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The subjectives from Metroid. For the specific YMMV pages see:


  • Alternative Character Interpretation:
    • Is Adam Malkovich a truly good, noble man who cares about Samus or an abusive Jerkass who actively tries to demean her? If the latter, was he always or just after she left his team?
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    • Did the SA-X ignore Samus for the Omega Metroid due to sheer instinct? Or did it develop its assimilated human emotions to the point of wanting to save Samus for being such a Worthy Opponent?
    • Some believe that Phaaze was simply a massive parasitic lifeform, without the sentience to understand the detrimental effects of its reproductive cycle, and that Dark Samus, which was actually a Metroid Prime that assimilated Samus's Phazon suit, enslaved it.
    • Was the Super Metroid of Super Metroid sorry for attacking its "mother", who had it had seemingly imprinted on when it was just a baby, or was it simply acting under instinct?
  • Anticlimax Boss:
    • The Omega Metroid in Fusion; not only is it nowhere near the hardest boss in the game, it isn't even as hard as its previous appearances in Metroid II. However, it's arguable whether it counts as the final boss; most fans believe that the SA-X is the true final boss, and the Omega Metroid is just designed to be one last challenge before you escape the station.
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    • Kraid in Super could be taken out with four well-timed super missiles before he even finished rising up from the ground. Ostensibly a glitch, Kraid can be defeated in little time even without the exploit by a seasoned player.
    • And the Ridley Robot in Zero Mission, who is incredibly easy. He gets more challenging, however, if you've gotten 100% of the items, or if you're doing a 15% item run.
  • Arc Fatigue: A major criticism of the series post-Fusion is that Nintendo has seemingly refused to continue the story past said game, despite ending on a note that there is a conspiracy within the Federation to weaponize Metroids. Every Metroid title released since then has been either a remake or an interquel. Despite most of the games released since being well-received, many fans are tearing their hair out waiting for an actual continuation past Fusion.
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  • Awesome Music: Has its own page.
  • Badass Decay:
    • Samus went through a stage of this in Other M, chronologically the second-to-last Metroid game to date. Though she has faced countless numbers of threats and monsters that others would not dare face, the repercussions of Super Metroid (namely witnessing the Super Metroid, the grown up baby metroid she decided to spare, die) left her more emotionally vulnerable and inclined to take orders from superiors. This culminated into a controversial scene where she suffers a Post-Traumatic Stress Disorder upon seeing the cloned Ridley despite defeating him multiple times beforehand without fear. Chronologically though, she gets over it after the game's events and is back to her old self in Fusion, even developing a distrust for Federation authority. Release-wise, Samus is back to being badass in the Metroid II remake Samus Returns
    • As far as the bosses go, Kraid. He went from being the hardest boss in Metroid 1, to being one of Mother Brain's four commanding officers in Super Metroid, to being the first boss in Metroid: Zero Mission, to never even being mentioned again outside of Metroid Prime's instruction manual.
  • Base-Breaking Character:
    • Samus' portrayal in Other M. While widely reviled among the larger Metroid fandom, some fans appreciated the character development, and a few female fans found her to be relatable.
    • Samus' Zero Suit, which ended up turning her into more of a Ms. Fanservice through the years. some people appreciate the fanservice and/or find that the Zero Suit makes Samus seem more "human" and relatable, while others claim that it ruined her character and undermined her reputation as a non-objectified strong female protagonist. In particular, Super Smash Bros. essentially turned Zero Suit Samus into her own entity and cranked her fanservice elements Up to Eleven, causing even more heated debate on how it affected Samus' image.
    • Adam Malkovich, in large part due to being the face of the controversial authorization mechanic, Samus' questionable role model, and for shooting Samus in the back with a Metroid hovering right above. That said, some feel like he was given a raw deal with Other M and his character in the manga is more balanced, interesting, and friendly with Samus. That other canon was ignored in that game leaves some room for redemption.
  • Best Boss Ever: Also has its own page.
  • Best Known for the Fanservice: Some fans of Zero Suit Samus in Super Smash Bros. become interested in Metroid expecting to see more fanservice, and are often disappointed when Samus spends most of her games in her face- and body-obscuring Power Suit (a point that is frequently praised by other fans). Metroid: Other M milked the Zero Suit's fanservice nature for all its worth, and (like many other aspects of the game) was heavily criticized by fans.
  • Broken Base:
    • Which is the best game in the series: Super Metroid or Metroid Prime?
    • The topic of how Samus should look outside of her suit is a loaded one. It largely comes down to those who like her design from the first Metroid Prime game more and those who prefer her more standard design. There are also debates about her height or how muscular she should be.
    • Nintendo giving Metroid games to third party or minor studios to develop instead of its major studios after Metroid Prime 3. Some sees this as sign of Nintendo not caring to Metroid at all, going to the cheapest way to keep the franchise alive, resulting in good games with questionable performance at best (like Metroid: Samus Returns) or very controversial games at worst (like Metroid: Other M and Metroid Prime: Federation Force). Others thing this approach is better considering how Nintendo handle its franchises outside of Mario, Zelda and Pokémon triangle and the good reception of Samus Returns.
    • The refusal to continue the franchise's lore/story past Fusion. Despite Metroid Fusion being well over a decade old, any and all games released in the meantime have taken place in between the Metroid 1 to Fusion time frame. While some feel this is a good decision since Metroid: Other M's contentiousness in the fanbase (and Samus' power suit is too iconic to dump), others really want to see what happens after Fusion, since the ending heavily implies that Samus is now an outlaw wanted by the galactic federation for destroying their secret experiments at Metroid cloning.
  • Complete Monster: Ridley and Mother Brain; "Boss"; Dark Samus; and Gorea. See those pages for details.
  • Cult Classic: Most people know Samus as one of the cooler fighters in Super Smash Bros., but fewer people know her as the protagonist of one of Nintendo's most acclaimed series. Most Metroid games have sold reasonably well, but were often overshadowed by the success of other games (such as Donkey Kong Country for Super Metroid and Halo for the Metroid Prime Trilogy); however, almost all of them have gotten consistently high praise, and Super and Prime in particular are considered to be among the finest games of all time.
  • Demonic Spiders: The Metroids themselves (though the base forms are A LOT weaker in the Prime trilogy). In the 2-D games, they inflict massive amounts of damage, and the only way to kill them is by freezing them with the ice-beam and repeatedly blasting them with missiles. While they're a lot weaker in the Prime trilogy, the Fission Metroid in the first game are this, they take a lot of damage, and then split into other Fisson Metroids that only take damage from a certain beam, which is really bad when see the ones that only take damage from the ice beam due to its low rate of fire.
  • Ensemble Dark Horse:
    • Rundas from Metroid Prime 3, the game's resident Proud Warrior Race Guy and arguably the most popular non-Samus character from said game, having the honor of rescuing Samus from freefall following a boss battle with Meta Ridley, visibly owning a bunch of Space Pirates and having a cool boss fight himself that borders on Tear Jerker. Being voiced by Christopher Sabat doesn't hurt either.
    • Sylux from Metroid Prime Hunters was always something of a darkhorse with its intriguing backstory of hating the Federation and source of many Epileptic Trees, but has been steadily gaining more popularity from 2015 ownward when it was explicitly confirmed that it appeared in the 100% ending to Corruption and later made a post credits cameo in Metroid Prime: Federation Force to steal an infant Metroid. And it's only gotten more attention stemming from the surprise announcement of Metroid Prime 4, given that it was also stated in the aforementioned interview that the next Prime game would likely revolve around a Samus vs Sylux plot.
    • Kraid is fairly well-liked despite being a minor boss with only three appearances to his name. His Kaiju-like design from Super Metroid helps due to being an epic display of the game's Sequel Escalation.
    • Anthony Higgs from Other M is the most well-liked character in the game due to being more friendly to Samus than Adam and subverting many of the tropes associated with a Token Minority.
    • Samus' green-haired "Justin Bailey" suitless look. Despite only appearing as an Easter Egg in the first game, it has a lot of fans who bring it to life through cosplay and fanart, and some people prefer it to the Zero Suit. It even made a return in Metroid: Samus Returns.
  • Epileptic Trees:
    • In Fusion, the extent to which Samus absorbs the X is only vaguely hinted at. Thus, it's unclear as to whether she's absorbing their DNA, or just their energy.
      • Another interpretation- Metroids absorb energy. Samus is imbued with Metroid DNA. Therefore, Samus is absorbing energy.
    • It's believed that the Ing are a form of semi-solidified Phazon. This is supported by the appearance of the Phaze-Ing in Prime 3, which is basically a blue Inglet. This could very well be untrue, though, as it raises a lot of other questions, (like why Phazon kills most Ing).
      • Though it's worth noting that Phazon beings are by nature highly vulnerable to weaponized Phazon, so the Ing's vulnerability to exploding Phazon containers may be justified.
    • Almost nothing is known for certain about Sylux, except that it hates both Samus and the Federation. Fertile ground for the trees right there, including that it is female.note 
    • Nobody really knows what Kraid is or what his actual connection with the Space Pirates is, beyond being a high-ranking member, but everyone sure loves to speculate. Pre-Zero Mission, a lot of them focused on whether he grew or was enhanced between the original game and Super Metroid, because he went from being tiny to being huge.
    • The identity of the dead soldier lying outside Kraid's room in Super Metroid. The body's purpose is to this day unknown, and has prompted much discussion and speculation over who it was, what faction it was with, and why it was there. Theories abound among fans, with claims that it could be anyone from Expanded Universe bounty hunter Armstrong Houston to Weavel (from Prime Hunters). It doesn't help matters that the soldier is the only human-looking sprite left on Zebes.
  • Even Better Sequel: Metroid basically created the modern Metroidvania genre, and Metroid 2 wasn't exactly bad, either, but it wasn't until Super Metroid that things really got swinging.
  • Evil Is Cool: Ridley, a badass purple space dragon who's ready to kick your ass in every game he appears. His original NES version wasn't all that popular due to his dopey sprite and lack of fearsomeness, but come Super Metroid he became so overwhelmingly popular that he was promoted to the series equivalent of Bowser and had a nigh-perfect attendance record in Super Smash Bros. before getting Promoted to Playable.
  • Fandom Heresy: Criticizing Super Metroid. It's unanimously considered a landmark game and a masterpiece of level design and craftsmanship by fans and critics alike, and is often considered the best game in the entire series (and, over two decades later, still one of the greatest video games ever made). If you go after it, prepare to get a whoopin'.
    • The first Metroid Prime is another game that's considered risky to criticize, since it's often considered to be in the same league as Super Metroid in quality.
    • If you say that you liked Other M or even go as far as to say it was your favorite in the series, expect a few eyebrows to raise, and quite possibly a fight to break out. This becomes exaggerated to the point that even if the discussion was based around potential gameplay improvements, detractors would shout them down.
  • Fanon Discontinuity:
    • Other M is often treated this way, mainly due to Samus supposedly suffering from Badass Decay according to detractors, but also for several other elements, such as the convoluted reincarnation of Ridley. This case also doubles over with the manga, as Other M considers it canon, contradicts it AND rehashes plot points from it at the same time.
    • There is a Metroid manga that is supposedly canon, but is ignored even by many who bothered to look it up in the first place. Not helping is that it isn't entirely consistent with the games and their generally minimal story.
  • Franchise Original Sin: The Metroid series has always had a very confused and complicated relationship with its Action Girl heroine, Samus Aran. Following Other M, many detractors have claimed that Samus has been forever tarnished as a lead due to the Chickification, increased sexualization, and infantilization of the character (to the point that Other M literally had her regress back into a child during a PTSD Trigger). Examining the series as a whole, though, Samus was sexualized as early as the first game, was placed into a "motherly" role in the second and third games, and was further sexualized in Zero Mission and Super Smash Bros. Brawl. Not to mention that Fusion took away some of her agency and had her taking orders from a "male" commanding officer.

    What makes Other M different, according to some critics, is that these other games only had maybe one or two of these problems and they were Downplayed Tropes for the most part. Other M had them ALL at once and many of them were front-and-center and treated as vital to Samus's identity and character in ways that they never had been before. This is further compounded by the Metroid manga, which portrayed Samus in much the same way—but during a point in her life when she was a Hot-Blooded Former Teen Rebel. She's portrayed as growing up and maturing by the end of said manga, which means even some people who knew about Samus's insecure side felt that the character regression ruined her.
  • Germans Love David Hasselhoff: The series has lukewarm reception in its home country, but has always received far more popularity in the US to the point that the first sequel was advertised in Japan as being a follow-up to "the outstandingly popular action game in America". Later, Nintendo would hire Western developers to create major installments, one of which proceeded to create some of the most well-acclaimed games in the series and another that also created the aforementioned Castlevania: Lords of Shadow games. Most entries release in the U.S. before Japan to cater to this fanbase, and some of them have English voice-overs even in the Japanese releases.
    • Samus herself fits this trope. In the US, she's considered one of Nintendo's "Big Four" characters, trailing only Mario, Pikachu, and Link in popularity. In Japan, she is probably behind any given Fire Emblem protagonist. This has ultimately led to a long-standing joke that main character Samus, being blonde and blue-eyed, was obviously an American character.
  • Goddamned Bats: Mellows and Weavers in Brinstar, and pretty much any lava enemy in Norfair. The titular enemies, however, skip right over this into Demonic Spider territory.
    • In Fusion, the winner goes to the species of X-infected Ki-Hunters. They're quite quick, contact damage with them takes about 50 energy, and their stinging attack takes a way a full energy tank. They're also found right before and after you have to flee from a super powerful SA-X, causing frustration for anyone who gets unlucky and isn't able to reach a save spot in time.
  • Good Bad Bugs: "This is an Elite Space Pirate. Elite Space Pirate Description 3."
  • Growing the Beard: While Metroid and Metroid II: Return of Samus were perfectly good games, Super Metroid improved absolutely everything, set the standard for all Metroidvania games in the future and is now regarded as one of the finest games in history.
  • Hilarious in Hindsight: You know all those people who've mistakenly called Samus "Metroid"? With the Retcon that the word is a Chozo word meaning "ultimate warrior", as well as her Trans Human infusion with Metroid DNA at the beginning of Fusion, they're technically correct.
  • I Am Not Shazam: A somewhat common outsider mistake is to call Samus "Metroid"; the Metroids are a race of aliens that she hunts.
  • Internet Backdraft: The Zero Suit alone has sparked discussions and flame wars about whether or not Nintendo over-sexualises Samus. Whether your definition of Stripperific extends to Latex Space Suit or goes to Absolute Cleavage and Thong of Shielding will determine your standing.
  • It Was His Sled: When the original game first came out, many players were shocked to discover that Samus Is a Girl. Not so much anymore, in large part because one of the original reasons why it was originally so shocking (a girl protagonist in a video game?!) is pretty pat nowadays.
    • Also, Samus suffers sudden shell shock against Ridley in Other M.
  • LGBT Fanbase:
    • Samus, as a strong, badass and sexy heroine, attracts a lot of queer women for being a character they can look up to as a role model and find highly attractive.
    • Samus also has a sizable fanbase of transgender women (including Azima Khan, one of the artists for Another Metroid 2 Remake), for having a stereotypically manly character archetype and Power Suit design but also for her beauty and grace underneath the armor, along with the whole Samus Is a Girl thing going on.
    • The Super Smash Bros. depiction of Zero Suit Samus takes this even further due to a higher camp factor and implied flirtatiousness, along with the ridiculous Jet Boots similar to the high heels used by many Drag Queens and burlesque performers.
  • Les Yay: It was clearly supposed to be a way of keeping the game's twist, but a Japanese-only strategy guide had Samus surrounded by two girls in bikinis.
  • Memetic Badass: Samus, as evidenced by her nickname on this very site: The Intergalactic Queen of Badass.
    • Also, Admiral Castor Dane, in part due to a scene where it seems he's standing in the Urtagian acid rain, which is strong enough to kill well-armored Samus in a few seconds, with no protection.note 
  • Memetic Mutation:
    • "REMEBEH ME??!?!?" After the trailer was released, it took about .372 seconds for "Mysterious Black Guy" to become a meme.
    • TUUUUUUUUUUUUUUUBES!
    • And don't forget that Science Team has vapor for brains.
    • "That seems inefficient"
    • Feather pubes
    • People feigning stupidity and pretending to think that Varia Suit Samus is a man named Metroid, while Zero Suit Samus is his girlfriend Samus.
    • Save the Animals/Kill the Animals. Explanation 
    • The baby. Explanation 
    • Metroids are not pets. Metroids are not for target practice. Explanation 
  • Mis-blamed:
    • At one point, Yoshio Sakamoto gave an interview with Kotaku where he said that he initially wanted Other M to be "on-rails." What he meant by on-rails was "on a 2D sidescrolling plane." What the article gave the impression of with what he said, however, was "Rail Shooter." Unfortunately, the misinformation spread like wildfire, and fans were up in arms over how Sakamoto was trying to derail the series with an unneeded Genre Shift. The uproar dissipated once Sakamoto was able to clarify what exactly he meant.
    • Sakamoto is often criticized by fans for supposedly considering the ''Prime'' games non-canon, which isn't helpful given Other M divisive reception. However, he is misquoted as Sakamoto had always considered the Prime games to be canon, but only saw it as a separate adventure featuring Samus (which is true). He later did an Author's Saving Throw with Metroid: Samus Returns by incorporating more elements from the Prime games as well as showing Ridley transitioning from Meta-Ridley to his organic self in Super Metroid.
  • Most Wonderful Sound: The fanfare that plays when you collect a new item. Doubles as Samus' victory theme in Super Smash Bros..
    • The explosions when you finally defeat bosses. Most satisfying on bosses like Phantoon or Ridley.
    • Samus' "Arrival" fanfare can count. Especially in Metroid Prime, where it's proceeded by a long, impressive cinematic, your first view of Samus' new, 3D-modeled Varia suit, and the fanfare kicks in as the camera moves in for a closeup, then pushing you into Samus' first-person view. If you've been waiting ages since Super Metroid for another adventure with Samus Aran, that simple, little theme lets you know, in no uncertain terms, that asskicking is about commence.
  • My Real Daddy:
    • After the base-breaking insanity of Metroid: Other M, many would say that Retro Studios should handle the series from here on out, due to the critical and commercial acclaim of the Metroid Prime Trilogy.
    • The original game was initially developed by Nintendo employees Hirofumi Matsuoka and Hiroji Kiyotake (the later better know nowadays as the creator of Wario) as a linear shooter named Space Hunter. The game was not going well and the entire Nintendo R&D1 department was called in to salvage the project. Faced with the dillema of having to rebuilt the underwhelming game while still respecting the release deadline, Yoshio Sakamoto suggested to make the game non-linear and focused on acquiring permanent power-ups, giving Metroid its distinctive mechanics in the process.
  • Narm Charm: The Gravity Suit is purple in almost every game it shows up in, yet the fans think it looks cool on Samus despite it typically being perceived as a girly color in western culture (and the suit's own gameplay effects help as well). Metroid Prime made it look even cooler by making it a darker purple and giving it a blue visor and lights. Suffice to say, fans weren't thrilled that it was changed to a particle effect in Other M and didn't agree with Yoshio Sakamoto's reasoning that the purple suit looked ridiculous in serious cutscenes. It appears Sakamoto got the memo, as the Gravity Suit is purple again (and is given an upgrade from Palette Swap design-wise, too) in Samus Returns.
  • Never Live It Down:
    • Fans like to say that any planet Samus lands on will explode at some point. To date, that only includes two: Zebes and SR-388. Now space stations, on the other hand...
    • Metroid: Other M is this for Sakamoto, considering he was well respected before the game's controversial decisions cost him credibility in many fans' eyes.
    • It's often said that Samus always loses her gear at the beginning of every games in some contrived circumstances, then has to get it back. It actually happened only twice on-screen in the series: Metroid Prime 1 and 2. Fusion is a third case, in which she loses them before the game starts. Most of the time, her gear from previous games doesn't show up with no reason given.
    • Metroid: Other M has several for Samus, but mostly angsting over the Super Metroid, that she still thinks of as the baby metroid, and her reaction to Ridley.
  • Nightmare Fuel: This series has its own page.
  • Paranoia Fuel: In Metroid Fusion, when the X Parasite takes over your former suit, you get to see a cutscene announcing there's another "Samus" lurking in the game. It has all of Samus's powerups, aside from the Gravity Suit and (oh thank god) the X-ray scope. Good luck trying to play it without being nervous.
  • Sacred Cow: Super Metroid and Metroid Prime are held in very high esteem by virtually the entire fanbase.
  • Scrappy Mechanic:
    • Wall-jumping in Super Metroid, due to the unforgiving timing required to pull it off correctly. Fortunately, there is only one optional occasion where you have to use it before you acquire the Space Jump, which is a much easier way of doing the same thing. Fusion, Zero Mission, and Other M subsequently made wall jumping a lot easier. And then some difficult romhacks of Super make the timing even more unforgiving.
    • Any long-time Metroid player's blood pressure goes up when they see water in a Metroid game. Though this gets MUCH better once you get a certain suit upgrade.
  • "Seinfeld" Is Unfunny:
    • The original Metroid got this in recent years, due to the confusing layout comprised of Cut-and-Paste Environments (which was more of a result of the NES's limitations) and clunky controls. At the time, it was rather innovative, creating the Metroidvania genre and its famous twist at the end of the game, which is pretty much common knowledge by now.
      • To dig its grave even further, a remake of the first game called "Metroid: Zero Mission" not only fixed a lot of the first game's Early Installment Weirdness but many fans prefer to put Zero Mission in Metroid 1's place timeline-wise, pushing it out of Fanon almost entirely.
    • Metroid II is underrated, overshadowed by further instalments and sadly blamed for being more linear and empty than Super Metroid. Despite this, it was the game that brought Save Stations, the space jump, the spiderball and the current design of Samus’ armor. Samus was able to shoot down and kneel for the first time which was easier to kill some enemies. For the story, it was also the game that introduced the evolutions of the metroid species and introduced the “baby”.
      • It doesn't help that, similarly to Metroid and Metroid: Zero Mission, II also got remade. However, in addition to the fan remake in 2016, it also got remade in 2017, both games not only fixing many of the issues with the original but adding a lot of new content that wasn't in the original game.
  • Tainted by the Preview: In 2001, Metroid Prime had fans complaining about the change to 3D FPS, but the game made up for it. And then 14 years later seeing the series revived with Gaiden Game Metroid Prime: Federation Forces lead to a downright hostile reaction.
  • Tear Jerker: Also has its own page.
  • That One Boss: Yakuza, Nightmare, Phantoom. And Ridley is hardly a fair fight, in any game.
  • That One Level: The second play through of Sector 2 TRO, in Fusion, is the hardest part of the game due to the plant overgrowth, lack of weak enemies, and the fact that every enemy you do encounter deals at minimum 1 tank of energy in damage (nevermind the SA-X, who takes 3 of them every time you touch her).
  • They Changed It, Now It Sucks!:
    • Metroid Fusion's linear progression caused waves of Internet Backdraft.
    • Prime 2 uses this as the Space Pirate encounter song, as opposed to Prime 1's song. Tellingly, Prime 3 instead uses a more orchestrated and slightly heavier version of the first game's song.
    • Metroid Other M is now included mostly because of its interpretation of Samus's personality. And the retcon for Adam to be Samus' father figure as opposed to the Chozo Old Bird and Gray Voice.
  • They Wasted a Perfectly Good Plot: The rival hunters' backstories are this.
    • Not only do we never find out what happened to the rest of the Diamont, we never even find out how Spire got separated from them in the first place.
    • Sylux's backstory states that it has a deep-seated hatred of the Galactic Federation, hating Samus by proxy. That's pretty much all we ever find out. Though its ship is seen in The Stinger for Corruption, so there's a chance of developing this. Federation Force's stinger has Sylux steal a Metroid Egg, so it's likely something is going to happen.
  • Tough Act to Follow: According to an interview, this is the reason there was no N64 sequel after Super Metroid. It took two console generations for a worthy successor to come around. After the critically acclaimed Metroid Prime trilogy, Sakamoto's first attempt to bring the series to its original roots was met with mixed reception; his second, while lauded, still had Super Metroid to live up to and wasn't groundbreaking in the same way.
  • Ugly Cute: The Metroids are either this or absolutely terrifying. Alpha Metroids get special mention as they don't look outright terrifying, unlike most of its kin (they lack any sort of visible "latching" point as the membrane the larval Metroids have is now positioned underneath its main body, meaning the topside just looks like a slug or a worm holding onto a transparent ball).
    • Out of the bosses, Crocomire gets this trope all the time. Kraid and Ridley also tend to get it, but not quite as often.
  • Vindicated by History:
    • Metroid II: Return of Samus was considered to be the weakest game in the series for a long time. However, negative reception to games like Hunters, Pinball, Other M, have had it reconsidered to be a respectable entry—especially for one that had to work within the limitations of the original Game Boy. Some even prefer its "Search and Destroy" mechanic to the "Go here and activate this" repetitiveness of later games.
    • Super Metroid was overshadowed at the time of its release by the hype for Donkey Kong Country, people didn't start acknowledging it as one of the greatest games of all time until 1996 or so.
    • Metroid Fusion was originally the black sheep of the franchise, with its focus on storytelling and linearity dividing fans. Now, it's remembered more for its boss fights and interesting deviations, while Other M gets the insults.
  • Win Back the Crowd: There is no doubt 2016 was by and large seen by fans as the culmination of what can be considered a dark age for the franchise. After six years of no new installments in the series following the divisive and underperforming Other M, Metroid Prime: Federation Force was released to disastrous reception and low sales, and a consensus amongst fans that, though it might have attempted, it ultimately failed to undo the damage done by Other M. Around the same time, Nintendo issued the controversial DMCA takedown of Another Metroid 2 Remake, and then largely failed to acknowledge, much less celebrate the series' 30th Anniversary. With Nintendo's E3 2017 event announcing Metroid Prime 4, their own remake of Metroid 2 (which includes a soundtrack disc in retail versions), and two Metroid-themed amiibo, fan optimism has undergone a great and rapid revival. 2018 would follow suit with the rejoicing, with the long-awaited arrival of Ridley and surprise addition of Dark Samus in Super Smash Bros. Ultimate.
  • The Woobie: A young girl is the Sole Survivor of not one, but two holocausts, the first of which happens when she's three?
    • Stoic Woobie: Despite that, she's very powerful and is capable of taking tons of abuse in her armour.

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