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  • Palette Swap: Many pieces of gear are simply copied models of a different piece of gear with either a different color or some minor details added. Many pieces of gear can be dyed, changing the color but keeping the same overall design. Frequently, patches will add new gear which uses the same model as existing gear -- but the new gear will be dyeable. Also happens with many non-human enemies, naturally, such as the series staple flans. Chocobos can be fed to change their plumage colors, though they are further customizable with barding.
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  • Paper-Thin Disguise: During a main story quest, you talk to refugees in Camp Drybone who refuse to have anything to do with you. All it takes for people to think you're one of them is for you to change into a weathered tunic and pants, even if the rest of your equipment is the exact same as before.
  • Percent Damage Attack: The last enemy before the final boss of the Great Gubal Library hard version has an attack that cuts your current HP, MP, and TP in half.
  • Pick-Up Group: One of Square-Enix's goals with FFXIV is to make these more probable and successful, thanks to the questing system used by the Duty Finder. The Duty Finder basically lets a player pick a quest, then wait for the game to find other players in proper roles to appear who are also looking to play the same quest. Patch 2.1 takes it a step further by adding the Party Finder feature, which allows players to create a party with specific roles and goals of their choosing, thus making it easier for people to find groups that cater to their needs.
    • Beyond dungeons and duty finders, higher level FATEs tend to work like this, especially ones with Notorious Monsters. Someone has to tank that thing's damage, which means someone has to heal the tank, meanwhile someone has to actually kill the thing... and there you have it. Sometimes it's an example of beautiful teamwork and camaraderie among people who have never seen each other before nor ever will again. Sometimes it's not so pretty.
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  • Pillar of Light: The confrontation between Omega and the newly-born Shinryu at the end of Heavensward's story concludes with their Beam-O-War unleashing one, with the backlash knocking both out of commission and sending the two crashing down on the far side of Baelsar's Wall in Gyr Abania, where they will presumably be encountered in Stormblood.
  • Pintsized Power House: Lalafellin Disciples of War. Just because they come up to your waist and look adorable in their armor doesn't mean they can't knock you on your ass.
  • Plant Mooks: A variation occurs in this game, where you can get special seeds which, when planted, produces a pet-like minion.
  • Playboy Bunny: The female employees of the Manderville Gold Saucer all wear bunny suits. Player characters regardless of gender can purchase the outfit themselves for MGP.
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  • Player-Generated Economy: The market board is a place where players can post items to sell to other players. Items that are hard to craft, hard to find, just released with a new patch, or are in high demand tend to have their prices set very high. While it is entirely possible to survive on just dungeon loot drops or ignore the vanity items, if you want to have optimized stats or must have that ultra cute minion in your collection, then you better have the gil to spend.
  • Player Tic:
    • Once the "D" waymark was added, it quickly became common practice for runs of Castrum Meridianum to spell out "C 1 D" at the spot Cid stands during the Magitek Colossus Rubricatus battle. This serves no practical purpose whatsoever, and is mainly done out of boredom while waiting for Cid to slo-o-owly get into position before the battle can start.
    • The "spite LB": After a duty is complete, any charge on the Limit Break meter is effectively wasted, so a healer or tank will sometimes cast their LB, as a pointed reminder to the DPS that they could have used it to end the fight faster.
  • Please Wake Up: A kobold child named Ga Bu alerts the Warrior of Light and the twins that along with summoning Titan, the kobolds intend to sacrifice those against the summoning to further Titan's strength, Ga Bu's parents being among those prisoners. By the time the party reaches the Navel, it is too late, both of Ga Bu's parents are dead. Ga Bu desperately pleads with his parents to wake up, repeating that he'd come for them like he said.
  • Plot Hole: When you begin the level 50 Culinarian quest, you're tasked with making a meal for Nanamo, who is the Sultanate of Ul'dah. This looks a bit odd if you happen to do the quest after she's Killed Off for Real in the 2.5 story line. Officially, this isn't a plothole, because FFXIV uses the standard MMO Hand Wave that older content takes place prior to newer content, even if the player does it out of order. Unofficially, there's a lot of content elsewhere that does take into account the status of other questlines when it would logically be relevant, making this stand out more than it would have otherwise. Ultimately subverted after a certain point in Heavensward, where it's revealed her death was fake all along.
  • Possessing a Dead Body: Ascians can do this, in addition to possessing living people, as shown when Elidibus possesses Zenos after his death.
  • Post-Final Boss: Lahabrea is the post final boss to the Ultima Weapon for the 2.0 story line. Lahabrea's attacks are not too threatening and the party has the blessing from the mother crystal, which grants them boosted power and HP regeneration. Compared to the Ultima Weapon, Lahabrea is a total joke.
    • From a narrative perspective, Tsukiyomi serves as this to the Stormblood expansion, compared to Nidhogg who was essentially the Final Boss of the Heavensward storyline. Compared to King Thorden for instance who narratively is more of a Climax Boss in the Heavensward storyline, the battle against Zenos as Shinryu definitely concludes the main storyline of Stormblood, with the patches 4.1-3 essentially wrapping up most of the loose ends, with Yotsuyu as Tsukiyomi and her brother being the final Stormblood plot thread to tie up before 4.4-55 set up the next expansion, just as 3.4-55 set up Stormblood.
  • Power Crystal: In the original version of the game, big ones called 'aetherytes' recover your HP and MP and let you start guildleve quests, small ones are elemental and used for crafting. In A Realm Reborn, the aetherytes are now used exclusively for travel.
  • Power Floats: The Teleport and Return spells, White Mage's Holy and Stone IV, Astrologian's Collective Unconscious, and the Summoner's Deathflare and Limit Break Teraflare cause you to float while you're casting them.
  • Power Glows: Relic weapons pulse with a light that increases in intensity as they are upgraded.
  • Power Incontinence: The Palace of the Dead can potentially turn you into this if one of the floor effects is Amnesia, which disables your Job/Class abilities (spells and weapon skills still work). If you're in a certain stance, such as Sword Oath or Cleric Stance for example, you'll be locked in those stances and you can't undo it until the next floor or if you find an item that can dispel enchantments.
  • The Power of Love: A 1.0 Gridanian questline involved a woman, Fye, making a ritual mask for her brother, Dunstan, who has been claimed by the Elementals as a Wildling for transgressions against the forest. No Gridanian knows if saving a Wildling is possible, and further events over the course of the quest raise the risk that Dunstan might die in the attempt. The Ritual of Clensing works, however, and according to Brother E-Sumi, it was Fye's love for her brother that made the difference.
  • Power-Up Food: There's numerous types of food available to get (from soups, to breads, to cookies, and more!) and all of them give temporary stat boosts and boosted EXP for half an hour. Food is a common quest reward and the Culinarian job allows you to make your own food.
  • Precursors: The Allagans. If the Binding Coil of Bahamut is any indication, the Allagans were far more advanced than even the Garleans, who are currently the most advanced civilization known in present day Eorzea, or other civilizations that existed during the Allagan's era. They are nowhere to be found in present day, at least for now, due to a massive earthquake caused by their emperor Xande's attempt to fulfill a Deal with the Devil, but remnants of their technology and history still remain.
  • Prestige Class: Patch 1.21 added a "Job System" on top of the already implemented Disciplines. Jobs are more streamlined variants of the game's base classes that can equip skills from less jobs at once, but have stronger equipment and job-specific abilities to compensate. Current jobs Call-Back to the job classes of the various Final Fantasy games — bar the Bard, a hybrid of the traditional party-buffing singers and distance-fighting archers.
    • In Heavensward (3.0), the new Jobs, Dark Knight, Astrologian, and Machinist start at level 30 and require players to complete the entire A Realm Reborn storyline from base game to Patch 2.55 to unlock.
    • In Stormblood, the Jobs, Samurai and Red Mage, both start at a high level 50. However, unlike the Heavensward Jobs, the trainers are in Eorzea proper, and you're capable of becoming them as soon as you finish the Praetorium. A later patch also adds Blue Mage as a "limited class".
    • Shadowbringers adds two new Jobs, Gunbreaker and Dancer. Like with the Stormblood Jobs, their trainers can be found within Eorzea, and both classes start at level 60.
  • Privateer: Merlwyb appears to have invented this in Eorzea, talk about the town in Limsa Lominsa indicates that the pirates now work for her and are ordered to prey on Garlean ships, and this is part of why Merlwyb is so powerful.
  • Promoted to Playable:
    • Of sorts with two mounts. Twintania and the ADS, boss enemies in the Binding Coil of Bahamut, can be summoned as mounts you can ride on. Twintania even retains her signature dive bomb attack, which you can use purely to show it off.
    • Oppressor, Brute Justice, and Cruise Chaser are major bosses in the Alexander raids. They become palyable in the Rival Wings PVP mode.
  • Proud Warrior Race Guy: The Amalj'aa were revealed to have originally been this in the A Realm Awoken patch. While most of the Amalj'aa are serving under Ifrit's influence, the rest of the race live a warrior lifestyle where they only fight people that try to get in their way and they live and die by the ways of a warrior in order to maintain their honor. The problem being... Ifrit's taken a good ninety-percent-plus of the Amalj'aa at this point, and the PWRGs are a tiny minority at this point, which is a fact they deeply lament, and is the reason the survivors now refer to themselves as the "Brotherhood of Ash". The tribe are also open to taking in people who are not the same race as long as they uphold the tribe's values.
    • In fact, the only way to gain access to them as a Beastmen quest faction is to have defeated Ifrit, a storyline boss fought at Level 20 approx. during the 2.0 storyline. By doing so, you prove not only that you are a very capable fighter, but also that you can go toe-to-toe with him and those who serve him.
  • Pun:
    • All of the achievement titles, FATE titles, or quest titles that aren't Shout Outs are puns, including some that are, such as "The Bear and the Young'un's Cares.
    • Each of the major cities has a network of Aetheryte shards to make getting around quicker and easier. This network is called the Aethernet.
  • Punch-Clock Villain: There's a Garlean soldier who doesn't want to fight you and says he was forced to join the the empire by his mother so that he could make something of himself like father instead of sitting at home playing cards all day. Naturally, the soldier is happy to play cards with you if you decide to challenge him. Similarly, there's another soldier who is so bored by his job with the empire that he'll also be happy to play a card game with you, but he'll refuse to play when it's not the right time, saying that his commanding officer could be watching him.
  • Pūnct'uatìon Sh'akër: Miqo'te. With the exception of female Keepers of the Moon, their names make extensive use of apostrophes (supposedly something to do with easy address while hunting) which follows a set of elaborate rules that are related to tribal affiliation, parentage and birth order. Ironically, in 1.0, player characters couldn't name their characters this way due to naming restrictions. A Realm Reborn remedied this.
  • Puzzle Boss: While many bosses can be beaten with a good old fashioned smackdown, other bosses require methods beyond whacking them with swords over and over again. One example is the fight against Diabolos, whose ultimate attack can almost instantly knock out anyone who gets caught unless the party can manipulate the correct pair of doors that will let them avoid the attack.
  • Rage Quit:
    • A shareholder who owned 1% of Square-Enix sold his entire stock portfolio for $26M, stating, "First thing in the morning tomorrow, I intend to instruct those who manage my precious Square Enix stock to arrange to sell all of it. To Square, thank you for the enjoyment of your products up until now, with the exception of this last one. Goodbye." The sale caused a dive in Square-Enix stock, though share prices recovered inside the day.
    • Square-Enix has done a commendable amount to stop rage quitting in this game. Players new to an instance (i.e. who might require some instruction and/or get the party killed) bring with them a bonus to completing the instance, an instance cannot be abandoned until 15 minutes have been spent in it (to stop one failure causing a sudden exit), the 30 minute penalty mentioned below applies (to stop players leaving to 'game' the instances to find a party they like) and fights against the primals have a mechanism called the 'echo' which boosts stats for every failed attempt at killing the primal (even where this would be a plot hole - see the above entry on plot holes).
    • Rage quitting is also quite common in the game after a few failed runs in an instance. Anyone that quits in the middle of an organized quest (ones requiring a party) will get slapped with a 30 minute timeout, preventing them from joining any other instance. Party leaders are immune to the penalty.
  • Rainbow Pimp Gear:
    • Dear God. The dying of armor simply makes it worse, as players can't tell what color an item will be before buying it/accepting it from a quest reward, and don't unlock the ability to dye armor in the first place until level 15. Those first fifteen levels are eye-searing. A patch somewhat alleviates the problems by showing the player what color the gear is dyed in via the item window. However, if it's not the colors, then it's the type of gear worn. For example, it's possible for a mage player to wear a robe, a pair of tights, sandals, mittens, and a straw hat with a flower on it. Even if you have matching colors, they won't matter if you look ridiculous with the kind of gear you wear and it gets even worse when you get gear that can't be dyed at all; most of the unique gear are unable to be dyed. Hope you enjoy looking gaudy and mismatched! Patch 2.2 finally fixes the problem by allowing players to glamour their gear to take on the appearance of another piece of gear without affecting their stats. However, patch 3.1 brings back the trope in spades with gear obtained from the Diadem where all the gear found there have randomized glamours. Luckily, you can remove the glamours and replace them with your own.
    • Parodied by the level 35 Weaver quest. You are commissioned to craft a perfectly tasteful linen shirt for a Lalafell in love... but his other sources give him a weird hat that allegedly makes him look smart, a subligar and no pants to show off his "chiseled miner's body", and armor boots and gauntlets for no other reason than that they were the most popular items in the store. The combination is... terrifying, really. Redolent Rose is not pleased to learn this.
  • Raised by Natives: Loohn Gah, a young female Miqo'te, is a part of the Brotherhood of Ash warrior tribe, which consist of nothing but the Amalj'aa lizard beastmen. It's revealed that Loohn, when she was a child, was caught in the middle of a kidnapping raid by a group of Ifrit worshipping Amalj'aa that left her gravely wounded. The leader of the Brotherhood of Ash found her and gave her a choice; die or join their ranks. Loohn chose the latter and she was raised by the Amalj'aa since then, becoming a part of their tribe and a capable fighter. Loohn eventually runs into people from her old hometown who tell her that her parents are worried about her, but she scoffs at them due to finding the Amalj'aa a much closer family and that she also has very few memories of her birth parents to begin with. And then that is turned on its head when its revealed that the entirety of her village, including her parents, have long been Tempered, her mother in particularly is so mentally shattered by her Tempering that she genuinely believes a rock she found is an infant Loohn.
  • Ramming Always Works: The climax of the Ixali questline is a showdown in midair between two airships. This trope is the natural conclusion.
  • Real Is Brown: When entering the Sylphlands in East Shroud, a brown filter is applied to the scenery.
  • Real Life Writes the Plot: Yugiri noticeably completely disappears from the plot shortly into Heavensward. This was due to her English voice actress being murdered. She reappears near the end of the post-Heavensward patches after a new actress was cast and the legal matters of the previous actress were resolved.
  • Real Money Trade:
    • The highly controversial lack of an Auction House in 1.0 was supposedly to combat the RMTs that plagued FFXI, but as some on forums put it, it threw the baby out with the bath water. Note that RMTs are still in the game even without the Auction House. Of note, however, the Special Task Force Unit that went to town on the RMTers back in FFXI (albeit a bit late) are back in force. Also, in a testament to someone's stupidity, the RMT crowd were actually attempting to sell gil made during the open beta. You know, after Square-Enix had stated categorically that characters and their possessions would not be carried over to the retail version of the game.
    • In A Realm Reborn (2.0), they changed the Market Wards, to the Market Boards to the game. And yet frustratingly the RMT companies keep coming up with new ways to be obnoxious or to get around filters of the Special Task Force. There have been at least four companies with bots who shout, yell and even sent tells like in FF11. Amongst their latest tricks a year after relaunch, is to send friend requests to players they send tells to, to either trick the player in adding them as a friend, or just add more step of having to decline the request before being able to blacklist them. What's worse is that the blacklist function has a cap of two-hundred names, which can easily be filled up depending on how much travelling a player does, and while the player can freely delete the older RMT names from their list several weeks latter, is still tedious, and required to open up space to black list new ones. About every two weeks the STF puts out a post informing they just banned several thousand accounts or characters tied to RMT activity, and the RMTs still keep showing up.
    • Heavensward (3.0) has a fairly steep requirement just to access the new city (Ishgard) and the new player hub (Idyllshire) - a player has to level to 50 then do all the storyline quests up to and including those released in 2.5. For a genuine player this is simply a matter of time, but for those creating characters for the purpose of advertising RMT it is a serious hurdle, as losing an account wipes out at least a month of work to get to Ishgard/Idyllshire that's difficult, if not impossible, to automate. For this reason RMT advertising in the Heavensward zones is unheard of, and generally is only found in the starter cities - where only new players reside who have no idea whether 4 dollars is a good price for 1 million gil, or why they would want 1 million gil. All of the players who might actually have a use for that magnitude of in-game money very rarely find themselves in the places where the RMT advertisers are.
    • As of patch 3.4, RMT spam has gone way down, largely from Square-Enix adding a proper report button, accessed by right-clicking the offending person's name in chat. Whereas previously, reporting RMT involved writing the trader's name, the message they sent, and the world you are in into a support form that was hidden away in the support desk window. Many weren't aware that it was even possible, and those that did never bothered since it could take five minutes per bot.
  • Reality Ensues:
    • Played for drama in the Leatherworkers questline. Acting like an incredibly mean person all the time and constantly putting down the efforts of your guildmembers is an excellent way of losing them, unlike in other games where it's usually played for laughs. Geva learned this the hard way when almost the entire Leatherworkers guild left enmasse tired of listening to her complain about their work quality constantly, she ends up having to complete more work orders than it is possible for any single person.
    • In the Stormblood Astrologian quests, it's shown that there's a strong demand for geomancers in Kugane, as the local businesses consider their divinations to be essential to success. Unfortunately, this also means that there's no shortage of fraudsters willing to play on the general population's ignorance, aided by a general attitude of "buyer beware" and lack of regulatory authority. And, as Kyokuho discovers the hard way, it's all too easy for a genuine and honest geomancer to be branded a fraud.
    • The Ishgardians have spent almost their entire history as a nation fighting dragons, so when they have to face threats that aren't dragons, they do poorly because they aren't equipped to fight against it properly. Furthermore, in Heavensward, after Aymeric pushes to end the war between Ishgard and the dragons, the people are heavily resistant to peace, and some even try to sabotage the proceedings because fighting dragons is all they have.
    • At various points in the game and the expansions, the Warrior of Light is ordered by their allies to rest, especially after a heavy battle or event. Even if the Warrior of Light is a powerful figure capable of slaying what are nearly Physical Gods, they still are a living being who needs rest, or they run the risk of being tired or getting hurt because of it.
    • During the Heavensward side quest "The Fate of Stars", Krile gets grabbed by a Garlean Death Claw, at which point the player needs to kill it to free her. When Krile gets free, she is heavily injured and unable to proceed, and ends up sitting out for a while to heal. Due to being a Lalafell, her smaller size meant that a weapon designed to grab people of larger sizes is going to be much more painful as a result, and she ends up admitting she fears a rib might of been broken from the device trying to crush her.
    • When the player is introduced to Radovan at the start of the Gunbreaker job quests, he had recently escaped from a Garlean prison where he was regularly subjected to Electric Torture for years on end. That kind of damage doesn't just disappear, and Radovan still suffers from occasional fits of paralysis.
  • Reality Warper: Primals on some level seem to be capable of this. A notable example would be the Tsukiyomi fight. The battle begins in the middle of an Imperial castrum, yet as the fight enters the final phase, the arena shifts into a wooden platform outside in the middle of a forest. Yet after she is defeated, you are back in the castrum.
  • Recurring Location: Done for at least two dungeons; Halatali is revisited in 3.0 in the main story where you and several allies explore the dungeon to save a key character from his execution. 3.1 has the player revisit the Vault to rescue captive hostages.
  • Recurring Riff: Different passages from Heavensward's opening theme song are remixed into almost half of the expansion's soundtrack, up to and including nearly all the boss themes, most of the town themes, and even most of the field themes.
    • Done again with Stormblood's opening theme, featuring prominently in the theme for the new hub city, Kugane, new dungeons' boss music, and the final boss's theme.
    • Both expansions' main themes—"Dragonsong" and "Revolutions" for Heavensward and Stormblood, respectively—also pop up very frequently.
  • Red Herring: In the earliest leg of the player's time in Doma Yotsuyu comes upon a katana that she gives to Zenos which he later uses to turn red during the second hopeless boss fight with him. It looks like it might end up becoming the MacGuffin for the expansion but it never does. The real ace is that they have Shinryu in stasis in the backyard of Ala Mhigo's royal castle.
  • Red Oni, Blue Oni: In the Hildibrand storyline, Briardien, a detective who is basically an elezen Captain Ersatz of Sherlock Holmes, is introduced as the passionate Hildibrand's rival, and he does indeed wear a blue bliaud and have icy blue eyes, in contrast to Hildibrand's red rose motif and red eyes.
    • Alphinaud and Alisaie Leveilleur are fraternal twin brother and sister. Alphinaud is a calm, logical, and diplomatic Scholar. While Alisaie is a passionate, hot tempered, and brash Red Mage. In later expansions they even get blue and red outfits.
  • Remixed Level: The majority of the "hard" mode dungeons serve as this. New enemies populate the dungeons and the paths taken are either slightly different or are new paths entirely. Amdapor Keep's hard version has you going to the boss room of the previous version and working your way backwards.
  • Replay Mode: The game has a book/desk in the inns with this feature available, so the player can rewatch unlocked cutscenes.
  • Revive Kills Zombie: The mechanic is omitted from the game since healing magic cannot be used on enemies normally. However, the final boss in the hard mode version of the Lost City of Amdapor can use the trope against your party by using Reverse on itself and then casting Cure III and Cure IV on you to deal damage instead of healing.
  • Rewarded as a Traitor Deserves: Ungust and a Traitorous Immortal Flames Soldier, who betray the Player Character and Immortal Flames to the Amalj'aa to be sacrificed to Ifrit, end up being sacrificed as well.
  • Ridiculously Cute Critter: Naturally, the series's monster/creature staples like the moogles, chocobos, and tonberries are present and are cute as ever. There's also the namazu beast tribe that are basically chubby walking catfish with big goofy eyes and a perpetual smile.
    • Spriggans, little black fuzzy things.
    • The lambs around La Noscea are the most adorable little buggers you'll ever violently slaughter.
    • When minions aren't Ugly Cute, they're this.
  • Ring Out: Several bosses have this as a mechanic against the player:
    • Titan's battle has the party on top of a rocky spire that gets smaller throughout the fight while Titan himself has one attack that causes massive knock back. Get caught in the knock back and you'll plummet to your death.
    • The fight against the Demon Wall has bottomless pits on both sides of the walkway and it approaches the party every so often to make the battle arena smaller. Demon Wall also uses a high knockback attack that can potentially shove you off the walkway if you happen to be facing the boss at a wrong angle.
    • The extreme version of Leviathan has no guardrails on the platform and the boss himself will rock the platform to make you slide to one side. Slide off the platform and you'll quickly drown.
    • The battle against Ultros and Typhon is a non lethal version of the trope. Typhon will sometimes try blow players off the ring and anyone who gets pushed out of bounds will be stunned for a few seconds and are unable to use any abilities. If the entire party is shoved out of the ring, the party loses the fight. If a player happens to be knocked out and falls out of the ring at once, the healers won't be able to revive them due to the knocked out player being considered out of bounds. Luckily, players can jump back into the ring if they are shoved out.
    • Ravana borrows a page from Titan's playbook in the final phase of his boss fight: he takes out chunks of the fence around the arena, and periodically does an AoE knockback on the party. If your back isn't to one of the fence sections that's still intact, you go flying over the edge. Oh, and more pieces of the fence break off as the fight wears on.
    • Bismarck joins the fun, though with very, very few mechanics to exploit this aspect of the arena. At least in the Hard Mode version. In extreme, players who were comfortable standing on Bismarck's back until they were flung off will find that Bismarck wised up and will now toss them off into the limitless blue instead.
    • The final boss of the grand melee event will create a ring of fire that acts as a barrier. He will gladly cause massive knockback to you to push you towards the fire, causing damage the longer you stay in the fire.
    • Sephirot's fight takes place on a circular spire and when he grows massive for phase 2, he can use attacks that will shove players back and off the edge if they're not careful. The design of the fight was also made by the same person who designed the Titan fight, so there's some similarities.
    • Sophia's fight also takes place in an arena similar to Sephiroth's fight. Unlike Sephirot, players who are knocked off will be brought back to the arena and can be revived.
    • The battle against Ozma takes place on a donut shaped structure that leaves very little room to move around. Like with the Sophia fight, falling off will kill you, but you will be brought back to the arena with your party to be revived.
    • If one isn't careful, they can fall off the arena in the fight against Lakshmi. This is through mere player accident or Divine Denial, which can wipe you literally off the floor if you don't use Vril. This makes it necessary to use it; but even with Vril you take a slight knockback, so if you're too close to the edge...
    • The final boss battle in Stormblood is against Shinryu, under Xenos' control. The fight has it where in both phases you and your party can fall off the platform. It doesn't help that Shinryu has access to Tidal Wave and other knockback skills to blow you away. And to top it all off, he'll start breaking one of the eight squares in the three-by-three platform you fight him on in Phase 2
    • The battle with Suzaku has a hole appear in the center of the arena. Unaware players can make the mistake of accidentally falling through the hole approaching Suzaku. Thankfully, your body will be put back on the arena, allowing you to be revived.
  • Robot Buddy: Late in the story you procure a suit of magitek armor and unintentionally give it sentience by using a special stone to power it up; it grows attached to you and performs a heroic sacrifice at least twice before still coming back in the ending to help you Outrun the Fireball when Gaius' base is collapsing.
    • The Guidance Node in Heavensward also counts, to the point where Wedge sends you on a dangerous mission into an ancient Allagan museum full of still-lethal "exhibits" to recover replacement parts for her.
  • Rocks Fall, Everyone Dies:
    • This is how the 1.0 version of the game ended, both in the lore and on a meta level; with version 1.0 of FFXIV being widely criticized and performing poorly, Naoki Yoshida decided upon being appointed the new head of the dev team to scrap the entire game and start from scratch. This resulted in the Calamity, the apocalyptic event that would serve as backstory for the game's 2.0 relaunch.
    • From 2.0 onwards, most bosses, especially trial and raid bosses, have attacks that require players to fulfill certain conditions (such as killing spawning enemies) within a limited amount of time to survive. Failing to fulfill these conditions will, in almost all cases, result in the entire party being wiped.
  • Running Gag: A level 15 story quest set around Aleport leading up to the first dungeon, Sastasha, is titled "It's Probably Pirates". A level 42 quest that takes place in the same area is "It's Probably Not Pirates". Patch 2.4 introduces the quest to unlock Sastasha (Hard) in Aleport — "It's Definitely Pirates".
    • A minor one involves you eavesdropping on Thancred contemplating what he'd like to do with whatever woman he's spying on at the time, with him getting shocked that you were standing there listening. Eventually he says the two of you need to talk about your habit of sneaking up on him.
    • As the story goes on, the Warrior of Light will react in horror whenever the people they meet get involved with Rowena's House of Splendors. When the Domans mention working with her, the WoL can sincerely say that they'd rather make deals with void sent.
  • Rule of Three: Many quests will have you doing something three times in succession and it's usually lampshaded and Played for Laughs.
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