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  • Gaia's Vengeance: Fittingly, The Twelveswood has a version in Woodsin and Greenwrath. Woodsin is when a single individual does something unacceptable to the nature in the Shroud such a killing a sacred animal, or cutting/burning down a sacred tree. Suffering Woodsin marks the individual for death and makes all local wildlife, even normally pacifistic animals like stags, aggressive and murderous towards them. Woodsin can be removed through a Rite of Cleansing ritual to earn the forest's forgiveness. Greenwrath is like Woodsin, except on a regional scale. Ever since the battle of Silvertear Lake, the wards around the Twelveswood have weakened and the change has drained the elementals, making it so that White Mages now every few years are forced to go to the Hedgetree, the closest thing the Genius Loci of the Shroud has to a brain, and lull it to sleep in a Ritual of Calming while under assault from enraged wildlife. If they fail and he fully awakens then he'll decide Gridania has broken the oath of co-existence they made centuries ago, destroy Gridania civilization, and never allow spoken to settle in the Twelveswood again.
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  • Game-Breaking Bug: 4.3 brought with it the ability to place multiple aquariums in a single dwelling, when it had previously been restricted to one. However, if the aquariums overlap with each other, the game freaks out, completely destroying your framerate and potentially making it impossible to even fix the error. The patch notes warned about this and made it clear that any player who does this risks having the offending furniture destroyed entirely when the bugfix drops.
  • Gameplay and Story Integration:
    • Vesper Bay is pretty important to the plot (as it's where the Scions home base is), yet it lacks an Aetheryte Crystal and indeed is the only proper town to lack one, causing you to have to hot foot it from Horizon (if not warp to Limsa Lominsa and take the ferry near the Arcanists' Guild to Vesper Bay instead) every time you want to go there. In the post-2.0 part of A Realm Reborn, it is revealed that the town doesn't have one because the various powerful factions of Eorzea are trying to pressure the Scions into working with them, with strings attached. They all refuse to give the town an Aetheryte Crystal unless the Scions start working with them, which is one reason Alphinaud believes the Scions should move their base elsewhere.
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    • During certain cutscenes, NPCs (and the player character) will openly use Aetheryte teleportation or explicitly refer to it. In a few other cutscenes, spells such as Protect are also used.
    • Pretty much everything related to the Seventh Umbral Era was reflected in game and commented by NPCs during that storyline in 1.0, from weather changes to the increase of monsters' size to the changes in Dalamud.
    • If the player gets a cutscene when logging in at the inn, their character will be without their headgear. According to the developers, that's because "no one sleeps with a hat or a helmet". Glasses, however, will remain on, as sleeping with them on is not unreasonable.
    • NPCs use, and will give you, Linkpearls in A Realm Reborn. You see Raubahn using one to communicate with his troops during the Echo flashback to the battle of Carteneau and Bahamut's release, and Minfilia gives you one during the plot so she can stay in touch.
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    • Each spellcaster class has a different style of mana management, and this is part of the lore. Conjurers and White Mages have reserves of powerful spells, but can easily run dry if incautious — and their tutor warns that White Magic was normally restricted to Padjal in part because overuse of magic drained enough aether from the land to cause an entire Umbral Age. Thaumaturges and Black Mages have structured lessons about the ebb and flow of aether through Umbral and Astral ages, and correspondingly burn through mana in Astral Fire then use Umbral Ice to regenerate MP. Arcanists are told about the value of planning, and correspondingly must manage Aetherflow, buffs, and debuffs, for up a minute in advance.
    • Similarly, the Bard job trainer speaks of the importance of Bardic music to inspire allies, and how one should always put their allies' needs in battle first, before their own vanity and personal glory. In gameplay, this translates as Bard being the most support-oriented DPS job, having less personal DPS than others, but having a host of abilities to boost their allies' DPS in various ways, increase the effectiveness of healing, refresh resources, reduce damage vulnerability, and more.
    • The fact that you can fight Primals over and over is also integrated into the plot: They cannot really be killed and can just be summoned again. Bosses that you'd never ever fight again because they couldn't be re-summoned like a Primal have their harder modes explained via other means, such as losing yourself in a bard's embellished retelling of your original encounter with them, or fighting a simulacrum made of the resident Precursors' technology used for training purposes. Even dungeons show time marching onwards, as Hard Modes are, rather than the same dungeon but harder, the dungeon after time has passed and newer, bigger threats have moved in among other changes.
    • One of the first quests for Dark Knights teaches about careful use of the power of one's own inner darkness, using just enough to grant them the strength needed to stand against their foes, without letting the darkness consume them and leaving them vulnerable to their enemies. Much like the spellcasting examples above, this translates to careful and balanced use of the Dark Knight's various high-MP-cost spells and abilities. Trying to use too many at once without using their MP restoring abilities will severely reduce their ability for damage dealing, damage mitigation, and holding enmity of their foes.
    • Why do you have to teleport to aetherytes? Why can't you just teleport anywhere you wish? Because you could possibly die from it! As explained in lore books, aetherytes are situated in areas where the physical and aetherial planes are closest to one another, with the aetherytes serving as beacons to allow a person to rematerialize their bodies and souls safely. Without them, they would be lost in the Lifestream and run the risk of having their bodies break down completely into aether. The spell "Flow" allows one to teleport anywhere they wish, at least in theory: in practice, it is so difficult to use that using it means risking one's life, and even if you manage to re-emerge from the lifestream, your body and aether will suffer for it. Thancred managed to return under his own strength, but completely lost his ability to use magic. Both times Y'shtola used Flow, she needed outside help to return, and the first time she did, she lost her eyesight.
    • Tied into the resource management above, the Red Mage job trainer explains that the pioneers of the job consisted of the White Mages of Amdapor and Black Mages of Mhaach who had joined other refugees in the Gyr Abanian mountains to escape the 6th Umbral Calamity of a massive world wide flood caused by the War of the Magi set prior to the events of the game, due to the land being drained of aether. Faced with the anger and destruction caused by their actions, the members of the two sides put aside their differences, and swore to repay their debts to civilization by helping with rebuilding and protecting the weak. They also swore a vow to only use the reserves of aether within their bodies to power their spells to avoid another Calamity. In game, this translates to Red Mages having no built-in ability to restore MP quickly, only that which gets restored naturally over time and requiring help from other party members or the use of items to get MP back any faster.
      • Red Mages are also described as entirely using spells which happen up front, rather than over time. This directly translates to gameplay, as their equivalent of the White Mage spell "Aero" and the Black Mage spell "Thunder" are long-cast but instantly-damaging spells, as opposed to the quickly-cast Damage Over Time spells that they are for White and Black Mage.
    • Glamour of all things is used in the main story of Stormblood. Yes, the mechanic you use you make your gear's appearance change and is purely cosmetic is used as part of a major plan: lacking the manpower to take over an Imperial Castrum, the Alliance and Resistance makes a plan to glamor the Imperial flag into one of their own, making it look like they had successfully taken the outpost, and causing the Imperials to flee, thinking they had lost. It works. A literal False Flag Operation, anyone?
    • At least in Stormblood, certain side quests have their basic stories changed depending on how far you've progressed. For instance, an NPC in a run-down village may need your help because the Imperials make things tough enough as-is. But if you've driven the Imperials out, it changes to they need your help so they can get back on their feet. Possibly doubles as Developers' Foresight.
    • Occasionally, the main story will reference your job. For example, if you're a Dragoon, Estinien will recognize you and promise he's not there to fight this time toward the end of A Realm Reborn; he'll also frequently address you as a fellow Azure Dragoon during Heavensward. In Stormblood, if you're a healer, Krile calls you to assist with healing Y'shtola after her run-in with Zenos.
    • This sometimes happens with race, as well. If you're Xaela, for example, an NPC in the Azim Steppes will talk about how your parents must have fed you a traditional Xaela dish as a child.
    • Your Grand Company will affect the dialogue you get occasionally. For instance, story quests that involve the Immortal Flames, if you are a member of that company, will have members of the Flames address you by your rank, including Raubahn. Sometimes the dialogue will change in other ways, including your commander saying that the fact you are an Immortal Flame makes it a better idea for him to give you the sensitive information you are asking him for.
    • While, as noted below, some boss fights treat you as alone despite being in a party, others fully integrate the idea of having a party into the story. The fight against the colossal Dravanian "siege engine" Vishap in A Realm Reborn is a good example - a large part of the story leading up to it involves desperately trying to recruit the assistance of the Grand Companies of Eorzea to defend Ishgard; when that fails, the Scions go around recruiting adventurers to help, instead. The seven people you do the fight with are implied to be some of those adventurers you recruited.
      • Lampshaded by the in-game dialogue before the fight with Susano. Lyse will muse that it's likely there will be friends of yours nearby who happen to be on a trip in the area who can help you.
      • The Final Boss of the Shadowbringers expansion involves summoning Heroes of Light from the other Shards, who make up your party for the actual boss fight.
    • The expense of acquiring and maintaining an aethernet within a city is implicitly acknowledged by the number of aethernet shards and their convenience for getting around in the three major city-states. Ul'dah, the wealthiest of the three city-states, has aethernet shards in close proximity to every single guild and other important area of the city, while Gridania and Limsa Lominsa require a fair bit of hoofing it to where you're needed even after using the aethernet, especially in Limsa Lominsa's upper decks, where a single aethernet shard at the center is the closest you can directly teleport to for anything in the southern half of the decks.
    • The final boss battle of the main story of Shadowbringers plays with this wherein the Big Good uses a spell to summon extra-dimensional help for your character, placing 7 summoning circles around your character. When the raid starts, the Big Bad turns expecting a single near death Warrior of Darkness in one of several Whole Plot Reference to the end battle of Final Fantasy 4, only to watch as 7 additional alt timeline Warriors of Darkness — your raid party members — step out of the summoning circles, ready for battle.
    • The implementation of New Game+ in 5.2 is justified by the ending of Shadowbringers's story as the Warrior of Darkness regaling a curious child with tales of their deeds before coming to Norvrandt.
    • Travel logistics are worked into how the games' armies move, in 4.5 Hien explicitly says that the main Doman fighting force will be delayed arriving in Eorzia as crossing the south sea (and having to avoid the Garlean home continent of Iselbard) takes time, and not every fighter has the necessary Aetherpool to just teleport halfway across the world. Hien himself, Yugiri, and a decent chunk of Doman fighters are still present in time for the Ghimlyt Dark dungeons however, because they attuned to the aetheryte crystals in Ala Mhigo during the fight to take the city; just like the player does when they find a new aetheryte, so they could just teleport there.
  • Gameplay and Story Segregation: Though the game does a fair amount of trying to incorporate the story into the class's abilities, and certainly averts a fair amount of "Dude, Where's My Respect?", there are some cases where this does occur.
    • The 2.x storyline has some problems integrating an Au Ra player character and acknowledging their race when it should. To wit:
      • Firstly, there are a number of Au Ra NPCs in Heavensward whose backstories include some persecution for looking like dragons. Nobody so much as bats an eyelash at your player dragon-person, however, to the point that you can walk into Camp Dragonhead without molestation and make friends with Haurchefant without issue, well before Yugiri is even introduced. Speaking of which...
      • The patch 2.2 quest line introduced Yugiri, the game's first Au Ra NPC. She covers herself completely sans her tail to hide her features, explicitly stating she does not wish to provoke a fuss by scaring people who'd be unnerved by an unfamiliar race. On a technical level, this was an excuse to cover up the fact that there wasn't an Au Ra female model yet, and the game uses a very heavily modified Miqo'te model for her instead. This can be quite jarring if you started the game after Heavensward launched and you're already playing an Au Ra character, as not only have you been wandering around the land showing your true heritage, but by this point in the story you're a national hero, well-known by many across Eorzea. It gets especially weird during the meeting in the Quicksand, as Yugiri mentions not wanting to alarm people by taking off her veil while your out-in-the-open character sits across the table from her in the very same shot, and doesn't even react to this assertion.
      • In the same questline, you also see the opening of the Rogues' Guild to the rest of Limsa Lominsa, and Yugiri offering to train them in the ways of the ninja. While at the time it was a suitably cool introduction for rogues and ninjas into the game, post-patch all players could join the Rogues' Guild as soon as they'd gotten far enough into the game to start joining multiple guilds, meaning that you could be a level 50+ ninja already trained by Yugiri witnessing her introducing ninjitsu to the Rogues' Guild in the first place. And that's not getting into the fact that even when you do play as a Rogue and reach the point where you can become a ninja, the story still treats ninja as an entirely new development that your Rogues' Guild compatriots have never heard of before.
    • While the Au Ra is the most visible victim of this for the above reasons, there are a few other cases where your character's race is never acknowledged even when it makes sense, such as in the case of the Archers' Guild questline. Silvairre makes it clear several times that he feels the Wildwood Elezen are the only "true" masters of archery as their people created it, and that everyone else not of them in the guild is simply "parodying" it - you included, even when you yourself are playing as a Wildwood Elezen.
    • Early in Heavensward, after assuring the heads of House Fortemps that you and the remaining Scions will attempt to display they only mean to be upstanding guests to Ishgard, and will seek to avoid causing any trouble for their hosts, one of the first things players can do is become a Dark Knight. The first two quests? Allying your self with a Dark Knight that just got done fighting some Temple Knights, and then launching an assault on the Ishgard inquisition's headquarters for their abuse of powers. No one in Ishgard outside of the Dark Knight's quest chain will bat an eye about this. Some of the later Dark Knight quests call into question how much of that actually happened, however.
    • As the game is an MMO, a lot of bosses are fought as part of a party. However, in some cases, the lore heavily implies you fought them alone. This is further strengthened when you notice cutscenes in the middle of a dungeon, raid, or whatever, almost without fail, will not show any of your other party members - and on the rare occasions they do (pretty much solely The Praetorium) nobody else particularly acknowledges that they're even there. This is clearly the case at the end of Heavensward, the Ascians and Thordan all speak in a manner suggesting you are the only person there. Thordan is actually absolutely terrified after being beaten, actually wondering what the hell you are, not who you are. You are the only person present in the cutscene. In fact the main questline (and some of the job quests too) generally makes the player out to be a chosen and unique individual, even though in reality every single player has the same powernote .
    • As usual for an MMO as well, Death Is a Slap on the Wrist for players but almost always permanent for NPCs in the story. Hand Waved as the Echo showing you what could go wrong if you fail, not as you actually dying.
    • Also as usual for MMOs, you're expected to just accept as granted that older content canonically takes place prior to newer content, regardless of what order you actually play it in. The prototypical example of this is the level 50 Culinarian quest, released in 2.0, which has you cooking a meal for the Sultana of Ul'dah, even if you do this between the 2.55 main story quests and the 3.0 level 54 quests, where she is apparently assassinated and no hint is given that she might still be alive.
    • Following the Seventh Astral Era main story questline, despite the fact that the player is Persona Non Grata in Ul'dah and practically all of Thanalan, there's no reason you can't simply wander around, business as usual. Slightly handwaved in that the only people who know what happened and believe you're guilty of the crimes you're accused of are too flat-out terrified of you to do anything but pretend they don't see you walking around. Heavensward later explains that Merlywb and Kan-E-Senna called bullshit on the accusations and told the Syndicate to not reveal anything until they have concrete proof.
    • In Patch 4.2, the Scions have a money problem thanks to the expense of retrieving Gosetsu's sword and are forced to take up some odd jobs. This can be despite the fact that you're holding on to anywhere from tens of thousands to millions of gil (Jessie even points out that you wear enough expensive equipment that you could have bought a house with it) and any attempt to give any of that away is instantly rebuffed. Moreover, while the money problems are brought up in the main quest, actually doing anything about them is relegated to sidequests, so you can happily ignore your organization's apparent economic issues as long as you want.
    • In the Ixali beast tribe quests, you craft a variety of airship parts to help make their prototype ship flight worthy. However, you can use any crafter class to make the parts, so you can end up using Culinarian to somehow cook ship parts into being. The game doesn't even try to justify it, it just works. This is good as the quests are a good source of experience when leveling crafters from 1 to 50.
    • The cutscenes for the Binding Coil of Bahamut still feature Alisaie even after she falls into a coma at the end of the Stormblood main story quests. A cutscene during the main story quests for Stormblood also mentions the events of the Binding Coil even if you haven't even started them. Likewise, Urianger remains a perennial tenant at the Waking Sands even through the end of 4.x through into Shadowbringers, where his soul was called to the First.
    • Alisaie's status as a Red Mage in Stormblood also makes several assumptions of what you've done. Alisaie speaks of the Red Mage trainer, X'rhun, as if you've never heard of him before, even though you can become a Red Mage as soon as you hit level 50 in the final stretch of the 2.0 storyline. In turn, X'rhun talks about Alisaie as if you're familiar and on good terms with her, even if you become a Red Mage as soon as possible and haven't so much as touched the Binding Coil questline. Amusingly, the introduction to the 60-70 questline for Red Mage does take into account whether you've beaten the 4.0 MSQ before starting it.
    • The introduction of the Hrothgar causes this if you start one from level 1. Much ado is made about Fantastic Racism against beastmen - even the Hrothgar's character creation screen calls attention to it - and by all accounts, eloquence aside, Hrothgar fit almost every description of a stereotypically discriminated-against beastfolk. Regardless since you're still a player character you'll still eventually become the Warrior of Light that people pretty much worship with no racism ever thrown your way.
  • Gay Groom in a White Tux: Two male players can invoke this trope at their eternal bonding event, though they can go with any color they wish. If they took the free wedding, it's enforced, as white will be the only tux color available.
  • Gender Bender: The Phial of Fantasia allows you to change the entirety of your character's appearance, including gender. The Retainer Fantasia is the same, but for retainers.
  • Genius Bruiser: Moenbryda Wilfsunnwyn is an example of this. She is a researcher who prefers an axe to defend herself with.
  • Ghostly Goals: Within the First, there are multiple specters of a group of Warriors from a century ago who seem to be going around randomly causing havoc. It turns out that though generally mindless, each one is performing acts related to something about them when they were alive. Branden has been violently hunting down people with certain jewelry, it turns out that in life they belonged to a princess that he vowed his life to, so in death he is just protecting his liege's possessions.
  • Goggles Do Something: The Scions of the Seventh Dawn, minus Minfillia and yourself, are outfitted with special goggles that allows them to detect aetheric energies. The gameplay-obtained "Scion Adventurer's Outfit" set and the various Mog Station-purchased outfits based on the other Scion's outfits have them, but they don't work for you, putting this in Goggles Do Nothing.
  • Gosh Dang It to Heck!: This little gem:
    What the kupo do you think you're doing?!
  • Global Currency Exception: Gil is generally accepted everywhere for most purchases, but...
    • The Grand Companies allow access to their stocks only with Company Seals, which can only be spent with the company that gave them to you.
    • The shopmasters at the Wolves' Den only trade in Wolf Marks, earned through Player Versus Player.
    • Huntmasters only trade in Allied Seals, which are earned only from participating in The Hunt. Heavensward introduced Centurio Seals, which are essentially an elite version of Allied Seals, which are also used in Stormblood. Shadowbringers uses Sacks of Nuts.
    • Endgame gear is usually bought with Allagan Tomestones, of which a new variety is introduced (and older ones removed) through patch cycles: Philosophy, Mythology, Soldiery, Poetics, Law, Scripture, Lore, Verity, Creation, Mendacity, Genesis, and Goetia. As of Stormblood, the devs seem to have settled on Poetics for Infinity Minus One gear at former level caps, and the newest variety (or varieties) for gear at the current level cap.
    • Similarly to Allagan Tomestones, Rowena's House of Splendors also provides the endgame crafting and gathering gear and various exclusive materials in exchange for colored Scrips, which is in turn obtained by trading in Collectables beyond a certain value. This gear generally outlevels the best gears that can be crafted in-game for a given expansion by 10, but cannot be melded with any materia. Additionally, the body gears are class exclusive, making it impractical for players who have multiple Disciples of Hand classes at max level.
    • The Manderville Gold Saucer only takes Manderville Gold Saucer Points, or MGP, for minigame fees and prize redemption. Unusually, there is a (very low) cap on how much MGP you can straight-up buy — the vast majority of MGP for that shiny mount or minion will have to be won.
    • The only payment retainers will accept for doing ventures is special coins called... ventures.
    • The various beast tribes all have a special shop that only accepts their special currency, earned by completing their daily quests. Annoyingly, the A Realm Reborn beast tribes don't start giving out this currency until you've ranked up their reputation significantly, while later beat tribes start at the required reputation to give you their currency.
  • Gods Need Prayer Badly:
    • True for the primals, at the very least. Unusually, and rather nastily, if the primals feel they aren't getting enough worship, they can compel it by a process called "tempering," which produces slavish worshippers from ordinary people and plays a key role in the main quest. The Grand Companies are also aware of this, and as there is no known means of removing the tempering, are forced to kill several allied soldiers so tempered to prevent them from strengthening the primals.
    • Gaius says that the Eorzean Twelve are the exact same: "They need crystals and worship, no different from the beastmen eikons." He raises a valid point, but the Twelve have not physically appeared in person to temper anyone, as of yet, though the Primals accuse you of being tempered by Hydaelyn, a claim which makes a disturbing amount of sense.
    • Exploited by the Big Bad of the 3.0 storyline: the leader of the Church of Ishgard, Archbishop Thordan VII. He uses centuries of Ishgardian worship and the energies of the Warring Triad bound in Azys Lla to make himself into a god-king by becoming the primal Knights of the Round.
    • Earlier in 3.0, Hraesvelgr effectively explains what the primals are, making this lean a little away from this trope: what is summoned isn't actually a god, but the aetheric manifestation of their fervent prayers and desires. You can see this as early as the final Hildebrand quest in 2.5 when Gilgamesh summons Enkidu in this manner by simply reminiscing about him while standing next to a large quantity of crystals. This ends up breaking Ysayle as she wholeheartedly believed that she was the reincarnation of Shiva.
  • Going Through the Motions: It's shown heavily in most cutscenes when characters are using stock emotes to express themselves while also using the same "turn in place before walking away" motions as well. Plot important cutscenes use a mixture of generic animations and motion captured animations.
  • Gold Makes Everything Shiny: You can get a golden coated Magitek mech if you manage to rack up 500 commendations. Gold dyes can also turn your gear into a shiny coat of gold. Yes, even cloth robes.
  • Goodbye, Cruel World!: An NPC in the Coerthas Western Highlands can sometimes be found near the edge of the cliff and says the trope word for word before going off the edge. You can see a few other people hanging from the edge and there's even a body at the bottom of the pit. However, said "body" turns out to be alive and he curses the softness of the snow that broke his fall.
  • Good-Guy Bar:
    • The first place you visit after arriving in your city of choice. Also where you can take guildleve quests for an entire region, as opposed to the very local ones other levemetes hand out.
    • Mor Dhona has a bar where the local adventurers meet. In the back is the Rising Stones, a private bar the Scions use as their Headquarters.
  • Gory Discretion Shot: At the end of Wanderer's Palace (Hard), when the Tonberries rush in for stabby revenge against their now-defeated captor, all you get to see is a Reaction Shot of your character wincing and one of your party members backing away slowly.
  • Gotta Collect Them All: There's a ton of stuff you can collect in the game that are 100% optional and doesn't affect your gameplay in any way, but players do collect as much as they can for the sake of it (some are gone for good due to being linked to a limited time event). Minions, mounts, cards, and gear from achievements are just a handful of things you can make a collection of.
  • Got Me Doing It: The Serpent Commander in the Shantotto crossover storyline begins speaking in rhyme before catching himself.
  • Got Volunteered: After you bring a weakened Namazu back to the Namazu mansion, events quickly happen that ends with the Warrior of Light being drafted into helping them put together a festival. The expression on their face is one of clear annoyance. Later on when asked by the Mol tribe leader to help them, you can say hells no, but she will tell you that you should do it anyway. And it's clear you don't take their plight too seriously, as when at one point one of the Namazu says he had a vision that all Namazu will be extinct in 7 years, it cuts to the Warrior of Light's very passive fate. The Namazu even lampshades this, saying you should at least pretend to be distressed about their plight.
  • Gratuitous English: The Goblins speak like this due not fully grasping the language everyone else speaks. According to Word of God, Goblins are mostly traders and they try to learn how to speak English / Eorzean so that they can communicate with everyone and make trades with them.
    • Gratuitous German: According to Word of God, the way the German language can string nouns together to form new words is the basis for many of the peculiar words the Goblins use, such as "Lipflaps" for "talking".
  • Gravity Barrier: Scattered everywhere in the form of steep cliffs and deep water. Heavensward continues the trend, though once you get the ability to fly, the barriers become trivial except for the edges of the map. You also can't dismount anywhere you're not meant to walk otherwise.
  • The Great Flood: The calamity that ended the Fifth Astral Era was the Calamity of Water. The War of the Magi used so much aether that an imbalance caused a LOT of water aspected aether to generate, and triggered a devastating flood that drowned out much of Eorzea.
  • Great Offscreen War:
    • The United Eorzea-Garlemald War at the end of Legacy is this for players starting in A Realm Reborn. We've seen the end, but Legacy players get to participate it.
    • The Dragonsong War. We know how it started and how it ends, but we don't know what happened in between except "dragons died and people fried".
  • Grey and Gray Morality: While the player and the Scions are very strictly opposed to the Primals and the Garlean Empire, the situation is far more complicated than it seems at first glance.
    • On the villainous side, The Garlean Empire are not solely composed of generic conquistadors bent on conquest. For every Nael van Darnus, who is driven by pure ego and landlust to crush Eorzea under his heel and purposely causes a Colony Drop out of delusion, there seems to be a Gaius van Baelsar, who genuinely believes Eorzea stands to benefit from Garlean leadership and intervention in their Forever War with the Beastmen and does everything he does, including digging up and reactivating an Artifact of Doom, with the best of intentions. Both kinds of individual Garlean have to be stopped, but while one is because of their general badness, the other is because their good ideas tend to be bad for Eorzea in practise. Further, Garlemald is just as opposed to the Primals as anyone else, and part of Gaius' plan for invading Eorzea was to use the aforementioned Artifact of Doom (the Ultima Weapon) as a permanent solution to the threat they posed, though sadly it also did things Gaius didn't know about.
    • The Primals are a big issue for the world around them (given how they make things worse just by showing up for even a second), but some of them are more noble than others. They all love their Beastmen followers like their children and refer to them as such, and the Beastmen genuinely consider them benevolent deities. Speaking of, there are five groups of Beastmen who don't subscribe to the destructive ways of their kin, and they all show how any of the beast tribes could, in theory, behave like helpful and functional members of society, if they would just stop worshipping their Primal of choice for five minutes.
    • On the heroic side, the Scions are all obviously good-hearted heroes just trying to save the world, but they seem to be better at responding to imminent threats than preventing new ones from arising, or working to disable the issue that caused the threat in the first place or prevent the problem from happening again. Meanwhile, the city states are bogged down by social problems that the Garleans and Beastmen are not responsible for. Ul'dah is struck through with severe economic imbalance and an astonishing level of corruption, enough so that the corrupt among the Brass Blades don't even try to pretend being honest men. Gridianan society's willingness to work under the Elementals leads to effective xenophobia and some very harsh laws, and they are by far the most racially bigoted and intolerant nation of the Alliance, openly oppressing Duskwright Elezen and Keeper of the Moon Miqo'te due to how their isolationist and heavily hunting-based lifestyles clash with the will of the Elementals. Finally, the Limsa Lominsan city of "former" pirates isn't as reformed as they would like you to think. Furthermore, while they seem happy to believe the Beastmen (except the Sylphs) are Always Chaotic Evil, in reality some of the aforementioned Forever War is at least partially their own fault.
    • And then there's Ala Mhigo, Ul'dah's fallen neighbor city state, who is outright being snubbed and discarded and a target of the city-states' contempt — indeed, one part of the main scenario storyline in A Realm Reborn involves your character helping some Ala Mhigan refugees out, because no one else will. On the flip side however, some of this lack of support is partly Ala Mhigo's own fault, or at least that of its resistance forces. Before its fall, Ala Mhigo was very warrior-oriented, worshiping Rhalgr, the Destroyer as their chief deity. Their natural belligerence led them to start quite a few wars with neighboring states, including the infamous Autumn War with Gridania. According to some of the refugees, it was ruled by a tyrant of a king before the Garleans showed up. The Garleans defeated them by helping to stir up the discontentment and anger against that king, weakening its defenses before rolling in and conquering it. Additionally, the Resistance has a rather bad habit of attacking their enemies even when greatly outmatched, not only getting many of their own members killed, but also risking further aggression against the remaining free city-states while they're in the middle of rebuilding their forces to take on the empire. Even worse, some of the more hot headed members of the Resistance are attempting a few brilliant ideas such as trying to summoning Rhalgr in Primal form. The player is tasked during the main storyline to stop that particular idea, and allowing cooler heads to prevail.
      • It really does not help their case that when you meet them, they are cartoonishly unfriendly and treat the player and other outsiders like dirt, even when the people in question are just trying to help them. Case in point: they refuse simple treatments for sore throats and other minor afflictions because they're Ul'dah alchemical potions rather than traditional Ala Mhigo remedies of questionable reliability, which forces the player into fetch-quest mode to satisfy their stubbornness. Also, those same young hotheads intent on trying to summon Rhalgr? They try to get the crystals necessary for the ritual by stealing from the Amalj'aa, who predictably respond by killing most of them, on top of trying to kill off the player to keep their plans a secret and considering going back to get the crystals again after most of them are killed and you save what's left of them.
    • The majority of the Syndicate in Ul'dah in patch 2.2 cold-heartedly refuse to grant refugees from Doma sanctuary purely because the Syndicate feels that A) the city has no resources to take in more immigrants (even though the city is financially well off), B) think the Doman refugees will just mooch off the aid from the Immortal Flames as everyone else had supposedly done, and C) fear that the refugees will turn into criminals once they see there's no chance to find work to support themselves. The majority rule comes after the refugees explained that they fled from a war and that they have children back on the ship who desperately need food. Yes, the Syndicate is willing to turn people away and let them and their children starve just to pinch a few gil, though the concerns raised about the city's financial state isn't too far off the mark. They also point out that the same members at the table in favor of allowing the Doman's refugee status in their lands weren't as kind to the Ala Mhigans fleeing the empire over 15 years ago in the story.
    • Ishgard, located in Coerthas, is a theocratic city state, dedicated almost completely to Halone, the Fury. They're so focused on their crusade against all of dragon-kind, that they've pulled a Face Heel Door Slam not once, not twice, but three times on the other three city-states in the past two decades in game. First they split off from the original Grand Companies before the events of the main story. Then they outright refused to assist the reformed Grand Companies in forming an alliance in the events leading up to the Calamity. And then they pull off the hat trick, again during the main story by refusing to join the alliance once more after the Calamity, preferring to remain neutral in the Eorzean-Garlean war.note  Additionally, those accused of being a witch/heretic in service to dragon-kind have a trial that will end in your death either way, with you proven guilty for sprouting dragon wings or being rescued by dragons, or proven innocent by dying from hitting the ravine's bottom from a high height. Have we also mentioned they are particularly suspicious of strangers, and haven't allowed anyone into their city who isn't a citizen for years?
      • The Ishgardian/Dravanian war is full of this. On the negative side, the Archbishop of Ishgard perpetuates a lie that the Dravanians were the original cause of the war between the two and wishes to become a god to wipe out the Dravanians permanently, and many of his closest knights are rather blood thirsty. And Nidhogg wants all Ishgardians, regardless of birth or connection to the war, to suffer and refuses to acknowledge that the Ishgardians of today are not the Ishgardians that started the war 1000 years ago. On the bright side, one can certainly see why Nidhogg would be furious, his sister was betrayed and slaughtered by people he and the other Dravanians thought were allies. And on the bright side for the Archbishop of Ishgard, he acknowledges that Niddhog's rage is fully justified, but he doesn't believe that the currently living Ishgardians should have to suffer for the mistakes of their ancestors; and he is afraid if the truth of the origin of the war were to get out, Ishgard would crumble. And despite his delusions of godhood, he does wish to be a benevolent one for Ishgard.
    • Given that the ancient Nymian Scholars used their knowledge, wisdom, and fairies to protect their army of marauders from hostile nations (in addition to taking on the role of doctors during times of peace), it's certainly conceivable that the minor city state Nym actually averted this trope. However, seeing as how it lies in ruins today, destroyed 1500 years ago when a plague transformed all of its people into Tonberries, we will probably never know for sure.
  • Guest Fighter:
    • Lightning from Final Fantasy XIII showed up in a series of chapters via events for a few weeks where players can fight alongside her and earn some unique gear based on Lightning's game.
    • Shantotto from Final Fantasy XI dropped by for a while, making you fight a giant doll that looked like her.
    • Iroha from XI also appeared in Eorzea (at the same time as the end of her story was released in her game), wondering why she's not in Vana'diel and trying to refresh her memories and training - at the end of her quest, when she remembers it all, she's willing but incapable to returning, and appears to be stuck in Eorzea for the time being.
    • Noctis from Final Fantasy XV came by for another event, needing the Ironworks' help in repairing the Regalia and fighting alongside you to take on Niflheim Empire soldiers and a different version of Garuda, with event rewards including Noctis' outfit and your own version of the Regalia.
  • Guest-Star Party Member: By the buttload. Every other quest has you teaming up with someone during your solo quests so things aren't too difficult for you. One can also consider other players as guest party members since you'll likely to never see them again after your party finishes the quest unless said party is a premade organized group that you know.
    • Becomes especially prominent in the 3.0 storyline, as Alphinaud accompanies you across Ishgard and Dravania, often helping you throughout quests. You're also later accompanied by the Azure Dragoon Estinien and the leader of the Ishgardian heretics Ysayle, the Lady Iceheart, and later still Y'shtola, rescued from the Lifestream after her Heroic Sacrifice in the conclusion of the 2.55 story.
  • Guide Dang It!: Legacy was every bit as bad about this as its predecessor. ARR was developed to be a little less obtuse.
    • Patch 2.35 introduced the ability to dye your chocobo via feeding it snacks that alter its colors. While each snack says what colors they darken or lighten, getting the exact color you want or just trying to figure out how the color changes work in general has zero information in the game.
    • Fishing starts out fairly simple but even just figuring out where to find certain types of fish can be frustrating pretty quickly. And then the game introduces various requirements for each such as weather and time of day without any information on those found anywhere in the game besides sometimes the name of the fish or the quest descriptions.
    • The boss on the 100th floor in the Palace of the Dead can overwhelm you with his minions that he always seems to revive no matter how many times you put them down. The trick to killing the minions for good is to defeat them, use a Pomander of Resolution to change form and use that form's power on the dead bodies to remove them from the battlefield, which prevents their Resurrection. Nothing in the game ever explains this.
    • The Sightseeing log. In theory, it was a neat way to show off some of the beautiful locals, as well as provide the player with some history. In practice, it requires you to find a location, then perform the correct action at the correct time in the correct weather. You're given a clue that usually makes the location easy to find and suggests which emote to do, but few clues provide hints to both the time and the weather. Even with a guide, some of the weather/time locations are rare enough that you could spend days just trying to get a single one of them. Heavensward and Stormblood removed the weather/time restriction, put large glowing markers on the vistas, and reduced the possible emotes to just "/lookout" and "/pray", making it much less frustrating.
    • Though not as bad as the Sightseeing log, the various Hunting Logs and Hunt Marks can require a guide to show precisely where the mobs spawn. You're given the region and area name, but this can be extremely imprecise as some of them only appear in one tiny location in the entire game, a location you might not have any need to ever go to otherwise. And because the Hunting Logs are tiered, it's very easy to miss one or two mobs in a low-level log which necessitates a great deal of backtracking if you want to finish them later. An update added a button to the flier that opens your map directly to the area they're supposed to be at, though it's only good for vaguely narrowing down where they can be, since the map will point to the center of whichever area bears that name, which will often be nowhere near where the enemies in question actually appear.
    • A minor instance with Astrologian before 5.0, where gaining the "Spread" ability (to hold away a drawn card and use it later) also unlocked an "Undraw Spread" ability (to put a held-over card away without using it, much like regular "Undraw" to put away cards you've drawn normally). The problem is that, while Spread was put on your hotbar when you unlock it as normal, Undraw Spread wasn't. Since the game generally doesn't hold newly-unlocked class-specific actions away until you look them up and put them on your hotbar yourself like this, it was easy to assume such an ability simply didn't exist until you got curious as to why that would be and looked around the actions menu or look it up online.note 
  • Half-Human Hybrid: According to Word of God, each of the five (Au Ra, Hrothgar and Viera haven't been mentioned yet) playable races can mate and produce viable offspring with each other, even Lalafell and Roegadyn, though in-universe most seem to frown upon this sort of mix-breeding. In Heavensward you meet your first halfblood, Hilda the Mongrel, the daughter of an Elezen nobleman and Hyur maid. She looks more like a Hyur than Elezen, but also has pointy ears.
  • Hard Levels, Easy Bosses: The Palace of the Dead is mostly this. While the bosses themselves aren't exactly a walk in the park, they are quite easy compared to the enemies you encounter before you get to the floor that has the boss (usually by floor 41 and deeper). When you get close to floor 200, some enemies will be so absurdly strong that if you don't avoid or interrupt their attacks, it's a One-Hit Kill and a potential Total Party Wipe.
  • Harder Than Hard: The "Extreme" version of the primal fights, which require near perfect coordination with your team and knowing the mechanics inside out. There are also "Savage" versions of the Second Coil of Bahamut, Alexander and Omega that are far more punishing than the normal raids.
  • Haunted House: Haukke Manor and, during the Halloween event, the carnival-attraction variety run by the Continental Circus.
  • Have a Gay Old Time: A modern example thanks to the pseudo-antiquated script in the English version. The word "queer" is often used to mean strange, among other examples.
    • In one of the Dark Knight quests, a character mentions an old tale called "The Boy and the Dragon Gay". It doesn't have anything to do with homosexuality.
  • Head Pet: Some minions will sit on a player character's shoulder when resting, either at random, on command, or all the time. If you play a Lalafell, however, due to their small size, said minions instead opt to rest on your head.
  • Healing Factor: Your HP/MP/TP slowly regenerate over time. If you are not on the enmity list of any enemies, the regeneration rate is significantly faster. Several abilities can also boost the regeneration.
  • Heel Realization: In "For Those We Have Lost", a young woman tries to rally the Ishgardians to throw away the ideas of peace with the Dravanians, filled with hatred and vengeance for her lost husband. In "For Those We Can Yet Save", once she hears that Aymeric doesn't want those who fought to be forgotten and that they should be remembered for giving the future a chance to live, she breaks down into tears, realizing how foolish she was.
  • Hello, [Insert Name Here]: Naturally, this being an MMORPG. Interestingly though, you pick both a given name AND a surname, and depending on the situation you will be called by one or the other, rather than the entire thing all the time. An NPC lampshades the trope by telling you that there's a seventh hell made for people who sign up for a guild with an "amusing" (read: offensive) name.
    • Was actually made fun of in 1.0 Legacy by a certain levequest NPC the first time you met him, saying this line before calling you by your actual name:
      Diego Athral: "Why, if it isn't Sephiroth! Or was it Sefiross? Sethirophx? xXxSephirothxXx? There are so many adventurers with similar names these days, it is so hard to recall them all."
  • Helmets Are Hardly Heroic: Averted because they're damned useful and played straight. The Midlander male who serves as the main representative character of Final Fantasy XIV wears a helmet as a warrior. A stray shot from a Garlean gunblade shatters it completely in the End of an Era cinematic, allowing his face to be seen in full detail and revealing him as the representative character.
    • That said, he never replaces his helmet until he switches to Dragoon to defend Ishgard.
    • Can be done by the players as well. Any head gear can be made invisible from view simply by hitting a button in their character equipment window, hiding it from view. There's also several high level tanking gear that, rather than featuring helmets as the head gear, has crowns and circlets instead.
    • The /visor command will reveal the face for many ordinarily face-covering headgear.
    • Actually enforced throughout Heavensward, at least visually. The game will automatically toggle your helmet off in select cutscenes, possibly for dramatic effect. Particularly in "A Spectacle for the Ages" during the grand melee, where your outfit is temporarily glamoured into Ishgardian armor - not including a helmet, even if you toggle your regular headwear to be visible.
  • Helping Would Be Killstealing: Averted. Even if they aren't in the same party, everyone receives experience and loot for helping defeat an enemy, as long as they feature somewhat prominently in the monster's enmity table (else, their reward diminishes or they don't even get anything). Some things, like FATEs and Hunts, encourage multiple players and parties to work together. Outside those things, it's not uncommon for, say, a passing healer to throw a few Cures towards someone they see having trouble.
  • Henpecked Husband: A very early Ul'dah-based sidequest has you deal with a Lalafell who forces you to go tell her husband to stop playing around because she won't get any money. The poor guy and a member of the Gladiator guild express sympathy for you getting caught up in the mess.
  • Hero of Another Story:
    • The character models featured in the opening cinematic, numerous trailers, and End of an Era cinematic are apparently internally consistent characters (source), that do exist somewhere in Eorzea, though they are never encountered in-game until the story quests introduced in 3.2, where the male midlander used for promotional material is revealed to be the Warrior of Darkness. The midlander male begins as a gladiator and eventually armoury shifts to marauder and warrior. He uses the Echo to meet a roegadyn male, lalafell female, and elezen female to fight a morbol in the past before returning to the adventurer's guild in the present to his current companions, a miqo'te female and elezen male. The party featured in the End of an Era cinematic consists of all of these characters, sans elezen female. They later fight a dragon.
    • In A Realm Reborn, this is played in a much more brutal fashion. Early after you gain access to airship travel between the three city-states, you are given a series of quests to go to three dungeons, which are basically the starter dungeons for each major region. If you bother paying attention to the atmospheric NPCs at all (who only appear during these quests), you'll notice there are a few other parties trying to do the same quests you are on: a party of four led by a confident Hyur gladiator (Avere) and featuring a conjurer who may not be very talented (Edda) note , a party of three led by a jovial and friendly Roegadyn (Dolorous Bear), and a very experienced and somewhat aged Elezen and his grand-daughter (Isildaure and Alianne). What happens to them? The party of four splits up very acrimoniously when the leader dies after the conjurer (his fiance, who takes it very poorly) couldn't do her job in the very first dungeon, the Roegadyn's party all die offscreen in the third dungeon because they got too eager for glory, and Isildaure and Alianne actually manage to escape after an elementary blunder almost killed Isildaure and warn the player about the dangers of being too headstrong. Even the guild masters are moved to comment that, yes, there are other stories going on around you - that doesn't mean they end happily.
    • In the first big storyline cutscene in regular play (around level 5) you see the Crystal not only talking to you, but several other Adventurers at the same time. You're one of The Chosen Many.
    • Edda returns in Patch 2.3 for the dungeon Tam-Tara Deepcroft (Hard), having gone insane and attempting to resurrect Avere. Instead, she ends up creating a winged monster with his cracked, gray-skinned severed head for a body, which serves as the final boss of the dungeon.
    • Likewise, Alianne returns in Patch 2.3 as among the first member of the newly-formed Crystal Braves. She even has a cameo in Patch 2.4. Though the Crystal Braves situation does not go well in the end, she and the other loyalist survivors of the group officially join the Scions of the Seventh Dawn after Heavensward.
  • Hidden Elf Village: There are a handful of hidden villages across Hydaelyn:
    • Sui-no-Sato is a small village hidden in a bubble deep in the Ruby Sea, populated exclusively by Raen auri and a handful of kojin who bring supplies from the outside world.
    • The viera, introduced as a playable race in Shadowbringers, are a fiercely isolationist people who inhabit the Golmore Jungle of Ivalice. As dictated by the ancient law known as the "Green Word", viera shun contact with the outside world, with any who would dare leave their homes being branded outcasts and subsequently exiled.
    • Shadowbringers also has two: there's Fanow in the Rak'Tika Greatwood (appropriately, given the above, it's populated entirely by viis, the First's version of the viera), which can only be found by following the blue flowers, and then there's the entire region of Il Mheg, which appears to be under a dense fog which also dulls people's senses due to the magic of the Fae Folk. Only those who are friends of the Fae Folk are allowed to see Il Mheg's true form.
  • Hide Your Children: Averted. No explicit violence is done upon children, but some of the storyline moments feature child characters very prominently (Gridania's main story especially), young characters find themselves in serious danger more than once, and the game does not shy from exploring the consequences.
    • Heavensward eventually averts it entirely. Through some side quests, you're introduced to a Street Urchin little girl stealing firewood and gil to save up and find a new life elsewhere. The last side quest involving her has you discovering her frozen corpse and being tasked to lay her to rest.
    • Surprisingly averted in probably the last place you'd expect to see it. During the 2018 Little Ladies Festival, which was an event where you get glowsticks to cheer on the fantasy equivalent of Idol Singers, there is a small sidequest that has one of the darkest storylines in the game. Specifically, many years ago, a young girl, not even a teenager, who had wanted to see the festival in Ul'Dah got kidnapped by slavers, sold off to a sex ring, and sometime later was murdered. The only consolation is that you help her spirit find peace by helping her see the festival she had wanted to see while alive.
    • Averted in Shadowbringers (MAJOR SPOILER) In Eulmore you meet a young girl who has hurt her throat and is scared because the only reason she's allowed to live in Eulmore is her singing voice. She is later granted "mercy" by being granted "ascension". You later find out that "ascension" is being turned into a Sin Eater and most people turned into Sin Eaters are later butchered and fed to the population as a food named "Meol".
    • In Shadowbringers Pixies are said to be the spirits of children who drowned during a great flood in Il Mheg many years ago. Your interactions with the Fuarth strongly suggest it's true.
  • Historical Hero Upgrade/Historical Villain Upgrade: The original Azure Dragoon is either one of these depending on which side of the Ishgardian/Dravanian conflict you look at. The Ishgardians revere him as the one who heroically slew Niddhog and took his eyes before going on to slay many more dragons, going so far as to erecting a giant statue to his memory. The Dravanians see him as a monster who slew Niddhog, took his eyes, and went on to slay many more dragons. In reality, he did nearly slay Niddhog and take his eyes, but it was in defense of Ishgard after King Thordan betrayed the Dravanians by killing Niddhog's sister Ratatoskr and consuming her eyes for power. And the Azure Dragoon was actually Thordan's son who was horrified at what his father had done. He was so horrified that he abdicated his role as the next king of Ishgard and chose to punish himself for his father's actions by becoming a nameless dragoon who would protect Ishgard from future Dravanian reprisals.
  • Hoist by His Own Petard: Used word for word during the 2015 Heavensturn event by the hitsuji ometsuke when the plotting hitsuji bugyo's own experimentally modified sheep uses its sleep spell on him when commanded to use it on the Adventurer so the bugyo could make an escape.
  • Hold Your Hippogriffs: Everywhere. An almost exact phrase ("hold your chocobos") appears more than once, but the game is rife with Eorzean metaphors/slang, some awkward and forgettable (for instance, every instance where "cat" would be used is replaced with "coeurl"), some plain (characters swear by the Twelve Gods and use phrases like "Gods be good")... and some spectacular.
    Lalafell NPC: Disaster follows that man like a behemoth chasing a butterfly.
    Geva: He doesn't have the sense the gods gave a chocobo's arse.
  • Holiday Mode: Like most MMORPGs, there are a few. In order of date: Heavensturnnote , Valentione's Daynote , Little Lady's Daynote , Hatching-tidenote , Firefall/Moonfall Fairenote , All Saint's Wake note , and the Starlight Celebration note .
  • Hope Spot: 3.2's story line leads into one. After securing an Ishgardian victory in the Grand Melee, the peace conference that follows seems to be working out greatly. Nidhogg in Estinien's body arrives to dig his lance into Vidofnir for "betraying" her kind, and vows to the audience that their judgement will be nigh. What was supposed to be hope for a new future turns into a hate chant for Nidhogg's blood and destroys the message of peace.
  • Horny Devils:
    • Despite having an overall draconian appearance, the Au Ra associate more with demons, meaning their imposing (but attractive in their own way) males and beautiful, waif-like women have more in common with incubi and succubi, respectively.
    • Succubi themselves have been a recurring foe for most of the game. According to their Triple Triad card, Succubi are normally formless spirits, but can enter the physical world by (and only by) possessing recently-deceased women, morphing them into the Succubi's form.
  • Horse of a Different Color: As usual in the series, the giant birds known as Chocobos all but replace horses in Eorzea (they are new to the Doman Refugees, who tend to call them horsebirds, so regular horses do seem to exist elsewhere while also serving as a reference to the "horsebird" fiasco in the Japanese translation), including the first mount given to the player character. The beast tribes prefer other kinds of mounts (and players can acquire them from the respective friendly factions) and yet more creatures from the setting can also be acquired as mounts in various other ways. Actual horses are limited to PVP milestone awards, unless one counts the various kinds of unicorns.
    • The first Heavensturn holiday event was for the Year of the Horse, and involved the Doman representative (Uma Bugyo)trying to force awareness of it upon the people of Eorzea, eventually resulting in a senior chocobo stable manager flipping out on him that they were merely "hornless unicorns."
    • As of the release of Stormblood horses are now found in universe around the Dawn Throne in the Azim Steppe. They are brown and use the unicorn mount model sans horn.
  • HP to 1: The first boss in Satasha Hard has the Tail Screw attack that reduces a party member's HP to 1 (or close to it since your HP always regenerates per tick). Normally, this is a non issue since the player acting as the tank will never get hit by this attack and the boss will focus on them anyway so other players don't need to worry about being struck again after being hit by Tail Screw. However, the boss likes to constantly hit the party with the debuff Slime, which acts like a poison; if the slimed player is hit by Tail Screw without being cured first, they're as good as dead.
  • Huge Guy, Tiny Girl: The Au Ra race as a whole, with its tall, imposing men, and small, lithe women.
    • Whenever Raubahn puts Sultana Nanamo on his shoulder.
  • Hunk: Male Highlanders, to contrast with the more bishonen Midlanders.
  • Humans Are the Real Monsters: A recurring theme with the beast tribes is that humans are just as much to blame for the existence for primals. As Y'shtola doesn't hesitate to point out to the Maelstrom's faces, the Kobolds and Sahagin only summoned Titan and Leviathan because humanity was encroaching on their territory; in the Kobold's case Limsa outright broke a land treaty they had signed with them. The Sylphs also only summoned Ramuh because they were absolutely terrified of the Garleans, and the tempering process for Sylph specifically makes them even more wary and hostile towards humans. Ultimately, even Bahamut himself exists because of human cruelty. The ancient Allagans went out of their way to torture his subjects into summoning him and then proceeded to trap them all inside of Dalamud. Alisae outright states that Bahamut's rage is justified, if not misplaced by a few eras.
    • Heavensward has this as a huge point of contention for whether or not humans started the war. The Dragonsong War was started by Ishgard, attacking Nidhogg and his sister in a time of peace in order to steal their eyes. Butchering the latter and sending the former into a rage so intense that it disturbs even those who think him justified. The Warrior of Light and crew attempt to make amends for the sake of peace, but despite generations of time having passed, from the Dragons' perspective it may as well have been days ago. Not helped by the Holy See refusing to acknowledge the past wrongdoings, and squashing any attempt to bring it to light. In fact, it's very notable that for all the Ascians are stated or alluded to being involved in, we hear nothing of them spoken in the echo flashback where the Heaven's Wards divide up the eyes they stole, implying there was no manipulation from them and driving this trope home. For how hard this trope is played straight, however, it's also deconstructed and rebuilt in that while the Ishgardians of the past were absolute monsters for doing what they did to the dragons - even the Archbishop acknowledges this to Aymeric - Nidhogg's crazed rage and enforcement of Sins of the Father makes certain that neither side of this war is any way in the right, so all he can do is keep being a monster to protect his people from a more hostile monster.
  • Hyperspace Arsenal: Wherein your off-hand equipment is stored. Main hand too, with the '/display mh off' command. Not to mention the whole Armory system, which allows you to store up to 25 entire sets of weapons and armor for your various classes. Its only limitation besides space is that it can't be used during combat, and you can't change classes (which means changing main hand weapons) while in a dungeon.
  • I Am X, Son of Y: The naming conventions for several races follow this trope.
    • The Sea Wolf Roegadyn use this in their native language. A Roegadyn last name is the father's name with the suffix -syn(son of) or -wyn(daughter of). For example, Merlwyb Bloefhiswyn would be read as "Merlwyb, daughter of Bloefhis".
    • Both Seeker of the Sun and Keeper of the Moon Miqo'te name children after the parents in some way. Female Seekers take the name of the breeding male that sired them as their surname, while male Keepers take their mother's forename with a suffix denoting order of birth, separated by an apostrophe.
  • I Ate WHAT?!: The Shadowbringers sidequest line starting with "A Costly Meal" begins with a newly-sapient amaro unthinkingly eating a Nu Mou's "porxie" familiar. While porxies look (and apparently taste) like flying pigs, they're actually made of enchanted clay, a fact the amaro is appropriately nauseated to hear.
  • Idle Animation:
    • Many beastmen enemies will do things like stretching their arms, rolling their shoulders, or conversing with one another as long as they are not active in combat. The trope can lead to a hilarious scene where you can walk in on two beastmen talking to each other, kill one of them, and see the second beastman still carrying on their conversation as if nothing ever happened.
    • From 2.2 onward patches have been adding additional idle poses for players that can be cycled through with the /changepose command. 2.28 added a setting that changes your idle pose to a random different one at set intervals. There are also class-specific poses with the weapon drawn.
    • Many monsters have some idle animations of their own, such as Goobbues yawning and scratching their butts and imps being in a Levitating Lotus Position.
  • I Let You Win: Various NPCs will claim they went easy on you if you happen to beat them in Triple Triad.
  • Ineffectual Sympathetic Villain: The villains of the 2014 All Saints' Wake event are hilariously awful at accomplishing their goals or concealing their sinister true intentions. On top of that, it turns out they were conned into believing they're helping spread terror and suffering among the populace when they're actually just helping make the holiday fun for everyone.
  • I Never Said It Was Poison: At the climax of the Scholisticate questline, you get Lebrassoir to confess to everything just by mentioning your Echo ability. As it is well known in Ishgard by this point that the Warrior of Light saw the true past of Ishgard using the Echo, he assumes you have already seen anything and spills his guts. You never mentioned though that you don't actually have access to the Echo on command.
  • Informed Attribute: Lore maintains that the Au Ra are the most racially oppressed race in Eorzea, but this rarely comes up. However, it gets subverted in both the White Mage and the Dark Knight questlines; in the former, anger over the racism and oppression she and her race have endured serve as the primary motivation for the Arc Villain's mad science, and in the latter, Sidurgu reveals that Ishgard attempted a genocidal pogrom on the Au Ra in the past, fearing that their draconic-looking features meant they were tied to the Dravanian Horde.
  • Informed Loner: While the game is consistent with the solitude preference of male Miqo'te they state is canon (there are very few male miqo'te NPCs), the fact that the catboys are very popular for players to make means that the throngs of PC!catboys one encounters makes their loner traits seem a bit off and unusual.
  • Infinity -1 Sword: There are many rare and powerful weapons to be found as loot, though most of them can't have materia melded onto them and the weapons become outdated by the next patch or so. The current "endgame" gear also inevitably becomes this when a new expansion pack is released, sometimes even with an update making it easier to get.
    • Probably the closest you can reach is the Antiquated Relic Weapons. You get the Heavensward versions just by grinding out 140 Centurio Marks (which you can do in two days tops should you have the first three levels of hunts unlocked) and you get the Stormblood versions just by completing the Level 70 Job Missions. They won't evolve and are easily outclassed by stronger weaponry, but if you're not gunning after every little thing, they'll do the job just fine.
  • Infinity +1 Sword: A Realm Reborn has relic weapons for each class and you have to go through a Chain of Deals (with a mixture of item gathering and boss fights) in order to get the weapon restored to their former glory. There's also stronger versions of the relic weapons that literally have a "+1" in their name, though the 2.1 patch changed it to [Relic Weapon Name] Zenith. Paladins also get an Infinity Plus One Shield to go with their swords.
    • Patch 2.2 allows players to upgrade their relics even further, through a long Fetch Quest of items which Randomly Drop from FATE events in different zones. And there's an upgrade beyond that which requires a lot of Tomestones and effort. Also, Word of God is that Relic weapons will always be among the best weapons in the game, so we can expect further upgrades next time better gear is added to the game.
    • Ultimately, over the course of the 2.X patches and several convoluted side quests, the relic weapons are upgraded to Zodiac Weapons, going from Zenith weapons to Atma (which requires grinding upgrades from FATEs), to Animus (which requires completing several different missions like dungeons, killing mobs, and FATEs), to Novus (which requires obtaining Alexandrite from treasure maps or FATEs to meld materia into the weapon for customizing secondary stats), and finally to Nexus (which requires tons of grinding against endgame content). And because Power Glows, the relic weapons shine brighter and brighter as they upgrade.
    • After achieving the Nexus level, the original weapons simply cannot become any more powerful. Instead, new weapons replicating the legendary weapons of the ancient Zodiac Braves are forged out of incredibly rare materials, in the most convoluted set of side quests in the chain. The Nexus relics are then converted into super powerful materia and infused into the new Zodiac Braves Weapon. Finally, the Zodiac Weapon can be upgraded into a Zodiac Zeta Weapon with more grinding against endgame content (akin to the Nexus stage). And it's well worth the incredible grind: because the Novus stage allowed the player to customize their relic's stats, the Zodiac Zeta Weapons are absolutely the most powerful weapons available in A Realm Reborn, equal to or perhaps surpassing the Dreadwyrm Weapons available in the Final Coil of Bahamut.
    • Heavensward obsoletes the Zodiac Zeta weapons by endgame, but a new relic weapon chain was introduced in patch 3.1, now referred to as the Anima Weapons.
    • Stormblood combines this trope with Infinity -1 Sword with the Eureka weapons: the Antiquated weapon you get as a reward for finishing the your job's level 70 quest gets progressively upgraded with materials painstakingly gathered from the mobs in Eureka, with fully upgraded Anemos and Elemental gears having 5 materia slots. Eureka Pyros and Hydratos replaces the quintuple material slots with a crystal grind that increases the substats even greater than the materias but has a completely randomized buff for each roll, though the weapon at the final stage is equal to the Alphascape Savage weapons in item level.
  • I Resemble That Remark!: When you meet Genbu, Soroban is extremely surprised to meet a talking turtle. The Warrior of Light and Tataru just quietly turn and stare at him after he says this, as he is a Kojin, essentially a talking turtle.
    • With the addition of The Great Hunt, you get the option to make a similar remark to the palico during the quest that unlocks it. If the Warrior of Light is a Miqo'te, the palico will call you out on it.
  • Ironic Echo: In the Dreams of Ice story line, it's revealed that the reason Ishgard didn't lend aid to the other city states when the empire was a threat was due to Ishgard using every soldier they had to defend the city against the dragon horde and simply had no spare people to help out. Near the end of the Before the Fall story line, Alphinaud belittles the other three city states for not giving Ishgard the aid they need against the horde and he is told that the city-states cannot spare anymore men due to each nation having their own problems to deal with.
  • Informed Attribute: Seekers of the Sun Miqo'te are stated to have claw like nails in their description compared to Keepers of the Moon Miqo'te, yet the in-game model doesn't reflect this. Notably, it does reflect the detail that Keepers of the Moon are known for having larger canines than Seekers of the Sun, which their in-game models definitely do.
  • Instant Awesome: Just Add Mecha!: Rival Wings introduces controllable goblin machina. In-game, Softknox explains that the goblins proposed the idea of improving the Eorzean Alliance's wargames by adding their machina into the mix.
  • Instant-Win Condition: In nearly every boss fight, defeating the boss is all you need to end the battle, regardless of how much backup it had summoned.
  • Interface Screw: The Hydra boss has an attack that inflicts Hysteria status, causing you to lose complete control of your character, forcing you to watch helplessly as they run in random directions, potentially into another attack that will finish you off. Siren's Charm effect not only makes you lose control of yourself, you are also forced to sit and watch your character attacking your own party members.
  • Interface Spoiler:
    • Zigzagged at times. All the dungeon and duty names themselves are spoiled through achievements in most places, but most duties have names that refer to their location, rather than the boss within. Some are easy enough to discern by location (Bowl of Embers = Ifrit), but most are quite vague. Dungeons themselves will also reveal the next objective, and often times the name of the boss you need to kill as a result, as you progress through them.
    • A notable aversion is the final boss of Keeper of the Lake, however, which the game and all official Square Enix sources go to great lengths to keep hidden. Upon finishing all other objectives in said dungeon, the game asks you to "defeat ???", rather than reveal the enemy's name. What's more, the Lodestone, a database which typically isn't shy about divulging boss information, intentionally omits said enemy's name when listing boss loot tables. However, it gets played completely straight when you get to summon the boss as a minion pet that's a major plot point. It's possible for someone who has never seen the boss yet get spoiled by seeing other players summon it as a pet.
    • Many images accompanying quest text can spoil the inclusion of important characters. For example, the image for the quest 'At the End of Our Hope' reveals the appearance of Lady Iceheart in it; quite a big deal, since it's the first appearance of said character in the Heavensward expansion.
    • Players can accidentally spoil the identity of Matoya if they play a game of Triple Triad against Morning Dew before meeting the character in question since she has a card that is modeled after that character.
    • Some of the titles awarded in Heavensward from the story quests can spoil or at least foreshadow some of the events that will take place, including enemy factions returning to oppose you. This became a major source of ire from many players when patch 3.5 gives players the title Papalymo's Final Witness after the named character dies. Players that haven't seen the cutscene related to the title would have the scene spoiled once they see the title on other players. However, this instance was a goof from localizer Koji Fox and he apologized for the slip up. He would later change the title.
    • In the hard version of The Great Gubal Library, the first boss looks like it's the Demon Wall again, but it reveals itself to be a full grown monster where the book/wall was an illusion. Two things give away the surprise: the monster's head clips through the book rather than being attached to it and if you have enabled the option to have targets highlighted when hovering your cursor over them, the outline doesn't highlight the book.
    • As of Stormblood, the crafting quests require you to craft items in a similar fashion to the Ixal and Moogle quests - with materials provided to you. However, all of these items are visible from level 62 onwards, and some can completely give away some of the story details of the later quests. For example, if you happened to read the new items from the class quest section for Goldsmith, It would fully give away the plot points of J'khebica having poor eyesight, the fact that you would ultimately make a big gift for the Sultana, and what exactly that gift is.
    • Several of the main story quest titles from Stormblood subtly give away the lyrics to a very important song that is heard at the end of the game (although not all of the words are in the titles). Said clues are the lyrics to the Ala Mhigan national anthem, which is sung after beating the Final Boss.
  • Interspecies Romance: The game doesn't generally call attention to it, but paying attention to NPC dialogue indicates that Eorzea doesn't object to sexual or romantic relationships between any permutations of Roegadyn, Elezen, Hyur, and Miqo'te. Even Lalafells are in on the action, as there is an implied relationship between a male Roegadyn and a female Lalafell in the form of Chief Foreman Fyrgeiss and the mother of his two Lalafellin sons.
    • The developers have stated that while interspecies relationships are not unheard of, they are uncommon and tend to be looked down upon, as the current intermingling of the spoken races is a relatively recent event.
    • Saint Shiva (if she was a real person and not folklore before being summoned) is heralded as a champion by the heretics and the most despised villain of the Ishgardians because she "laid with a dragon", as the NPCs phrase it. Heavensward reveals that she was indeed a real person; though a simple Elezen rather than the Ice Goddess that the heretics summoned. While it's never clarified whether they actually "laid with one another", or if this was just historical propaganda; Shiva was quite explicitly deeply in love with the dragon Hraesvelgr, who loved her in turn.
    • G'raha Tia in the Crystal Tower storyline is revealed to be a descendant of Allagan royalty who, judging by Doga and Unei, were most likely Hyur, meaning at some point the last Allagan princess or her descendants hooked up with a Miqo'te. This also confirms that yes, Miqo'te and Hyur at least can have completely viable offspring.
    • Near the end of ARR, a bunch of the girls Thancred has wooed in the past all show up to fight over him, and there are Elezen and Miqo'tes. A little bit later, you see him hitting on another Miqo'te, showing he has no issues with race for one night stands at the very least.
    • One of the random NPCs you can find in the world, a Miqo'te, mentions that she was kicked out of her tribe for falling in love with a female Hyur, but her commentary implies that it was entirely because of her race and her gender was a non-issue.
    • The unlock quest for The Wanderer's Palace (Hard mode) involves a pair of adventurers, Hyur and Miqo'te, who are in a homosexual relationship. The reason for their ostracism is implied to be solely on inter-racial grounds, not sexual orientation.
    • In Heavensward Hilda's status as bastard-born is worsened by the fact that she's half Elezen, half Hyur. One of the NPCs who tells you about her makes it pretty clear Elezen-Hyur relationships are looked down upon, possibly because Hyur as a whole are considered lesser by Ishgardian Elezen.
    • In Heavensward, the Culinarian quests feature a female Lalafell and male Miqo'te couple.
    • During the Ruby Princess's questline, she learns about an old tale of of one of her ancestors marrying a hyur who saved her. Their child was said to have very few scales as a hyur/au ra child.
    • After the Rising Stones is repopulated with new scions, there's a Hyur female who has her eyes on a Roegadyn who also joined. As of 3.2, it's clear they've gotten to "know each other", much to the distress of the girl's sister who ponders the logistical implications and the fact the only time it would have been possible would be when she was asleep not ten feet from them on missions.
    • The Hard version of the Great Gubal Library contains a book called "Of Love Unrequited", which is a confession of love from a Roegadyn to Brayflox, a goblin
  • Instant Awesome: Just Add Dragons!:
    • The City-State of Ishgard has been at war with giant man-eating dragons for 1000 years.
    • Bahamut, Final Fantasy's King of Dragons, is revealed to be inside the second moon at the end of 1.0; his release from there motivates A Realm Reborn, as he devastates the world.
  • Invisible to Normals:
    • In this setting, most people can't see moogles unless they choose to be seen — the effect is complete enough that if a moogle picks something up in front of them, they'll notice nothing amiss instead of suddenly seeing an object floating on its own. Certain people (including the A Realm Reborn player character) can see moogles even when they're hidden, however.
    • Ascians are revealed to operate like this. Elidibus was completely unseen by Tataru while speaking to Minfilia in the Waking Sands. He explains that those without the knowledge or the gift cannot see the Ascians if they chose not to be seen.
    • During the questline for your relic weapon in 3.15, an aetheral being appears and is aware of the Warrior of Light's presence. It appears again at the end of the quest chain right in front of Gerolt and Ardashir, but they cannot see the being at all and said being makes its home inside the relic weapon. The two of them do believe the Warrior of Light's statement about seeing the sentient being and believe it will mature over time.
    • Pixies are invisible to anyone they don't wish to be seen by. They can be seen however by using "Looking Grass". It's also shown that someone with sharp enough senses can find them.
  • Invisible Wall: Certain instances that take place outside of a dungeon will have some areas blocked off to you with red dotted lines so that you stick to the area the fight is supposed to be in. For areas where flying is allowed, trying to go past the map's borders, fly too high, or fly too low below the Gravity Barrier will erect a shield like effect that prevents you from going past that point, but there's no explanation for why they appear. There's also invisible barriers around certain rock formations to prevent players from climbing up to places they weren't meant to be, though they only apply on-foot, since you can fly over such rocks in the expansion areas without issue (just not land on them).
  • Ironic Name: Drybone, an area with Eastern Thanalan, is far from dry since it frequently rains. It's explained that the constant rain is due to the Calamity's impact screwing with the weather.
  • Irony: Lalafells in Ul'Dah were the ones who are responsible for creating the designation of "beast tribe" for the more animalistic but sentient races across Eorzea and beyond, essentially to make them second class citizens. Within the First World, adjacent to the Source world that is "our" world, the lalafell race grew in a completely different direction, becoming essentially stereotypical dwarves to the point that they are considered a beast tribe.
  • It's a Wonderful Failure:
    • Failing to stop the giant dragon from destroying the last barrier in the "Steps of Faith" duty shows the dragon roaring in victory while your character is knelt down in pain and exhaustion, unable to continue fighting and leaving Ishgard doomed. And you can't skip it.
    • Failure to stop Bismarck from destroying the island you're on in The Limitless Blue will have a cutscene where Bismarck swallows the island, and your character along with it.
  • It Will Never Catch On: A couple of Dunefolk Lalafell discuss the creation of (what we know as) a bicycle in Ul'dah.
    Lalafell Girl: I have an idea for a two-wheeled cart you pedal with your legs.
    Lalafell Boy: Why wouldn't you just ride a chocobo?
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