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Adaptational Heroism / Live-Action TV

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TV series where a character is more heroic than in the source work.



  • Happens several times in the series adaptation of 13 Reasons Why:
    • Clay himself is much more proactive in the series in trying to get justice for Hannah. This is partially due to the Adaptation Expansion, as in the novel Clay listens to the tapes in one day and that is essentially the entire plot. In the series, Clay listens to the tapes over a number of weeks and even calls out the subjects of the tapes for mistreating Hannah.
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    • In the book Hannah wakes up when the crash into the stop sign happens. In the series, she partially causes it by distracting Sherri, making the latter more sympathetic. Sherri is also shown to be deeply conflicted by it and ultimately reports it to the police.
    • Justin is softened slightly in the series. In the book he and Hannah dated for a while and then he abruptly broke up with her, breaking her heart. He doesn't do this in the series, and they never end up actually getting together. His abusive home life is also shown in great detail, and he's very much a pawn of the jocks he hangs around with. He also tries harder to resist Bryce's attempts to get into the room with Jessica, while in the book, even Bryce himself is surprised by how quickly he got Justin to comply.
  • In the Indian adaptation of the American series 24, the Nina Myers character (Nikita Rai) is loyal, stays by the cause of the show's CTU (named ATU) and does not kill this show's version of Teri (Trisha).
  • Agent Carter:
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    • Chief Dooley, whose comic counterpart in infamous for sexually harassing She-Hulk, is portrayed as A Father to His Men.
    • Jason Wilkes, whose sole comic appearance had him trying to sell technology to the Russians, is an unambiguously good guy, although he briefly allies with Whitney Frost out of desperation.
  • Agents of S.H.I.E.L.D.:
    • In the comics, Lash and Mister Hyde are both unrepentant villains. The show turns both of them into sympathetic AntiVillains, with Cal (Mister Hyde's TV counterpart) being noticeably ashamed of his actions, and Lash having a Split Personality that he has little control over.
    • Donnie Gill, aka Blizzard, does not actually become a supervillain in the show, and bears no ill will towards S.H.I.E.L.D. — in his second appearance, his worse actions are due to being Brainwashed and Crazy.
    • Holden Radcliffe, the Big Bad of Machine Teen is reinvented as a more morally ambiguous character, who is initally working with the bad guys out of cowardice, and later inadvertently creates threats out of a dangerous combination of altruism, lack of foresight and selfishness (i.e. it's fine to take shortcuts and break the rules if it helps people ... even if it helps him a bit more).
  • Arrow:
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    • Shado in the original comics was a Japanese assassin who raped Green Arrow. In the show, she's a lawyer and one of Ollie's friends on the island, even training him in being an archer and developing an unrequited love for him. When she is killed, Oliver vows to honor her for the rest of his life by taking on her green hood and cloak as the Hood (later the Green Arrow).
    • Anatoli Knyazev aka KGBeast. In the comics, he was usually a Psycho for Hire, while on the show he's a sympathetic mobster who helps Ollie during his trip to Russia.
    • Merlyn. In the comics, Merlyn is a Psycho for Hire and has opposed the JLA as a member of the League of Assassins and the Injustice League, while on the show Malcolm Merlyn started out as a Well-Intentioned Extremist who wants to destroy the Glades to avenge his murdered wife and simultaneously put an end to the criminal element there that was threatening the rest of the city. He gets better. Merlyn gradually becomes an ally or at least a frenemy of Team Arrow, largely due to him finding out that Thea is his biological daughter as a result of a fling with Moira years ago, and stricken by guilt over the death of his son Tommy during the destruction of the Glades, vows to become a much better father for her than he was for Tommy. While he isn't winning any 'father of the year' awards due to his admittedly ruthless training of Thea and his drugging and manipulating her to kill Sara as part of a convoluted plan to get Oliver to take down Ra's al Ghul, he genuinely cares for her as is exemplified by him weeping when she almost died at the hands of Ra's himself. He was also highly hesitant in supporting Oliver and Barry's decision to not bow to Vandal Savage's demands and deliver the Hawkpeople to them (in return for him letting them, their cities and their loved ones survive) and directly threatened to come after Ollie in case Vandal ended up hurting or killing Thea. He has also come to care for Oliver in a certain way, even admitting that he now sees the latter as another son, though this again hasn't prevented him from occasionally manipulating or generally being a thorn in the side of Ollie now and then.
    • Slade Wilson (the comics Deathstroke) in the island flashbacks completes the Power Trio with Ollie and Shado. No longer the case as of the present-day scenes in "Three Ghosts". Double subverted upon his return in the Season Five finale, where he's pulled a Heel–Face Turn.
    • In the comics, Ra's al Ghul's daughter Nyssa is a villain who plots revenge on her father by brainwashing her half-sister Talia, and wants to kill Superman in order to destroy hope. In the series she's got a role similar to classic Talia, torn between her loyalty to her father and her love for one of the heroes (in this case Sara Lance).
  • In Bates Motel, Norma Bates has been drastically altered for the TV series. In the original films, Norma was an Abusive Parent who tortured her own son into insanity For the Evulz. The show's version of Norma instead portrays her as a Broken Bird trying to be a good parent and help her son with his mental problems.
  • In Battlestar Galactica (Reimagined), Gaius Baltar is significantly less villainous than his original series counterpart, Count Baltar. Count Baltar deliberately betrayed humanity to the Cylons For the Evulz, while Gaius was tricked. Subsequent actions on the behalf of the Cylons were down to cowardice, and a couple of examples of poor character judgement rather than vindictiveness.
  • Constantine:
    • One of the big complaints about the series by fans is the titular John Constantine, himself, is this. His addiction to magic and meddling with forces mankind was not meant to know is downplayed to, instead, focus exclusively on the Newcastle Incident as his motivation. This version of John is The Atoner and wants to make up for his crimes (as well as avoid damnation) versus the John who is a rebel without a cause. This isn't that far from some comic portrayals of John, albeit significantly Lighter and Softer. Constantine also comes off better in dealing with the below mentioned Gary Lister; in the comic, he doesn't sit by Gary's side so he wouldn't have to be alone while being eaten alive, either.
    • Chas has an active role in Constantine's good deeds and is fairly competent at helping out even besides his immortality. In the source material, he is more often then not simply roped into the insane things that go on around Constantine, often only to the extent of being press-ganged into being John's driver, and is ill-equipped to handle the supernatural. His wife Rene also gets an upgrade, going from extremely abrasive, controlling and rarely sympathetic to being generally unsupportive but understandably so, considering how things look from her perspective.
    • Gary Lester is made more sympathetic than his comic counterpart, who was much less accepting of being the host for binding Mnemoth inside of
    • It's easy to imagine the comic version of Papa Midnite working to fix things when his magic goes off the rails and brings the dead back as ghosts who cause havoc for practical reasons. When this actually happens in the show, however, he seems to have at least some genuine concern for the people who are caught in the middle. Further, in "Waiting for the Man," while he uses his dead sister for information, he also seems to be actively trying to bring her back. In the comics, he not only would never willingly give up her use as a tool, she has to team up with Constantine to escape him.
  • The famed ruda Princesa Sugey was a bodyguard to the Monterrey area talk show host La Pao on Curva Directa. Rule of Funny applied given that Monterrey was the area she worked in at the time.
  • Daredevil (2015):
    • Melvin Potter is Forced into Evil, as opposed to his career criminal comic book counterpart.
    • Frank Castle is more noble than his comic self usually is, something that's further expanded upon in his own show.
  • The Dresden Files:
    • In the books, Bianca is a high-ranking villainous vampire. In the show, she's much more sympathetic and she and Harry end up on the same side more often than not.
    • Morgan in the books, while a good guy, was a Lawful Stupid Inspector Javert who watched Harry like a hawk waiting for the slightest excuse to chop off his head. This version doesn't trust Harry but wants to help the innocent too, which leaves them begrudgingly on the same side more often than not, while having a problem with how visible he makes himself, and the amount of kablooey his larger battles cause. Also, the not trusting him bit isn't purely because he killed Justin in self defense like in the books, but also because he was taught by Justin in the first place. This Morgan is far from Harry's biggest fan, but we go from "he broke a law, forget why he did it, Off with His Head!!" to "yeah, he mostly does what's right, but he's got no regard for the masquerade, he was the student and relative of a Big Bad, and ye gods, the property damage! Keep an eye on this one."
      • To readers of the novels, the show characters are quite easily identifiable as CompositeCharacters. Show!Morgan is a mix of the two sword-wielding badasses Morgan and Michael Carpenter (Michael being staunchly pro-Harry). Similarly, Show!Bianca is a combination of Book!Bianca and Lara. Apparently there is only room for one sexy lady vampire, so she got the helpfulnees and flirtiness from Lara and the job and description from Book!Bianca.
  • The Flash (2014):
    • Gorilla Grodd is a violent sociopathic gorilla who despises humans and attempts to make apes rulers of the Earth with him as leader. While this version still hates humans, two in particular not withstanding, he has an actual reason due to being a guinea pig for psychic experiments and suffered abuse.
    • Plastique. In the comics, she was a villain of Captain Atom and a convicted terrorist before making a Heel–Face Turn. Bette here is portrayed as, at worst, an Anti-Villain who fears her powers and wants to get rid of them. The worst thing she does is attempt to kill General Eiling, a Knight Templar who would come after any and all meta-humans to turn them into weapons for the Army, and had to be convinced into doing so by Dr. Wells.
    • Dr. Harrison Wells, who is secretly the Reverse Flash in disguise and the main antagonist of the first season - is primarily motivated as a villain not so much by his desire to destroy the Flash like in the comics, but by his desire to return to his time and place in the future and reunite with his loved ones - albeit at any costs. In spite of also initially hating and seeing Barry as an enemy to be destroyed in his origin story, he grows to become genuinely fond of the young man and comes to see him as a son, even admitting that it was not his version of Barry he hated but his future self, and that they were never enemies in the first place. Thawne even goes as far as passing S.T.A.R. Labs down to Barry as part of his will in addition to giving him a video-taped confession about his role in murdering Nora Allen, exonerating Henry who was unjustly imprisoned for the murder and whom Barry had till then dedicated his entire life to get justice for. While Thawne is still the man who murdered Nora in the first place, the one who was responsible for framing Henry in the first place and still the monster of the Flash's childhood - it shows that on the show even the Reverse Flash has a heart, at the end of it all.
    • Hunter Zolomon from the main universe is a normal civilian and is not a super villain unlike the comics. On Earth-2, however...
    • In the New 52 comics, the Future Flash has been driven mad in a Bad Future with crippled and deceased loved ones, and plans on murdering anyone who wronged him in the past. The Future Flash of the show is morose and depressed, but is convinced to return to heroism by his younger self. This is because all of Future Flash's negative traits have been transferred to Savitar, who turns out to be his time remnant.
    • Oddly enough, Savitar is a retroactive case of this. The comics Savitar was a straight-up supervillain who turned to destruction and crime as soon as he got his speed. The show's version was a genuine hero when he was still Barry Allen. It took losing his parents, watching the love of his life die, and getting ostracized from his friends for him to finally make a Face–Heel Turn.
  • The Huang parents in the TV adaptation of Fresh Off the Boat, in comparison to the original memoir. Jessica in particular is greatly toned down from her portrayal as a borderline abusive Tiger Mom, since a more faithful depiction likely would've veered into Dude, Not Funny! territory.
  • From Dusk Till Dawn:
    • Richie Gecko is still a creepy psycho, but unlike his Ax-Crazy movie counterpart, he has the excuse that supernatural forces are actively messing with his head.
    • The vampire Santanico Pandemonium is portrayed as a Tragic Monster in the series, whereas in the movie she had no such redeeming traits and was an unambiguous monster.
  • Gotham:
    • While still a crime boss, Carmine Falcone is trying to keep Gotham from falling apart, was friends with Jim Gordon's father, and even concedes that Gotham needs an honest cop like Gordon instead of someone like him, and even helps Gordon after Nygma frames him.
    • Falcone's son Mario takes after his debut in Dark Victory in trying to be a good person, as opposed to his post-Battle of the Cowl appearances, where he succeeded his father and sister Sofia as the head of the Falcone family. At least until Alice's blood kicks in... However, then with that in mind, he's still this, as Carmine in the series considers him the White Sheep of the family and part of Dark Victory's backstory involved Mario getting arrested as a teenager.
  • The Handmaid's Tale: At least in comparison to the original book, courtesy of character expansion, when Serena Joy affords some, even if obsolete, genuine pity for Offred at times.
  • Inhumans: Maximus actually has a good reason for wanting to take control of Attilan (to end its Fantastic Caste System) and Earth (to give the Inhumans more living space), in contrast to his more selfish comic book counterpart. He's still a villain, but a more sympathetic and understandable one.
  • Journey to the West:
    • In his original portrayal Sun Wukong kills wantonly as soon as he is not within the presence of his master. This happens throughout almost the entire journey. The popular 1996 and 2002 HK adaptations had him portrayed as a more merciful character from the start. As a result, his actions of killing the robbers, hunters, and oppressors were often omitted.
    • Tang Sanzang's original portrayal was worse. Acts hypocritically or at best inconsistently, and seemed to treat his disciples as tools most of the time. He also wept fearfully when threatened by demons, while popular adaptations such as the HK versions (1996 and 2002) had him face death with dignity and showed genuine care and concern for his disciples.
  • Kamen Rider:
    • Kamen Rider Fourze's movie pulls both this trope and its opposite with characters based on Space Ironmen Kyodain, another Shotaro Ishinomori creation. Inga Blink (inspired by the villainous Goblin Queen) and her bodyguard Black Knight become heroes who help Fourze, while the Kyodain are the main antagonists of the film.
    • In Kamen Rider Dragon Knight, some Riders are considerably nicer than their original Kamen Rider Ryuki counterparts. Ryuki is basically Highlander as a Toku, so the main hero is the only one at first who is not just out for himself. In Dragon Knight, a lot of them remain just out for themselves, but Wing Knight (Knight) and Siren (Femme) are true heroes. When Len is training Kit early on, that's taken from a scene where Ren was trying to kill Shinji because he'd be trouble down the road. Kase fighting JTC is still Kase fighting JTC, but in Ryuki, the reason is different: Miho just wanted revenge on Asakura. Also, Mirror Kit is Adam, downgraded from evil like mirror Shinji to merely selfish and eventually making a Heel–Face Turn. But perhaps the biggest case of all is Alternative. In Ryuki, he was highly antagonistic to all the Riders and was willing to kill an innocent woman if it meant ending the Rider War. His Dragon Knight counterpart Eubulon on the other hand is the Big Good.
  • In The Last Kingdom, Aldhelm does a Heel–Face Turn and protects Aethelflaed from Aethelred's plan to kill her, tells her of Aethelred's plan to divorce her by having him seduce her instead of carrying it out, and even falls in love with her, eventually prompting Aethelred to stab him, leaving his fate ambiguous as he thinks he's dying while Aethelflaed insists he'll live. In Season 3's book equivalent, Aldhelm attempts to carry out Aethelred's aforementioned divorce scheme and is killed by Uhtred.
  • Legend of the Seeker:
    • In the Sword of Truth series, Richard's step-brother, Michael, is a villain of the first book, who's willingly in league with Darken Rahl, and executed after his treachery is found out. In this he is instead tricked into serving Rahl, and when push comes to shove he sides with his brother, dying in a Heroic Sacrifice.
    • James is a villain in the books who works for Queen Milena as her court artist, painting pictures of people that affect them. Here he's mostly good, though still some somewhat sketchy since his art magic creates paintings that trap people inside when he paints them into there, and he wants Livia to stay inside one with him forever so she'll be safe, but he makes a Heroic Sacrifice to get them out in the end.
    • Panis Rahl is dead by the time of the books (at Zedd's hand) and a brutal tyrant without any redeeming qualities. Here he's never seen to be anything but a mildly corrupt king. Zedd teaches him magic, heals his infertility, and appears to be his friend. Panis tries to stop his son Darken Rahl when he sees his evil by fathering a second son, Richard, who's prophesied to defeat Darken. Then, presumably when he hears Darken killed all newborn boys in Brennidon to kill Richard, he fathers a daughter for the same purpose, who also plays a part in Darken's defeat. The only questionable things we see him do is to kill Caracticus Zorrander, Zedd's father (which was in revenge for Caracticus' attempt to murder his son), plus seducing Richard and Jennsen's mother in the guise of another man. He later spends decades as a monk atoning for what he did wrong, helps Richard to find the Stone of Tears in the form of a scholar, and after this he sacrifices his life for Zedd's.
  • Lost in Austen has George Wickham as a good guy, or at least a Jerk with a Heart of Gold or Lovable Rogue, in contrast to the unrepentant scoundrel he was in Pride and Prejudice.
  • Luke Cage (2016) portrays Luke himself as a genuinely heroic Nice Guy, while in his early comics, Luke was an Angry Black Man who was Only in It for the Money.
  • In the 2004 Marple adaptation of The Body in the Library, Mark Gaskell's role as one of the murderers was shifted Adelaide. Also, the TV version of Mark is shown to be a very kind man, even though he's really careless with his words and his money, whereas in the books he's rude, unpleasant, egotistical gambler.
  • Max Headroom: In the original TV film, Bryce Lynch hires thugs to kill the hero, Edison Carter. Lynch's boss reacts angrily when he hears the news, saying "I run a television network, not a goddamn hit squad!" but Lynch defends his brutal tactics as rational. In the show, Lynch's boss is the one who tries to have Carter killed. Lynch is a morally neutral character who will occasionally work with Carter, rather than the clear villain he is in the film.
  • Once Upon a Time:
    • Characters who start out as villains but undergo a Heel–Face Turn include The Evil Queen from Snow White, Captain Hook, The Snow Queen, Maleficient, and the Wicked Witch of the West. This is not even the full list — and sometimes, depending on the plot, these Heel-Face Turns can flip-flop for a character before they undergo a Heel–Face Turn again and become a hero.
    • Rumplestilskin constantly changes sides and time will tell on which one he'll end but he has a sympathetic backstory and motivates (at first) and he's not an unrepentant baby eater like in the original tale.
    • Gaston is Belle's Disposable Fiancé; in the show and appears to be a good guy for the little we see of him. Subverted by his reappearance in Season 5 though.
    • The Wicked Witch of the West in the original Oz books was...well, wicked. In her brief appearance, she is one of three good witches — and Zelena, who is the Wicked Witch of the West in this series, is the only Wicked Witch there. She undergoes a Heel–Face Turn at the end of season 5.
    • Ursula from The Little Mermaid is reimagined as an ancient sea goddess, who is implied to be benevolent (granting mermaids the power to walk on land once a year). An evil sea witch called Ursula appears in Season 4 - but this one is named after the goddess and also pulls off a Heel–Face Turn. This is slightly more in line with the original story, where the sea witch wasn't evil but neutral.
    • The Big Bad Wolf from Little Red Riding Hood in a sense as Red, herself, is really the wolf.
    • The Knave of Hearts is one of Robin Hood's Merry Men who was manipulated into serving the Queen of Hearts.
  • The 1990 miniseries of The Phantom of the Opera featured Charles Dance as a gentler, kinder and more sympathetic Phantom than his counterpart in the original novel.
  • Poirot:
    • The Big Four turns Li Chang Yen, Régine Olivier and Abe Ryland, three of the titular characters of the so-called "Big Four", from megalomaniacal leaders bent on world domination in the novel, into pacifist members of the Peace Party who have been framed for a string of murders by Number Four (who here has been named Albert Whalley, a.k.a. Claud Darrell, a.k.a. Dr. Quentin), whose usage of the title "Big Four" into scaring the world is all just a figment of Whalley's imagination.
    • Cards on the Table clears Anne Meredith from the murders she committed in the book and moves the guilt to her friend/house mate, Rhoda Dawes.
  • Power Rangers:
    • Power Rangers Samurai does this in adapting Samurai Sentai Shinkenger's Fuwa Juzo into Deker. Both of them are Blood Knights, but while Juzo is a remorseless killer, Deker was made into an Anti-Villain by making his battle-lust a curse placed on him that he hates. Basically, Deker is what Juzo led us to think he was before The Reveal that he wasn't misunderstood, just evil. However, this makes Deker's death in a manner similar to Juzo's ever so tragic.
    • Dayu is made more sympathetic, especially back during her human days, even if in the end she does just as much bad stuff in both versions.
    • In Tensou Sentai Goseiger, Gosei Knight is largely indifferent to helping humans, only incidentally helping them because of his mission protecting the planet itself, and often doesn't care if they get hurt in fights. In Power Rangers Megaforce, Robo Knight is exactly the same, but stops short of destroying a factory to stop its pollution as a way of protecting the environment.
    • Sanbash, the first general in Seijuu Sentai Gingaman, was a violent, dirty thug. His counterpart in Power Rangers Lost Galaxy, Villamax, was the polar opposite. However, he's a partial example: Sanbash's role in the story was held by Furio, who didn't look like Sanbash 'cause (it is said) the costume hadn't arrived yet. The costume did finally show up and so was used later, becoming Villamax, a character whose role in the story didn't exist in Gingaman. Furio is not a sympathetic Noble Demon.
      • Bookrates in Gingaman, while not quite as evil as the other Barban, is still a villain. His Lost Galaxy counterpart Kegler is a friend of Villamax who's just kind of along for the ride (and never gets Bookrate's Evil Makeover).
    • Alex in Power Rangers Time Force. While he is still a massive Jerkass, he's ultimately well meaning and trying to save the world. His counterpart in Mirai Sentai Time Ranger, on the other hand was downright evil, having been responsible for the events of the series occurring in the first place, and despite making efforts to save the future, he was willing to allow mass destruction to be wrought in the present. Furthermore, saving the future was a secondary goal, his primary being ensuring his own survival, at the cost of having someone else die in his place.
    • The Monster of the Week Notacon in Time Force and his Timeranger counterpart, D.D. Ladis, are both sympathetic characters in their respective series. However, D.D. Ladis was initially arrested for bombmaking, unaware his creations were used to kill people. Notacon's crime was stealing vegetables.
    • Tommy in the original Mighty Morphin' Power Rangers series. While he was an enemy during the "Green with Evil" arc, he's shown as being a good person who was brainwashed into becoming evil against his will by Rita, as opposed to his counterpart Burai in Kyoryu Sentai Zyuranger who hated the Zyurangers due to being jealous of his brother, the team's leader Geki, and had to be talked out of being an enemy rather than have a spell on him broken.
    • In Hyakujuu Sentai Gaoranger, Yabaiba and Tsuetsue are silly villains, but they remain villains to the end, even after Rasetsu betrayed them. Their Wild Force counterparts, Jindrax and Toxica, are largely the same, but Mandilok's betrayal of them causes them to switch sides and ditch the conflict.
  • Pretty Guardian Sailor Moon:
  • In Pretty Little Liars, Alison DiLaurentis is quite the Alpha Bitch but not nearly as a horrible person as she is in the novels. Unlike her book counterpart, she never tried to kill anyone and after coming back to Rosewood, is trying to shed her more nasty traits and become a better person and fix her relationship with her friends.
  • RoboCop: The Series does this with the Old Man's counterpart, the Chairman. Whereas, even barring his Sudden Sequel Heel Syndrome in RoboCop 2, the Old Man was apathetic towards people in the first movie (his anger at the ED-209 screw up was more about the product malfunctioning, not the fact that the malfunction got an employee killed), the Chairman, while still greedy, does indeed care about people, willing to help them out and make things right when he finds out his company did something bad.
  • Runaways (2017):
    • Most of PRIDE, to some degree. In the comics, the Pride all knew from the beginning that the Gibborim's endgame was to wipe out all humanity save six people, and were happy to help in exchange for wealth and power. Here, Jonah has led them to believe his goal is to find a clean, renewable energy source, allowing them to save the world and get rich in the process. Of course, this still involves human sacrifice.
    • Molly's parents in particular; in the comic, they were a pair of Smug Supers who, along with the Deans, planned to betray the rest of the group out of self-interest. Here, they tried to sabotage Jonah once they learned how far he was willing to go - which got them killed.
    • Alex isn't The Mole in this version.
  • A Series of Unfortunate Events: Double Subverted with Aunt Josephine. The series has the characters first learn about her in the episode previous to her first appearance. Another character describes her as "Fearless and Fierce", a term which would never describe the Aunt Josephine from the books. However, when we meet her in the next episode, Josephine is every bit as cowardly and terrified as her literary counterpart. We later learn, though, that this version of Josephine in fact *had been* fearless and fierce, prior to the loss of her husband.
  • Sherlock exploits this in "The Hound of Baskerville" in the form of Dr. Stapleton, who shares the name of the villain of the novel The Hound of the Baskervilles. The culprit turns out to be a completely different character.
  • Supernatural features a twist on the Biblical story of Cain and Abel that paints Cain in a much better light: Cain killed Abel because Abel believed he was talking to God, but was actually talking to Lucifer, who intended to trick Abel into giving up his soul. Cain offered his own soul in exchange for Abel going to Heaven, and Lucifer accepted on the condition that Cain kill Abel himself.
  • In the novel on which The Time In Between is based, Ignacio harasses Sira as long as possible, while in the adaptation, he has a Heel–Face Turn and helps her help Paquita.
  • Gomora from the Ultra Series. Introduced in the original Ultraman as a ferocious rampaging dinosaur kaiju who proved to be one of Ultraman's most powerful foes, Gomora proved to be so popular with fans that in Ultra Galaxy Mega Monster Battle, he was made the giant hero of the show, battling other rampaging kaiju under the command of a superpowered human named Rei. The trend was continued in Ultraman X, in which Gomora is Daichi's longtime companion (usually at Sleep-Mode Size though) and can be summoned in a digital form called Cyber Gomora to help XIO battle the Monster of the Week.
    • Ultraseven's most famous foe Eleking received similar treatment in Ultra Galaxy Mega Monster Battle as well, though he was initially an enemy that Gomora fought when ZAP SPACY encountered him. Unlike Gomora, this has remained his only heroic appearance to date, though a very popular one.
  • The Umbrella Academy (2019):
    • Vanya. In the comics, she is a willing participant in the apocalypse, joining the Apocalypse Suite in order to destroy the world after being rebuked and disrespected by her siblings one too many times. In the show, she goes through a Trauma Conga Line of epic proportions, still being disrespected by her siblings, but now piling up an abusive boyfriend, repressed memories from her traumatic past coming to her, being locked in a cell by her brother and finally snapping, making her much more innocent and sympathetic about eventually causing the apocalypse (which happens more or less by accident).
    • Five. The series add an inordinate amount of focus on the fact he does care for his siblings and loves them dearly, instead of his pragmatic Anti-Hero nature like he is in the comics. He even goes on to explain how unpleasant it is to kill someone innocent, even when he knows it will help save the entire world.
    • Hazel. In the comic, he is a sugar-addicted psychopath who gleefully beats down a waitress and tears off another man's arms, in the series, he is a Hitman with a Heart that confesses that finds his job really unpleasant and no longer wants to kill, seeking to run away and starts a peaceful, idyllic life with Agnes, the waitress he killed in the comics, now his Love Interest.
  • In The Vampire Diaries, Caroline goes from a vicious bitch who tries her utmost to ruin Elena's life to a sympathetic character. She becomes outright heroic after becoming a vampire.
  • The Worst Witch did this with a lot of characters who mostly made one or two appearances in the books but had their roles expanded on the series.
    • Miss Drill was a strict Drill Sergeant Nasty who becomes the teacher the girls can confide in the most.
    • Miss Bat similarly was your average strict teacher as well but got changed to a quirky and lovable Cloudcuckoolander that was always friendly to the girls.
    • Drucilla was simply a friend to Alpha Bitch Ethel but gets a few Hidden Depths moments and even makes a Heel–Face Turn towards the end.
    • Ethel herself gets a few Hidden Depths and becomes a sort of friend to Mildred in the spin-off Weirdsister College.
    • Miss Hardbroom was a Sadist Teacher that got maybe one Pet the Dog moment in the books. She is still a bit of a Sadist Teacher in the series but is much more sympathetic and is shown to genuinely care for the girls and the welfare of the school.
  • Trampas was the villain in the original novel and film adaptations of The Virginian. On the TV show, he's the titular character's right hand man and essentially a co-lead since the show tended to rotate the focus between several characters.

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