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Leadership

    Wilson Fisk 

Wilson Fisk / The Kingpin

https://static.tvtropes.org/pmwiki/pub/images/wilsonfisk_kingpindaredevil.jpg
"A city crumbles and fades. It needs to die before it can be reborn."
Click here to see Fisk in the 1960s. 

Portrayed By: Vincent D'Onofrio, Cole Jensen (young)

Appearances: Daredevil

"I'm not a religious man... but I've read bits and pieces over the years. Curiosity more than faith. But this one story... there was a man. He was traveling from Jerusalem to Jericho... when he was set upon by men of ill intent. They stripped the traveler of his clothes, they beat him, and they left him... bleeding in the dirt. And a priest happened by... saw the traveler... but he moved to the other side of the road and continued on. And then a Levite, a religious functionary, he... came to the place, saw the dying traveler... but he too moved to the other side of the road, passed him by. But then came a man from Samaria, a Samaritan, a good man. He saw the traveler bleeding in the road and he stopped to aid him without thinking of the circumstance or the difficulty it might bring him. The Samaritan tended to the travelers wounds, applying oil and wine. And he carried him to an inn, gave him all the money he had for the owner to take care of the traveler, as the Samaritan, he... continued on his journey. He did this simply because the traveler was his neighbor. He loved his city and all the people in it. I always thought that I was the Samaritan in that story. It's funny, isn't it? How even the best of men can be... deceived by their true nature."

A powerful businessman with interests in the future of Hell's Kitchen and New York City. He's also a mob boss who has been building a major illegal enterprise in Hell's Kitchen.


  • 0% Approval Rating: Zig-Zagged. His downfall, repeatedly, is that he works hard to maintain an image of a well meaning philanthropist falsely accused of horrible crimes, yet he invariably alienates those who actually work for or with him through his behavior (with the notable exception of Wesley, who dies early on anyway) to the point that some of his closest underlings are only there because he's bullied, blackmailed or manipulated them. This is especially notable in season 3 where he gets his entire FBI detail in his pocket by digging up dirt on them and / or threatening their families, leading to them testifying against him once he is actually arrested anyway, and especially with Dex who turns on him the moment he learns that Fisk had Julie killed just to undermine his sanity further. The public at large alternates between loving him and loathing him depending on what they think about him is true, and at the end of the day he's just plain unable and unwilling to invest in genuine loyalty rather than mere obedience, basically giving members of his own organization every reason to want him to somehow fail.
  • Abusive Dad: Bill Fisk was psychologically abusive toward Wilson, and coerced him into carrying out beatings. He also brutally beat Wilson's mother, forcing the boy to stare at the wall as he did so, leaving him with lingering trauma. Eventually, Wilson fought back, killing Bill with a hammer at the age of twelve.
  • AcCENT upon the Wrong SylLABle: Fisk has a noticeable stutter, which is part of the reason he dislikes being in public. It becomes even more pronounced when he speaks to Madame Gao in Mandarin.
  • Acrofatic: There's a muscularity to his immense weight that means he's able to dominate in most fights and beat people to death with his bare hands. He could keep up with a fully-suited Daredevil at the end of Season 1 and in Season 2 he quickly defeats the very capable Frank Castle in a one-on-one.
  • Adaptation Personality Change: Unlike the comics, Fisk sometimes acts as a Psychopathic Manchild who is socially awkward, and a Visionary Villain. He does however, share his comics counterpart traits of being a romantic, as well as very intelligent and cultured.
  • Adaptational Curves: For practical reasons, Fisk's physique isn't as exaggeratedly rotund as it is in the comics. He is still a reasonably large man, just not the egg-shaped giant he usually is in comics and animation.
  • Adaptational Wimp:
    • Played With. Comics Fisk has Stout Strength that, especially in his time as a Spider-Man villain, was basically Super Strength sufficient to let him crush a man's skull in his fist, throw people through brick walls, and go blow-for-blow with Captain America and a holding-back Spider-Man. Here, due to the more realistic tone of the Daredevil show compared to the comics, Fisk is just a really big and strong human, although this does match up with how the Daredevil and later Spider-Man comics depict him. In general, the MCU version and comics both depict Fisk as a very, very strong human; the difference being that the MCU depicts him as what a very strong normal human can realistically do (while meeting Castle, he bench presses a solid 300 kg) , whereas the comics depict him to the norm of Charles Atlas Superpower. He's definitely not dead-lifting a small car like Captain America any time soon.
    • In the comics, Fisk is a master of several martial arts and is built like a sumo wrestler. This version is just a brute who relies on his natural size and strength as well as his psychotic temper to deliver unskilled but savage beatings. Season 2 shows that he does work out, however, and his battles with Castle and his three-way with Dex and Matt show him using some proper fighting form.
    • Also in the comics, Fisk is a confident, domineering Control Freak who rules through force of personality as well as terror. Here, he is much more shy, neurotic and visibly insecure, and while he terrifies his underlings he commands far less respect from his cohorts and relies more on mediation, with even Wesley accusing him of letting the others walk all over him (on the flip side, though, this does encourage others to fatally underestimate him, so it is still his true personality as much as it is a ruse). As Character Development kicks in, his ability to scheme and manipulate start to more closely approach his comic counterpart's, and Season 3 has him outplay all other parties at every turn until the series finale.
  • Affably Evil: Fisk has a girlfriend, would do anything for his mother, is respectful of his enemies, and wants to make his community a better place. He's also a brutal mob boss behind heroin trafficking, racketeering, money laundering and extortion.
  • Ambiguous Disorder: Wilson might be on the autism spectrum. He has a hard time maintaining eye contact, has an odd way of inflecting his speech, and, despite taking precautions, has a set routine. He mentions that he has trouble "clearing his head" at times, and is insecure when out in public. Vanessa helps him improve to some degree. Not to mention that D'Onofrio has family that are on the spectrum.
    • However, he also seems to show sociopathic tendencies during Season 3, as evidenced by his frequent Lack of Empathy, his tendency to treat people like pawns and kill innocent people to get closer to his goals.
  • Anger Born of Worry: He has a moment of this early in season 3 when Vanessa is unable to be reached following the Albanians' attack on him while he's being moved from jail to his secret penthouse lair, worrying that the Albanians got to her. Fortunately, it turns out to be a false alarm as Vanessa's bodyguards were unreachable due to relocating her.
  • Anti-Villain: Deconstructed. Fisk is evil, which he knows and admits to those closest to him, but he also deeply loves his mother and Vanessa, clearly cares for right-hand man Wesley (who reciprocates), and he believes that all the evil he does is in service of saving New York/Hell's Kitchen and ushering it into a brighter future. However, as his capacity for empathy drains and his crimes become increasingly heinous, he becomes less sympathetic. By Season 3, he's become a straight-up villain, resigned himself to being evil and given up on maintaining any kind of moral guidelines to achieve his goals. The only features that saves him from being utterly monstrous are his (very rare) Pet the Dog moments, his love and loyalty towards Vanessa, and his final deal with Matt for the safety of his beloved Vanessa with an honorable handshake.
  • Appropriated Appellation: Seemingly adopts his name as the Kingpin after he manipulates Frank Castle to take out the former ringleader of the prison they were at, who used the name before Fisk did.
  • Arch-Enemy: Funny enough, due to not knowing that they are one and the same person until Season 3, he considers both Daredevil and Matt Murdock this, as he lost everything thanks to them/him. So naturally, when he does learn that Matt is Daredevil, he fully considers him this, and works actively to ruin Matt's life in both of his personas.
  • Authority Equals Asskicking: He's both the head of a criminal empire and shown personally kicking crap out of his enemies on occasion.
  • Ax-Crazy: Downplayed, but it's still there. He's just very good at hiding it. Fisk possesses a very dangerous temper and is rampantly homicidal when things don't go his way.
  • Bad Boss: Fisk relies very heavily on manipulation, blackmail and threats to corrupt and control his subordinates. This ultimately means that the henchmen most responsible for protecting him or doing his dirty work are the ones who most despise him and want him defeated, worrying only about how they might save their own necks in the process. In season 3, Mrs. Shelby (who runs Fisk's secret "war room") is positively relieved when she sees Matt sneak into his building planning to kick his ass and bring him down and is fully willing to help him, and he is largely undone by Nadeem's video confession, as well as Matt turning Dex against him by telling Dex how Fisk murdered Julie. This mostly stems from how self-absorbed he is, as outside a handful of people he genuinely cares for, he is unwilling and unable to invest in loyalty when obedience and fear seem to do the trick. Only James Wesley, Felix Manning, and Vanessa show any sort of loyalty to him that comes from a place of respect/admiration, and Owlsley was only with him for the money.
  • Badass in a Nice Suit: Perhaps invoked. He's always invariably clad in a sharp suit and the series explains his suits are tailored by Melvin Potter to be lined with knife resistant material. When we see his closet, it's composed entirely of suits, blacks in season 1 and white in season 3.
  • Badass Longcoat: Sports one during the Season 1 finale.
  • Baddie Flattery: Fisk compliments Matt's decision to wage a one man war to change Hell's Kitchen.
    Fisk: I respect your... conviction; the lone man who thinks he can make a difference.
  • Bad Guys Do the Dirty Work: Matt is actually not able to fully defeat Dex at any point in Season 3; Fisk is the one who ultimately takes him down during a Mêlée à Trois with the three of them, slamming Dex's back into a brick wall and snapping his spine.
  • Bald of Evil: Fisk, as usual, has no hair as an adult, but he used to have it as a kid.
  • Berserk Button: Doing anything that affects Fisk's relationships with the women or loved ones in his life is the sort of thing that prompts him to personally kill the offender in question (as opposed to have someone else do it for him).
  • Benevolent Boss: While he's a Bad Boss towards people he hardly knows, he's surprisingly kind, friendly and loyal to some of his most competent subordinates such as Wesley and Felix.
  • Big Bad: Of Daredevil (2015). He is the main threat Matt is up against in Seasons 1 and 3, and even with his reduced role in Season 2, he's still able to cause a lot of havoc from behind bars. In the series finale it devolves into a Big Bad Ensemble with Dex, who after serving as The Dragon throughout season three turns against Fisk after finding out he had Julie killed. Fisk himself is still the enemy Matt is more concerned with, and Fisk molded Dex's fall into insanity in the first place.
  • Book-Ends: Fisk's life of crime in season 1 begins with him staring at a wall, thinking of the man he will become. It ends with him in prison, staring a blank wall, clearly thinking what man he will become once he leaves prison.
  • Broken Pedestal: By the first season finale, the destruction of his empire has left Fisk bitter and resentful to the very city he was once trying to save.
    Wilson Fisk: This city doesn't deserve a better tomorrow! It deserves to drown in its filth! It deserves people like my father! People like you!
  • The Bus Came Back: After being absent for a large portion of Season 2, he makes a return for two episodes, allowing us to catch up with him. He then returns to being the main antagonist for Season 3.
  • Card-Carrying Villain: A rather complex one, since he's not your typical self-aware villain. As a firm believer that the end justifies the means, Fisk knows how evil he is, and admits to those closest to him, but he also sees himself as Necessarily Evil for a better future of the city.
  • Character Development: He starts the show barely able to articulate, and is almost cripplingly shy, as well as showing several other Ambiguous Disorders. Wesley runs the day-to-day operations of his business while he gives the orders from the shadows, but as the series goes on he is forced more and more to deal with things himself, and by the end you can start to see the man who would become the Kingpin. By Season 2 he has made a full transition into his ruthless, cunning comic counterpart.
  • Charles Atlas Superpower: Though falling short of superhuman levels, Fisk is still a pretty strong and unstoppable fighter. Because of this, he's one of the strongest and deadliest enemies Matt has ever faced. Pretty much every fight he's been in has been a Curb-Stomp Battle, at least until Matt comes along in a new suit crafted by Melvin. And even then it took great difficulty from Matt and Dex to bring him down because he's that damn strong.
  • The Chessmaster: While Fisk is regularly sabotaged by his Hair-Trigger Temper, he still possesses a very sharp mind for tactics, outmaneuvering his foes and making sure that whatever happens, he wins. Perhaps the finest example is when he orchestrates the downfall of the Russians by engineering a war between them and Matt, and then striking them down while they're busy dealing with Matt, and absorbing their business. Season 2 shows that he hasn't lost his touch. While in prison, he's able to take control of the contraband trade from a rival kingpin, while using Frank Castle to boot, and ruining Nelson & Murdock as an extra bonus. This is taken Up to Eleven in Season 3 as he sets up an extortion racket that taxes other prominent gangsters while under house arrest.
  • Combat Pragmatist: When Fisk deigns to get his hands dirty, he simply does not stop until his target is dead or incapacitated. He uses his massive size and strength as well as any object he can gets his hands on in order to get the upper hand in a fight.
  • Comic-Book Movies Don't Use Codenames:
    • In Season 1, he's only referred to as Wilson Fisk, although his "The Kingpin" name is given visual references: Ben Urich uses the King of Diamonds playing card to represent him on a chart (tacked on by a white pushpin). His father tells him he's going to be a king. Detective Blake refers to him as "King Freakin' Kong".
    • By Season 2, Fisk seems to consider taking on the moniker after orchestrating Dutton's murder.
    • In Season 3, Fisk just goes by his legal name, and Matt, Karen, Foggy, Brett, Tower and Nadeem only ever address him as such. On the other hand, the corrupt FBI agents he's blackmailed into working for him have use the codename "Kingpin" for any dirty work Fisk orders them to do.
  • Complexity Addiction: On occasion he plays complex manipulations with people he's planning to just kill anyway.
  • Cool Old Guy: He puts on this persona, coming off to most people as a well-spoken, community-focused man in his late fifties/early sixties.
  • Cop Killer: He isn't above ordering the deaths of cops on his payroll who have become liabilities, generally having other corrupt officers be the ones to carry out the deed.
  • Corrupt Corporate Executive: He is a rich businessman with a lot of companies. Actually, many of his companies acted as façades for the illicit activities and money laundering operations of Fisk himself. This makes sense, he is The Don, after all.
  • The Corrupter: Fisk is very good at turning otherwise good people, or maybe just vulnerable people, into accomplices and killers. While Dex was already a psychopath and killer, he was trying to hold his life together in a largely law-abiding way. Fisk learns all his dirty secrets, manipulates him with ease, takes him under his wing and grooms him into becoming a top assassin. He also corrupts the entire FBI task force handling him into becoming his muscle.
  • Crazy-Prepared: Fisk's back-up plans have back-up plans. His suits have a special armored lining, he tends to have secondary assassins in place in case the first killer fails and he has juries tampered with well ahead of time.
  • Deal with the Devil: Any dealings one may have with Fisk almost invariably end with their death. A literal example occurs by the end of Season 3, with Matt being on the bargaining end. Fisk is forced to sacrifice any chance of a happy life with Vanessa as well as any chance at revenge against Matt by willingly going to prison and taking the fall for his crimes; Matt, in turn, won't go after Vanessa or prove her involvement with the death of Nadeem, absolving her of her crimes.
  • Demoted to Extra/Commuting on a Bus: After being the main antagonist of Season 1, Fisk only appears in two episodes in Season 2. However, the impact of his removal from the streets is shown in great detail throughout the first part of Season 2. What limited time Fisk appears onscreen is responsible for setting up the entire third act of Season 2, as well as set up Fisk for his return to main antagonist status in Season 3.
  • Deuteragonist: The antagonistic variety for Season 1. Season 1 is just as much his story as it is Matt Murdock's. The story is heavily centered around him even in episodes that don't showcase his war with Matt, explaining his origins, his motivations, and his personal life.
  • Diabolical Mastermind: He's at the top of the criminal empire Matt is trying to dismantle.
  • Disproportionate Retribution:
    • Simply speaking his name is considered sufficient for Fisk to brutally murder his own personnel and then wipe out everyone they've ever known or cared about.
    • He beats Anatoly to death with his bare hands, then purges Anatoly's brother and entire gang, because he embarrassed Fisk during his dinner with Vanessa.
    • He kills Ben Urich for merely speaking to his mother, though he was under the impression that he somehow directly or indirectly caused the death of Wesley.
    • He nearly beats Francis to death for not accompanying Wesley, thus possibly preventing his death, even though the ever-loyal Wesley ordered him to stay and guard Fisk. However, he still places his trust in this guy afterwards simply because Wesley trusted him.
    • Matt threatening him in prison is enough to get him to declare war on the members of Nelson & Murdock, and set up a multi-tiered attempt to kill Matt when Matt visits the prison in season 3.
    • He beats one of his FBI agents to death simply because he tells him that Karen escaped Dex's assassination attempt with Nadeem's help.
  • The Don: A rare modern variant of this trope. Fisk is one of the most realistic examples of what a powerful criminal leader would be in places where corruption is rampant. To clarify, Fisk is the head of an immensely powerful criminal organization that oscillates between the legal and the illegal, keeps a number of seemingly legitimtate businesses to employ as fronts, conspires with other equally powerful criminal organizations such as the Hand, with him getting a major benefit from the illegal activities of these organizations, and has both the mob and half the law on his side, blackmailing the latter in his favor.
  • The Dreaded: In season 1, Fisk's associates are afraid to say his name under penalty of death, and Healy immediately impales himself on a metal spike out of fear of Fisk's retribution the moment that he gives it up to Matt. When he discovers that Leland and Gao were responsible for the assault on Vanessa's life, even the latter seems to prefer skipping town for a bit. In season 3, it turns out that he's managed to control FBI agents for years and manipulated Ray Nadeem for the longest time without Nadeem ever knowing it.
  • Even Evil Has Loved Ones:
    • Fisk is in love with Vanessa, a woman who works at an art gallery he frequents. You mess with her at your own risk.
    • Also his mother, who he's willing to do absolutely anything for.
    • His love for Wesley also starts to become clear as the show goes on. In Season 3, he admits to Dex that he'd even come to see Wesley like a son by the time the latter died.
    • Fisk is effective as a crime boss because he'll go out of his way to take care of the families of those who work for him and have proven themselves very loyal and competent. And if you fall out of his favor or piss Fisk off, those families become a highly effective tool for leverage, or who will pay the penalty for your failure.
  • Even Evil Has Standards: Despite the fact that he's a ruthless mob boss, he has some firm morals.
    • He states that he's not cruel for the sake of being cruel, since he knows perfectly well that all his actions serve a purpose. Despite his highly reprehensible acts, he's far more aware than other mob bosses.
    • After killing Anatoly, Fisk sincerely admits that sooner or later he still would've cut the Ranskahovs off, on the grounds that their inability to deal with Matt has made them "too unpredictable" to have them in business. Given the nature of Anatoly's death, Leland is a bit skeptical.
    • Fisk finds the most important painting for his collection in the hands of a Holocaust survivor, whose relative was the actual painter. Her story is so sad that Fisk realizes this is a line he won't cross. He's somewhat annoyed and appalled to learn that Dex doesn't have the same standards, going behind Fisk's back and murdering Mrs. Falb to get the painting anyway, and is moreso offended when Dex tries to endear himself to Vanessa by calling himself "the new James Wesley".
  • Evil Sounds Deep: In the Japanese dub, he gets the Badass Baritone of Kenji Nomura.
  • Evil Sounds Raspy: Speaks in harsh, quiet whispers.
  • Evil vs. Evil: The conflicts between him, Dutton, the Russians and the Albanians. Although, considering his charisma and the fact that he's an Affably Evil Wicked Cultured mob boss, viewers prefer that he wins over them.
  • Evil Wears Black: In Season 1, Fisk wears stylish suits with dark colors. In season 3, his black dress shirts clash with the white suits he now wears.
  • False Flag Operation:
    • He pays Jasper Evans to shank him non-fatally, so the FBI will be prompted to move him into his penthouse base of operations.
    • He directs Dex to carry out these sorts of operations while impersonating Daredevil.
  • Fat Bastard: Admits to Vanessa in an unguarded moment that he may have enjoyed zuppa inglese "a little too much" as a kid. However, he demonstrates that he is far from being out of shape.
  • Fatal Flaw: His Hair-Trigger Temper. Acting rashly out of sheer wrath is something that ends up sabotaging his The Chessmaster tendencies. One specific instance is his murder of Owlsley because he tried to kill Vanessa. Murdering Owlsley directly causes Hoffman to spill information to the FBI. More subtly, despite his skill as a manipulator with a criminal empire, he has a pronounced habit of falsely assuming everything is in place and beyond disruption, then being surprised by unexpected challenges both relatively minor and immediately dangerous — for himself, and people he actually cares about.
  • Final Boss: He's one of the last enemies Matt must defeat in the climactic showdown of season 3, along with Dex.
  • Flipping the Table: He does this to his own penthouse table after he gets embarrassed and threatened by Madame Gao in his own penthouse.
  • Foil:
    • To Matt Murdock. Both have the desire to "make their city a better place" and don't hesitate to use brutality if needed. However, Matt generally stops shy of lethal force and tries to direct his brutality towards criminals while Fisk's ambitions often impact everyone including innocent lives. Fisk started off as a meek child who abhorred violence and gradually became murderous. The Murdocks' familial dark side is a penchant for brutality, yet Matt keeps it in check despite being trained as a warrior. Fisk's father was abusive and coerced him into violence, while Matt's father was very loving and never wanted him to fight. Both men were shown to be offered alcohol as kids. Matt's case was one of father-son bonding; Fisk's case was one of peer pressure. Matt's faith is a major reason he stays on the side of angels. Fisk claims he's never had the mind for prayer or religion, and in the Season 1 finale invokes a bible passage in his Then Let Me Be Evil speech.
    • To Frank Castle, aka The Punisher, to the point that both men are complete opposites. While both believe that the end justifies the means, their methods in achieving their goals could not be more different. Frank Castle is a tactical genius and a brutal vigilante who kills only criminals, while Fisk is a cunning manipulator and mob boss, willing to kill criminals and civilians alike, including innocents. Castle wears combat clothing, while Fisk is always impeccably dressed in a suit. Castle is sullen, while Fisk is polite and courteous. And finally, while Castle is a One-Man Army, Fisk (usually) prefers others to do the dirty work for him, though he is more than capable of handling himself in a one-on-one fight.
    • To Dutton in Season 2. Both are ruthless mob bosses, but while Fisk is reserved, cultured, Affably Evil, doesn't boast of his achievements and is a Magnificent Bastard, Dutton is just a nasty Smug Snake who gloats his position as "the kingpin". Unfortunately for him, his arrogance gets in the way of him giving Fisk as much credit as he should. Ironically, Fisk takes his position as the real kingpin.
  • Freudian Excuse: A very powerful one. In his childhood, he was a nonviolent kid who grew up in a violent place, with a Domestic Abuser of a father who taught him violence and brutality. He is undoubtedly pushed to the limits when he ends up killing his father.
  • Genius Bruiser: A huge guy who spends most of his time masterfully building and overseeing a massive criminal enterprise and frequently discusses matters of art and philosophy.
  • Grand Romantic Gesture: Fisk tries to do this with Vanessa to various degrees of success.
    • The first time he asks Vanessa out, she says she has to close up shop, and he just politely leaves. She's surprised that he didn't offer to buy the place so she could leave early; he quietly says that "Any woman who can be bought isn't worth having."
    • On their second date, he does buy out the entire restaurant, but this was a pragmatic move, not a romantic one. He's not good in public and doesn't want to be interrupted (like that fatal mistake Anatoly made last time), so buying the restaurant was the simplest solution.
    • In season 3, we see Fisk going to great lengths to regain "Rabbit in a Snowstorm" in time for Vanessa's return to New York, but ultimately giving up after learning of the sentimental value the painting for its owner.
  • Guttural Growler: His usual tone of voice is rather deep and husky. Unusually, it actually gets higher pitched when he's really angry.
  • Heel Realization: He comes to the realization that he isn't a Good Samaritan, but the ill intent in the Season 1 finale.
  • Hair Today, Gone Tomorrow: He had a full head of hair as a kid.
  • Hair-Trigger Temper: He hides it better than most, but Fisk has a very low patience threshold and will brutally murder people with his bare hands if he detects the slightest disrespect. As Anatoly sadly discovered.
  • Hidden Villain: Fisk renders himself very insulated from his illegal activities to the point he's like the boogeyman. He has Owlsley (and later Red Lion) handling all his money, while having James Wesley (and later Felix Manning) serving as his mouthpiece, and the few criminals who do take direct orders from him are intimidated into silence by the threat that they and their loved ones will be killed if they so much as whisper his name. Before he goes public, Ben Urich has to mark him with a King of Diamonds with a big question-mark on it to represent him. He isn't even heard until the very end of the first episode, and his face isn't shown until the end of the third episode.
  • Hypocrite: He does not welcome intrusions on his privacy or people using his loved ones against him, yet is perfectly willing to do those sorts of things himself to underlings or innocent pawns.
  • I Am Not Left-Handed: Fisk openly lets an already-injured masked Matt (who's out for blood that night) take a shot at him — with an armed Wesley and Francis at his side — soaks up a few blows and then starts whaling on him... but when Matt uses the shoge hook lying on the floor from the fight that tore him up, which is only repelled by hidden body armor, Fisk visibly realizes that that's all that saved him, and starts giving it his all.
  • I Did What I Had to Do: Fisk genuinely feels some regret when innocent people get hurt for the needs of his vision, as Matt observes when Fisk mourns Elena Cardenas' death on TV, though he's perfectly willing to sacrifice innocent people for the sake of his pawns, like Karen's Bulletin colleagues or Julie.
  • It's All About Me: Evident in his philosophy, especially as we learn more about it. All that matters to Fisk are his vision and the things he wants, and to him the horrible things he does to obtain either of those are justified because he doesn't see himself as cruel. This ultimately drives a rift between himself and his associates when he wants to have his cake and eat it too, and becomes really obvious after his defeat and subsequent Heel Realization, where he rants to Matt about how the city deserves to fall into squalor because it denied him his vision of change.
  • Kick the Son of a Bitch:
    • While Anatoly's death at the hands of Fisk is incredibly brutal, the man was in life a human trafficker who willingly kidnapped women and young children, so...
    • At the age of 12, Fisk beat his own father to death with a hammer. But said father was a smug, selfish and violent Jerkass who physically and verbally abused his wife and son over petty slights and/or problems that were his own fault to begin with. So it's hard to feel much sympathy for Bill.
    • When it's revealed in the season 1 finale that Leland poisoned Vanessa, Fisk responds by throwing him down an elevator shaft after he tries to steal half of his assets.
  • Kingpin in His Gym: Fisk spends lots of his time in prison bench-pressing weights to keep his strength up. He also arranges for Jasper Evans to shank him in the rec room as part of his gambit to manipulate the FBI.
  • Kneel Before Zod: On sneaking out of the hotel to go to a sitdown with crimelords he wants to extort into paying him, Fisk demands that Ray Nadeem be the one to remove his ankle tracker. Fisk refuses to simply take the key to the bracelet, making Nadeem unlock it himself, which requires him to kneel before the Kingpin.
  • Large and in Charge: Fisk is unquestionably the boss and probably weighs around 300 pounds. Not to mention at 6'4", Vincent D'Onofrio towers over 5'10" Charlie Cox in their scenes together. He also looms over his subordinates (though this effect is achieved through copious use of Scully boxes and trenches).
  • Legacy Character: Technically, Dutton was the first person to have the moniker of "Kingpin". Fisk takes it for himself after arranging Dutton's death.
  • Let's You and Him Fight: If Fisk can't get rid of an enemy or inconvenient ally directly, he'll manipulate someone else into taking that person out for him.
    • He escalates the conflict between Matt and the Russians, so that the Russians are in a position where Fisk can target them with bombs, and then sends in the corrupt cops in his pocket to kill the survivors.
    • When Nobu gets too insistent that Fisk immediately fulfill his part of the Hand's deal to acquire Elena's property for Midland Circle, Fisk sets him up to fight Matt in the hope that they kill each other.
    • When Dutton tries to intimidate him in prison, Fisk makes arrangements for Frank Castle to be delivered to him and then manipulates Frank into killing Dutton and his entire gang, allowing Fisk to take over the prison's underground economy and gain a new revenue source.
  • Light Is Not Good: He wears his comic counterpart's iconic white suit in season 3.
  • Lightning Bruiser: He can be incredibly quick, belying his size. He can take on a younger and fitter opponent in a fight and mete out a No-Holds-Barred Beatdown (see below) with little trouble.
  • Limited Wardrobe: In Season 1, his wardrobe is limited to an assortment of black suits, plus his late father's cuff-links. Vanessa influences him to wear a lighter shade of black and different cuff-links. In Season 2 and the beginning of Season 3, he only has his prison uniform, and for the rest of Season 3, again wears an assortment of similar-looking suits (which are white this time instead of black).
  • Love Makes You Dumb: Fisk's Fatal Flaw is his inability to keep his emotions in check when it comes to his Morality Pets. Leland uses this against him, giving Fisk an ultimatum to either let Leland part with half his money and out of the organization, or he'll have Hoffman reveal all of Fisk's criminal activities to the FBI. Fisk kills him regardless because he poisoned Vanessa. Even though he does send men to kill Hoffman afterwards, Matt's able to get to Hoffman first. The fact that Fisk has to personally see to Vanessa getting out of the country due to Wesley being dead also prevents him from getting away himself.
    • In season 3, despite initially planning to deal with Nadeem by discrediting him rather than killing him, his desire to please Vanessa allows her to convince him otherwise. This directly leads to his downfall, as killing Nadeem renders his recorded testimony admissible in court. What's more, allowing Vanessa to give the assassination order herself gives Matt leverage against Fisk, as he threatens to expose Vanessa to prosecution if Fisk causes any more trouble.
  • Love Makes You Evil: Fisk's protectiveness towards his mother drives him to murder his father at the age of 12, then the assassination attempt on him that nearly kills Vanessa drives him over the edge. This eventually leads to him murdering Ben Urich for simply talking to his mother.
  • Luxury Prison Suite:
    • Averted in Season 2. While Fisk's situation would be idyllic for most incarcerated crime bosses, given Fisk's unique mental state, he absolutely detests being in prison despite all the comparative freedom he has in it and he's desperate to leave it so he can take revenge on everybody that helped put him there.
    • Of course, he is just biding his time until his plans in season 3 are ready, which upgrade him to a penthouse suite when he's under FBI house arrest, which also contains a secret room from which he can give orders to his henchmen. Eventually he's able to have nice furniture and art moved in to the point that it's as much a luxury apartment as his season 1 place, and the only thing keeping it from losing the status of being a "prison" altogether is the cameras...but even he has control over when they're recording. Karen lampshades it when visiting him:
    Karen Page: I suppose this qualifies as hard time?
    Wilson Fisk: Yes, I'm sure all of this is offensive to you, given our personal history.
    Karen Page: You mean the times you tried to have me killed.
    Wilson Fisk: Crimes for which I'm still paying.
  • Made of Iron: Even after surviving his getaway truck overturning and bleeding from the head, Fisk is still lucid enough to make a run for it when he realizes Matt/Daredevil is after him. In the subsequent fight with Matt, he takes countless blows to the head from clubs, fists and feet and still keeps coming. Matt has to completely wear him out to put Fisk down for good.
  • Manipulative Bastard: Overlapping with his skill at being The Chessmaster, Fisk is just as good at manipulating people as he is at manipulating events. To family man Ray Nadeem, he appears as a contrite man pained by the loss of his true love. With Dex, he hits at very specific emotional beats while pulling strings that Dex can't see. It says something that at the start of Season 3, Dex is bullying Fisk and treating him with disdain. But five episodes later, when Fisk orders Dex to kill Karen to avenge Wesley's death, Dex regards the order like Fisk is a father he fears disappointing.
  • Might as Well Not Be in Prison at All: Even while imprisoned, Fisk still has people working for him, inside and out. Once Frank Castle is imprisoned as well, Fisk manages to play events so that Frank kills his competition, allowing Fisk to run Riker's with an iron fist. A lot of season 3 is also the result of long-term manipulations that Fisk began before or while he was in prison.
  • Moral Myopia: Is perfectly willing to kill anyone who crosses him along with everyone they care about. However, whenever someone close to him, be it his mother or Vanessa, is hurt or threatened, he treats it as though it is completely unforgivable.
  • Never Got to Say Goodbye: Invoked. When Fisk begs to say goodbye to Vanessa one last time before being detained at the end of Season 3, his crimes up to that point (including Nadeem's death) have been so atrocious that Brett denies his final request.
  • Never My Fault: Fisk rants to Matt in the Season 1 finale, during his Villainous Breakdown, that it's his fault that Fisk lost his empire. While it is true that Matt is the driving force, both as Nelson & Murdock and as the Devil of Hell's Kitchen, that leads to Fisk getting arrested, this is ignoring that the major factors that put Fisk in that situation are his own temper tantrums (his murdering Leland being the tipping point as it leads to Hoffman being rescued, causing Hoffman to testify against Fisk).
  • Nice to the Waiter: Fisk gives a heavy tip to the maitre'd who accommodates his second date with Vanessa, knows the first name of the head of his security detail (Francis), and is always respectful to James Wesley and Felix Manning.
  • No Historical Figures Were Harmed:
    • As this article explains, season 1 Fisk is partially based on Robert Moses. note 
    • Maybe intentionally, maybe not, but several people have noticed similarities between him and several real-life criminals who were as powerful, cunning and ruthless as he was, such as Al Capone and Pablo Escobar.
  • No-Holds-Barred Beatdown: After Anatoly embarrasses him during his date with Vanessa, he savagely beats him to death and keeps going until he decapitates him using his car door. He also gives one to Matt after he is weakened from the fight against Nobu. He gives one again to the restrained Frank in the prison, though Frank is tough enough to remain conscious after the thrashing.
  • Non-Action Big Bad: Zig-Zagged. Fisk is very hands-off, and generally has others do his dirty work for him, unless he's in a really bad mood and it's for very personal reasons. At which point he's more than willing to dirty his own hands. The only five times he's personally killed someone rather than have someone else do it, they've all been for personal reasons: his father (for beating his mother with a belt), Vladimir Ranskahov (for crashing his date with Vanessa), Ben Urich (for visiting Fisk's mother), Leland Owlsley (for poisoning Vanessa), and Agent Weller (for being the unfortunate agent to inform him that Dex has failed at killing Karen to avenge Wesley).
    • In season 3, Fisk is under house arrest and it's gambits he's been planning while behind bars that are the main hurdle for Matt and friends to tackle, with Dex as his main enforcer. The only fight scenes he ends up having are his staged shanking by Jasper Evans, and the three-way at the end with Matt and Dex.
  • Not So Different: Fisk claims this about himself and Daredevil, though Matt aggressively denies it.
    Fisk: You and I have a lot in common.
    Matt: We're nothing alike.
  • Obfuscating Stupidity: Downplayed. Fisk pretends to not understand Chinese or Japanese for several episodes before Madame Gao, who herself is revealed to be fluent in English, breaks the illusion to prove she knows the value of seeming simple.
  • Omniglot: Fisk understands several languages very well, but his own vocabulary is somewhat limited and his diction poor, even with his stutter.
  • One Head Taller: His towering figure is pretty obvious when he stands up after Karen provokes him with the details of Wesley's death.
  • Out of Focus: During Season 2, while he's in prison.
  • Overarching Villain: Fisk is the overall main antagonist of Daredevil, with every conflict Matt has tying back to him one way or another.
  • Pay Evil unto Evil: Fisk gets people to do things for him through blackmail and threatening their loved ones. That's how Matt defeats him: by threatening to have Vanessa sent to prison for ordering the murder of Ray Nadeem if he ever hurts anyone again.
  • Pet the Dog: In Season 3, after listening to Mrs. Falb's Dark and Troubled Past, he allows her to keep the painting he was obsessed to get back. Too bad Dex later undoes this by going behind his back and killing her for it anyways.
  • Pragmatic Villainy: Fisk knows when to push ahead (like when he finally takes up a public persona when Matt is about to expose him as a criminal mastermind) and when to fall back to best benefit him; for example, he has Karen Page spared once the Union Allied pension laundering goes public, rather than have her killed like McClintock, Rance and Farnum, on the grounds that what she knows is already in the papers, so there's no point in killing her and leaving a possible trail back to him. He's also very apt in manipulating his enemies against each other to avoid having to tie up loose ends himself. If relationships with an ally are on the rocks, Fisk generally tries to handle things through diplomacy and offers of support, only escalating to physical violence when those don't work out.
  • Psychopathic Manchild: Vincent D'Onofrio himself describes Fisk as "a child and a monster". It's implied that in many ways, Fisk is still stuck at the age of twelve when he killed his father. Much like his archnemesis Matt Murdock, he's very childish in terms of his vision to improve Hell's Kitchen and New York City, especially considering that having the mob on his side is not the best way to improve the city.
    Fisk: "I wanted to make this city something better than it is, something beautiful. YOU TOOK THAT AWAY FROM ME! YOU TOOK EVERYTHING! I'M GONNA KILL YOU!"
  • Psychotic Smirk: He sports one while watching a wall of TV monitors all tuned to news stations covering Dex's attack on the Bulletin.
  • Rogues Gallery Transplant: Downplayed. Fisk is naturally well-known for being Daredevil's arch-nemesis like he is here, but the comics character is equally well-known, and was even originally introduced as, a Spider-Man villain. However, this version of Fisk has never encountered Peter Parker in any way.
  • Sharp-Dressed Man: He has a walk-in closet full of stylish suits, shirts, and accessories.
  • Signature Move: His head appears to be made of iron.
  • A Sinister Clue: Fisk is, much like his actor, left-handed. note 
  • Small Role, Big Impact: Within Season 2, Fisk only appears in two full episodes, but he also plays a major role in the breakup of Nelson & Murdock by manipulating Frank Castle into throwing his trial, and is responsible for the Blacksmith's death due to arranging Castle's escape.
  • The Sociopath: By the start of season 3, prison has hardened Fisk into a callous, ruthless, greedy, power-hungry, Machiavellian, remorseless, cold, sociopath. Having given up on his old ambitions, he cares solely about attaining money and power, getting revenge upon the people who had wronged him, and being reunited with Vanessa. While in season 1 he shows reluctance and remorse about having innocent cops shot alongside Detective Blake, and in having Elena Cardenas killed as part of Nobu's trap for Matt, in season 3, Fisk is perfectly willing to have innocent people killed without a second thought if it benefits him, as shown with Karen's colleagues and with Julie Barnes. In short, his capacity for empathy has drained away, feels no remorse for any of his murders, and manipulates people like pawns, eventually proving that, by the end of the day, there's no place for emotions in his ambitions. Bear in mind, he's already quite violent and homicidal in season 1, seeing as he decapitates Anatoly for merely interrupting his dinner with Vanessa, and kills Ben Urich with his bare hands for speaking to his mother Marlene.
  • Soft-Spoken Sadist: Fisk always speaks quietly, sometimes even awkwardly, and can come across as a man not used to speaking publicly. Which makes any moment where he does erupt like a volcano more terrifying.
  • Star-Crossed Lovers: With Vanessa. Both he and Vanessa love each other dearly, but are constantly separated thanks to Fisk's actions jeopardizing his standing with the law. By the end of Season 3, Fisk is forced to sacrifice any chance of a happy life with Vanessa, as well as any chance of revenge on Matt, lest Matt go after Vanessa and incriminate her in Ray Nadeem's murder. In the end, Fisk begs for one last chance to say goodbye to his wife as Brett is taking him back into custody, but his crimes up to that point have robbed him of any sympathy the NYPD may have for him. His villainy robs him of even the chance to say goodbye.
  • Start of Darkness: As a child, Fisk killed his father in response to his acts of domestic abuse. It certainly doesn't help the fact that his father is the main reason for what he is today: a ruthless mob boss with anger issues and internal conflicts.
  • The Stool Pigeon: When introduced in Season 3, Fisk learns that Vanessa will face criminal charges as an accessory to his crimes in Season 1, which prompts him to turn state’s witness against other criminals and cut a deal with Agent Nadeem of the FBI, who becomes his handler. Of course, the reality is that in this arrangement, Fisk is the one who has all the power here, as he's using his control of the FBI to sell out criminal gangs that refuse to pay a protection tax to him.
  • Stout Strength: When he kills people himself, as opposed to having his henchmen do it, he prefers to use his own bare hands instead of a weapon, and very few people prove capable of escaping once he decides to do this. He doesn't have a bodybuilder's physique; indeed, he looks like a larger version of the pudgy boy he was. However, the second season shows him bench pressing roughly five hundred pounds.
  • Super Strength: While he falls short of what passes as superhuman by Marvel standards, Fisk is still far far stronger than the average human, being able to decapitate a man using a car door, lift a grown man above his head with ease, and his punches leave holes in a brick wall (though it caused him visible pain).
  • Then Let Me Be Evil: When his empire crumbles and the city that hailed him as a philanthropist turns on him, he undergoes a Heel Realization and declares that he will not be held back by noble intentions any longer. "I am the ill intent."
  • To the Pain: When Matt threatens to separate Fisk from Vanessa, he snaps his handcuffs, then proceeds to beat and throttle him while threatening in turn to destroy everything and everyone Matt cares about.
  • Took a Level in Badass: Come Season 2, prison has made Fisk more dangerous, and ruthless, even while imprisoned and almost bankrupt, as shown with his interaction with Frank Castle. Season 3 continues this, showing that he has fully grown into the Crazy-Prepared Manipulative Bastard that his comics counterpart is known for being.
  • Trademark Favorite Food: Fisk's favorite dessert is zuppa inglese, an Italian custard which his mother made all the time. He jokes that liking it a little too much probably resulted in his weight. He also begins every morning with an omelette for breakfast.
  • Tragic Keepsake: He wears his father's cuff-links, specifically the ones he wore the night Wilson killed him, as a reminder that he is not his father, and not cruel for the sake of cruelty. Vanessa encourages him to consider alternative pairs of cuff-links.
  • Tragic Villain: Despite being a hardened mob boss, Fisk has an internal conflict, as Madame Gao notices, and despite his awful actions, he's aware of this and is not something that makes him proud. It certainly doesn't help that he is vulnerable, childish, and has had a violent upbringing from his horrible father. Actually, he wants to be a better person than his father, and is willing to take Vanessa away from the mob. Furthermore, his opposition to Daredevil comes from both having different ideas of how to improve Hell's Kitchen. Fisk does monstrous things, but ultimately believes he is working for the greater good, with this belief inspiring several fiercely loyal associates. Introspective and emotionally complicated, his success as Matt's nemesis is due in large part to the fact that both of them are working to fix the city, but both also worry that they might be monsters.
  • Tranquil Fury: By Season 3, Fisk has almost conquered his notoriously uncontrollable temper, turning his moments of rage into this. When Karen taunts him about killing Wesley, it's almost shocking to see that he manages to keep a lid on his homicidal fury for even a few seconds whereas before he would have lunged at her immediately. Of course, in that case he might have been simply too paralyzed by rage to do anything. It's played straighter three episodes later, when he receives news from Agent Waller that Nadeem has aided in helping Karen escape Dex's assassination attempt in the church and is now in the wind; Fisk absorbs this and then calmly, even casually, asks Waller for his jacket. He waits patiently as Waller removes the jacket and hands it over. Fisk proceeds to wrap said jacket around Waller's head and beats him to death.
  • Unskilled, but Strong: Unlike his comics counterpart, Fisk has zero formal martial arts training and his climactic fight against Matt consists of throws, charges, and wild hay-makers. He's still a huge Lightning Bruiser, but he struggles to even land a punch on his opponent at the beginning of the fight. But once he gets his hands on you... SNAP!
  • Unstoppable Rage: While it actually either takes a lot of aggravation or the right triggers to set him off, once made angry he won't stop until the person who pissed him off is brutally killed, often by his own hand.
  • Use Your Head: Headbutting seems to be one of his favorite moves.
  • Used to Be a Sweet Kid: He was a shy kid who hated violence until his father's abuse of him and his mother drove him to commit patricide.
  • Utopia Justifies the Means: He wants to make Hell's Kitchen a beautiful, modern place. Unfortunately, his way to achieve that goal is not the cleanest way. Fisk believes his vision for the city is a good one, even though it displaces lots of poor people and he's making allies with powerful criminal organizations such as the Hand.
  • Villain in a White Suit: He wears white institutional apparel as a newcomer upon his arrival in prison, as new arrivals get. Midway through Season 3, after some heavy negotiating between his lawyers and the FBI to get his possessions returned, he starts wearing his trademark white business suits.
  • Villain with Good Publicity:
    • After spending half the season in the shadows, Fisk stops the heroes' attempts to expose him cold by going public as a generous philanthropist. This ruins their attempts to expose him, since now he has a sparkling image that's stronger than the secrets they were planning to tell. It lasts until the first season finale when Hoffman confesses and rats everyone out, exposing him and his crime organization.
    • In season 3, after using Dex to orchestrate a successful smear campaign against Daredevil, Fisk is able to get himself back into the public's good graces by pretending that everything that happened to him was a mere Frame-Up by the corrupt vigilante. It works so well that even the protesters who spend days outside his hotel demanding him to be send back to jail end up being swayed to his side. Fortunately, his stint as beloved celebrity doesn't last long before he is exposed again and ends up back in jail.
  • Villainous Breakdown:
    • The cool, collected mask starts to crack after he manipulates Matt into taking care of Nobu, and Owlsley and Gao start questioning his conviction. Breaks even further as in the span of a day, Vanessa is poisoned, Wesley is killed, and he discovers his associates were behind the poisoning. By the time Nelson & Murdock succeed in exposing him, he's reduced to a raging, ranting mess striking out at anything and everything - though no less dangerous for the loss of control.
    • When he allows Karen into his penthouse to speak to him, the conversation starts very civil, but he quickly loses his composure as she rubs the details of how she shot Wesley to death in his face.
  • Villainous Friendship: He and Wesley seem to be genuine friends who care about each other just as Matt and Foggy do, enough that Fisk is willing to put out a hit on Karen when she taunts him with the details of how she killed him. He and Madame Gao seem to have some sort of friendship as well, albeit one laced with ruthlessness and threats, though that ends on his end when he discovers she and Owlsley betrayed him - ostensibly for his own good.
  • Villainous Gentrification: His goal is to turn the blocks of Hell's Kitchen he acquires (except for the building given over to the Hand) into luxury condos, which the original tenants can never hope to afford.
  • Villain in a White Suit: Once he obtains a new wardrobe midway through season 3, the only thing he wears are his comics counterpart's white suits.
  • Villains Out Shopping: In his spare time he's in his own penthouse cooking omelette for breakfast or touring art galleries.
  • Visionary Villain: Fisk has grand plans for a new Hell's Kitchen once he and his partners take ownership. He believes he will save the city.
  • Vocal Dissonance: He's a hulking mob boss who kills with his bare hands, but his voice is a lot more higher than one would expect, especially when he shouts.
  • Well-Intentioned Extremist: Fisk honestly and truly believes that him being in control of crime in Hell's Kitchen will ultimately help with its recovery and that he can use his criminal enterprise to help make the city a better place in the long term despite immense damage in the short term. Deconstructed, in that while genuine he eventualy loses faith in himself and embraces being a villian. (see Tragic Villain)
  • White-Collar Crime: Wilson Fisk is no stranger to this, as Karen discovers that he has shell companies.
  • Wicked Cultured: Played with. Fisk certainly has an eye for the finer things (suits, abstract expressionist art), unlike his comics counterpart, he's much less of a gourmet; due to his reclusive and orderly nature, he ends up constantly eating the same food rather than developing a more sophisticated palate, and Wesley has to help him before his dinner dates by recommending certain vintages of wine.
  • Woobie, Destroyer of Worlds: He may be a crime lord and a murderer, but when you learn his backstory and how he became the way he is, you can't help but pity the poor bastard. In every scene where he isn't angry, Fisk looks perpetually sad, as if he's filled with extreme remorse over the monster he's become.
  • Worthy Opponent: Tells both Daredevil and Ben Urich that he respects the kind of men they are, admires their conviction and goals, and that he regrets having to take action against them. Though the actions he does take are no less ruthless for the respect he gives.
  • Would Hit a Girl: Fisk has ordered hits on Karen, Elena, and Julie when they posed threats to him or his goals. When Karen rubs the details of Wesley's death in his face, he stands up and looks prepared to beat her up, but the FBI intervene due to Foggy showing up. As a result, Fisk resorts to hiring Dex to kill her.
  • Would Hurt a Child: He's more than willing to threaten peoples' families to get their cooperation. He has one of Tammy Hattley's kids murdered and the death staged to look like a hit-and-run, then blackmailed Hattley into working for him by threatening to kill her other daughter. He similarly threatens this on Nadeem's wife and son, sending men to kill them after Nadeem goes rogue.
  • Xanatos Speed Chess: When Frank Castle is imprisoned, Fisk gives him an offer to kill Dutton, only to betray Castle and have all the man's thugs attack him. When Frank survives that, Fisk decides to change his plans, and actually arranges for Frank to be smuggled out of the prison disguised as a guard; figuring Castle will drive away the competition until Fisk inevitably leaves prison.
  • You Have Outlived Your Usefulness: It is his standard procedure to discard of people once they serve no further purpose, although he draws lines for it. Small loose ends and associates he thinks are scum are free game after their business is concluded (Rance, Farnum, McClintock, Jasper Evans), whereas people he actually respects tend to be safe unless they betray him (Owlsley).

    Vanessa Marianna 

Vanessa Marianna Fisk

https://static.tvtropes.org/pmwiki/pub/images/97b230ac985f2df278ed64602c04faa7.png
"We've been sitting here talking for hours and you're going to insult me like I have no idea what you really do?"

Portrayed By: Ayelet Zurer

Appearances: Daredevil

"People always ask me how can we charge so much for what amounts to gradations of white. I tell them it's not about the artist's name or the skill required, not even about the art itself. All that matters is 'How does it make you feel?'"

An art gallery owner who becomes romantically involved with Fisk.


  • Adaptational Villainy: In the comics, she has always been against Fisk's criminal activities, but here, she encourages him, and orders Ray Nadeem's murder.
  • All Girls Want Bad Boys: She decides that the fact that Fisk is dangerous is actually a plus. If nothing else, it means he will definitely keep her safe.
  • Ambiguously Evil: She doesn't do anything particularly evil by herself, but she's not against encouraging Fisk to fulfill his vision to gentrify Hell's Kitchen by any means necessary. By season 3, the ambiguity falls away as she is the one to order Ray Nadeem's death.
  • Bitch in Sheep's Clothing: She seems perfectly nice and sane, but some of her suggestions and encouragement of Fisk's criminal behavior certainly don't fit a sheep.
  • Dissonant Serenity: Borderlined Unusually Uninteresting Sight, she reunites with Fisk, who has taken over Manhattan's organized crime and a chunk of the feds (while a "prisoner"), in part, to get her back. Their reunion is surprisingly unemotional. Its even implied, once she leaves the room, they don’t have contact again for the rest of the night. Justified on account of her being jet-lagged and needing to rest.
  • Foil:
    • To Claire, as the other white-clad love interest of the story who knows about her beau's double life - the difference is that Claire is increasingly troubled by Matt's vigilantism (to the point of ending their relationship before it can really begin) while Vanessa is increasingly... not troubled by Fisk's criminal power-plays.
    • To Karen Page. Both are initially presented as naive characters, who end up getting pulled toward lives of darkness and moral grayness. They both find that they are able to live within this darkness, and gain personal empowerment through this discovery. They both place an emphasis on the truth– they try to uncover Fisk’s true nature, but from differing perspectives and with opposing outcomes. And Karen is attracted to Matt’s heroism, conviction, and “genuineness”, just as Vanessa is attracted to her perception of those qualities in Fisk.
  • Karma Houdini: As part of a deal with Fisk, she is allowed to remain free, as long as her husband stays in custody.
  • Lady Macbeth: Shows aspirations of becoming one. While Fisk's inner circle believes she makes him weak, this is only partially the case: Fisk neglects his business when her safety is threatened, but is otherwise spurred on by her. She fully becomes this by season 3, where she insists that Wilson allow her to fully be part of his life (including the criminal side), and one of the first things she does is order the assassination of Ray Nadeem.
  • Love Interest: To Wilson Fisk.
  • Morality Pet: Subverted, it initially seems like she's going to humanize Fisk, but if anything, their relationship and his desire to protect her from his criminal activities lead him to committing even more violent acts, which she encourages. Made clearer in Season 3, when Fisk, upon learning that Vanessa is going to be facing criminal charges as an accessory to his crimes, becomes an informant to Agent Nadeem, and agrees to rat out other criminals in exchange for her protection. However this is later revealed to be a long-term gambit by Fisk, and when they are reunited, she calls for the assassination of Nadeem to show she is fully committed to becoming Fisk's partner in crime.
  • Nice Job Fixing It, Villain!: She fancies herself Fisk's partner, and to her credit, Fisk considers her as such, but whereas he's a lifelong criminal mastermind she's merely a particularly savvy art dealer. Her first action as part of Fisk's criminal empire is to order that Ray Nadeem be killed. The fallout from Nadeem's death (his confession video going viral, and Matt indirectly finding out both Vanessa's role in the murder by torturing Felix Manning, as well as information that allows him to turn Dex against Fisk) dismantles Fisk's entire operation within a matter of days. Had she not been so bloodthirsty or eager to prove herself, Fisk would have gone ahead with his original plan to discredit Nadeem, a tactic which was working...but killing Nadeem meant that his dying confession video became admissible evidence in court.
  • Put on a Bus: Fisk arranges for Francis and some of his bodyguards to safely get Vanessa out of the country as he's being arrested. During Season 2, she's hiding out overseas, living off a special protection fund Fisk has set up for her with what assets of his weren't seized.
    • The Bus Came Back: She comes back towards the end of Season 3 as soon as Fisk's conviction is overturned.
  • Small Role, Big Impact: She's only in the last two episodes of season 3, yet she's also the biggest motivation for Fisk's actions throughout the entire season. And her decision to order Ray Nadeem's murder ends up undoing Fisk's criminal empire.
  • They Do: Marries Fisk in the Season 3 finale.
  • Yoko Oh No: Owlsley strongly dislikes the distracting effect she has on Fisk and tries to have her killed for it. invoked

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Lieutenants

    James Wesley 

James Wesley

https://static.tvtropes.org/pmwiki/pub/images/4257a8f99c1f76ea4026470f999ec468.png
"I'm curious about your...clientele. Do they all end up working for you after you get them off for murder or just the pretty ones?"

Portrayed By: Toby Leonard Moore

Appearances: Daredevil

"I mean, if he had an iron suit or a magic hammer, maybe that would explain why you keep getting your asses handed to you."

Fisk's right hand man during season 1. He is very much the face of the organization for a long time, but never lets anyone forget that he's not actually in charge.


  • Affably Evil: Wesley is even-headed, calm and soft-spoken and he doesn't hurt people unless he has to.
  • Aloof Leader, Affable Subordinate: Wesley is much more approachable than his boss. This is both because of how socially awkward Fisk is, but also because it allows Wesley to act as a buffer insulating Fisk from the grunts who carry out the dirty work on the street.
  • And Your Little Dog, Too!: He regularly threatens peoples' loved ones to get their cooperation.
  • Artistic License – Gun Safety: He leaves a loaded gun unattended and within arm's reach of Karen as an Implied Death Threat. This ends up causing his death instead.
  • Ascended Extra: His comic counterpart is a rather minor character from the "Born Again" story. Here, Wesley is practically the beating heart of Fisk's entire operation.
  • Book-Ends: Wesley's first scene has him ordering a guard who owes money to Fisk to carry out a hit on Karen Page by threatening the guard's family. In his last scene, Karen Page kills him after he threatens her friends.
  • The Chessmaster: He might not be the guy at the top, but he largely serves as the brains behind Fisk's operations and is heavily responsible in orchestrating events and manipulating other characters.
  • Composite Character: He also carries role of Oswald Silkworth, also known as the Arranger, who would arrange Wilson Fisk's day in order to give Fisk free time.
  • The Consigliere: Besides serving as Fisk's mouthpiece, Wesley also handles Fisk's personal affairs, like his scheduling.
  • Didn't Think This Through: Wesley has Karen sedated and threatens her with a loaded gun he leaves on a table between them. While he keeps the pistol closer to him than to her, he focuses on her friends and family rather than the immediate risk of him killing her. While he implies he knows everything about her past in both threatening her acquaintances and in how he offers her a job, he's completely oblivious to the fact she's been drinking so heavily recently, despite Foggy saying she smells like a distillery. Alcoholics are more resistant to sedatives, and Wesley's reliance on Karen's diminished state, not to mention failure to do a deep enough background check to know about what she did in Fagan Corners, is what gets him killed.
  • Deadpan Snarker: Wesley could fill a whole book.
    • He dryly jokes to Vladimir and Anatoly that their issues would be more understandable if some guy in an iron suit or magic hammer was beating the shit out of their goons, instead of some guy in a mask.
    • When ordering Hoffman to kill Blake:
      Carl Hoffman: Out of turn? You shot him.
      James Wesley: Technically, we paid someone else to shoot him.
  • Dissonant Serenity: He's completely calm and composed even while Fisk beats Anatoly to death. Leland finds him unsettling half the time.
  • The Dragon: Wesley is Fisk's personal assistant, organizing his empire, meeting with business partners, and even doing dirty work without being asked to. He and Felix Manning are also Fisk's only actual friends (outside of Vanessa), as Fisk takes it really hard when Karen kills him.
  • Equal-Opportunity Evil: When Wesley pretends not to know where Anatoly is, he asks Vladimir whether his brother might have "a girl - or a boy - he might be celebrating with" without any apparent prejudice. Of course, in the same conversation he also pretends with a smile on his face that his boss didn't just murder Anatoly with his bare hands and a car door, so whether his words have anything to do with his convictions is another question.
  • Establishing Character Moment: Wesley is introduced by walking up to Clyde Farnum, who owes money to a boss recently "retired" by Fisk. He sits down, casually rattles off the amount of money Farnum owes them, shows him a live feed of his daughter on a tablet and the assassin sitting not ten yards from her, and gets Farnum to carry out a hit on Karen Page in exchange for his debts being forgiven. Not once does his voice raise above casual talk and he stays very polite about the entire affair.
  • The Face: He's the one who specifically goes out and does Fisk's dirty work for him. Up until Fisk comes out of the shadows, it's likely most of those in Fisk's organization have only spoken to him and not Fisk.
  • Face Death with Dignity: He doesn't even raise his voice or break into a nervous sweat when Karen gets ahold of his gun.
  • Foil: To Shades Alvarez. Both function as competent sidekicks to their volatile crime bosses (Fisk and Mariah), and both also have close, personal ties with their employers as well. Their main difference being that Wesley puts his boss before himself whereas Shades breaks things off with Mariah when she goes too far.
  • Four Eyes, Zero Soul: Wesley's flat tone of voice, his flat expressions, and his glasses, are used to great effect.
  • The Heavy: In the first three episodes, Wesley is the more present antagonist than Fisk. While he makes very clear from the onset that he's only Fisk's mouthpiece, he is the one setting most of the story's plot points in motion. Many things are, in fact, a result of Wesley's own individual decision-making.
  • Honest Advisor: At times. Fisk trusts him to tell it like it is and even do what's best for his organization in situations where he cannot.
  • Hyper-Competent Sidekick: Played with. Fisk is by no means incompetent, but Wesley is typically the one who runs his business being exceptional at taking charge and manipulating people. While Fisk is quite cunning and tactical in his own right, he isn't as good with people as Wesley is and has a habit of losing his temper, while Wesley keeps his cool at all times.
  • Insistent Terminology: He's very insistent on only ever referring to Fisk as "my employer" in conversations with underlings so they don't know who the real shotcaller in charge is. It's such an engrained habit he even finds himself needlessly using this terminology well after Fisk has gone public.
  • Karmic Death: He's introduced threatening Farnum into trying to kill Karen in her jail cell. It's Karen who kills him in the end.
  • Large and in Charge: Not as much as Fisk, but he's 6'2" and has a fairly muscular build.
  • Last-Name Basis: People primarily address Wesley by his last name.
  • Like a Son to Me: Fisk drops the trope name word-for-word when revealing to Dex that this is how he felt about Wesley, before dispatching Dex to kill Karen and avenge him.
  • Mouth of Sauron: He transmits orders from Fisk early on, and most people have only ever spoken to him, never meeting Fisk at all.
  • Named by the Adaptation: Only his last name was known in the comics. In the 2003 film, Wesley was his first name rather than his last (the full name being Wesley Owen Welch, which actually was a plot point).
  • Nerves of Steel: Credit where it's due, even after Karen gets ahold of his gun, he doesn't even blink. He calmly tries to bluff her into thinking it's not loaded. It doesn't save him.
  • Noble Top Enforcer: He's Fisk's closest, if not only friend.
  • Non-Action Guy: He speaks several languages, can do accounting as well as handle criminal affairs, break people by talking to them and he serves as a very capable personal assistant. He also can fire a gun, as he and Francis do when Matt is escaping from them after his bouts with Nobu and with Fisk. But he makes the mistake of lowering himself to grunt work by abducting and subsequently threatening Karen without taking guards with him. Leaving a loaded gun on the table within her reach is a mistake few of his more battle-hardened subordinates would have made and she kills him as a result of this.
  • Not So Stoic: Actually looks shocked when Karen shoots him.
  • Only Friend: From what we see, Wesley is the only genuine friend Fisk has. Enough that Fisk is willing to order a revenge hit on Karen when she rubs the details of how she killed Wesley in his face.
  • Only Sane Man: Everyone in Fisk's organization has some vendetta or shade of insanity; even Fisk gets caught up in romance more than business. But Wesley? Pragmatic to a tee. It helps that he's very savvy.
  • Pre-Asskicking One-Liner: On behalf of Fisk, to Anatoly-
    "He'd like a word with you."
  • Sacrificial Lion: His death signals the point Fisk is truly desperate and resorting to increasingly brutal methods as a result.
  • Scary Shiny Glasses: On and off, especially when he threatens Karen from the shadows.
  • Shipper on Deck: Encourages Fisk's relationship with Vanessa, such as recommending good wines to impress her and bringing her to Fisk when Fisk is in a bad mood after being threatened by Madame Gao. He is noticeably the only other person in Fisk's organization who approves of it.
  • The Sociopath: While Wesley does have people he cares about, such as Fisk, he has a very cold detachment that makes it chillingly easy for him to do terrible things.
  • The Stoic: While Wesley can come across as even-tempered and friendly in a business-like way, in reality, there's a disquieting lack of emotion to him. Scenes where he's watching graphic violence or even when he's threatened with death, are met with a calm unemotive demeanor.
  • Tactful Translation: Quite often with Nobu and Gao such as "he does not like the accommodations" after a long and angry sounding rant. Nobu eventually threatens to cut his tongue out the next time he tries to water something down.
  • Two First Names: James and Wesley are both employed as first names.
  • Verbal Tic: He has such a habit of insisting that Wilson Fisk is referred to as his "employer" rather than by name that he finds himself doing it in needless situations, long after everyone knows who he is.
  • Undying Loyalty: Wesley's loyal to a fault to Fisk, and won't admit betrayal.
  • Villain Ball: Leaves a loaded gun within hand's reach of Karen, and is surprised when she ends up grabbing it when he's distracted by an incoming phone call and shooting him with it after he makes death threats towards Matt and Foggy.
  • Villainous Friendship: He legitimately cares about Fisk's well being on a friendly level, to the point of playing Shipper on Deck because he knows Vanessa makes him happy.
  • Wicked Cultured: Recommends excellent wines to his boss. Also sports a fancy Cartier wristwatch.
  • Would Hit a Girl: Is introduced strong-arming Farnum into carrying out a hit on Karen, and later kidnaps Karen trying to intimidate her.
  • Wrong Genre Savvy: He trips up when dealing with Karen. He believes that she's someone who can be cowed with threats and promises. Having been framed up, attacked, and almost killed (the latter two on Wesley's orders), Karen grabs his gun and shoots him to death.

    Big Ben Donovan 
See the New York City page

    Stewart Finney 

Stewart Finney

https://static.tvtropes.org/pmwiki/pub/images/stewart_finney_mcu.jpg

Portrayed By: Korey Jackson

Appearances: Daredevil

A former accountant who was arrested and housed with violent offenders after pissing off the wrong person. He helps Fisk get the lay of the land and assists him in consolidating power on the inside.


  • Corrupt Corporate Executive: He was a mortgage analyst on the outside who skimmed from his clients.
  • The Dragon: Becomes one for Fisk in jail, keeping tabs on the other inmates and providing him with information.
  • Four Eyes, Zero Soul: Well he does sport glasses, which makes this trope seem to be in place.
  • Mugging the Monster: He ended up locked in with hardened murderers like Fisk and Dutton because he double-crossed the brother of a very influential Justice Department official.
  • Not So Different: He connects with Fisk by appealing to him as a businessman and their shared belief that they are superior to the violent criminals they're incarcerated with.
  • Put on a Bus: Or rather, left behind on the bus. He isn't seen at all during Season 3 despite being Fisk's prison Number Two; it seems Fisk left him behind.
  • Replacement Goldfish: Given what he used to be on the outside, he is more or less a replacement for Owlsley.

    Felix Manning 

Felix Manning

https://static.tvtropes.org/pmwiki/pub/images/vlcsnap_2018_11_08_01h02m15s977.jpg
"Answer my question, please. Do you understand your situation?"

Portrayed by: Joe Jones

Appearances: Daredevil (2015)

“Off the record, you are incorrect. About what I do for a living. I don't fix problems. I make them disappear.”

Fisk's outside fixer in season 3.


  • Ascended Extra: Like James Wesley before him, Felix Manning was a very minor character in the "Born Again" story, who stood out for his overly eloquent pattern of speaking, and both were killed in a shootout with Karen's pimp Paolo outside Foggy's apartment. Here, Felix is a high-ranking member of Fisk's empire.
  • Adaptational Nationality: Felix in the original comics was American. Felix in the show is British.
  • Affably Evil: Felix is rarely anything other than perfectly polite.
  • Dirty Coward: Subverted, he tries his best to remain uncooperative when Matt hunts him down after Nadeem's death, but finally cracks once Matt subjects him to the extreme torture of a High-Altitude Interrogation.
  • Evil Brit: He's a Brit with the looks of an elderly Daniel Craig, and he works for Fisk.
  • The Fixer: He works as one for Fisk, but Felix doesn't seem to like the term all that much. He says that he doesn't fix Fisk's problems; he makes them disappear.
  • The Handler: Among the many jobs that Fisk assigns Felix to do, he serves as Dex's handler. He picks Dex up from his apartment to take him to Melvin Potter's for outfitting, and is also the one to report Dex's activities to Fisk.
  • High-Altitude Interrogation: Matt dangles him from a roof to get him to admit that it was Vanessa who ordered Nadeem's assassination.
  • Morally Bankrupt Banker: He moves Fisk's money through Red Lion National Bank.
  • Remember the New Guy?: Dialogue between Fisk and Felix implies that Felix had been working for Fisk before he was arrested, and had been looking after Vanessa while Fisk was in prison, though had not been so much as mentioned in seasons 1 or 2.
  • Replacement Goldfish: Serves Fisk as one to both Wesley and Owlsley, having taken up Wesley's duties of relaying orders to Fisk's underlings and threatening people to get their cooperation, as well as laundering Fisk's money through Red Lion Bank, which used to be Owlsley's job.
  • Sharp-Dressed Man: He dresses in crisp three piece suits, as befitting a man of such a high position in Fisk's organization.
  • Undying Loyalty: He's one of the few people in season 3 who are loyal to Fisk out of respect and not thanks to intimidation or bribery.
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    Benjamin "Dex" Poindexter 

Special Agent Benjamin "Dex" Poindexter / Daredevil

https://static.tvtropes.org/pmwiki/pub/images/poindexter_benjamin.jpg
"If I was wearing a mask, the press would be calling me a hero. Instead I'm sitting in here trying to justify defending myself."
Click here to see his phony Daredevil costume 

Portrayed By: Wilson Bethel

Appearances: Daredevil (2015)

"FBI and the army before that, they helped keep me on the straight and narrow path. But now... without that it's all... I'm drowning in deep water and I don't know whether I'm swimming through the surface or the bottom."

A SWAT sniper on the detail protecting Wilson Fisk.


  • Adaptational Heroism: In the comics, Bullseye was a Psycho for Hire from the off, never had any sort of career in law enforcement (though he potentially was an NSA contractor) and showed zero inner conflict. Here, Dex is an FBI agent (albeit a Cowboy Cop) and while he's most certainly still psychotic, he has a desire to fix it and takes steps to deal with his disorder, which causes him no shortage of pain.
  • Adapted Out: Unlike his comics counterpart, his skeleton is not laced with Adamantium due to those rights being with Fox's X-Men Film Series at the time that Daredevil season 3 was filmed. Nevertheless The Stinger in the final episode shows him getting Cogmium steel reinforcements for his broken vertebrae.
  • Adaptation Name Change: Comics Bullseye has no known real name; the closest we ever get is "Lester". And "Benjamin Poindexter" is just one of his preferred aliases, not his legal name.
  • And I Must Scream: By the end of the season, he's had his spine broken and he's been left in the care of an unknown party that performs a surgical experiment on him. While he's conscious.
  • Arch-Enemy: Dex becomes this for Matt when Dex murders Father Lantom in front of him.
  • Ax-Crazy: Not only does he have severe mental issues, he doesn't need much incentive to kill.
  • Badass Normal: He doesn't have any explicit superpowers, yet is able to overpower Matt (who admittedly is still recovering from all the abuse he went through in The Defenders) using his skills and fighting prowess alone.
  • Big Bad Ensemble: While he serves as The Dragon to Fisk throughout season three, once Dex finds out Fisk had Julie murdered he completely snaps and turns on him, becoming an independent threat for the finale. While Fisk and Matt's rivalry still has the spotlight, Matt is equally focused on stopping Dex from inacting his revenge.
  • The Brute: Fisk corrupted him into his personal attack dog, which came back to bite Fisk in the ass in the season finale.
  • Blood Knight: It's clear that when worked up, he loves a good fight when the opportunity arises.
  • The Bully: Dex gets his kicks where he can get them, and that means lording whatever power he has over whoever has less. He even pettily torments Fisk while he's under house arrest by taking a bite out of Fisk's burger.
  • Catchphrase: "That's hard. Really hard" is his go-to response whenever he's told about someone suffering, simply because he genuinely doesn't understand how he should react, but on the advice of his therapist has found a phrase that will let him (just about) function in society.
  • Charles Atlas Superpower: His throwing power comes from an obsessive amount of practice since he was young. He fervently believed that if he could perfectly throw a baseball his parents would come back.
  • Clothes Make the Superman: The fact that Dex wears an armored Daredevil suit when acting as Fisk's assassin, while Matt has gone back to his original off-the-shelf ski mask and black sweater, significantly helps level the playing field between the two of them.
  • Cowboy Cop: Dex is a bloodthirsty and sadistic man, and his badge gives him license to indulge in his violent tendencies. His appointed FBI therapist remarks that he's used lethal force before, but Dex is agitated that cops like him get condemned by the press for using self-defense whereas vigilantes like Daredevil get cheered on for doing the same.
    Dex: If I was wearing a mask, the press would be calling me a hero. Instead I'm sitting in here with you having to justify defending myself!
  • Cold Sniper: He's an FBI sniper, although he doesn't do any sniper jobs for Fisk.
  • Composite Character: Fisk manipulates Dex in ways that seem akin to how he manipulates Nuke in the "Born Again" story, especially with the speeches he gives about how Dex “sacrifices for his country” and “nobody appreciates him for it”. He also takes the role of the Daredevil imposter from the story.
  • Comic Book Movies Dont Use Code Names: Dex never goes by his alias name "Bullseye", but we do see it alluded to twice: Coach Bradley is wearing a hat bearing the image when young Dex murders him, and we see a "bullseye" in Dex's iris when he is being experimented on at the very end of the series.
  • The Corruptible: Wilson Fisk exploits his need for recognition and a North Star to turn him into his crazed assassin.
  • Creepy Child: He was a very unsettling little boy. He ultimately kills the one adult in his life who encouraged and mentored him, for essentially no reason... and subsequently showed zero remorse.
  • Crippling Overspecialization: Dex's marksman skills are superb, as he can make any object, regardless of how harmless it is, into a lethal—or at the very least, painful—thrown weapon. However, while his close range hand to hand fighting skills aren't horrible, and his durability is impressive enough to enable him to survive hits from Matt and later Fisk, his actual moveset is limited and he has to resort to either finding a surrounding object to throw or wield or he can use or block the barrage of blows thrown his way.
  • Dark and Troubled Past: His parents died at a young age, and according to him, they were "always mad" before they died. He was then sent to an orphanage, spending much of his time entirely alone.
  • Disproportionate Retribution: He killed his baseball coach for benching him, along with telling him a harsh truth that no amount of skill at the game would bring his parents back. He also wanted to kill his therapist for dying of cancer, as he saw it as her abandonning him.
  • The Dragon: Fisk crafts him into his personal enforcer and hitman, and he spends most of the season posing as Daredevil to tarnish his reputation.
  • Driven to Suicide: He's on the verge of doing this after he is made a scapegoat by the FBI when their investigation into his conduct in killing the Albanian hit squad after Fisk is leaked to the press (by Fisk) and he is put on administrative leave. Feeling betrayed, he is going to shoot himself on his kitchen table before getting a phone call from Fisk, who had orchestrated Dex's suspension and has Felix Manning waiting outside Dex's apartment to take him to the tailor to be outfitted for a Daredevil costume.
  • Dude, Where's My Respect?: Fisk is able to get inside Dex's head because he's the first person who's actually shown admiration for Dex's talents, as he's been driven to be a very bitter and jaded person by the various mentors, institutions, and other figures that he has trusted who have all abandoned him for one reason or another.
  • Establishing Character Moment: When Fisk's armored convoy transporting him to a safehouse is ambushed by an Albanian hit squad that incapacitates and/or kills the rest of the FBI agents in the transport, Dex manages to singlehandedly dispatch every assassin with quick and meticulous accuracy, which is what ultimately leads Fisk to take interest in his skills. He also murders a couple of surrendering gunmen using pieces of a dissassembled gun, showing off his ability to use improvised weapons.
  • Even Evil Has Loved Ones:
    • He is genuinely deeply attached to his therapist and is utterly heartbroken by her death. While he expresses this in violent ways (saying he wants to kill her to punish her for leaving him, even when he intellectually knows it's not her fault), his pain is genuine.
    • He tries this again with Julie, and even though he proves completely incapable of a personal relationship with her, he truly recognizes and respects her goodness, and however messed-up his feelings for her are, they are certainly genuine, to the point that Fisk has her killed because she's too positive an influence on Dex.
  • Even Evil Has Standards: Subverted, and in direct contrast to Fisk. Fisk clearly won’t take a painting from a family affected by the Holocaust. Dex has no problems killing the remaining family members for it. He does this without Fisk’s knowledge, and Fisk is understandably disturbed to find the painting in his living room. This pretty much draws a line of separation between Fisk’s ambitions, and Dex’s complete lack of morals.
  • Evil Counterpart: To Matt Murdock. Both lost their parents at a young age albeit through different circumstances, both of them work for law enforcement, and they constantly suffer life crisis'. However, Matt found other parental figures in Father Lantom and Stick, whom while none of them were perfect, did care for Matt in their own ways. Whereas Dex lost both his parents, killed his own mentor in a fit of rage, and everyone else he cared about died off, none of whom were nearly as sketchy as Matt's familial ties. Matt is also a respected lawyer and despite defending a few questionable clients, stays true to his morals, is mostly well liked by the authorities, and does the right thing for the most part. Dex however is an FBI agent who is constantly looked down upon by his superiors for his brutality until they are all either killed off or turned dirty by Fisk and expresses fierce jealousy towards vigilantes, which ultimately turns him dirty and corrupts him into Fisk's personal hitman. However, their fighting styles are completely different: Matt focuses on his fists, specializing in close quarters combat and uses boxing just like his late father, and even though he does show he have some long-range skills, it's more of an improvised backup and even then, it's limited and he's only decent at it. Dex meanwhile is more of a marksman and unlike Matt, can use pretty much anything he grabs his hands on as a weapon, and while he is more than capable of holding his own during a brawl, he is at a significant disadvantage and has to resort to more defensive measures via constant blocking or find something he can throw. In many ways, Dex is what Matt Murdock would have become if he wasn't able to control his bloodlust and became a sociopathic killer instead of a fighter for justice.
    • Also to Wilson Fisk. Dex and Fisk each have some Ambiguous Disorder, but Fisk is absolutely a loving member of his family and devoted to the ideal of helping his community while Dex is The Sociopath who enjoys bullying people and has no qualms about killing people, even doing so for the pettiest reasons. However, Fisk has embraced his role as the villain and declared Then Let Me Be Evil, while Dex has spent his life desperately trying to find a Morality Pet to help him be a good person. Hell, Dex's apartment is entirely decked out in black, white, and gray, just like Fisk's.
  • Evil Is Petty: Dex takes a lot of pleasure in bullying others, including Fisk. He takes a bite out of the big man's burger just so he can watch how he reacts. He's openly disappointed when Fisk just cuts away the bite and eats the burger without emotional response.
  • Expy: He has a job in law enforcement, is explicitly identified as a sociopath mimicking human empathy, and his name even has "Dexter" in it.
  • False Flag Operation: Fisk directs him to commit crimes in a replica of the Daredevil armor to turn public opinion against Matt.
  • Final Boss: He's one of the final enemies Matt must defeat in the final showdown, along with Wilson Fisk.
  • Foil: When finally joining Fisk, Dex becomes a contrast to James Wesley. Both served as a chief enforcer to Fisk, with Dex even telling Vanessa to consider him "the new James Wesley" when they meet. However, Fisk and Wesley's friendship was entirely genuine on both sides, with Fisk beating Francis to within an inch of his life for not being there to protect Wesley, and ordering a hit on Karen when he finds out, while Dex is merely a tool he is perfectly willing to manipulate and later discard. While Wesley is no physical threat and has others do Fisk's brute work, he is more mentally stable and competent with enforcing Fisk's demands, while Dex is more impulsive and becomes increasingly desperate and accident-prone as he struggles to gain Fisk's approval and avoid his wrath, which further leads to his downfall.
  • Glass Cannon: Downplayed. Dex is by all means a skilled hand-to-hand fighter who can hold his own against Matt in close quarters combat, but it's clear his specialty lies in ranged weaponry.
  • Hair-Trigger Temper: It really doesn't take much to piss Dex off. Not unexpected of course, since he has BPD.
  • The Heavy: Dex is responsible for both major character deaths (Father Lantom and Ray Nadeem) in season 3, as well as a large number of minor character killings or hospitalizations (Ellison, Jasper Evans, etc).
  • Improbable Aiming Skills: Dex is a very skilled sharpshooter, and is downright uncanny with thrown weapons, two very different skills. He can hurl pencils with such force that they impact with the strength of thrown daggers, and is able to bounce bullets and other objects off of items that deflect them into their intended targets. His first fight with Matt at the Bulletin sees him also turn practically anything that isn't tied down to the floor into a weapon. When going after Karen and Matt at the church, he turns rosary beads into projectiles and collection plates into deadly boomerangs.
  • Improbable Weapon User: Pencils, scissors, snow globes, light ornaments, and rosary beads to name a few. If it's not tied to the floor, and can be thrown with one hand, he will use it with lethal accuracy.
  • Improvised Weapon: If it can be thrown, anything is a deadly weapon in his hands.
  • In Love with Love: He makes it clear he has no real physical attraction to Julie, he just wants her as a Morality Pet. He can fake the idea that they are a couple but the truth is that he just wants a good person to praise him when he tries doing good.
  • Inexplicably Awesome: While the series does a good job of setting up his impressive accuracy, Dex's general fantastic combat ability is left more in the air. Matt was trained by the Chaste since he was a child and, by the time he faces Dex, has already been proven as a match for any of the Five Fingers of the Hand, the Iron Fist or the Black Sky; all of whom have superhuman abilities, as does Matt himself, though of a more passive nature. Dex still defeats him twice over the course of the season and, during the three way fight in the finale, it's pretty clear that he would have been able to kill both Matt and Fisk if he hadn't been distracted by his obsession with killing Vanessa as revenge for Julie. All this despite nothing stating that he has any combat training beyond the standard for a soldier and an FBI agent, nor any superhuman ability.
    Matt: He didn't just find someone to wear my suit. He found someone as fast and skilled as I've ever seen, and I couldn't take him. He found someone to kill me!
  • The Insomniac: He tends to have trouble sleeping due to the voices in his head.
  • It's All About Me: Much of his instability seems to stem from being so narcissistic, even as a child, that he becomes violent to the point of homicidal if the world cannot live up to his self-entered expectations of it.
  • It's Personal with the Dragon: Played with. Matt and Fisk are genuine Arch Enemies dating back to Season 1. But Dex makes the conflict between him and Matt very personal after murdering Father Lantom.
  • Kick the Dog: As a kid he used to torture and kill animals; it required a lot of therapy sessions for him to stop.
  • Kick the Son of a Bitch: He shoots a couple of surrendering gunmen...who had just gunned down five of his fellow agents in cold blood. Hard to feel bad for them.
  • Lack of Empathy: He has so little empathy for others that he has to be taught how to fake it.
  • Lean and Mean: He has a slender (but muscular) build, and is as dangerous as they come.
  • Long-Range Fighter: Dex can hold his own mostly, but even when not in top shape Matt still has the edge over him in hand-to-hand. However, Dex absolutely dominates at long range, whether with firearms or improvised weaponry.
  • Meaningful Name: "Poindexter" in popular culture has come to mean "a boring nerd". Its original Old French meaning was "poing destre" - "right fist". Dex is both a socially awkward and obsessive individual and Fisk's carefully cultivated right-hand hitman.
  • Morality Chain: Dr. Mercer told him that he needed a constant "North Star" to keep him morally on-balance and guide him. After her death, he spends much of his adulthood fixating on finding another north star, which leads to him stalking an old work acquaintance.
  • Mundane Made Awesome: One of his common attacks is picking up everyday objects and throwing them at people. In his first fight with Matt, he uses random objects with terrifying effectiveness. Matt is knocked out of the air and hit in the face multiple times, even while behind cover.
  • Mythology Gag: His assumption of the Daredevil identity (and Matt's renewed use of the Bullseye-like plain black costume) calls back a brief era at the end of the Ann Nocenti run where he impersonated Daredevil of his own accord and Matt had to snap him out of it by dressing as Bullseye.
    • As a kid, his ball cap had a target similar to Bullseye's insignia stitched onto it.
  • Never My Fault: Refuses to admit to doing anything wrong during the convoy ambush, even though two of them had their hands behind their heads, obviously having surrendered. He'd rather blame the vigilantes for getting away with what he can't.
  • No Celebrities Were Harmed: His backstory (working at a suicide hotline and shadowing Julie) gives him shades of serial killer Ted Bundy.
  • Not Wearing Tights: He never wears his iconic comics costume, only wearing civilian clothes throughout the show and only donning a costume when Fisk has him impersonate Daredevil.
  • One-Man Army: Dex takes down a dozen well-armed Albanian gangsters with advanced weaponry and body armour, entirely by himself. This is after the Albanians just murdered most of the FBI envoy transporting Fisk.
  • The Paranoiac: He has several symptoms, such as refusing to accept blame for the murders he committed and even reframing his supportive coach as a jerk to justify his killing of him, a penchant for murderous revenge over even minor slights, controlling tendencies manifesting in needing everything in his home to be in perfect order, a suspicious outlook and self-fulfilling belief that others are out to get him, a tendency to see himself in a self-important light (such as preferring to see his actions as heroic, or not caring as a child if other kids didn't get to pitch at baseball to the point of murdering over it), and an irritable temperament and general Jerkass attitude overall. He also has stalking tendencies and a habit of growing dangerously attached to particular people for fear of abandonment, to the point he would rather kill them than allow them to abandon him in any way.
  • The Pen Is Mightier: He uses office supplies during his fight with Matt in the Bulletin, and uses a pencil to wound Mitchell Ellison.
  • Pet the Dog:
    • Even while obviously threatening Nadeem upon turning up at his house, he acts very polite and cordial in the presence of Nadeem's wife and kids.
    • He worked for a time at a suicide prevention hotline. Unfortunately, this just led to him stalking Julie and didn't solve his mental issues at all.
    • Even though his Roaring Rampage of Revenge involves Revenge by Proxy, he pulls his punches when taking out the honest FBI agents, and we know at least Hattley survives when he could have very easily killed her. It seems like trying to make the frozen corpse of Julie, the "north star" to his moral compass, has had at least some positive effect on him.
  • Psycho for Hire: He's diagnosed as having borderline personality disorder with psychopathic tendencies and is hired by Fisk to impersonate Daredevil.
  • Psychopathic Manchild: He was already a psychopathic child after murdering his baseball coach purely out of spite. He's no better as an adult, being very insecure, frequently bullying others, and still seeing nothing wrong with killing people. Kingpin even acts like his father figure when Dex becomes his new mercenary.
  • Roaring Rampage of Revenge: When Matt tips him off that Fisk had Julie murdered, he dons the Daredevil armor and makes a one man assault on Fisk's heavily defended hotel, with the intent to kill him and Vanessa at their wedding.
  • Sadist: He openly takes pleasure in hurting others (both people and animals), and sees little difference between innocent civilians and armed combatants.
  • Sanity Slippage: Over the course of Season 3, he becomes more and more unhinged as Fisk's influence corrupts him. By the Season 3 finale, he seems to have completely gone off the deep end, talking to the corpse of Julie, bent on making his enemies suffer as much as him, and engaging in Revenge by Proxy regardless of the cost.
  • Shadow Archetype: To Matt Murdock. See Evil Counterpart for more details.
  • Single Woman Seeks Good Man: Gender Inverted. He falls in love with Julie because of her kindness.
  • The Sociopath: One of the most comprehensive clinical examples on the show. He's diagnosed at an early age with borderline personality disorder with psychopathic tendencies, which is the textbook definition of a sociopath (this begs the question of exactly how he got a job with the FBI in the first place, as his background check and psych evaluation should have thrown up more red flags than a Soviet parade). He needs to fake empathy when confronted with the feelings of others, repeatedly falling back on "It's hard, real hard." as a mundane platitude because he doesn't know what else to say. He shows no remorse for killing people, always finding a way to shift the blame to them for angering him, or getting in his way, or simply inconveniencing him. Once Fisk corrupts him and he embraces his role as Fisk's executioner, he relishes any chance to flaunt his power over others with impunity, killing and maiming almost at will, and with no regrets.
  • Stalker with a Crush: He tells his FBI therapist that he has a girlfriend, Julie. He doesn't, but Julie Barnes is indeed real. He worked with her at a suicide hotline for a year, and has been stalking her ever since. When he finally gets the chance for a real date with it, he's far too excited, easily insulted and unhinged to keep things together. He winds up ruining any actual chance with her, falling deeper into his insanity as a result. Although he is able later to win her over a bit, convince her to try to help him with his issues. Before she can, Fisk has her killed and pretends that she has rejected him again in order to make Dex reliant upon him. When Matt reveals the truth to him, he goes on the warpath against Fisk.
  • Start of Darkness: He's been a murderous psychopath since he was a child. He tortured and killed animals. He killed his baseball coach, and showed no remorse for it, because the man benched him so other kids could play.
  • Super OCD: The first episode to focus on him, "The Perfect Game", opens on him eating breakfast. The scene varies between a very subtle Undercrank to make his movements seem alien, and showing him perfectly stacking his finished newspapers, making sure his cleaned coffee cup is parallel to its neighbor, and going back into his apartment to fix a photo thrown off-kilter by him closing his front door.
  • Throwing Your Gun at the Enemy: Naturally he can get away with it. He can even turns clips into daggers.
  • Tragic Villain: He knows he's an apathetic killer, which breeds an intense self-loathing. He later became an FBI agent to only target bad people, but Wilson Fisk's influence causes him to snap, transforming him into a fully insane killer willing to target innocent and guilty alike.
  • We Can Rebuild Him: After his spine is broken during a three way battle with Matt and Fisk, he undergoes an experimental surgery to upgrade his body.
  • Wham Shot: (turns to the passenger seat) “Don’t worry Julie. He’s one of the good ones.” By this point Julie is a corpse that’s been sitting in one of Fisk’s freezers for most of the season. Now, Dex is driving around NYC with her thawing corpse in the passenger’s seat. Also, Dex is in his Daredevil costume. Even Matt, who is aware of Dex’s crazy, has to do a double-take on that one.
  • Woobie, Destroyer of Worlds: Dex is a psychopath with limited empathy for others, but not no empathy. He wants love and connection and has absolutely no ability to find it. He wanted to be part of the baseball team and couldn't. He wanted his therapist to stay with him, but she couldn't. He fixated on Julie not out of any weird sexual thing as would normally be portrayed, but because he recognized her as a good and beloved person and wanted her to keep him good. He knows he's broken, and takes active steps to try and fix it.

Henchmen

Law Enforcement

FBI

    Tammy Hattley 
See the United States Government page under Federal Bureau of Investigation

NYPD

    Detectives Blake & Hoffman and Officers Corbin & Farnum 
See the New York City Police page under 15th Precinct.

Department of Correction

    Officer Olsky 
See the New York City page under New York City Department of Correction

Criminals

    Turk Barrett 

    John Healy 

John Healy

https://static.tvtropes.org/pmwiki/pub/images/healy_john.jpg
"I had issues. I'm better now."

Portrayed By: Alex Morf

Appearances: Daredevil

"That's not a client. It's a shark in a skin suit."
Foggy Nelson

A contract killer hired by Fisk to kill Prohashka.


  • Adaptation Name Change: Seems to be the MCU version of Alvin Healy aka Tenpin, a juggler who used bowling pins as blunt weapons.
  • Bald of Evil: Not quite, but he's got a clearly receding hairline.
  • Beard of Evil: He's a bearded assassin with a long career.
  • Better to Die than Be Killed: He commits suicide after revealing Fisk's name to spare his loved ones from the retaliation.
  • Comic-Book Movies Don't Use Codenames: If the assumption under Adaptation Name Change is true. The only thing related to bowling pins he does is deliver his finishing blow at the start of the episode with a bowling ball.
  • Composite Character: Of the two villainous Healy brothers, Tenpin and Oddball. The assassination he is hired for occurs in a bowling alley and he finishes the job with a ball.
  • Convicted by Public Opinion: Though Healy gets away on self-defense, Matt certainly makes sure to word his closing statement in a way that makes it entirely clear that regardless of the jury's ruling, he intends for this to occur. He winds up killing himself for unrelated reasons.
  • Even Evil Has Loved Ones: To judge from his reaction after revealing Fisk's name to Daredevil.
  • Eye Scream: He rams his eye into a broken piece of metal to kill himself.
  • Impaled with Extreme Prejudice: After he tells Matt about Fisk, he points out that Fisk will have his family killed, and he subsequently impales his head on a fence spike to cover the thing up.
  • Improbable Weapon User: After his gun jams, he resorts to bashing the target's head in with a bowling ball.
  • Pragmatic Adaptation: Instead of using bowling balls or pins as a modus operandi like his comicbook counterparts, he simply used a bowling ball as a weapon out of convenience when his gun failed to fire.
  • Professional Killer: He commits murders for money.
  • Psycho for Hire: It is clear he enjoys his job.
  • Revolvers Are Just Better: Believes in this because they don't jam up, unlike the gun his arms dealer sells him.
  • Rogues Gallery Transplant: The Healey brothers are enemies of Hawkeye and Captain America in the comics.
  • Small Role, Big Impact: He only appears in one episode and isn't missed by anyone after biting it, but his one contribution to the plot - revealing Wilson Fisk's name to Matt Murdock - is extremely significant.
  • Wake-Up Call Boss: Though Matt has had his ass handed to him at least once before this point, it was because he was greatly outnumbered and led into a trap. Healy is the first individual to give him a hard time on equal terms.

    Oscar 

Oscar

Portrayed By: Devin Harjes

Appearances: Daredevil

A thug operating in Hell's Kitchen on behalf of Fisk.


  • The Brute: He's a thug used to intimidate those who may interfere in Fisk's plans.
  • An Offer You Can't Refuse: He blackmails one of the juror's in Healy's trial with a video she made when she was 19.
  • You Have Failed Me: He's subject to this if he fails in the jobs he's charged with.

    Rance 

Rance

Portrayed by: Craig Henningsen

Appearances: Daredevil

An assassin in the employ of Wilson Fisk.


  • Death by Irony: Farnum tried to kill Karen and make it looked like she hanged herself in her jail cell, a crime Rance participated in by threatening Farnum's daughter. He later meets the very same fate for failing to kill Karen.
  • He Knows Too Much: Is killed for being subdued by the man in the mask.
  • Knife Nut: When Wesley is threatening Farnum with having his daughter killed by Rance, he explains that he personally finds Rance's methods are "unpleasant." Based on the way Rance handles that knife during his fight with Matt, Wesley was making an understatement.
  • Never Suicide: Allegedly hangs himself in his cell. Karen quickly sees through it.
    Karen Page: [to Ben] What about Rance? Do you really believe that he just—just up and hung himself in jail? I mean that guard tried to do the same thing to me. Why don't you ask him?
  • Starter Villain: The first of Fisk's guys that Matt engages in a fight.
  • Would Hit a Girl: The threat of using his knife on Farnum's daughter is used by Wesley to get Farnum to carry out that first hit on Karen. When this fails he is sent to take out Karen in her apartment.

    The Valdez Brothers 

The Valdez Brothers

Portrayed By: Lawrence Bingham (Miguel); Jose Guns Alves (unnamed brother)

Appearances: Daredevil

Two brothers that become Fisk's top muscle at Rikers Island.


    Jasper Evans 

Jasper Evans

https://static.tvtropes.org/pmwiki/pub/images/431013.jpg

Portrayed By: Matt DeAngelis

Appearances: Daredevil

A lifer who Fisk hires in season 3 as part of his plans to get out of prison.


  • Boom, Headshot!: Dex shoots him in the head with Karen's gun.
  • Even Evil Has Loved Ones: Fisk has threatened his son's life to ensure his cooperation.
  • False Flag Operation: Fisk pays him to shank him and make it look like the Albanians retaliating for Fisk snitching on them, so the FBI will move him to the Presidential Hotel. He is killed as the end goal of a different false flag operation when Fisk sends Dex to kill him at the Bulletin.
  • He Knows Too Much: Matt, Foggy, and Karen get him to tell them all he knows about Fisk arranging his own shanking in prison, and do get to tell other people like Ellison and Nadeem about this; however, Dex attacks the Bulletin and kills him before he's able to officially say anything more than his own name on tape.
  • I Have Your Wife: Fisk is threatening his son's life.
  • Small Role, Big Impact: Despite only being in three scenes, Jasper's death is what finally convinces Nadeem to realize that Fisk is manipulating the FBI.
  • Would Hit a Girl: He's doing life in prison after he killed an old grandmother and a clerk during a convenience store robbery in 1991.
  • You Have Outlived Your Usefulness: After being integral to Fisk's plan to get himself out of prison, Fisk is quick to have him disposed of by Dex.

Others

    Francis 

Francis

Portrayed By: Tom Walk

Appearances: Daredevil

The head of Wilson Fisk's security detail.


  • Mook Lieutenant: Is the highest placed of Fisk's bodyguards, and is given more responsibility when Wesley is killed.
  • Undying Loyalty: Even after Fisk savagely beats him after Wesley's death, he is kept on and remains dedicated to Fisk's every order. Owlsley ask why Fisk still trusts him, and it's because Wesley did, to the point that Fisk trusts him enough with getting Vanessa out of the city after Fisk's escape attempt is thwarted.

    Mrs. Shelby 

Mrs. Shelby

Portrayed By: Kelly McAndrew

Appearances: Daredevil

A computer technician forced into working for Wilson Fisk.


Allies and Associates

    Randolph Cherryh 

Silver and Brent

    Leland Owlsley 

Leland Owlsley

https://static.tvtropes.org/pmwiki/pub/images/23965138319493a2f1df6375e7294b3d.png
"Heroes and their consequences are why we have our current opportunities."

Portrayed By: Bob Gunton

Appearances: Daredevil

"What, you think I'm a doddering pencil pusher who moves enormous amounts of money with no clue as to what it's connected to? The numbers are like tea leaves. Nobody reads them like I can."

A ruthless financier and associate of Wilson Fisk who laundered money for Fisk and his associates in their crusade to remake Hell's Kitchen.


  • Adaptational Wimp: His comic-book counterpart is a crime lord called The Owl, who has low-level superpowers and is a dangerous fighter; this guy is just a regular old human man with no fighting ability at all. A Downplayed example mind since before becoming a ruthless superhuman crime lord the character really was just a ruthless businessman with no special powers, so he is actually a mostly faithful (if somewhat older) adaptation of Leland Owlsley before he became The Owl.
  • Action Survivor: Despite the dangerous, younger people that surround him, Leland remains unfazed, even holding his own with a sneak attack and a taser when Matt tries to jump him. His luck eventually runs out when he tries to blackmail Wilson Fisk, however.
  • Age Lift: In the comics, the Owl is middled aged at the oldest, instead of elderly.
  • Badass Bureaucrat: He might not be the Owl but he is the one able to put Fisk in the ropes by stashing Detective Hoffman, and his reaction to Matt attacking him is to use a taser while he is distracted by the arrival of Stick, then call him an asshole as he walks away.
  • The Chessmaster: Moving money is not the full extent of his Machiavellian methods, as exemplified by his dealings with Madame Gao.
  • Comic-Book Movies Don't Use Codenames: Because he doesn't don a costume, he isn't called "the Owl".
  • Dead Man's Switch: He blackmails Fisk by stashing Hoffman away, checking in every 24 hours. If he fails to do so, Hoffman will rat Fisk out. That doesn't stop Fisk from killing him, though.
  • Deadpan Snarker: He has a very sardonic sense of humor. Every other line is a sharp quip at the expense of someone or a dark commentary on how wrong things have been going.
  • Death by Adaptation: His comics counterpart is alive and well.
  • Even Evil Has Loved Ones: He has a son named Lee who he clearly cares for. He's very pissed off that he has to postpone a visit with him. It is thought that his son will eventually become the Owl in a future season, as Daredevil season one showrunner Steven DeKnight said his inspiration for the character of Leland Sr. was that he knew in the comics The Owl's father worked in finances.
    Leland Owlsley: I'm afraid to go anywhere with that masked psychopath running around. My son was coming to visit. I had to tell him, "Nope, stay out of New York, Lee. Shit's going on". I'm seventy three years old. You know how many times I have left to see him?
  • The Evil Genius: With the exception of Wilson Fisk himself, he's the smartest criminal about with a head for numbers.
  • Evil Old Folks: 73 years old, and age hasn't impeded his greed or his ruthlessness.
  • False Friend: Starts working with Madame Gao to undermine Fisk and steal his money. Played with inasmuch as he only does so to try to get his boss's head "back in the game" after his dalliances with Vanessa start negatively impacting his business.
  • Four Eyes, Zero Soul: His thick glasses mask the eyes of a white collar sociopath.
  • Foreshadowing: Sets up his son multiple times, who has been all but stated by showrunner Steven S. DeKnight to be the one who will become The Owl, possibly in revenge for Fisk taking his father's life, which would make sense due to the history between the two characters in the comics.
  • Hypocrite: Leland calls Fisk out on his relationship with Vanessa, thinking Vanessa is a distraction to Fisk. Fisk eventually reminds Leland that he has a son too (who he's mentioned on several occasions), which means, Leland found a woman in his life too.
  • Jerkass: Every single line out of his mouth is a scathing jab on some level. At his absolute best behavior he's merely insensitive and self-centered.
  • Laser-Guided Karma: Tries to make off with a large chunk of Fisk's money and murder Vanessa, then has the bright idea of gloating to Fisk's face about it. Fisk beats the crap out of him, then throws him down an elevator shaft.
  • Murder Is the Best Solution: He's quick to call for Healy to be hanged in jail rather than go through the rigors of a rigged trial. Wesley has to talk him out by reminding him that they can't afford more dead bodies what with the number of people they had killed to cover up the Union Allied matter. He also is against using Nelson & Murdock to defend Healy and would rather use one of the shady attorneys he knows.
  • Nice Job Fixing It, Villain!: He takes in Hoffman and hides him out in the city as a precaution so if Fisk were to ever figure out that both he and Gao were conspiring against him, he won't retaliate against him and let him walk with half of Fisk's money. It doesn't work out well for him but it does work out for Matt, Foggy and Karen to expose and take down Fisk and his entire criminal organization.
  • Politically Incorrect Villain: The pilot shows he believes in Interchangeable Asian Cultures, though he's hesitant to flat out say that.
  • Screw Politeness, I'm a Senior!: Not to Stick's level, but he's 73, and is sarcastic and insulting to everyone around him, including the other crime bosses.
  • Wicked Cultured: He seems very fond of the finer things, aside from paintings; he thinks that "Art" was a guy Fisk was meeting.
  • Wrong Genre Savvy: He's an experienced and accomplished white-collar criminal surrounded by supervillains, and completely unaware of it. He's in charge of their money, and spends the entire first season convinced that this makes him protected and indispensable. Fisk kills him when he puts him in a no-win situation after admitting to trying to kill Vanessa. Leland knows that a businessman would take the deal... but Fisk is a gangster, not a businessman.

Triads and Yakuza (The Hand)

    Madame Gao 

    Nobu Yoshioka 

Landman & Zack

    Parish Landman 

Parish Landman

Portrayed By: Richard Bekins

Appearances: Daredevil

One of the senior partners at Landman & Zack. His firm represents Fisk and is part of its criminal activities.


  • Amoral Attorney: Demonstrated when his firm sues a poor, old man who became severely sick for working for Roxxon Oil, a company represented by Landman & Zack. They sue for "damages" after the man told his doctor about his work to find out what had made him sick. Landman invokes that the man had violated confidentiality agreements by sharing this info with his doctor.
  • Evil Old Folks: Not as old as Owlsley but he's over sixty and protects the interest of powerful white-collared criminals and corporations regardless of crushing the poor and humble.
  • Foil: A wealthy, older corporate Amoral Attorney? He's the opposite of Foggy and Matt.
  • Sharp-Dressed Man: As befits a wealthy lawyer and head of a powerful firm.

Ranskahov crime syndicate

    In General 
A gang lead by a pair of brothers, formerly members of the Russian Mafia, trying to make a name for themselves in America.

  • All Your Base Are Belong to Us: After Prohashka is killed they take over his taxi company.
  • Big Bad Wannabe: While undoubtedly a dangerous threat, they make the mistake of inadvertently angering Fisk.
  • Canon Foreigner: They are completely original characters.
  • Even Evil Has Loved Ones: They're very close to each other.
  • Evil Virtues: Love, Loyalty, Determination and Valor. Vladimir, especially, for all his many faults, displays admirable traits for such a scumbag, leading to a temporary alliance with Matt Murdock.
  • Human Resources: They escape from their Siberian prison using weapons crafted from the bones of their dead cellmate.
  • The Mafiya: Used to be 'Princes of Moscow' before being imprisoned in Siberia, and escaped from there to the United States.
  • Red Oni, Blue Oni: Anatoly's diplomatic blue to Vladimir's volatile red.
  • Russian Guy Suffers Most: From having to fashion shivs out of a dead cellmate's bones to escape torture in a Russian prison, all the way to their grisly deaths, the brothers do not get a break.
  • Siblings in Crime: They're brothers, and Vladimir takes it hard when Anatoly is killed.
  • Starter Villain: They serve as Matt's main opposition for the first half of season 1, until Fisk takes them out.
  • Thicker Than Water: Despite being ruthless criminals and murderers, they clearly love and worry about each other.
  • The Worf Effect: Collectively, they are the first real threat that Matt has to deal with. But despite the ambushes and kidnappings that Matt has dealt with, they don't match up to Fisk's threat level. Fisk not only kills Anatoly with his bare hands, he sets in motion the machinations to eliminate the rest of the Russians, including Vladimir.
  • Would Hurt a Child: Have no problem kidnapping a random child from the streets just to lure Matt into a trap and then sell the kid off to slave traders.
  • You Have Outlived Your Usefulness: Fisk believes this, and the rest of the group don't take much convincing, thus both brothers and practically all of their underlings are dead just shy of the halfway point.

    Vladimir Ranskahov 

Vladimir Ranskahov

https://static.tvtropes.org/pmwiki/pub/images/668d5e484c046d12c493a054fe92e9bb.png

Portrayed By: Nikolai Nikolaeff

Appearances: Daredevil

The younger of the two Ranskahov brothers.


  • Celebrity Paradox: Agents of S.H.I.E.L.D. reveals Power Rangers series exist In-Universe. Nikolai Nikolaeff portrayed Rhino Ranger (Dominic) in Power Rangers Jungle Fury
  • Deadpan Snarker: Vladimir has his moments.
    Vladimir: [seeing Matt discard Officer Corbin's gun] We could have used that.
    Matt Murdock: Not big on guns. [picks up his staves]
    Vladimir: Great, little stick, much better.
  • Determinator: Vladimir is a solid badass capable of fighting through intense amounts of agony.
    Vladimir: This is not how I die. This is not how it happens.
  • Enemy Mine: Matt and Vladimir are forced to work together to escape the corrupt cops surrounding the warehouse.
  • Good Scars, Evil Scars: Has a nasty scar across his right eye.
  • Heroic Sacrifice: Vladimir gives Matt enough time to escape while he faces Fisk's corrupt ESU team alone while bleeding heavily.
  • Right for the Wrong Reasons: Vladimir is perfectly justified on being angry at Wilson Fisk killing off Anatoly, but assumes that Fisk did so by hiring the Man in the Mask as a mercenary to eliminate Anatoly, rather than doing it personally with his own bare hands.
  • Sir Swears-a-Lot: Vladimir's dialog is utterly obscene in both English and Russian.
  • Worst Aid: Under guidance by Claire, Matt cauterize Vladimir's wound using a road flare. It REALLY hurts.

    Anatoly Ranskahov 

Anatoly Ranskahov

https://static.tvtropes.org/pmwiki/pub/images/ee35283d2b98833f84fbbf2fa24b0d6d.png

Portrayed By: Gideon Emery

Appearances: Daredevil

The older of the Ranskahov brothers.


  • Affably Evil: Anatoly is far calmer and more polite than his brother, and often acts as the diplomat of the pair. When they realize they do need Fisk after all, Anatoly is the one who goes to accept his offer.
    Vladimir: I will not bend my knee to that man!
    Anatoly: Then I will go and bend my knee for the both of us.
  • Alas, Poor Villain: They're drug dealers, human traffickers, and overall terrible human beings, but Anatoly's death is nasty, even for this show, and his brother's grief is uncomfortably pitiful.
  • Ambiguously Bi: When Wesley pretends not to know about Anatoly's death while talking to Vladimir, he asks whether Anatoly has "a girl - or a boy - he might be celebrating with". Since Wesley is unfailingly polite and would probably not risk insulting a Russian's beloved brother by insinuating him to be bisexual without cause and Vladimir lets it slide without comment, there may be some truth to it.
  • Off with His Head!: Fisk kills Anatoly by beating him unconscious then decapitating him with a car door.
  • Shoot the Messenger: Anatoly wants to tell Fisk in person that he and Vladimir are accepting of Fisk's new terms, but makes the mistake of interrupting Fisk's date in the process. He loses his head for it.
  • Too Dumb to Live: When Anatoly decides to accept Fisk's help, rather than just call Wesley to say they accept the offer, he decides to do so in public by forcing a meeting with Fisk, despite knowing that Fisk values his privacy, ruining his date with Vanessa in the process. Fisk does not take the lack of respect well.

    Sergei 

Sergei

https://static.tvtropes.org/pmwiki/pub/images/sergei_mcu.png

Portrayed By: David Vadim

Appearances: Daredevil

A high ranking mobster working under the Ranskahov brothers.


  • Boom, Headshot!: He's found by corrupt officers who are eliminating witnesses, and Officer Corbin shoots him in the head.
  • The Dragon: He's the Ranskahov brothers' second in command, as he's seen accepting orders directly, relaying them to the rest of the gang, and leading them when the brothers are absent.
  • Hope Spot: He's one of the only mobsters to survive the bombings, and escapes with Vladimir. They're attacked by Matt, and then cornered by corrupt cops. While Matt and Vladimir escape, Officer Corbin shoots Sergei in the head.
  • The Mafiya: He's a Russian gangster.
  • Nothing Personal: He says to Claire that they need information, and though he's causing her pain, it's not just for the sake of it.
    Sergei: This gives me no pleasure, it really doesn't... But I have been given a job to do. So please, answer the questions that I was told to ask, or I will begin breaking you, a piece at a time.
  • Undying Loyalty: He, like the rest of the Russian gang, is very loyal to his leader. After Fisk blows them up he's seen limping, and supporting Vladimir to help him escape.
  • Would Hit a Girl: As he says to Claire, talk, or get hurt.

    Semyon 

Semyon

Portrayed By: Alex Falberg

Appearances: Daredevil

A henchman for the Ranskahovs.


  • Eye Scream: Matt tortures him, with Claire's guidance, by putting a sharp object through his eye socket, without touching the actual eye itself, and started cutting the soft, tender parts protecting his brain. One step short of a transorbital lobotomy.
  • Fake American: In-Universe, he sports an American accent while posing as an NYPD detective to search Claire's building.
  • Impersonating an Officer: Poses as a police detective looking for a robbery suspect while looking for Matt in Claire's building
  • Small Role, Big Impact: His telling Anatoly and Vladimir about Claire starts a chain of events that ends with Wilson Fisk killing Anatoly, and in the long run, Fisk's own downfall.
  • Uncertain Doom: Vladimir and Anatoly wake him up with epinephrine to get him to report on what happened but they also mention that this might be lethal or put him in a coma. He's never seen afterwards but it's never mentioned where he's still alive or not.

    Piotr 

Piotr

Portrayed By: Paul Mann

Appearances: Daredevil

Another henchman for the Ranskahovs.


  • Boom, Headshot!: Detective Blake shoots him in the head.
  • He Knows Too Much: Blake and Hoffman kill him because he knows Fisk's name.
  • Oh, Crap!: His reaction when he realizes that the police detectives he just told Wilson Fisk's name to are also on Fisk's payroll, and are about to kill him.
  • Police Brutality: Executed in cold blood by Detective Blake for speaking Wilson Fisk's name
  • Small Role, Big Impact: Piotr is partially responsible for Anatoly's death, due to telling him and Vladimir about the restaurant where Fisk was on a date with Vanessa. Also contributes to Fisk's downfall, as Matt's interrogation of Blake over Piotr's murder leads to Blake getting shot, Hoffman being forced to kill Blake, and Hoffman turning on Fisk.
  • Too Dumb to Live: He tries to give up Fisk as a plea bargain when facing a 20-30 year jail sentence, even though Fisk's name is quite taboo. The detectives questioning him turn out to be on Fisk's payroll and have orders to kill anyone who speaks his name.

Union Allied Construction

    McClintock 

McClintock

Appearances: Daredevil (mentioned)

Karen Page's former boss at Union Allied.


  • Corrupt Corporate Executive: He's responsible for managing Fisk's money laundering through Union Allied.
  • The Ghost: Never appears onscreen, but is mentioned repeatedly by Karen and other characters.
  • He Knows Too Much: After Karen leaks the pension file, Fisk has him killed.
  • Never Suicide: His death by overdose.
  • The Scapegoat: He's used by Wesley and Fisk to take the fall for the Union Allied scandal.

Westmeyer-Holt Contracting

    Armand Tully 

Armand Tully

Appearances: Daredevil (mentioned)

The owner of a number of buildings in Hell's Kitchen. He seeks to force his tenants out to sell his properties to Fisk to turn it into luxury condos.


  • Fat Bastard: If what Elena says is any indication, Tully is both fat and a pretty deplorable person as well.
  • Jerkass: Foggy describes him as a sleazebag.
  • The Ghost: He's never seen and flees the United States after selling his property to Fisk.
  • Karma Houdini: He's one the few of Fisk's associates that manages to escape without answering to justice. He purchases a small island in a country without an extradition agreement with the United States.
  • Villainous Gentrification: His plot is to buyout his tenants with US$ 10,000 or force them out and then sell the property to Fisk to turn them into luxury condos.

    Joseph Pike and Stewart Schmidt 

Joseph Pike and Stewart Schmidt

Portrayed By: Kevin McCormick (Joseph Pike) and Bryant Carroll (Stewart Schmidt)

Appearances: Daredevil

Two of Tully's "handymen" who are sent to damage Elena Cardenas' building as part of Tully's efforts to intimidate his tenants into leaving their homes and later to harass and intimidate Karen Page.


  • Adaptational Villainy: In the comics, they are a pair of low-level crooks. In the MCU, they are thugs for their criminal employer and much more intimidating.
  • Ax-Crazy: Some of the things Schmidt says to Karen suggests that he's...not entirely stable and seems pretty eager to harm her in rather painful ways.
  • Bald of Evil: Pike has a shaved head that accentuates how menacing he looks.
  • No Name Given: They are not named in the episode they appeared. A later episode has their names as a Freeze-Frame Bonus on their contractor's licenses.
  • Tattooed Crook: Schmidt's defining feature is his body tattoos that are visible on his arms and neck, and he's a hulking brute of a man that works for a landlord that is aligned with Fisk, making him a crook by default.
  • Those Two Bad Guys: They get little, if any, characterization beyond acting as muscle for Tully.

Alternative Title(s): MCU Criminals Fisk Crime Ring

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