murdock has caused many to automatically imagine his voice whenever they are reading his adventures. Likewise, with Karen Page and Foggy Nelson, it's often hard to not imagine hearing Deborah Ann Woll's and Elden Henson's voices. Also, Vincent D'Onofrio as the Kingpin.
  • Catharsis Factor:
    • Much like the 'death of HYDRA higher-ups' in Agents of S.H.I.E.L.D. Season 2, the montage of the people on Fisk's payroll being arrested is glorious after a season of Fisk being all but untouchable.
    • Every single freakin' time the Punisher brutally kills people, really because almost all of them had it coming. Special mention goes to the pawn shop owner's death. He knowingly buys the contents of a stolen purse from an obvious junkie and sells a variety of illegal/stolen products, including child pornography and a police scanner. His punishment came in the form of a metal bat from Frank, and he deserved no less.
    • For some, seeing Matt finally land a few good punches on Stick at the end of his titular episode felt really good.
    • Finally seeing Matt get to beat up Nobu, after the ninja had butchered Matt like Swiss cheese in Season 1.
    • At the end of Season 3, seeing Matt standing over a bloodied and blackmailed Fisk, having finally beaten him for good and stuck to his code against all odds. Fisk screaming impotently as he's denied the chance to say goodbye to Vanessa as he's arrested is the icing on the cake.
  • Character Rerailment: This show fulfills this for the most part compared to modern comics when it comes to Frank Castle, and moreso with his standalone show. Thanks to Garth Ennis' interpretation of the character being the best-known version in the New Tens, a lot of contemporary readers are more aware of his Sociopathic Hero side than anything else, essentially existing as a serial killer targeting criminals, sometimes including ones guilty of significantly lesser crimes. This series' version, while certainly keeping his violent and bloodthirsty side, gives him back the moral standards he'd long been known for, such as his rules of never hurting innocents and only hurting the truly deserving. It also shows a more human side of him present in the early comics, such as a grudging respect for Daredevil, genuine love for his family, and occasionally having him bond with people who understand him (like Karen). This, mixed with Jon Bernthal's spectacular performance, has led to more interest in the character, especially from those who had written him off as a one-note '90s Anti-Hero.
  • Continuity Lockout: One can't go straight from season 2 to season 3 without watching The Defenders (2017) along the way, due to Matt being "killed" in the destruction of Midland Circle, Stick's death, Elektra's resurrection, the Hand/Madame Gao being defeated, the resolution to the huge hole in season 2, etc.
  • Crack Pairing: Comic readers probably didn't expect Luke Cage's ex-girlfriend to share a kiss with Daredevil.
  • Critical Dissonance: Season 2 received a more lukewarm reception from critics compared to Season 1 (RT score of 75% vs S1's 98%). Audiences were far more positive, as sites like Metacritic and Rotten Tomatoes show.
  • Crossover Ship: There are a number of people who ship Matt with Laurel Lance from Arrow likely because the two share a similarity in being vigilante lawyers.
  • Ear Worm:
  • Ending Fatigue: The credits for the season two finale roll about ten minutes after the final battle, and aside from a cheesy monologue and Matt revealing himself as Daredevil to Karen not much happens. There's a brief shot implying Elektra being brought back to life by the Hand but comic fans won't be suprised by that.
  • Ensemble Dark Horse:
    • Claire Temple can be considered this due to her status as an Advertised Extra. She managed to largely avoid being a Base-Breaking Character due to Rosario Dawson's acting and chemistry with Charlie Cox, as well as being the Only Sane Man that actually offers helpful advice for Matt, both as a vigilante or as someone who cares about his happiness. Her Good Is Not Soft mentality (considered unusual for a love interest) also helped. She is even borderline on Breakout Character as of right now, as the producer confirmed that she would return for season 2, before announcing anyone else would, excluding the titular hero. And this is also after revealing she'd also make appearances in Jessica Jones and Luke Cage. In fact, she reappeared in the comics in Captain America: Sam Wilson, after over two decades of absence.
    • Melvin Potter. Being a major player in the comics, and being The Woobie of the show, play a big part in this. This was upped in season 2, since his relationship with Matt is rather touching. Matt and Melvin talk like they're actually friends now, and Melvin seems to be the only person Matt can actually talk to about what he does, since Foggy prefers Matt not discuss it. Oh, and it helps that he improved Matt's costume and creates the iconic billy club.
    • The Russian brothers, Anatoly and Vladimir, receive distinctive characterization and backstory, turning them from Starter Villains into fully-fledged, somewhat sympathetic characters whose Villainous Friendship stands out, and whose deaths at the hands of Fisk's temper are still tragic.
    • Fisk's criminal lawyer Benjamin Donovan from Season 2, who largely serves as a replacement for the above-mentioned Wesley and goes here for all the same reasons. He even went on to have a much larger role in the first two seasons of Luke Cage, which happened in between Daredevil seasons 2 and 3.
    • Stick, for being an Old Superhero Mentor Archetype to Matt, who trained him in the ways of fighting while blind. Plus his asshole personality is just hilarious.
    • Marci Stahl has a sizable fanbase due to her dialog, relationship with Foggy (especially in Season 2), and her unapologetic outlook on life that makes it clear she's out for her own well being, but still has a caring side. She's the show's poster girl for Lovable Alpha Bitch. It certainly doesn't hurt that she's played by the drop-dead gorgeous Amy Rutberg.
  • Evil Is Cool: Where do we start?:
    • Nobu, mainly for how absolutely brutal and badass he is. Bonus points for setting up a reason for the Hand to make an appearance.
    • Madame Gao. She manages to be a manipulator extraordinaire, a charismatic leader, and one of the most efficient antagonists of the series.
    • Wesley. He is Fisk's most competent subordinate and very professional in his position as The Dragon. It helps that he is the most prone to being a Deadpan Snarker. Also, his relationship with Fisk is always nice to watch.
    • Wilson Fisk manages to be the personification of this trope. Despite the fact that he's somewhat awkward, vulnerable and often times childish, the man is unquestionably polite, Affably Evil, Wicked Cultured, and a Magnificent Bastard combined. He improves in season 3, having become a Crazy-Prepared Chessmaster.
    • Bullseye in the comics had initially been a very interesting foe for Matt, but in the years leading up to the Netflix show, he'd become better known as "the guy who kills Matt's girlfriends" for having fridged Elektra and Karen. Season 3 of the show gives us a highly reinvented Benjamin "Dex" Poindexter, who steers far away from that characterization. As a result, Dex manages to be one of the most terrifying, most efficient professional killers of the MCU. His Genius Bruiser status and memorable lines certainly help.
  • Evil Is Sexy: Vladimir gets some of this. Dex even more so.
  • Family-Unfriendly Aesop: During the diner scene in ".380", Frank Castle suggests to Karen that the people you love the most are the ones who can hurt you the most, but that it is worth experiencing that to feel that love. However, the way he says it, he comes off suggesting that if you're in love with someone you should just put up with them being emotionally abusive and/or neglectful, and you're better off with your spouse treating you like crap than dead and not in your life at all. Since this during one of Frank's Pet the Dog scenes and Karen doesn't argue the point, and the fact that Jon Bernthal sells the hell out of the monologue, the audience is suppose to agree with him. And as mentioned under Alternative Character Interpretation, it's a matter of ambiguity whether Frank telling Karen that it's better to put up with being hurt by someone you love than not have them at all, or he was telling Karen "pain is inevitable in a relationship as people simply aren't perfect and things won't always be perfect between her and Matt."
  • Fanfic Fuel:
    • Matt and Daisy were at St. Agnes together. Bring on the chibi fix!
    • Matt representing Bucky Barnes on trial.
    • What's Stick been up to these past twenty years?
  • Fan-Preferred Couple:
    • While the Official Couple of Matt/Karen (as of season 2) does have a sizable and devoted fanbase, Matt/Claire and Matt/Elektra have enjoyed more popularity in much of the fandom, despite both ships having been thoroughly sunk in the show's official canon. Fans of both tend to complain of a lack of chemistry between Charlie Cox and Deborah Ann Woll, despite Charlie Cox himself being a Matt/Karen shipper.
    • Karen/Frank Castle became one overnight and has a massive following on Tumblr which only grew after the release of The Punisher, even though in reality there is very little chance of the pairing happening due to Karen being in mourning over Matt getting "killed" at Midland Circle during The Defenders and Frank being emotionally unavailable. It's more or less sunk by Daredevil season 3.
    • On the Ho Yay side of things, both Matt/Foggy and Matt/Frank Castle are very popular, with Matt/Foggy having been the most popular pairing alongside Matt/Claire after the first season of the show ended.
  • Fountain of Memes: Tumblr is having a field day quoting Matt Murdock and Claire Temple, either separate or together.
    • Dex's goat bleating scene in season 3 has led to its own family of memes.
  • "Funny Aneurysm" Moment: When Matt and Foggy are debating over whether or not to take a plea deal on Karen's case in Season 1, Foggy says, "You don't necessarily show the best judgement when beautiful women are involved, Matt". It seems at first like a funny line about Matt's womanizing tendencies. But season 2 reveals that Matt had dated Elektra in college and while Foggy isn't aware of the circumstances under which they broke up, he does know that she was incredibly toxic to him, so this line is actually Foggy reminding Matt about how his past fling with Elektra ended.
  • Genius Bonus:
    • In the Season 1 finale, Wilson Fisk attempts to propose to Vanessa as FBI agents are literally kicking in his door. While it's later revealed he has a plan to escape, it's also likely that he was laying the groundwork for a backup plan: attempting to cloak Vanessa in the Spousal Testimony Privilege.
    • When Owlsley asks Melvin what the body armor is made out of, Melvin lists "silicates and polyethylene glycol", which are the components of a shear thickening fluid, specifically the type being used to develop liquid armor.
    • When Wilson Fisk is out on his first date with Vanessa, he admits to not being a wine connoisseur, and has to have Wesley make wine recommendations for him. This is shown visually: Fisk grabs his glass by the goblet, which is something wine enthusiasts avoid because it smudges the bulb of the glass and warms up the wine more quickly. The high-class and cultured Vanessa, however, holds her glass by the stem through the whole scene.
    • Early in "Bang", when Matt and Foggy show up to work, Karen informs them that one of their clients has a dog that was viciously beaten by his neighbor after the dog defiled the neighbor's statue of Saint Francis (er, humped repeatedly until completion). Saint Francis of Assisi is the patron saint of animals.
  • He Really Can Act: Quite a lot of praise has been given in season 3 to the relatively unknown Jay Ali's performance as Ray Nadeem, who is perfect at executing a man with a good heart who is forced to compromise what he stands for and is torn up the whole time about it.
  • Harsher in Hindsight:
    • In "Into the Ring", Karen Page is nearly killed in an attempt to stage her death as a suicide in police custody. This becomes a bit harder to watch after July 2015, when a woman named Sandra Bland was found hung in a jail cell while in police custody, with many suspecting foul play in the death even though it was ruled a suicide (it's possible this scene was a reference to the death of Ron Settles, who died while in police custody in 1982 as a result of a bogus traffic stop).
    • Any scene where Claire worries about the legal ramifications of treating Matt in her apartment, after Jessica Jones (2015) reveals that she did indeed get evicted over it.
    • Iron Fist (2017) gives a further explanation on the Hand's resurrection technique, revealing that it gradually chips further and further away at a person's humanity and identity each time. With Nobu already completely unaffected by cold at the start of the show, how far gone was he? On the bright side, the later show also confirms that he's dead for good, as it's impossible for resurrection to continue after a decapitation.
    • In "Nelson v. Murdock", Foggy says, "You're going to get yourself killed if you keep this up. You know that, right?" At the end of season 1 of The Defenders (2017), Matt is seemingly killed when Midland Circle is imploded to destroy a Hand base (he somehow survives), confirming what Foggy was saying.
    • "The Dark at the End of the Tunnel" sees Matt rush to stop Elektra from killing Stick. That's fine. But try watching it knowing that he'll fail to talk her out of it the next time this happens.
    • "Please": When Karen talks with Neda Kazemi in the hospital, she brings up her brother's death using weaponized tears as a way to get Neda to open up to her. Karen makes it seem as though she had been wrongfully blamed for his death. As we see later in the extended flashback that takes up most of season 3 episode 10, Karen was 100% responsible for Kevin's death, and in the episode after that, when she and Matt are talking in the church basement, she fully admits she was. Indicating that the events of season 3 between episodes 2 and 10 have pushed Karen to fully accept that kind of responsibility. Something that one could see happening, considering episode 10 ended with Father Lantom dead and Matt beaten senseless, all thanks to Karen's simple desire to do the right thing backfiring and the fallout snowballing as a result.
    • In Season 3, the woman that Dex stalks? Her name is Julie Barnes. This last name is shared with Zoey Barnes from House of Cards (US). Both women are killed off in a quick and anticlimactic way.
    • Dex's attack on the Bulletin in season 3 can be a little uncomfortable seeing as it came just months after a shooting rampage at the Capital Gazette in Maryland.
    • The Daredevil movie had a scene where Bullseye showed he had enough of a conscience to not kill a priest. Father Lantom ends up as a collateral damage when this show's version of Bullseye tries to kill Karen Page.
  • He Panned It, Now He Sucks!:
    • Tim Goodman of Hollywood Reporter lost credibility for many commenters when his first paragraph was basically an attack on superhero fiction in general for taking away from "complicated films about real people with real emotions" and seeming to have a misunderstanding of Daredevil as a character and how his powers worked.
    • Oliver Sava of the AV Club received a lot of negative comments with his reviews of the first season, which often made complaints of the roles and treatment of female characters. The commenters thus make accusations of coddling female characters and criticizing any character flaws they possess. He also makes the same arguments that other viewers have (such as Karen's questionable methods of bringing Ben to meet Fisk's mother), but the commenters reacted negatively to that criticism as well. Fans are not excited to see how the Season 2 reviews play out.
      He didn't help himself at all by calling Elodie Yung's portrayal of Elektra on par with Jennifer Garner's, as they had opposite strengths and weaknesses. Plus an utterly bizarre criticism of how Elektra's characterization makes little sense until you get the reveal about her true motivation later on, when that's exactly the point the show was going for.
  • Hilarious in Hindsight:
    • Charlie Cox rightly receives a lot of praise for the work he puts into properly portraying a blind person. All that effort ended up costing him the role of Han Solo, however, as he'd conditioned himself to not look directly at others when speaking to them and it made him seem stand-offish and awkward during the audition.
    • Prior to being cast in the series, Deborah Ann Woll was briefly in a very different Hell's Kitchen.
    • After all the controversy over the black costume:
      Claire: Your outfit kind of sucks, by the way.
      Matt: [unmasked] Yeah, it's a work in progress.
    • In "The Path of the Righteous", Melvin asks Daredevil if he wants a suit like Fisk's. Consider Matt's 2015 costume.
    • Fisk does a lot of staring at the wall in this series. In Avengers: Age of Ultron, Steve asks Natasha if she's just gonna stand there and stare at the wall.
    • A few weeks after the first season's release, Matt's former orphanage-mate Skye got to do her own take on wiping out a bunch of villains in The Oner. And then it happened again in the next season.
    • In Teen Wolf, Gideon Emery played a blind werewolf able to get around easily because of his enhanced super senses. Now he's on a show about a blind man able to get around easily because of his enhanced super senses. Not only that, but Gideon Emery's Deucalion was the Big Bad of that season, the most terrifying werewolf ever seen on the show thus far. Wilson Fisk decapitating the demon wolf with a car door was all the more epic and enjoyable for fans of both shows.
    • When Matt confronts his father's killer Roscoe Sweeney in "Kinbaku", he says he's killed many people's fathers. Season 2 aired the same week as the episode of Gotham where Bruce Wayne confronts the criminal who killed his parents, getting the same reaction almost word-for-word.
    • Nikolai Nikolaeff, who played Vladmir, also portrayed Dominic, the White Ranger, in Power Rangers Jungle Fury. Eka Darville who plays Malcolm on Jessica Jones, played Scott the Red Ranger, in Power Rangers RPM making it the second time these two actors have been a part of the same franchise. Furthermore, just as RPM was the season that directly followed Jungle Fury, Jessica Jones is the second Marvel Netflix show made after Daredevil.
      • Furthermore, Emma Lahana, who played Kira, the Yellow Ranger, in Power Rangers Dino Thunder, has been cast as Brigid O'Reilly in Cloak & Dagger, bringing the amount of former Power Rangers in the MCU up to three.
    • The previous Daredevil and ElektraBen Affleck and Jennifer Garner — had a Meet Cute on camera and a messy, public divorce in real-life before the series aired. When Elektra is introduced in this series, she and Matt are exes — and not amicable ones.
    • Man of Steel fans will get a chuckle knowing that Superman's mom is now dating Wilson Fisk.
    • Early in season 2, there's a scene where Brett compares the Punisher to Paul Kersey, the protagonist of Death Wish. Fast forward to late 2017, and Vincent D'Onofrio, who portrays Fisk, appears in the remake of the movie as Paul Kersey's brother Frank.
    • We're supposed to think Matt is wrong for dismissing Stick's story about the creation of the Hand and the Chaste, but then The Defenders reveals the whole thing and it turns out the version Stick told is at best highly simplified and misleading.
    • The Punisher's defeat of Schoonover becomes even more impressive given that with the actor returning to the MCU a bit later, he took out freaking Surtur!
    • The previous live-action version of Bullseye only wore ordinary clothing including a trenchcoat, rather than the outfit of his comic book counterpart and became so fixated upon Daredevil that one of his demands for being the one to kill him was "a bloody costume". When Bullseye makes his debut here, he does have a costume but one that once again isn't his own. Whose costume is he wearing? Daredevils's.
    • Father Lantom's repeated efforts to have coffee with Matt can take on an entirely different meaning after Luke Cage (2016) used the phrase as a euphemism for sex.
  • Ho Yay:
    • There's a smattering of jokes about the exact nature of Matt and Foggy's relationship, and their personal arc across the first season wouldn't be out of place between a hero and his love interest. This was lampshaded several times in "Nelson v. Murdock" AV Club reviewer Oliver Sava spoke at length about their romantic chemistry in the same episode.
    • Wesley and Fisk, with some even nicknaming Wesley, "Smithers". Regardless of sexuality, each one is clearly the most important guy in the other's life.
  • HSQ:
    • You just know that shit's hitting the fan when Wilson Fisk casually blows up an entire Russian mob before the season has even reached the halfway point.
    • The first time Matt takes down a room full of henchmen. While this is normal for superhero fare, especially in the Marvel Cinematic Universe where being a One-Man Army is standard for everyone prominent without powers, in this show Reality Ensues. Matt receives realistic injuries and the scene shows just how brutal you would have to be to really fight more than two men at the same time and win.
    • Karen grabbing the gun? Maybe. Killing James Wesley? Whoa. Flaunting about it to Fisk's face trying to get him to react? Balls of steel.
    • The Punisher being announced for season 2. He introduces himself committing multiple massacres that everyone assumes were committed by an army, before they realize it was all just one man.
    • Wilson Fisk's return in Season 2. His absence in the first part of the season is a major plot point as it creates a vacuum for other gangs to move in. The show goes just long enough without checking in on him that many viewers just assumed they'd have to wait until Season 3 to get more Fisk, only for him to come roaring back towards the end of the season. Best part? He uses the "kingpin" name for himself after disposing of Dutton. And he makes the FBI agents under him use that as his codename.
    • Season 3 doesn't just bring back Wilson Fisk as main villain, it also brings in a highly reinvented version of Bullseye, Matt's other known arch-nemesis.
    • Season 1 may have had Nobu, but season 2 we get to see the organisation he represented: The Hand. And they are depicted gloriously.
    • Even with as much of a Magnificent Bastard as Fisk was before, the reveal of just how much of Season 3 was part of his plan three-quarters of the way through is jaw-dropping.
  • Iron Woobie: Matt Murdock. As a child, he gets blinded by acid, loses his father, and endures brutal training from a Jerkass mentor. As an adult crimefighter, he get beaten up, framed for crimes he didn't commit, and is hopeless outnumbered by the criminals in Hell's Kitchen. What makes Matt's fight especially tough is how all he feels even more pain than an average human being thanks to his enhanced senses. So much so that even touching cotton sheets feel like being scraped by rough sandpaper. When taken into account how frequently he gets injured and has to constantly experience intensified pain, he's living a life of pure hellish anguish. Yet he still fights on, learns from his mistakes, and stays committed to helping others as the Devil of Hell's Kitchen.
  • Jerkass Woobie: Wilson Fisk may be a criminal and murderer, but when you learn his backstory and how he became the way he is, you can't help but pity the poor bastard. Vincent D'Onofrio really sells this; in every scene where he isn't angry, Fisk looks perpetually sad, as if he's filled with remorse over what he's become.
  • Love to Hate:
    • Wilson Fisk, thanks to Vincent D'Onofrio's brilliant and endearing performance.
    • Benjamin "Dex" Poindexter. Wilson Bethel's performance solidified him for instant fan approval.
  • Magnificent Bastard: Wilson Fisk runs a complex scheme to make himself the hero to Hell's Kitchen, all while bringing organized crime under his thumb for the supposed betterment of the city. Falling prey to his own insecurities and impulsivity, Fisk is defeated and imprisoned, but slowly rebuilds himself as more dangerous and clever than ever. Shedding his former flaws, Fisk becomes a force to be reckoned with, even arranging for the Punisher to dispose of his obstacles, outmanuevers and crushes all his opposition and arranges for his own release from prison under 'house arrest' where he still dominates organized crime as the true kingpin. Steadily manipulating others into his grasp, including the deadly FBI agent 'Dex' Pointdexer, he arranges for Dex to impersonate Daredevil on several murders as to frame him, all while rising even further and even getting his hooks into FBI agents. Even when defeated, he makes a deal with Daredevil for the safety of his beloved Vanessa and seals it with an honorable handshake, constantly showcasing himself as one of the most brilliant and skilled villains in all the Marvel Cinematic Universe.
  • Memetic Mutation:
    • Quoting "Bring Me to Life" in discussions, as the song was in the 2003 movie.
      "WAKE ME UP!"
    • Nelson and Murdock, Avocados at Law. note 
    • The fact that Matt somehow ended up in a dumpster in "Cut Man" is frequently brought up and repeated in fanfic, sometimes with Hawkeye involved.
    • "YOU EMBARRASSED ME. EMBARRASSED ME IN FRONT OF HER!!"explanation 
    • Matt's crying face as he emulates the memetic one from Dawson's Creek.
    • The Oh, Crap! face that Foggy makes in season 3 upon reading on his iPhone that Fisk is out of prison is a go-to response to hearing something shocking.
    • "That's hard. That's really hard."note 
    • "Who eats a burger with a spork?"note 
    • Matt's use of a neti pot to clear his sinuses in the first episode of season 3 has caused the pot to earn quite a following.
    • Comedian Dex note 
    • Bleating Dex note 
    • “When I was a boy...” note 
  • Moral Event Horizon:
    • Fisk crosses him whenever he hurts innocent people. He was the one who orchestrated the murder of Elena Cardenas and the bombing against the Russian Mafia, which cost the lives of some innocent people who lived nearby.
    • Nobu crosses it in the second season when he abducts kids and drains their blood.
    • In the third season, Vanessa finally crosses the line upon ordering Ray Nadeem's death, eliminating any doubt of her being no better than Fisk.
    • Dex killing the old lady who had bought the "Rabbit in a Snowstorm" painting. Fisk had let her keep it and didn't order Dex to do this, but Dex does it anyway because in his warped mind he thinks that Fisk will actually be pleased with him for doing it. Of course, that's if you are one who doesn't think Dex already crossed the line when he killed Father Lantom in the course of trying to kill Karen at the church.
  • Narm: Has its own page.
  • Narm Charm:
    • Fisk's and Matt's final battle may seem a bit cartoony, but it's still a no-holds-barred, brutal face-down between the two each of them gives as much as they take.
    • Likewise, Fisk's long-winded speech in the FBI van is still seen by many as beautifully symbolic.
    • The outrageously stereotypical Oireland mob in the Season 2 premiere, who are tolerable because they only exist to get wiped out as an introduction to the Punisher, plus serving as a fun reference to Charlie Cox's Irish hitman character Owen Sleater in Boardwalk Empire.
    • Fisk beating people up like a gorilla tends to also look like a toddler throwing a fit, especially when is in prison jumpsuit which makes it look like he is wearing a onesie. However, his fight with the Punisher is saved because even Frank seems to think it's funny.
  • Narrowed It Down to the Guy I Recognize: Odds are many fans weren't surprised that Colonel Schoonover had a bigger role to play than his one scene at Frank's trial, simply because he's played by Clancy Brown.
  • Never Live It Down: A highly popular method for crossover fics with other parts of the MCU is to have the other character find Matt beaten up and tossed in a dumpster, after this only happened to him once (granted, it did serve as our introduction to MCU Netflix staple Claire Temple).
  • Older Than They Think: Daredevil's black costume is actually very similar to the Daredevil costume in the second movie spinoff of the 70s Hulk TV series. And, closer in time, it is similar to the one used in Ultimate Daredevil & Elektra, a reimagination in the Ultimate Marvel imprint where Matt and Elektra are Not Wearing Tights.
  • One-Scene Wonder:
    • Officer Sullivan, the clean cop who finds Matt and Vladimir. Being an honest cop makes him stand out, as is the fact that he tries to warn his fellow cops of his location rather than lie and say it was a false alarm. Too bad it doesn't save him.
    • Tony Curran's Finn Cooley only gets one episode to shine, "Penny and Dime", but still leaves quite a memorable impression.
    • Clancy Brown as Frank Castle's commanding officer, who Frank saved from his own incompetent orders and now speaks in glowing terms about his heroism. And then he becomes a two scene wonder when he's revealed to be the Blacksmith.
    • Jeri Hogarth in the Season 2 finale.
    • Madame Gao in Season 2, who only appears for a single scene throughout the whole season.
    • Lesley Ann Warren as Esther Falb, the Holocaust survivor who has balls of steel when it comes to Fisk's efforts to get the "Rabbit in a Snowstorm" painting back from her.
  • Portmanteau Couple Name: Several of the ships, including "Clairedevil" (Matt Murdock / Claire Temple), "Kastle" (Karen Page / Frank Castle), and "Karedevil" (Karen Page / Matt Murdock).
  • Rescued from the Scrappy Heap:
    • For many viewers who weren't too keen on spending a lot of screentime with Foggy, finding him to be a boring and pointless character who exists as a geek/nice guy trying to woo the hot girl in the office (Karen), the episode "Nelson v. Murdock" gave more depth to his character and his relationship with Matt. Most of the critics were won over.
    • The show managed to save Karen Page's character in the eyes of many people. In the comics, Karen's most well-known attribute was her role in the Daredevil: Born Again storyline, where she became a drug-addicted porn star that sold out Matt's identity for a heroin fix, information that eventually made its way up to Wilson Fisk, who then proceeded to dismantle Matt's life. The show gives Karen a much more proactive role, even having her take over Ben Urich's role as Daredevil's newspaper confidant and informant by the end of season 2.
    • Season 2 managed to save Karen in the eyes of those who felt that in season 1, she came across as someone blindly charging into things and getting people killed. Season 2 shows her meticulously researching and to be less willing to involve others.
  • Romantic Plot Tumor: Up to twenty minutes per episode for the first several episodes of Season 1 were spent on Foggy and Karen's budding relationship. This was negatively received, with many fans calling it boring filler and a Give Geeks a Chance-type romance.
  • Rooting for the Empire:
    • Some people prefer to cheer Wilson Fisk on, despite all the horrible things he does, both due to his adorkability and D'Onofrio's excellent performance.
      • Most viewers prefer to root for him when it comes to Evil vs. Evil conflicts, such as his feud with Dutton, the Russians and the Albanian Mob.
    • A great number of fans found themselves rooting for Frank Castle in season 2, as he brings up some valid points. Plus, Bernthal's performance is nothing short of amazing.
    • After everything Fisk put Ben Poindexter through, up to and including killing his Morality Pet, Julie just for the sake of controlling him, and even going so far as to feign a fatherly affection for him after the fact, it's hard not to hope Poindexter succeeds in slaughtering both him and Vanessa, especially when she becomes just as evil as he is, if not more so.
  • Rewatch Bonus: Fisk wearing his father's cufflinks every day takes on a completely different meaning knowing full-well the nature of his abusive father and what Fisk did to him.
  • Ship Mates: In the second season, Karen/Frank has become one of the more popular companion ships to Matt/Elektra or those who still ship Matt/Claire.
  • Signature Scene:
    • The Hallway Fight scene in "Cut Man" is clamored by fans and critics alike as one of the show's high points for its excellent cinematography and the realistic manner Matt is exhausted after the ordeal.
    • The show's creators seem to be aware of this, as another similar fight scene occurs in Season 2's "New York's Finest".
    • Frank Castle telling his past to Daredevil in "Penny and Dime". The scene overall has been acclaimed as of the most emotional moments in MCU history, thanks in part to Jon Bernthal's amazing performance as he voices the pain and regret he's been through ever since the death of his family.
    • Season 3 has its own one-take Hallway Fight, but it's a much longer and true continuous take and involves Matt being caught in the midst of a prison riot against inmates paid by Fisk to kill him.
    • Also from season 3 is the battle of words between Karen and Fisk, marking the first occasion where we've seen Fisk interact with one of Matt's loved ones.
    • One more for Season 3, with the Brechtian presentation of Dex's backstory being a highly unusual and thus instantly memorable style for the show. Many consider it to be Fisk's version of Misty Knight's crime scene reenactments.
  • Slow-Paced Beginning: The first episode is very much a place setter, introducing us the main characters, giving us the idea of Wilson Fisk as He Who Must Not Be Named, and showing how Matt's powers work. However, the storyline seems a bit cliche, and dialogue isn't particularly clever. Episode 2 introduces Claire Temple, gives a healthy dose of Reality Ensues to Matt's abilities and pain tolerance, and ends with a kickass fight scene. Most critics seem to agree that The Oner ending the episode is what sold them on the series. It's the third episode where Wilson Fisk is introduced properly.
  • Some Anvils Need to Be Dropped:
    • In season 1, Shirley gripes to Ben about having to deal with a measles epidemic because some parents refuse to vaccinate. Measles outbreaks have been on the rise around the time of the series release, and not merely in Amish communities, because of parents refusing to vaccinate.
    • Frank goes on a rant at the suggestion he's got PTSD, saying he wouldn't dishonor those vets who really endure that trauma. This is undercut by the fact that his own show makes clear he does suffer from a form of PTSD (a mixture of the war crimes he was a part of in Operation Cerberus, and the death of his family) but, still, the message is sound.
  • Special Effects Failure:
    • Season 2 has the awkwardly edited hallway fight in "New York's Finest", alongside Matt's fight with a Hand assassin in "Guilty as Sin", where they completely failed to conceal Charlie Cox's double.
    • Vincent D'onofrio puts in a valiant effort to make them seem heavy, but the barbells Fisk lifts while in prison clearly don't have much weight to them.
  • Spoiled by the Format:
    • In the first season finale, it appears that Fisk's organization has fallen apart and he is following all of his men to prison, as our heroes celebrate. Of course, with 22 minutes left, it isn't going to be that easy.
    • Season 3 takes a cue from Iron Fist and actually tries to fool us into thinking everything's going to wrap up when there's still an entire episode to go.
  • Squick:
    • The newspaper sticking to Matt's bloody back after his fight with Nobu.
    • Stick biting off the ear of the Hand boss.
    • Matt uses a Neti Pot to clear his sinuses, causing all the blood that had been blocking his ear to come gushing out.
    • In a flashback to Karen's time as a Greasy Spoon waitress in Fagan Corners, the local police chief asks his food to be replaced, and she sees that she unknowingly had a nosebleed that fell into it.
  • Strawman Has a Point: Mitchell Ellison was right not to print Ben's article about Fisk killing his father, because Ben admitted it was completely on the say-so of Fisk's senile mother. Unlike his article on Union Allied, all of Ben's articles up till then were completely from informant testimony with no hard evidence. Ben is trying to take down a major criminal who's got good publicity with the press, using nothing but hearsay, and wonders why no one would listen. The show itself seems to acknowledge this as Ellison was ultimately revealed to only be a Red Herring for Fisk's mole at the paper, meaning everything he said was genuine. This is further emphasized by Ellison's backing of Karen's investigation into Frank Castle's past during season 2.
  • They Changed It, Now It Sucks!. In the comics, Leland Owlsley, AKA The Owl, is one of the Marvel Universe's big-name street-level villains, a Creepy Awesome drug lord. In the show, they turned him into an old, corrupt banker who's something of a Dirty Coward and a Smug Snake, which rubbed some fans the wrong way. With that said, Owlsley mentions his son 'Lee' a few times, raising hopes that he might appear as a more accurate depiction of the character.
  • They Wasted a Perfectly Good Character:
    • Ben Urich's death, given the character's historical connections to upcoming franchises Spider-Man and Jessica Jones. According to Word of God it was a sad case of the deal with Sony for the rights to Spider-Man not quite being worked out in time, as they made the first season under the impression that this was the only time they could have used him. As a result, Karen's season 2 storyline is used to further develop her investigative side and even ends with her getting hired by Ellison, setting her up to more or less take over Ben's role beginning in season 3.
    • Karen killing Wesley. His actions seem unusual for him in abducting her, and his death leaves the show without its most notable character in Fisk's empire. However, it forces Fisk to become more personally active in his enterprises and the plot.
    • Many viewers were disappointed that although Claire was marketed as one of the show's leads, she was essentially a glorified guest star who was Put on a Bus. Given that she was associated with Luke Cage in the comics rather than Daredevil, however, it's also possible this was an extended Early-Bird Cameo for his series. The producers seem to also think so, as she was confirmed to return for season 2, and then got a bigger role in Luke Cage (2016) season 1.
    • Nobu, despite coming Back from the Dead and being the de facto Big Bad of the second season as the leader of the Hand's New York operations (or at least one faction, as Iron Fist (2017) reveals), barely gets any more screen time or characterization than he did in the first season. The reveal of his return happens very late in the season and his rare appearances without the heroes around are never used to explore his thoughts, his past or the beliefs and workings of the organization he serves as the face of. Downplayed after seeing Iron Fist, as he was likely already little more than an empty shell devoted to the Hand after numerous resurrections destroyed his humanity.
    • After the highly intriguing introduction of Stone, he's never seen again even when the Chaste reenters the picture in Season 2, and The Defenders strongly implies he was Killed Offscreen.
  • They Wasted a Perfectly Good Plot:
    • After Matt is shot in the head in the Season 2 premiere, the next episode features a terrifying scene where he temporarily loses his hearing, and then his head acts up again during the climactic fight and allows the Punisher to capture him. And that's the last we see of it, with his injury seeming to be magically cured for the rest of the season. In fact, it doesn't really come back in any form until the first few episodes of season 3, where Matt's injuries from Midland Circle have left him partially deaf in his right ear.
    • Early in Season 2, Brett mentions what the police call "Devil-Worshippers," people inspired by Daredevil to go out and fight crime like he does. They are never seen, and never mentioned again.
    • Season 3 features no acknowledgement at all that the last time we saw Karen and Ellison was in The Punisher, with Ellison feeling deeply betrayed by Karen hiding that Frank was still alive, other than a remark Ellison makes to Karen about her becoming a pain in the ass in much shorter time than Ben Urich managed to do so.
    • Season 3 seems to set up a conflict between Fisk and the Albanians after Fisk snitches on them as part of his plans to get out of prison, but this is dropped after Matt gets information from the imprisoned Albanians at Rikers.
  • Tough Act to Follow:
    • The show's crew didn't even try to top Wilson Fisk as the Big Bad, with Season 2 instead being composed of several mini-arcs that each have their own main villain, one of whom is even Fisk again. And then bring back Fisk for season 3.
    • The second season in general, while still acclaimed, wasn't seen as good as the first one by critics, with a 75% rating in Rotten Tomatoes in contrast to the first one's 98%.
    • Averted with the third season, which saw the return of Fisk to his rightful place as the main villain and also introduced a highly reinvented version of Bullseye, was seen as a significant improvement over season 2 with a 93% rating by Rotten Tomatoes, with many reviews considering it to be the best season of Marvel's Netflix shows to date.
  • True Art Is Angsty: Easily both the darkest and the most critically beloved entry in the Marvel Cinematic Universe. Season 1 and Season 3 are considered the best of the Netflix seasons overall.
  • Unfortunate Implications:
    • It had been brought up that out of all the stereotyped criminal organisations in the first season, the Chinese and Japanese are essentially modern day Yellow Peril cliches. Moreover, there's the fact that they're basically not even considered human (Matt killing Nobu isn't even counted as a blip on his moral radar, despite his Catholic guilt and Thou Shalt Not Kill being a huge part of his character). Doesn't help that canon wise they are not human, Gao is clearly supernatural and Nobu is an undead.
    • The second season also came under fire. The need to equate the Asian gangs and ninjas comes across as a bit racist, as does the fact that the one decent person tied to The Hand is... a white guy. Who is being forced to help them against his will. Iron Fist (2017) and The Defenders (2017) take some steps to overcome this issue: the other Fingers of the Hand being non-Asians (Alexandra, Bakuto and Sowande), and have allies like Harold Meachum who are much worse individuals.
    • Oliver Sava in the A.V. Club pointed out that Karen's "What does it mean to be a hero?" monologue has a few issues, namely that a lot of her language about heroism is attached to images of Frank Castle in his old home one last time before he destroys it. Namely, the pairing ends up painting Frank as a big heroic figure and encourages his behavior, which is still murder even if he’s killing gang members and drug dealers.
      "Frank’s story isn’t inspirational, it’s tragic and terrifying, and it’s strange that the show equates that with the experience of being a New Yorker. I don’t think the writers intended for Karen’s speech to end on such a cynical note, but that’s what happens when it closes on the image of Frank walking away from his burning home with a skull spray-painted on his chest."
    • Some people have taken some issues with Matt's treatment of his potential love interests in season 2. Namely, that he takes great pains to hide the darker aspects of his personality from the white Karen Page, being very chivalrous and gentle with her, while being abrasive with the Afro-Latina Claire and the French-Cambodian Elektra, continuing an unfortunate media trend wherein white women are seen as the 'happily ever after' instead of non-white ones.
  • Unintentionally Unsympathetic:
    • One does have to question if Jack Murdock ever considered the traumatizing effect his death would have on his recently blinded son when he set up his Thanatos Gambit. Enough that for season 3, the writers had to go back and add a little more depth to his decision, to establish that Jack was a good but flawed man who made a bad decision rather than a heroic one.
    • Karen Page taking Ben to see Fisk's mother is often seen as a jerkass move on her part. Not only is it a severe Yank the Dog's Chain moment that exploits his love of his wife and makes him think there's a new option for her (when there isn't at all), it put him in Fisk's crosshairs.
    • Karen constantly tells off Matt and Foggy of lying and keeping secrets, despite keeping some pretty big secrets of her own, such as that she killed James Wesley and lying about Frank kidnapping her when she really ran off with him.
    • Foggy gets quite a bit of this himself. At first, he has quite a few legitimate criticisms about Matt's nighttime activities. But then he has the nerve to suggest that the real reason Matt wants to save Frank Castle from death row is not because saving a man's life is Matt's (and by extension Foggy's) moral and ethical obligation as a lawyer to donote , but because Frank is a fellow vigilante... who uses methods Matt has made perfectly clear he does not approve of.
    • In season 2, Matt has it when he's shown to be more interested in beating up bad guys than helping out at Nelson & Murdock (which the first episode shows takes on a lot of poor and underprivileged clientele), then showing more interest in hunting down the Punisher (who the audience knows only goes after criminals) than general purpose super heroics, then outright abandoning his law firm and friends for the rest of the season to help out his crazy and manipulative ex-girlfriend. While Matt does try to dissuade Elektra's attempts to invade his life, it's clear he's not trying as hard as he could and that she's very easily roping him into things with little prodding. He also doesn't find some way to tell Karen about Elektra, leading to him looking like a dumbass when Karen walks in and sees Elektra in Matt's bed, with no idea what was going on.
    • Charlie Cox has said in interviews that this trope is one of his favorite things about playing Matt:
      "I think my favorite thing about this character is what the writers have done with him, which is they've made him someone who hopefully — we've made — we've found in a superhero who's relatable. We meet someone who is — of course — he's a superhero, and of course, he's a force for good. He's incredibly brave, and incredibly generous of spirit, and kind, and is trying to help the city. He's trying to help people. He's selfless in that way. But, at the same time, we also meet someone who suffers from very human character flaws. He's very stubborn. He's got a temper. He takes things too far sometimes. He's deeply arrogant at times, and he believes he has a childlike belief of his invincibility. And at times — hopefully as an audience — at times, you look at Matt, and think to yourself, 'Dude, what are you doing!? Like, be more sensible' or 'Take it easy.' Hopefully, you relate to him, but you relate to him because he kind of make the same mistakes that we make. And for a superhero, that's very exciting to me. That's fun."
    • Matt's decision to intimidate Wilson Fisk by threatening to write a letter to the State Department requesting Vanessa's visa be declined is completely asinine, immediately leading to Fisk literally beating some sense into him.
    • DA Reyes. Her mistakes during a sting got Frank Castle's family killed, and while it is implied she regrets this, afterwards she tries repeatedly to kill Frank simply to save her own career, acts like a complete bitch, and threatens to ruin the careers of three innocent, well meaning people, plus her assistant. And yet we're supposed to feel sorry for her simply because her daughter was threatened. Few tears were shed at her death.
  • What an Idiot!:
    • Karen Page in "Into the Ring". After narrowly escaping being both framed and murdered by Fisk's men, she sneaks off in the middle of the night to her apartment alone, only to be attacked again. If Matt hadn't have followed her, she'd have died there. Another instance is when she is going off alone to investigate Ms. Cardenas's tenement case and gets jumped in an alley. This time, she's saved by Foggy.
    • Anatoly and Vladimir are desperate as Matt continues to strike back at their operations. So Anatoly makes the reasonable decision to go to Fisk for help: Solid. He does this by ruining his date, knowing Fisk is a multiple-murdering career criminal who very much likes his privacy. Then when Fisk gets pissed off and attacks him, he gets the brilliant idea to try and slice him with his knife. You know, because running for his life or begging for forgiveness would've made too much sense. Needless to say, the very slightest hope for mercy was lost at that point.
    • When a non-crooked cop finds Matt with Vladimir, Matt tells the cop to tell the dispatcher it was a false alarm and that he will let him go eventually. Matt fails to give the cop any reason to believe him (such as explaining the situation, that at least half of the cops in his precinct are on the take in some form) or detect that the cop was going to scream for help (a logical decision on his part, given being left indefinitely in the hands of "The Devil of Hell's Kitchen" with no chance of backup is a bad idea). When the corrupt ESU team does enter the building, they proceed to kill the officer.
    • Overlapping with Too Dumb to Live, Wesley leaves a loaded gun on a table in reach of an unrestrained Karen Page. When he tries to talk her down, he even asks her if he would be dumb enough to make such a mistake. Apparently he is.
    • Matt neglects to get Detective Blake's statements about Fisk on tape, which would have made them admissible in court as a dying declaration. Ben is disappointed in him because he doesn't think of this.
    • Karen drags Ben into a nursing home to interview Fisk's mother, without revealing her true intentions, which ends up getting Ben killed by Fisk, after Fisk finds out from his snitch at the Bulletin. It's particularly egregious, considering that Karen chastises Matt over visiting Vanessa at her art gallery, and then she admits to giving a false name so they wouldn't track her, but of course doesn't mention that to Ben, making him the target. Even Ben calls her out on not telling him the true intentions of visiting that particular nursing home.
    • In the season 1 finale, when Fisk points out Leland's embezzling, Leland admits he and Gao poisoned the banquet and he stole from Fisk. He says he'll take half of Fisk's money or Hoffman will go to the FBI. Despite pointing out that his feelings for Vanessa are making Fisk erratic, he expects him to act rational. About sixty seconds later he's being thrown down an elevator shaft.
    • After Frank Castle gives up the location of a stolen briefcase of money to the Irish mob, the guys sent to retrieve it don't think for a second that it might be a trap. Indeed, Frank hid a bomb under the money, which explodes once someone tries to grab some cash out of the briefcase. Frank had even pointed out that Finn was too interested in getting his money back.
    • The pawn shop owner that Frank visits in the second episode of Season 2 to buy a police scanner. At the buyer's request, he leaves himself completely vulnerable, selling the buyer his gun and disconnecting the video camera (and giving the tape to the buyer). Considering the incredibly illegal sale he's just conducted (of stolen police equipment "straight out of Officer McDipshit's dashboard"), this is already pretty dumb. But as Frank is walking out, he tries to sell him child pornography. Now, Frank has demonstrated literally nothing to indicate that he's interested in that. All he's demonstrated is that he's a professional criminal. It should also be worth noting that many real criminals despise child molesters and child pornography in general. Now, if the buyer was the average criminal, this probably wouldn't end well for the seller anyways, but we're talking about Frank, a grieving father. The seller is so dense that even as Frank turns around and flips the sign in the door to "CLOSED" to prevent any witnesses, he still thinks he's making a sale, not about to be beaten to death with a baseball bat.
    • In "Guilty As Sin," Karen visits Matt's apartment. She manages to make it to Matt's room, where he's talking to Elektra. Somehow, in the time from Karen showing up at the door, Stick letting her in, and presumably bringing her to the door, Matt doesn't realize it's Karen and seeing Elektra in his bed is a bad idea, and thus try to shoo her away.
    • Speaking of which, Karen's not that much better. She knows Matt is a reasonable, sweet, and overall decent man and the fact that both of them were fully clothed, and he was at her bedside, and not say, lying in it with her seems like a pretty big tip. Also, Stick was right outside the door and she met him on her way in, so Matt wasn't even alone. But instead of even considering that Matt may have just been taking care of a friend, Karen instantly assumes he's a sleaze.
    • In Season 2, Matt pissing off Fisk in jail is really close to set up Daredevil: Born Again level of punishment on him just because he wanted to know something he already knew and would not be able to prove anyway.
    • As smart as Fisk usually is, he has one glaring moment in Season 3 when he has Julie killed to take away Dex's moral compass so that he'd be entirely devoted to Fisk. Except he already clearly was, so this does nothing except providing a way for Matt to turn Dex against Fisk later on. The sole argument in Fisk's favor is that Fisk has researched Dex's background meticulously and knows that Julie is a "North Star" for Dex, and doesn't want her threatening his place as Dex's main "North Star".
      • The really dumb move was leaving Julie's body in a freezer for several days/a few weeks instead of disposing of it ASAP. Matt would probably not have been able to flip Dex away from Fisk without that proof of her death.
    • Fisk carefully selecting his FBI detail in advance because he's researched them thoroughly and plans to bribe, threaten and blackmail them all later and turn them into his personal bodyguard was an incredibly stupid master plan, as it means he is under the direct protection of about a dozen or so people who all would be happy if he met a tragic end of some sort. When Matt breaks into his penthouse to kill him, the woman running his surveillance network is thrilled at the prospect, purely because she hates working for him just that much, and eventually it's these very Feds that, respectively, provide testimony against him (Nadeem), try to outright murder him (Dex), and provide yet further testimony against him after he is finally arrested (everyone else). Fisk utterly failed to realise that fear and bullying do NOT produce loyalty whatsoever.
    • Karen's decision in season 3 to visit Fisk in his penthouse and provoke him into trying to kill her, which not only fails, but prompts Fisk to order a hit on her and indirectly causes the death of Father Lantom.
  • What Do You Mean, It's Not for Kids?: Despite it being a Marvel brand, the TV-MA rating is warranted. The blood and language is enough to scare most parents away.
  • What Do You Mean, It's Not Political?: A lot of Fisk's actions in season 3 seem very influenced by the election of Donald Trump as President, with Erik Oleson even making remarks in interviews that hinted that Trump's presidency was influential in writing the season. As one Redditor pointed out, there are lots of parallels, like the fake news comment Nadeem makes to Karen when she's trying to ask him how Fisk got out, to the way Fisk uses the media to create smokescreens to hide his actions, or the idea that law is circumvented through control, and the FBI is run by a deep state (or criminal organization). Hell, the hotel he's under house arrest in is known as the Presidential Hotel.
  • Win Back the Crowd:
    • It's safe to say that the series has erased any ill feelings that people still had over the 2003 film. As Rifftrax put it: "'Marvel presents'? Shouldn't that be 'Marvel takes a mulligan'?"
    • Elektra also proved popular among fans, and after being one of the most contentious parts of the Affleck film and her spin-off receiving mixed reviews.
  • The Woobie:
    • Melvin Potter. The poor guy gets forced into assisting Wilson Fisk because Fisk threatened his girlfriend Betsy Beatty, just because he happens to be a pretty skilled tinkerer.
    • Ben Urich. He's treated like a washout and is disrespected, he's reluctant to aid the investigation team on multiple occasions, loses his job just after his wife misses out on another extension and after Karen misleads him into thinking he was being shown a good facility for his Alzheimer's-afflicted wife that's actually just the place where Fisk is hiding his mother, he is killed by Fisk for something that he wasn't even responsible for.
    • Ray Nadeem. An honest and hardworking FBI agent who only wants best for his family. He goes into financial debt to handle his sister-in-law's cancer treatments thanks to Fisk cutting off her insurance, tries his best to weather things as he gets blackmailed into working for Fisk and Dex. And after an effort to get him to speak out against Fisk in front of a grand jury fail due to Fisk tampering with the jury, he just goes home, films a dying confession to his family, and is just resigned to his fate when Dex comes by to kill him.

Top

How well does it match the trope?

Example of:

/

Media sources:

/

Report