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  • Alternate Character Interpretation: Ridley seems to show a bit of empathy toward the three-year-old Samus before trying to kill her. This has been viewed as him faking it to catch her off guard, or a genuine moment of empathy that he ignored and/or him attacking her for making him seem weak. Alternately, he's utterly baffled at how stupid the kid is for trying to befriend him.
  • Complete Monster:
    • Ridley, Arch-Enemy of Samus Aran, is the monstrous, dragon-like military commander and security chief of the Space Pirates, and is the most brutal, vicious and monstrous member of the organization. He is introduced attacking Samus Aran's home colony, and immediately gave orders to his men to slaughter everything in sight and enjoy it to the fullest. When the three-year-old Samus tried to befriend him, Ridley attempted to murder her, killing her mother when she tried to save her daughter. After Samus's father sacrificed himself to destroy Ridley's ship, nearly killing him, Ridley survived by eating the corpse of Samus's mother to heal himself, a fact he later uses to mock Samus. A veteran raider, Ridley has slaughtered dozens of innocent colonies and was the one responsible for annihilating the last of the benevolent Chozo race who had rescued and raised the child Samus. Driven by a relentless and mutual hatred of Samus and his desire to destroy and kill whatever he can sink his claws into, Ridley is one of the most feared beings in the universe and a sadist of the highest order.
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    • Mother Brain was an advanced A.I. who was initially created with peaceful intentions by the dying race known as Chozo, but grew a god complex from her role. In order to take the universe for herself, she trained an orphan named Samus Aran to become her own personal Tyke-Bomb and then allies herself with the vicious Space Pirates while letting them attack the Chozo planet, Zebes, as she felt that she already surpassed the Chozo in terms of intelligence. After Samus discovers Mother Brain's plans in horror, she attempts to manipulate her into joining her side, and when one of the Chozo rebelled against her, she uses the leader of the Space Pirates to kill him. After Samus returned to Planet Zebes during the "Zero Mission" incident, it was revealed that Mother Brain intends to use a dangerous substance known as Metroid and pit the Space Pirates and the Galactic Force members against each other in order to reshape the universe in her own vision.
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  • Fanon Discontinuity: It's considered canon to the series by the creators, but it doesn't entirely mesh well with games' details found, so many who bothered to look it up have decided it's non-canon as a result. Those who don't like it refuse to acknowledge its existence, while those who enjoy it, but nonetheless acknowledge the continuity errors, treat it as Loose Canon or Alternate Continuity so they don't get worked up about the details.
  • First Installment Wins: The manga fleshes out Samus Aran's character and backstory eight years before Metroid: Other M did likewise. Even some of the manga's critics view it as the superior story, avoiding and/or justifying what would be criticized about Other M.
  • Love to Hate: Ridley's character (the first canon time he displayed characterization) was easily the manga's show stealer, and has been widely embraced by the fandom even as opinions towards the rest of the manga remained mixed. His combination of viciousness, sadism, cunning and badassery, plus showing why Samus opposes him, has made destroying him nearly once per game (already the games highlights) even more satisfying. Telling is that around this time Ridley started supplanting the Metroids as the leading foe of the series, if for nothing else, having more reason to root against him.
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  • Moral Event Horizon: While Ridley was always a villain and was expected to be one in this manga, his Establishing Character Moment where he invades K-2L with the pure intent to Kill 'Em All, tries to kill Samus after putting her guard down, and ends up murdering Samus' mother and indirectly her father as well, firmly shows that the Space Pirate Commander is far much worse than just a boss character.
  • Never Live It Down: Ridley being the one who killed Samus' parents. For many, it is the defining facet of his character, frequently receiving mentions in fanworks and discussions of him. Yet the Metroid series as a whole has only mentioned it twice; first in this manga adaptation, and then a brief allusion to it in Metroid Fusion.
  • Rescued from the Scrappy Heap: An odd example, since the manga was technically written well before Other M, but only discovered by most Western fans after Other M's release. People who hated Adam Malkovich's character and relationship with Samus in that game greatly preferred and appreciated his portrayal in the manga, where he is much more of a Reasonable Authority Figure and presents little to no sexist tones.
  • Vindicated by History: The manga was once an obscure piece of Snark Bait among the fandom but began getting much more positive attention after the release of Metroid Other M, both by people who liked and disliked the game. "MOM" supporters used the manga to justify plot and character developments detractors complained about, while detractors also sourced the manga as evidence the plot and character developments they didn't like had been handled better previously.
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