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Weaksauce Weakness in video games.


  • In 16 Ways to Kill a Vampire at McDonalds, you need to find a way to drive out or kill a vampire before he seduces and eats the McDonald's cashier. Some possible ways to do this are twisting drinking straws into crosses, eating enough garlic parmesan fries to make your kiss fatal to him, and simply plugging in an air sanitizer and waiting for its UV radiation to kill the vampire.
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  • In Assassin's Creed: Revelations, the Janissaries are the toughest enemies in the game by far. Able to survive normally insta-kill kill chains, multiple stab and gunshot injuries, can pull pull out a pistol and shoot you in the face, players learn to loathe them quickly. The fists of an elderly man are the bane of their existence, since chaining 4 unarmed attacks will take them out of commission. Quite depressing when a soldier trained from childhood meets his end from Ezio kicking his nuts twice.
  • Baldur's Gate II:
    • The extremely powerful liches rely entirely on magic in combat. There is a relatively low-level spell that allows you to polymorph into a 100% magic-immune and thus undamageable-by-liches creature: The Terrifying Mustard Jelly. Game-Breaker ensues. This is arguably also a case of Good Bad Bugs, since mustard jellies aren't 100% immune to all magic under the AD&D rules that Baldur's Gate is based upon; they merely resist certain elements and status effects but are affected normally by other spells.
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    • Also, all healing spells have reverse effects on undeads. The mid-level spell that heals someone back to max HP? It reduces any undead to one HP. Including an epic dracolich.
    • Taken even further with Bonus Boss Kangaxx. While he is definitely one of, if not the strongest enemy in the game, his death resistance is piss poor. There are so many ways of taking advantage of these, along with Good Bad Bugs, that someone wrote the song parody "Fifty Ways to Kill Your Kangaxx." ("Use Protect Against Undead, Fred.")
  • Bendy and the Ink Machine: The only thing that can hurt Bendy is playing a film reel called "The End."
  • The Bizarre Adventures of Woodruff and the Schnibble: Woodruff can repel the Beast from his body by... eating bouzuhouli, an old Bozouk dish.
  • The most likely candidate for the Big Bad of BlazBlue, Terumi, is, story-wise, one of the most powerful beings alive...and he is allergic to cats. Horribly allergic. So allergic that his joke ending has him reduced to a sniffling sneezing chew toy of the Kaka kittens. It's hinted to be canon too; in one scene he mentions that he hates the smell of cat. It's possible that Relius Clover, a Jerkass in his own right, added those allergies when he created Terumi's current body as a twisted joke.
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  • For some reason, vampires in the world of BloodRayne are vulnerable to water. Not just holy water or running water, any water at all will burn them. As a half-vampire, Rayne is half as vulnerable, but it can still kill her if she's fully immersed, or if she stands around in a puddle long enough.
  • Ormagodden from Brütal Legend was killed by being doused with mud.
  • Captain Novolin is weak against junk food. It makes him sick when he gets near it.
  • Castlevania:
    • Castlevania II: Simon's Quest features the easiest fight against Dracula in the entire series. There are two weapons the golden knife and the sacred flame which cause Dracula to completely freeze in place. All Simon has to do is repeatedly spam those weapons, and he'll win before Dracula can even move.
    • In Castlevania: Portrait of Ruin, there's an optional battle with the spirit of Richter Belmont, one of the most powerful vampire hunters ever to walk the Earth. The easiest way to beat him is to keep throwing pies in his face, as the downward arc of the Cream Pie sub-weapon lets you safely jump and toss them while staying out of range of his whip and axe. Also the pies are Darkness elemental and boss is weak to Darkness, but that actually doesn't make much difference since the pies still aren't very damaging.
  • Played with by the Hints of Cultist Simulator. Summoned from the world of mirrors, they will be destroyed if a mortal so much as looks directly at them. And yet they're extremely capable in combat, able to shred apart untold numbers of mortal foes. Apparently they're just so stealthy, cunning, fast, and/or lethal that their enemies don't get a chance to so much as glance at them before they die.
  • In Dark Souls, for all its legendary difficulty, you would be absolutely amazed at how many bosses can be killed with Dung Pies. Seriously, you can literally kill some of the strongest bosses by flinging poop at them.
  • In Devil Survivor, the Nigh-Indestructible enemy Beldr is only harmed by Devil's Fuge AKA Mistletoe, which the only thing made of said plant you can get your hands on is a cellphone strap that is only made in the image of mistletoe. Makes up for it by being That One Boss of the game, but still a rather undignified weakness—but justified, due to the boss's background origin.
  • In Diablo II, a Paladin using the skill Blessed Hammer (commonly known as Hammerdins) are capable of throwing dozens of high-damage hammers at a time, even into the highest difficulties. Their weakness? Walls. Since the hammers arc in a circular pattern, it can be extremely difficult to defeat certain monsters who are positioned in a difficult spot. There's a reason why the most effective equipment for a Hammerdin has an item that provides the Teleport spell: because there's quite a few mandatory sections of the game that are best served teleporting around, avoiding enemies, grabbing the one item you need, and getting out of there.
  • Disgaea:
    • Laharl, being a young demon who makes a big deal out of being evil, is violently allergic to women with sexy bodies and expressions of optimism or hope. In one battle he has to fight a bunch of half-naked succubi and nekomata with his stats halved. During one of those chapters, Flonne nearly kills him by yelling "eternal love!" (her favourite words). This appears to be largely psychological, however. Laharl learns to accept that he is capable of love by the end of the game, and while he makes a few comments about not wanting Jennifer's body near him, her presence has no effect on his stats. In Disgaea Infinite you can even use Mind Control to make him love sexy bodies, and glomp Jennifer. The novels explained this as the result of being raised by an abusive, buxom aunt. Disgaea D2, however, implies it was because the curvaceous Ranier was his nursemaid growing up, and to get him to sleep she'd smother him into unconsciousness with her considerable... assets.
    • The fact that the Prinnies explode when thrown is an unfortunate weakness, as well. It doesn't matter how high the level and/or stats of a Prinny is, a simple toss is all it takes to do it in. Unless it's one of those Prinnies... In the Prinny games, said weakness can be exploited by a Prinny against some particular enemy Prinnies.
  • The Elder Scrolls V: Skyrim's Dragonborn DLC adds Lurkers, a fish-like form of lesser Daedra in service to Hermaeus Mora, the Daedric Prince of Knowledge. Lurkers are an immensely powerful Giant Mook type of foe, with strong physical attacks including a Shockwave Stomp, several forms of Combat Tentacles, and an Acid Spit attack. They also have a rapid Healing Factor and resist almost every form of Destruction magic. However, they do not have a resistance to Paralysis. Paralysis is a Useless Useful Spell throughout much of the game due to how many high-level foes resist it or are outright immune to it. Not Lurkers. A Paralysis spell or poison applied to a weapon can leave them as a helpless sitting duck in the middle of battle.
  • In Elite Beat Agents, an alien species known as the "Rhombulans" come to Earth and ban music because they're scared of it. Then the agents come and get everybody in the world to dance to Hoobastank and the Rolling Stones.
  • Overboss Colter in Fallout 4 challenges your character to a gladiatorial match to the death, confident in his own victory because he wears a suit of modified Powered Armor which makes him immune to most conventional weapons. The easiest way to beat him is to use a water pistol to short circuit the suit's electrical components.
  • Final Fantasy:
    • In general, Revive Kills Zombie, so even undead bosses can be easily killed as long as you have a Phoenix Down in your inventory.
    • In Final Fantasy V, the Bonus Boss Omega, like hard bosses in general, are designed to have immunity to every status attack the player can throw at him... except for Romeo's Ballad. For some reason, this machine of death will specifically never be able to dodge a song about love, and will unerringly be frozen for a (very short) time because of it.
      • Even more jarring, Omega is not immune to the Mix combination that generates Bacchus Wine, which gives the target berserk status causing them to do only physical attacks. Combine this with the summon Golem, which blocks all physical attacks, and you can render the superboss helpless.
      • Most bosses towards the end of the game are at level 97. Being a prime number, this makes them immune to a lot of Blue magic that use levels. Except by using the mix ability Dragon Power or Samson Power and the Blue Magic Dark Shock, you can manipulate their levels to make them vulnerable to any of the level-based Blue Magic, including L5 Death.
    • In Final Fantasy VI the irritatingly durable Platinum Dragons (formerly Wirey Dragons in the SNES version) have no elemental weaknesses and high offense and defense. However, Relm's generally useless Sketch ability triggers a monster spell called Cyclonic when she sketches a Platinum Dragon, and it knocks out 90% of their hitpoints. The Ultima/Atma Weapon on the floating island is extremely powerful and has a lot of HP, but dies when it runs out of MP, which it doesn't have nearly as much of. The spell Osmose absorbs a neat chunk of an enemy's MP and adds it to yours, while the spell Rasp destroys a large amount. Rasp, rasp, rasp, dead.
    • In Final Fantasy VIII, no enemy, including the superboss Omega Weapon, is immune to Vit0, which drops the target's defenses to physical attacks to 0. It's also stupidly easy to obtain the spell that causes it. By inflicting Vit0, you don't need to spend any of your magic stock (which can affect your character's build due to how the Draw system works) on the boss, just wail at them to death with weapons.
    • In Final Fantasy X, using Provoke on Defender X will force him to use an attack that halves the target's current HP for the remainder of the fight (unless the Provoker switches out of battle). Therefore, the fight becomes a Foregone Victory. Many other bosses have some exploitable weakness (some more obscure than others), making a "level one" run easier than you might expect.
    • The final boss of Final Fantasy Tactics, St. Ajora, is incredibly weak to the Oracle spells of Drain and Osmose, the two easiest spells to acquire for the class. The AI even actively hones in on characters using it by outright killing them if able, or depleting all their magic if not. However, even a single Chemist is enough to counter these effects, and you can merely have the rest of the party wail on the final boss without it even bothering them for an easy victory.
    • In Final Fantasy Mystic Quest, due to a rather unusual bug, the basic Cure spell causes a bizarre rollover effect when used on the final boss of the game, either hitting him for tens of thousands of points of damage, or healing him for that amount. Either way, he typically dies in the following round, likely due to a failsafe caused by his hit points being pushed into negative/out of range values.
    • Vercingetorix in Final Fantasy XIII is brutally hard...unless you know he's vulnerable to poison. In that case, killing him is simply a matter of inflicting poison, then turtling in a three Sentinel paradigm until he removes the debuff, then repeating. It doesn't even take that long.
      • Poison also remains extremely powerful in both sequels. This is thanks to its mechanics draining a flat 1% of the boss' max HP, instead of their current HP, meaning that its effectiveness never falls off, many of the games' harder Bonus Bosses could be cheesed by laying on poison, turtling with sentinels and a medic, and just waiting it out.
  • Halo:
    • Scarabs are somewhat easily beaten in Halo Wars; just stick an infantry unit too close for it to hit and send your army after it while it's stuck. They tend to die quick unless they have engineers.
    • In Halo: Combat Evolved, the Hunters were enemies who could easily ruin your day. The best way to kill them, other than a rocket, was a single Pistol round to the unarmored area in their back. That's right, just one Pistol bullet. Justified in-universe in that said pistol fired high-explosive armor piercing rounds, but still. Hunters were made a lot tougher in subsequent games, and the pistol was significantly nerfed.
  • inFAMOUS:
    • Cole has the standard "electric super" Weaksauce Weakness of water... but also has one in chain-link fences. The metallic mesh absorbs his shots and dissipates them harmlessly. He has to go around to shoot whatever is on the other side — since every last chain link fence in the game is capped with razor wire and can't be climbed. Penny Arcade didn't let this go without comment. It's even lampshaded in the sequel — you can now climb over chain link fences, and there's a trophy for doing so for the first time, celebrating this amazing achievement.
      Don't Fence Me In: Climb a chain link fence and rejoice.
    • He has another weakness: areas without flowing electricity. If there isn't an active power grid where he is, he suffers from severely blurred vision and is said in dialog to be generally impaired, though this doesn't really show in gameplay.
  • Judge Dredd: Dredd vs. Death: Hilariously, Judge Mortis can be fought with cleaning products according to the loading screen, although it's not put to the test in the game itself.
  • Kirby: Meta-Knight isn't afraid to get bloody in battle...but he is afraid of losing his mask. Every battle with him ends with his mask coming off, revealing that he's every bit as cute as the rest of the inhabitants of Pop Star. He immediately wraps himself in his cape and leaves.
  • The vampires of the Legacy of Kain franchise have the generic weaknesses including one to water; just standing in a heel-deep puddle will quickly burn away at Kain's health in Blood Omen 1 and 2, and even after becoming something short of a god, Kain still can't be submerged in it in Defiance. Most of the vampire clans have evolved past the sunlight weakness in the thousand years between the first Blood Omen and Soul Reaver, only fledglings and the Rahabim (who evolved to survive in water) are harmed by direct sunlight. Impalement is, at best, a temporary solution, even a vampire that's been dead for a thousand years can spring back to life if the object used to impale it is removed unless their body is further destroyed by flame or water.
  • Dodongos in The Legend of Zelda are only weak to bombs via Feed It a Bomb and shrug off everything else. However, they become completely crippled if the dust and smoke from a bomb's explosion hits them. Once stunned, a stab from even the weakest sword can kill them instantly.
  • In The Legend of Zelda: A Link to the Past, Mothula is generally considered by far the most difficult fight in the game, since it's meant to be killed with the fire wand but most players don't have enough fuel to get the job done. However, you can deal massive damage if you unleash a bee on him... (It's worth noting that this is the only boss fight this tactic will work for, so perhaps the game designers realised how disproportionately difficult it was normally).
  • The Bonus Bosses of Mana Khemia: Alchemists of Al-Revis are very powerful, to say the least. However, they all share a common monster trait that renders them vulnerable to a certain character's normal physical attack. Said character is one of the highest physical attackers of the game (plus, he also has a skill that increases his attack power even more), and abusing the weakness will quickly increase the Limit Break meter, allowing faster access to the uber-powerful Finishing Bursts. This is a saving grace, however, since one Boss Battle has you fighting three Bonus Bosses at once.
    • The final boss of Raze's campaign in the sequel can be difficult mainly due to a status move that gives him three moves per turn and blanks out the turn order to keep the player from planning their turns. Annoying, but easily dealt with if you brought a Status-Buff Dispel item. The weird part is that in this game, that item happens to be vegetable juice.
  • The Mega Man series has plenty of bosses who had a weakness to unlikely-looking weapons and questionable moves.
    • The final boss of Mega Man 2 can only be damaged with the most useless and most difficult-to-hit-with weapon, Bubble Lead. The boss is a hologram; other ammo refills its energy (somehow), while the bubble lead shorts it out.
    • Metal Man just takes this Up to Eleven. Most bosses laugh at you when you use their own weapons against them. Metal Man explodes in a single hit like an overripe can of sardines being hit by a chainsaw.
    • The final form of Wily in Mega Man 3 can be one-shotted with a proper application of Top Spin, a glitchy and hard to aim attack that often damaged you and would drain the entire bar if mistimed. (Thankfully, Search Snakes also work on it—which has much the same movement pattern as the aforementioned Bubble Lead and would be this game's hardest-to-hit-with weapon if not for the Top Spin.)
    • In Mega Man X1 and X2, the final boss forms of Sigma were weak against the Rolling Shield (a hard to aim attack that generally did less damage than a charged shot) and the Strike Chain (a pathetically short ranged attack).
      • In Mega Man X2, Violen's actually weak against the Bubble Splash, and the weakest variation of Silk Shot that you can only use on Wire Sponge's stage; a small clump of leaves. Firing leaves on other enemies isn't worth the effort and by the time you used up all of the weapon energy for the Silk Shot, you'll only have killed a total of five enemies with it. So it's best to use it up against him if you happen to encounter him in the said stage and you have this weapon acquired.
    • Wave Man of Mega Man 5 was essentially vulnerable to being kicked. Though this could be counted as a subverted example in that the weapon used requires Mega Man to contact Wave Man while it's in effect. Messing it up means Mega Man gets hurt too. Badly.
    • The Bounce Ball in Mega Man 11 is essentially deadly bouncy rubber balls, and it's the (quite logical) weakness of Fuse Man.
    • This comes up in the series so often that veterans will, upon reaching the final boss, immediately switch to the hardest-to-use weapon to try fighting Wily. The cases where this isn't strictly true are Mega Man (Wily is vulnerable to two different Game-Breaker strategies), Mega Man 4 (vulnerable to an easy-to-use weapon that is slightly prone to abuse), Mega Man 5, and Mega Man 6 (in addition to fulfilling this trope in those two games, Wily was also vulnerable to Game-Breaker Beat, which is why Beat was subsequently nerfed).
    • Now we have Street Fighter X Mega Man, where one of the weapons is a watermelon. Since this is a Mega Man game, there's going to be somebody from Street Fighter who's weak to it. It's Rose.
    • Rom Hack Rockman No Constancy makes Za Warudo / The World (which isn't even offensive) a One-Hit Kill (at least on Normal mode) towards Clash/Crash Man.
    • And this feature is carried to many expies. The list includes, but not limited to, Mega Mari and Rosenkreuz Stilette.
      • In the sequel of the latter game, one of the late game bosses can be one-shot with a specific weapon. Guess who if you know the Shout-Out.
    • Mega Man himself is notorious for being quite durable for an old-school platformer character... unless you're talking about spikes, which kill him if he so much as brushes against one.
  • Minecraft's final boss, the enderdragon, is extremely difficult to defeat with a sword, and arrows take a long time to bring it down. However, they can be damaged with snowballs, which usually just knock mobs back without hurting them. Since snowballs can be stockpiled easily in a snow biome, and can be thrown much faster than arrows can be shot, they're probably the easiest way of winning the fight, and most people would never think to use them since they're harmless when used against 95% of the other mobs.
    • Endermen, freakishly tall pitch-black Eldritch Abominations from another dimension, are damaged by water. Not only by falling into lakes or rivers, but also by rain; the latter makes them teleport around frantically until they find a dry spot. Their height gives them a second embarrassing weakness: though they can teleport at will to attack you from unexpected directions, they cannot duck and have no ranged attacks... so if you make a 2-block-high tunnel to hide in, they can't reach you, and you can slash away at them to your heart's content.
    • Undead monsters—i.e. most common enemies—catch fire in sunlight. Even those that aren't harmed by the sun usually will not spawn in any illuminated areas.
  • Monkey and Secret Army 2 ends with the monkey becoming a superhero to battle the Giant Enemy Crab. He's going to beat the crab when it distracts him with bananas. He flies off and is not seen again until chapter 5.
  • All of the final bosses of the MOTHER series are established as ridiculously powerful, perhaps even immortal, up until the final fight. Hitting it with any attack will do nothing, so you have to resort to attacking them emotionally. Giegue/Giygas from Mother is forced to retreat because Ninten sings the song his mother once sang to him, destroying his resolve. When Giygas makes his return in EarthBound, Ness and his friends have to send a call out to all of the friends and companions they made during their adventure, including you, who all begin praying that they will be safe, allowing them to win. And finally, at the end of the fight against Claus/Masked Man from Mother 3, Claus deliberately kills himself due to brotherly love.
    • In EarthBound, using the Jar of Fly Honey on Master Belch will make him stop fighting and focus on just eating it where you'll be given the whole time to drop his HP to 0. He's actually unbeatable if you don't do this to him, though, as his HP simply won't go down until then.
    • The Pork Trooper in MOTHER 3 is a rabid DCMC fan, and will waste multiple turns staring at you jealously if you show him a piece of their merchandise. The amount of attack power he possesses is high enough to make him a threat even with his attacks coming only every third turn, however.
      • The Ultimate Chimera, despite its name, is the only one that has an on/off switch on its back. However, it turns out that the silly-looking bird on its head isn't just a decoration and acts as a fail-safe of sorts, reactivating the chimera once the coast is clear...
  • In Nelly Cootalot, there's El Mono, who guards the gates to the mine/spoonbeaks' prison, with some pretty powerful (as Adventure Game standards go) magic. So what is an ordinary Pirate Girl to do? After doing a few more errands, the answer will come in the form... of an orange.
  • NieR: Automata: the androids of YoRHa are battle-hardened fighting machines, but there is one thing that will kill them faster than any enemy: mackerel. Androids can eat any kind of fish except mackerel, which causes a chemical reaction that congeals their bodily fluids, resulting in rapid paralysis and death.
  • Ōkami monsters:
    • The "Bloom" technique, that causes flowers to sprout from trees, will also open bud-based enemies and reveal their weak point.
    • Umbrella-wielding and flying enemies are weak to "Galestorm" which most of the time isn't any more powerful than a moderate breeze.
    • The Tengu can be calmed down from going berserk by causing it to rain.
    • The Big Bad is weak to sunlight, but then again, he is a god of Darkness.
  • Hooktail, the boss of Chapter 1 in Paper Mario: The Thousand-Year Door, has a weakness to things that start with "cr" and end with "icket". This is because she ate some crickets a long time ago prior to the game's events, and the sound of crickets became so unbearable to her that she never wanted to eat a single cricket again. Equipping a certain badge that makes a cricket sound lowers her attack power and her defense drastically, making her easier to defeat.
    Hooktail: Bleck! That awful sound! It... sounds like a cricket! How did you know?
  • In Paradigm, one of the Moon Logic Puzzle requires you to remove the head on the mannequin The Cone TM is protecting (long story). So you need to scare him away. How do you do that? In a conversation with him, you learn that he's afraid of flying cones. So you need to go through another moon logic puzzle to build one and set it off.
  • Penny Arcade Adventures features a literal example: the special-attack weapon "Double-Mild Weaksauce" is such a wimpy hotsauce that it actually makes enemies wimpier and more vulnerable when you shoot it at them.
  • Persona 5: The Reaper, a massively powerful Bonus Boss meant for endgame parties will become paralyzed and can be easily killed in a few turns by even lower level parties when infected with the flu.
  • Don't even get us into how this applies to multiple-typed Pokémon.
    • Poor Shedinja. Its ability, Wonder Guard, is great (invulnerable to all direct damage moves except for the types it's weak against), but it only has one hitpoint, and its type (Bug/Ghost) gives it five weaknesses—including types and common moves that only an idiot would build a team without. That means it's only good against AI opponents that you know don't have those type moves (or any of the environment moves that would defeat it as well). Moreover, while it's invulnerable to direct damage moves, status ailments could affect it normally. Shedinja could simply be confused, and it would effectively commit suicide. Good luck leveling the poor guy without Exp Share.
    • Inversely, Shedinja is an extremely viable option in the Legendary/Uber arena, in that most of the commonly used Legendary Pokemon have no moves that can penetrate Wonder Guard. For example, the near-almighty Kyogre will be generated most of the time with no powers that can hit Shedinja, letting the tiny bug cut him to death. If you can take out the one or two (at most) Pokemon that could beat Shedinja, you've practically assured yourself a victory.
    • There's also Paras and Parasect, who in the first generation had three Super Effective weaknesses (Parasect is also incredibly slow). One of their new abilities in the fourth generation gives Parasect what is essentially a five fold weakness to Fire. Parasect also gets a 100% accuracy sleep move, which is potentially the most powerful status-inducing move in the game, so this was likely added to keep it from being a Game-Breaker.
    • The Electric type is half-composed of cute little rodents (and a grinning sphere, too, but those are actually dangerous). You'll wind up with one-foot-tall squirrels and mice taking down Gyarados—a 21 foot long sea monster known for destroying entire towns in fits of rage—in one hit.
    • Several moves and other things introduced in the fourth generation of the games can cause examples of this trope. One of the most hilarious: a Grass-type move called Grass Knot that is said to work by tripping the opponent, and does more damage the heavier the opponent is. The result of this is that the heaviest Pokemon in existence, the Ground-type Groudon, can often be tripped to death in one hit by something as small as a Pichu.
    • Good news for Groudon: It's primal form picks up a secondary Fire typing, so it's no longer weak to Grass Knot. The downside is that the only thing staving off its double weakness to Water-type attacks is a unique weather condition that nullifies water moves. Outside of Rayquaza, there happens to be one family of Pokemon whose ability can dispel that condition, and it also happens to be a Water type. Which means that Primal Groudon now lives in mortal fear of Psyduck.
    • Dragons are weak to Ice-type moves. This means that pseudo-legendaries like Salamence and Garchomp can be taken out in one hit by an Ice Beam from a Cloyster. As of Pokémon X and Y, they're also weak to Fairy-type attacks. Averted with Kyurem, though, as Ice is its secondary type. As Fire-types resist Ice, too, this also applies to Reshiram. Double Subversion with the aftermentioned Fairy-type, but only for Kyurem.
    • Double subverted with Kingdra. Due to its Water/Dragon type, the only super-effective type, for a really long time was Dragon-type attacks. note  Come Pokémon X and Y, however, and there is the aforementioned Fairy Type. Moreover, there is a certain Ice Type move which subverts the usual type relations, being super-effective against Water (along with Dragon), and therefore opening up a chance for a 4x weakness attack.
    • Volcarona is widely considered one of the most badass Bug-type Pokemon. It and its pre-evolved form (Larvesta) naturally lose half their health from Stealth Rock. Just from switching in. Same with other Pokemon with double weaknesses to Rock, notoriously Charizard.
    • All Pokemon that are weak to Water probably count, especially the double-weak ones. Using these critters in battles on the ocean is a common source of head scratching.
    • Rock/Ground is a common combination. It's double-weak to both Water and Grass, and mons of this type usually have very low Special Defense, so pretty much any attack of these types will be an insta-kill. Ironic, since Rock types are supposed to be difficult to kill. Gen V changed the Sturdy ability to prevent insta-kills, so that they can at least survive with 1 HP and get a chance to attack.
    • Fairy-types were introduced in Gen VI, and such attacks are super-effective against Fighting, Dark and Dragon types. Hydreigon, Scrafty, and Pangoro thus have a 4x weakness against attacks that typically involve sparkles and cuteness.
    • While fairies are resistant to most commonly-used types like the ones mentioned above, their counters are Poison (a generally-weak type since Gen 1) and Steel (Lost resistance against Dark and Ghost to adapt being Fairy counters instead of defenders).
    • Lance, the champion in Pokémon Gold and Silver, is a dragon trainer. That is, he trains dragon-esque Pokémon, not Dragon-type Pokémon. This means all of his Pokémon are part flying, meaning all of them lose at least a quarter of their health to Stealth Rock in the remakes.
  • The Aperture Science security androids in Portal will riddle you with bullets from their bottomless magazines ... unless someone tips them over. Then they plaintively self-destruct.
  • In [PROTOTYPE], Alex Mercer and the Infected have a Weaksauce Weakness in water. Their biomass is too dense to float. Alex and Hunters will just jump back out of any body of water they fall into after a brief pause. The Infected not so much. However, it takes place on Manhattan Island, so besides the surrounding water that makes it an island, there's not a lot of water to use. Makes the quarantine easier to keep, though.
  • Razputin in Psychonauts cannot go into deep water because of a family curse. Any time he goes near deep water, a hand made of water tries to drag Raz in and drown him. It's heavily implied that this is actually a psychosomatic weakness caused by Raz's psychic abilities rather than the curse being real however.
    • Made funnier in Gloria's mental realm, where the cardboard cut out background for water will actually spout a cardboard cut out hand of water to grab Raz if he gets too close.
  • Resident Evil:
    • It seems that human(ish) enemies in the series are more vulnerable to melee attacks than they are to heavy firepower and ordnance. Krauser from part 4 is weak against Leon's knife, and in part 5, the first two fights with Wesker can be considerably shortened by clobbering him with as many QTE combos as possible.
    • In Resident Evil 4, the Plagas that hatch out of the various Ganados are either Demonic Spiders or Goddamned Bats, depending on your opinion. However, once "popped", they can be killed instantly with a single flash grenade... yes, that's right, the otherwise useless blue grenade you've probably been selling off for upgrades and beefier guns.
      • The final part of your fight with Krauser is a pretty tough boss fight...until you realize that your knife does about as much damage as a Magnum bullet and similarly causes him to stagger.
      • As a matter of fact, in this game, your knife, the thing that has been with the Player Character since the game's start, doesn't occupy a single slot in the inventory, and has a dedicated button to use, will always remain as your best damage dealer, although hampered by the obviously short range, and the inability to cut through armor plating or hardened skin. When neither is present, you won't find anything more reliable to finish off your enemies.
  • Vampyres in RuneScape avert this somewhat. When they were first introduced, Juvinate or higher ranked vampyres could only be harmed by weapons made of silver... all of which are weak because silver is a soft metal. So it was more like they were just immortal against everything else, and silver worked as well against them as it did against normal monsters. And then the player learns about the Blisterwood Tree...
  • In The Secret of Monkey Island, Big Bad Le Chuck is destroyed by root beer.
  • Kanbari in Shin Megami Tensei: Strange Journey is weak to physical attacks, and each hit against him generally results in a cooperative attack with your allies. To be fair, he's the god of the toilet, so players are right not to expect much. Be careful, however - Kanbari does know Tetrakarn (which reflects physical attacks).
  • In SimCity 4, most buildings and infrastructure will crumble to pieces if you move the ground near them. This was the case for Sim City 2000 and 3000, but the terrain manipulation was more obvious in those games. In Sim City 4, you can raise the ground a foot up or down and it'll destroy everything within a 20 foot radius.
  • Sonic is extremely weak in water. Not only can he not swim, he also moves at an extremely slow pace when underwater, and sinks like a stone. In Sonic X, he nearly drowns in the first episode, and he can't even move while on ice. Episodes of Sonic Underground, Sonic X, and Sonic Boom were devoted to Sonic's aquaphobia. Also, in Mario & Sonic at the Olympic Games, Sonic wears a life vest whenever he participates in a swimming event. He eventually overcame this in Sonic the Comic by taking swimming lessons, and Sonic Colors gave Sonic an infinite jump underwater, and his Drill Wisp power works just as well underwater as it does underground.
  • Played for laughs in Spandex Force when shortly after a Hopeless Boss Fight a surprisingly well-informed little old lady tells your character that according to Science Today its main weakness is coleslaw.
  • Splatoon: The Kraken special weapon turns the Inkling's squid form into a powerful monster that can easily deal with any unprepared opponent by simply jumping at them... unless they're standing over a grate, that is. Like the regular squid form, Krakens fall through grates. Best case scenario they just fall to a lower area of the map. Worst case scenario their desperate chase for the opponent makes them fall straight into a Bottomless Pit or become a victim of Super Drowning Skills.
  • Somewhat in keeping with the game's theme, the Big Bad of Spore, the Grox, is weak against... Life! They can only survive on barren planets; creating a life-sustaining world kills them (although their spaceships can still bomb you from orbit).
  • StarCraft II: The Odin is an incredibly powerful Mighty Glacier but has rather weak anti-air abilities. In the final level of StarCraft II: Heart of the Swarm, the easiest way to beat it is with a few Broodlords attacking from outside the range of its escorts, especially as their broodlings will keep the enemy from advancing to attack them.
    "Must solve Zergling lemon-juice allergy. Weakness in Swarm."
  • Wart, Final Boss in Super Mario Bros. 2 has only one weakness. Vegetables. Smacking Wart with veggies isn't what hurts him, but the taste alone is vile to him. You force feed Wart until he gives up in defeat.
  • In Super Robot Wars Z 2: Saisei-Hen, The DAMON are affected by Basara's singing. They even take damage, making Basara a viable choice for fighting against the DAMON.
  • An odd case in Tales of Phantasia, which isn't a conventional weakness, but more of a developer’s oversight. The Bonus Boss of the Bonus Dungeon, Pluto, only has physical attacks, and one ridiculously long charging special attack, all of which have insane amounts of damage behind them, but must be used at close range. The first skill the main character ever learns is a long range, one SP cost move called "Demon Fang", which instantly pushes Pluto back and flinches him. Hence, a Bonus Boss battle where the heroes stay on oneside and nuke the poor guy and the lead constantly pelts him with Demon Fangs, while the boss sits on the other side of the screen defenseless.
  • Kratos from Tales of Symphonia's weakness is tomatoes. His son Lloyd seems to have inherited that weakness. Every playable character in the game has a least favorite food in the same way — Kratos' is just the only one that became memetic, probably because he's so stoic as to become The Comically Serious. It's not like they can ever get used against him in battle or anything.
  • Touhou: In Immaterial and Missing Power, Patchouli tells Youmu that she ought to be weak to fire since she's (half) an undead. Youmu replies that it doesn't apply to ghosts. In the end her human half turns out to be weak fire, but then again who isn't?.
    • In her scenario, Patchouli ends every fight by listing her opponents' weaknesses that often turn out to be weaksauce (although the validity or application are doubtful):
      • Reimu: Wasabi.
      • Marisa: Eel.
      • Sakuya: Asian ginseng, bitter melons.
      • Alice: Chili peppers.
      • Youmu: Bitter melons.
      • Remilia: Lots of weaknesses....
      • Yuyuko: Fire.
      • Yukari: Dried plums.
      • Suika: Fried beans.
    • Youkai are said to be able to regenerate physical damage very fast, but are weak to faith.
    • In Embodiment of Scarlet Devil, there's Rumia, the Stage 1 boss. She has the power to control darkness itself... but whenever she manifests this power, it blinds her and she starts walking into things. In other words, her weaksauce weakness is herself.
    • Finally Oni (which in this verse includes devils and vampires) are believed to be vulnerable to boiled beans, but apparently this is only because humans think so.
    • The Lunarians are established in the series as a race of extreme intelligence and extreme power whose society is like Gensokyo with its security buffed on steroid. Our heroes tried to invade them twice, with the second only technically succeeding by piles of fake-outs. In Legacy of Lunatic Kingdom, the antagonists are easily laying siege on these super-powered immortals - by exploiting their xenophobia through fairies. As fairies brought life to their surrounding nature and life itself is abhorrent to the Lunarians, doubled with Complete Immortality nature of the fairies, they got cornered more and more within their capital with their weapons doing nil on the invading fairies.
  • In The Twisted Tales of Spike McFang, soup is what renders the Freezer vulnerable. Lampshade Hanging emphasizes how absurd this is.
  • War Thunder, being a simulator, realistically deals with most of the idiotic design decisions that plagued the real life tanks. Soviet tanks as a whole struggle to aim down, making them hilariously awful on hilly maps where a German or American tank can just plink at them with impunity from a gully.
  • In the SNES The Wizard of Oz game, the Tin Woodman is normally useless, since he can't crouch or jump, but his attack is apparently the only one that can hit the Wicked Witch.
  • World of Warcraft is rife with such weaknesses to make otherwise impossible encounters winnable or just for amusement value. One great example is a quest where you have to get an artifact to defeat a pack of imps. The effect of this awesome weapon? It creates beautiful rainbows... cue sound of heads exploding.
  • Although not a flaw of the units themselves, ground units in X-COM: Apocalypse can only travel on roads and if the road square they are on is destroyed so are they. Especially galling with the Assault Tank which is pictured as having huge caterpillar treads but still can't go off-road.
  • X Com UFO Defense: Chryssalids are an unholy terror until you get Flying Armor. Chryssalids have no ranged attacks so at that point you can just hover over them and spray them with plasma until they fall down.

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