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Final Fantasy XIV / Tropes S to U

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  • Sacrificial Revival Spell: The aptly named Sacrifice-L action in Eureka fully revives a knocked out player on the spot and bypassing the Weakness status, basically being a single target version of the level 3 healer Limit Break. In exchange, the caster is afflicted with an incurable Doom status that kills the caster in ten seconds.
  • Sad Battle Music:
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    • "Breaking Boundaries" note , the song that plays during the level 50 and 60 job quests is a very sorrowful sounding melody that sounds like a fight that shouldn't be happening, In pretty much every circumstance, your final opponent is tragic at best and well-intentioned at worst.
    • The BGM for the Lost City of Amdapor plays uninterrupted throughout the dungeon save for boss fights, and fits the desolate, somber ruins nicely.
    • And in Heavensward, we have the melancholy, chiming tune used in the very first dungeon, the ruined fortress of Dusk Vigil. Like the Lost City's theme, it plays without interruption through the whole of the instance.
    • During the final boss of Turn 13 of the Binding Coils, Answers, the main theme of A Realm Reborn is playing throughout, and while it grows louder and more powerful by moving into the chorus on the phase shift, it's still the same song with the same heartrending lyrics to it.
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    • The first phase of the final battle with Nidhogg has Heavensward's tragic main theme Dragonsong playing from the preceding cutscene instead of any of the more bombastic things.
  • Sanity Meter: Used as the sole failure condition in 2017's All Saints Wake event.
  • Scary Impractical Armor: The Dreadwyrm Armor, both normal and Replica types, both bearing stupidly pointy spikes and/or wings on the armor.
  • Scenery Censor: The Naked on Arrival flashback images of Thancred surviving in the Dravanian wilderness have hilariously convenient squirrels quite close to the camera, blocking out anything one might consider objectionable.
  • Scenery Porn: From the beaches of Limsa Lominsa, the sprawling forests of Gridania, to the sweeping deserts of Ul'dah, this game is very, very pretty. Norvrandt, the Eorzean equivalent of the First Shard takes this even further, especially in Il Mheg.
  • Scenery Gorn: Should you survive a run to Mor Dhona, you'll be greeted by the wreckage of the Garlean mothership from the FMV opening, encircled by the dessicated corpse of a dragon.
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    • To say nothing of what the player sees in the Heavensward expansion - in particular, the pre-Ishgardian Avalonian ruins in the Dravanian Forelands or the desolate, charred landscape of the Churning Mists.
    • Or the frozen battlefields in the Coerthas Western Highlands, with Dravanians reeling from the impact of Dragonkillers and Bertha cannon fire, all of it locked in the moment from the flash-freeze brought on by the Calamity.
  • Schizo Tech: Fairly deliberately done:
    • Eorzea generally has a "Renaissance", pre-powered-locomotion technology base - they do have non-repeating guns and cannon (most prominently used by Lominsans) but the majority of their armed forces still use melee and non-powder ranged weapons. This is offset by "ranged combat" including throwing Final Fantasy attack spells around, however, meaning that powder weapons are more a niche appliance for things like ships, who need the extra range at sea. There's also not been as great an incentive for powered locomotion thanks to Aetherytes and the preponderance of chocobos, although Garlond Ironworks has introduced airships and Ul'dah is finally experimenting with freight rail in certain, secure parts of the realm, and in Heavensward firearms technology picking up significantly is a cornerstone of the Machinist questline.
    • Garlemald, by contrast, possesses substantial powered locomotion including walking robotics, large-scale airships, large-scale trains (unseen in the game but discussed at length in dialogue) and also repeating, semi-automatic gunpowder weaponry reliably capable of reasonably high rates of fire, as well as metallurgy beyond what Eorzea seems capable of. This is all posited, however, as a lack of skill in any kind of "magic" - without the ability to throw Flares around and whatnot, Garlemald was pushed into the development of higher levels of technology to compete.
    • The Ancient Allagan Empire was, and still is, ages of progress ahead of anyone (even real life) technology and Magitek of the entire world of Hydaelyn. Wonder Materials stronger and lighter than anything that can be produced (real or fantasy ore alike), and drones still active and fully operational millennia after the empire fell.
    • With Patch 2.4, the schizo tech now goes further, as Cid Garlond's Ironworks is now producing Allagan tech inspired carbon fiber based armors, and powered weapons (the Ironworks bow for example, looks like it features magnetic rails or a Wave-Motion Tuning Fork to assist with the launch of arrows). Players can purchase these primarily with Allagan Tomestones of Poetics.
    • In Heavensward, the technology in the lost ruins of Sharlyan also qualifies, including some of the machines the Illuminati Goblins built based on Sharlyan blueprints and Alexander.
  • Secret A.I. Moves: Enemies that are the same class as the player will usually have a skill or two that the player never has access to. Stormblood makes it a weird case where numerous skills like Stoneskin and Kiss of the Wasp were removed for the players due to the skill rebalance while enemies still have access to these moves.
    • Not just enemies but ally characters often still have access to moves removed from player characters such as Lyse being able to use the now removed Monk move "Touch of Death".
  • Serious Business: Brayflox Alltalks asks for your help to fend off goblins who are a part of the Illuminati in Brayflox Longstop Hard. Why are the Illuminati after Brayflox? They want to know and claim the secret behind her cheese recipe and she doesn't want to give it up. They show up again in Heavensward, and they still want the cheese. There's also this huge robot that's capable of laying waste to the world that they'd like to get their hands on, but mainly it's the cheese.
    • The Sundrop Dance to the Vanu Vanu, which was made to avoid unnecessary conflict. The dance is supposed to demonstrate the dancer's strength and courage, and can cow lesser opponents and prevent them from fighting altogether.
  • "Shaggy Dog" Story: The entire arc where you, Alphinaud, Estinien, and Ysayle form an uneasy alliance to meet Hraesvelgr and peacefully end the war. Hraesvelgr refuses to do a thing and you are forced to kill Nidhogg with Estinien. Estinien notes the trip wasn't completely useless as during the trip to Hraesvelgr, you happen to kill one of Nidhogg's lieutenants, changing the focus of his immediate anger from Ishgard to you.
    • During the Healer role questline in Shadowbringers, you learn that Lamitt went on a quest to find a cure for her fellow dwarves, sister included, who were dying of a condition that slowly turned them to stone. For breaking Dwarven codes of honor, she was promptly exiled from her village, but on the bright side, the Dwarves she cured went with her, as they had basically been left to rot inside caves away from the other dwarves, and didn't appreciate seeing their savior treated like scum. Bittersweet ending overall that Lamitt accepts. Except shortly thereafter, Lamitt and her fellows accidentally kickstarted the flood of light, which is implied to have killed everyone that she saved and turned them into Sin Eaters. Giott and the Warrior of Light come to the conclusion that Lamitt, herself now an especially powerful Sin Eater, has been going around mindlessly reviving slain Sin Eaters who were once her kin that she had cured, as she notably leaves other dead Sin Eaters where they were slain.
  • Shoot the Dog:
    • Standard practice in the city-states for victims of primal tempering is to put them to death. Even if they could be kept imprisoned safely (they can't), their newfound devotion is making the primal stronger, and they don't know any way to un-temper someone.
    • Similarly, in the First, those afflicted by sin-eaters' aetheric corruption need to be put down before they turn into a sin-eater themself. The standard method is by mixing poison into their favorite food.
  • Shoot the Medic First:
    • Occasionally a useful strategy for the players, though proper healers are somewhat rare, and some quests also play with it by instead having a mage of some variety attempting to summon something that it's in your best interest to interrupt. More interestingly, it's the enemies that frequently play this role against the players: Foes will, in the usual MMO style, prefer to attack whatever they perceive as the greatest threat. Usually, this means anyone who's doing damage to them - a vital role tanks play is increasing enmity towards themselves so that enemies go after them rather than the squishier DPS or Healers - but players using healing spells on their allies also register as a threat to any enemies near their healing target. This means that, should an enemy not have their target well established (say, because it entered the combat halfway through) it's most likely to decide that the Healer is the greatest threat and make a beeline directly for them. Particularly excessive displays of healing can cause an entire group of enemies to all gang up on the poor medic at once. A number of bosses also have attacks that will target healers explicitly, regardless of enmity, which tend to be particularly dangerous since an adventuring party without its healer is not likely to survive very long.
    • The Wolves' Den PvP arena has the trope played straight by both teams, since obviously players are smart enough to recognize this.
  • Shout-Out: Has its own page.
  • Shown Their Work:
    • The Vanu Vanu perform the Sundrop Dance to show off their strength and intimate their opponents. The player can learn them with both males and females getting their own versions. The dance is based off the Haka dance in real life and both versions of the dance are also performed by the Māori tribe. Said dance is also used for purposes similar to the one in game.
    • The song sung at the end of Stormblood (The Measure of His Reach) has one little detail that's easy to miss unless you have a good ear for it. Everyone singing the song are slightly off on the timing, which sounds very natural for a group of people that are not professional singers. Compare the song to The Measure of Our Reach, a Garlean rewrite of it, where everyone is singing in perfect unison since they are soldiers trained to be perfect.
    • The 2nd boss in the Temple of the Fist dungeon has a pair of attacks that are based on direction. Fore and Aft hits anyone at his front or rear. Port and Star hits players near his sides. The attack names may sound nonsensical, but they're actually terms used to describe one's location on a ship, thus it gives players a clue on where they should be standing to avoid the directional attacks.
  • Sidetracked By The Golden Saucer: The 2.51 patch gives us the Manderville Golden Saucer, along with new mini-games. Why bother doing dungeon runs or leveling up your characters when you can play cards or race with your chocobo?
  • Significant Wardrobe Shift: Most of the Scions gain brand new outfits throughout Heavensward with all but one of them made by Tataru. Thancred gets his from the Vath and Minfillia, Yda, Papalymo and Urianger don't get one as Minfillia becomes a mouthpiece for Hydaelin, Yda reveals herself as Lyse at the end of Heavensward, Papalymo performs a Heroic Sacrifice and Urianger isn't given the choice, but probably doesn't want to. Even you get in on the fun with the Scion Adventurer's Garb.
    • Lyse joins the fun with a Tataru-designed outfit near the beginning of Stormblood, and she gets a second wardrobe shift near the end of the expansion when she pulls out one of Yda's traditional Ala Mhigan dresses.
  • Sins of Our Fathers: The ultimate reason for the Dragonsong War between Ishgard and the Dravanian Horde under Nidhogg. Centuries ago, the King of Ishgard Thordan I and his forces attacked the elder dragon Ratatoskr, killing her and taking her eyes that they might consume them and gain her power. In vengeance, Nidhogg attacked Thordan and his Knights; Nidhogg was driven back with his eyes taken, but still alive, while Thordan and many of his Knights were killed. The survivors returned to rule Ishgard, while Nidhogg declared unending war upon the city, even centuries later when the people of Ishgard no longer remembered the reason for the war and many of them pushed to end it and make peace once the truth comes out.
  • Slasher Smile: Edda Pureheart gives one to Paiyo Reiyo at the end of the "Corpse Groom" quest. Double as a Kubrick Stare.
    • A family trait of the Garlean royal family. Special mention goes to the resurrected, half-primal Zenos yae Galvus, who is downright broken.
  • Slavery Is a Special Kind of Evil: The Arcanist's guild questline has a slaver as its Big Bad, he's a completely horrific individual that's been on Limsa's most wanted list for years. As well, you deal with slavers in a Rogue's guild quest, and the thieves' code, while willing to let live stealing from Lominsans or other pirates and just steal the loot back, mark the entire crew for death without mercy when the slave trade is involved.
  • The Slow Walk: The Warrior of Light does this during the "The End of the Song" quest in truly awesome fashion. The forces of Ishgard are pressed to the brink against Nidhogg's armies, on the verge of collapse...until the WoL, Ser Aymeric, and Alphinaud fly in on the backs of Hraesvelgr and his allies. The WoL leaps down and starts a slow walk towards Nidhogg as the rest of the Ishgardian force retreats.
  • So Last Season: Zig-zagged. Many of your skills and abilities will still be useful once you hit Level 50 and dash into Heavensward and Stormblood. A lot of this is due to the fact a vast majority of the dungeons you run will probably still be from A Realm Reborn. Weapons and Armor are an odd thing - though they will be replaced inevitably, the Relic/Tomestone gear can be used through at least half of an expansion before you need to take up a new piece of gear.
  • Soft Water: Averted. The Stormblood expansion adds deep water, but landing in it hurts just as much as hitting the ground would, and if you're in combat, it can easily kill you.
  • Solid Gold Poop: At the end of the Halloween event, it was revealed that the cookies given by the Imps were actually Chocobo dung. The reporter that discovered this wasn't very happy.
  • Something We Forgot: The Ixali Beast Tribe quests start when you are to help the Twin Adders deal with the Ixali tribe that has been causing grief for Gridania. You track down a crashed Ixali vehicle, but it turns out to have belonged to a splintered tribe of Ixali who simply want to create an airship that will allow them to reach their promised land. You get roped into helping helping them build it which leads to a long questline that takes weeks to finish due to daily limits. Finally you craft it after many trials, and one of your companions asks you why you decided to help the tribe. At this point, you finally remember that you were originally there on the orders of the Twin Adder Lieutenant and go report back to her. Luckily, she had forgotten all about it too and in the process of building the ship, you had to sabotage the enemy Ixali tribe's ships anyway, meaning the Twin Adders got what they wanted.
  • Soundtrack Dissonance:
    • The special mounts dropped from the extreme Primal battles now play the battle theme of the respective Primal while you ride. All well and good if you're riding into battle, not so much on a pleasant stroll through Mist or other residential areas.
    • Speaking of Primal battles, Lakshmi's theme about dreaming is somewhat surreal to hear while Lakshmi herself is trying to kill you. Unlike most other Primals, Lakshmi's theme is the same throughout the fight and doesn't change with the mood, resulting in a hilariously awkward contrast between her uplifting theme song and her own (voiced!) angry ranting. This is a bit jarring when compared to Sophia, another female Primal who instead has a calm voice to go with her mellow theme. Curiously this is reversed in the Japanese version, where Lakshmi's VA is calm and Sophia is the one that sounds angry.
    • Customizing the music that plays during your eternal bond ceremony can also invoke this. You can use some classic Final Fantasy themes, use themes from the grand companies to give the event a military like feel, or you can decide to go the silly route and play Hilidibrand's Inspector theme for an event that's supposed to be about two people joining their souls in love and harmony.
  • Speed Run:
    • Popular at endgame as a means of farming gil and endgame gear currency in dungeons. In 1.0, instanced dungeons offered more rewards and achievements if completed in fifteen minutes or less, leading to all kind of Speed Run strategies.
    • In the current state of the game, the team has mostly killed off speed running content, as best as they could. Speed running things such as the Main Scenario roulettes have been actively killed due to people leaving new players in the dust and actively abusing them for it, making it content that takes between 30 minutes to an hour. Most dungeons too now have walls set up that only fall once a certain wave of enemies has been cleared out, forcing rushing tanks to pause so the party can kill whatever's been collected.
  • Square Race, Round Class: Players have absolutely no restrictions on what classes their chosen race can be, resulting in the sight of physically intimidating Roegadyn and Hrothgar being casters, and the absolutely diminutive Lalafell being warriors. While a lot of characters hold tightly to the expected tropes of their classes, such as lots of axe-weilding Roegadyn and crafting caster Lalafell, the game's lack of hard limits on what a race is capable of pulling off is as much in effect for NPC as it is for the the player characters, with a Roegadyn being the guild leader of the Arcanist's guild (Arcanistry being the most elegant - and mentally taxing- magical art besides Astrology) and the Scholar's class partner and escort is a Lalafellin Marauader.
  • Statuesque Stunner: Several examples.
  • Status Buff: Every class has some kind of way to increase their power in a fight.
  • Stealth-Based Mission: Some of the Ninja job quests have you sneaking around enemies to avoid being spotted. One main story quest in Stormblood enforces stealth as your only option since attacking the guards or letting the guards capture you completely will have the quest end in failure.
    • The 2017 All Saints' Wake event consists of trying to find specific objects in a (slightly) repurposed Haukke Manor. There are no normal enemies, but if you're spotted by one of the abnormal ones you'll be turned into a pumpkin and lose points from the party's shared Sanity Meter.
  • Stealth Pun: In the Hildibrand quest "Seeds of Rebellion", Lewenhart will send you to recover a stolen vegetable that "very closely resembled the Eorzean dragon pepper — save for its color, which was a deep purple". However, a thread is spotted when you recover them and they are, in fact, blue — that's right, there are no purple dragon peppers!
  • Sticks to the Back: Most two handed weapons and shields work this way. One handed weapons usually stick to the hip.
  • Storming the Castle: Two of the Dungeons in Stormblood, Doma Castle and Ala Mhigo, are pretty much this.
  • Storyboarding the Apocalypse: Played for Laughs with the Namazu beast tribe quests. The story deals with a Namazu who has somehow received visions of a disastrous future awaiting his people, and each quest shows how he inadvertently prevents a different disaster that would wipe the Namazu out, from famine to indentured servitude and so on.
  • Strange Salute: Being part of a Grand Company gives the player character a unique salute emote depending on which one they join. The Maelstrom favors a traditional Military Salute with the palm towards their face, while the Order of the Twin Adder and the Immortal Flames have stranger variations (respectively crossing both arms in front of their face and placing one arm in front of them with their other hand behind their back). The Garlean Empire have a "hand over heart" gesture (which is unlocked upon completion of a main story quest involving infiltrating a Garlean outpost to rescue the Scions, and as such usable by all characters) and the Crystal Braves have their own one, shown only in cutscenes and inaccessible to the player.
  • Stripperiffic: Subligars. In addition, some female versions of armor are a bit skimpier, and for some reason the base Elezen male outfit is some kind of inverted shirt—sleeves, but nothing on the torso whatsoever. The developers have also responded to requests for more sexy, or at least better gender defined, gear as requested by fans.
    • Heavy plate armor worn by gladiators, marauders, paladins and warriors, however, covers up everything, regardless of who's wearing it.
  • Strictly Formula: While the context and events vary between each city state, the level 1-15 main quests from your starting city all roughly follow the same pattern.
    • You start off having a dream sequence of you facing down Lahabrea in the signature equipment of your starting class's Job. You then wake up on the way to your starting city alongside Alphinaud, Alisae, and Brendt the Peddler.
    • When you arrive at the local Adventurers' Guild, you're accosted by the local guards, who scoff at your inexperience. The local guildmaster helps you start making a name for yourself by helping out the locals.
    • While investigating a strange occurence (Out of control monsters in Gridania, local kidnappings in Lominsa, a lost noblewoman in Ul'Dah), you meet the region's Scion (Papalymo and Yda in Gridania, Y'shtola in Lominsa, Thancred in Ul'Dah), who helps you fend off a sudden monster attack. The monster drops the first Crystal.
    • Shortly afterwards, you run afoul of a tense scene (Poachers attempting to steal a valuable Chocobo egg in Gridania, a former Serpent Reaver being blackmailed into sending the Reavers more slaves, and an assassination attempt on one of Lolorito's rivals in Ul'Dah), but the situation is suddenly interrupted when an Ascian appears and attacks you with a Golem.
    • After doing some more questing, you ultimately stumble upon an insidious plot (A massive Ixal invasion in Gridania, a Serpent Reaver raid in Limonsa, the theft of Nanamo's crown in Ul'Dah), which ultimately culminates in a Big Badass Battle Sequence between you, the nation's army, and the bad guys. After the initial enemies and their leader are killed, the Ascian from before ambushes you again, and you defeat him with the help of the nation's Scion.
    • In recognition of your heroics, the nation leader personally invites you to a ceremony. During the ceremony, Hydaelyn contacts you again with a vision of the Calamity before beseeching you to find the remaining Crystals. The nation leader asks you to introduce yourself to the other nation leaders. As your airship departs, Gaius van Baelsar is seen watching your departure...
  • Stupidity Is the Only Option: One section in the hard mode version of Copperbell Mines requires you to jump down an elevator shaft due to said elevator not being functional. The drop is long enough to bring your HP to critically low levels once you hit the ground, but you'll never actually die unless you're in combat. There's no other way to progress but to jump down. Also happens in the final stretch of Hullbreaker Isle where the only way forward after the 2nd boss is to jump off a high cliff.
    • At one point, you are tasked with keeping an eye on a shipment of crystals leaving Aleport to make sure the Sahagin don't get their hands on them. Assisting you in this task is a man with bright blue facial tattoos who can't even remember his own name. Naturally, everyone is astonished when he turns out to have been a Serpent Reaver (a faction of pirates who have been Tempered by Leviathan) impersonating the real harbormaster.
    • And once more in Heavensward; jumping down a perilously high point after the first boss of the Aery is the only way forward.
      • In Heavensward and later they did change it so mandatory jumps cause no damage.
  • Suicidal Overconfidence: In one questline, the Nunh of the Seekers of the Sun tribe in the fringes tells you about a Tia who wants to take his position, but has lost miserably every time he challenged the Nunh. The Nunh is intrigued by his persistence and asks you to train him to see if there is some hidden potential. When you find the Tia and tell him this, he balks and says he will just beat you up before challenging the Nunh again. He is so outclassed that he gets beaten by you off screen, the game cuts from you pulling your weapon out to him being down on the ground in what is probably the first instance the entire game of the Warrior of Light beating someone offscreen.
  • Suicide Attack:
    • The giant wasps in the Sunken Temple of Qarn and Hullbreaker Isle will use an attack called Final Sting when their HP is critically low. Final Sting kills the wasp who used it, but it also deals a fixed 80% of the target's max HP as damage, making it lethal to anyone, even the tank, if they're not topped off.
    • Bees make a return in Heavensward in a level 60 dungeon, Neverreap. Woe be to any group that pulls both pairs of bees after the first boss battle.
    • For a player's option, there's Catastrophe L, a Logos action from Eureka Pyros. It only has three uses, but using it will cause an explosion that inflicts an obscene amount of damage, while the user takes 999999 damage, ensuring they're killed off upon using it...provided they're not under the protection of a skill such as a Paladin's Hallowed Ground.
  • Super Drowning Skills: In the Leviathan Extreme battle, your characters can get knocked off the platform you're on and into the water below, causing instant death. Justified as there is Sahagin and a Leviathan in the water, and the waters are too fierce for your character to swim. Otherwise, you just can't swim at all.
  • Suspiciously Specific Denial: A quest description in Limsa Lominsa reads "Mordyn would like to make you a completely legal proposition." The person he sends you to talk to welcomes you to "the Seventh Sage, purveyors of the finest spices from the East. All of our products are guaranteed obtained through completely legal means." This turns out to be true - he's "a heavily armed trader" who "engages in a form of trade with Garlean ships." Since the Garleans are waging an aggressive war against Eorzea as a whole, raiding and sinking their supply ships is the only form of piracy that's still legal and officially sanctioned in Limsa Lominsa.
    • Another quest gives the player a succulent bone to give to a wolf. Said bone "was not made using a plump Lalafell".
  • Swallowed Whole:
    • The fight against the Cerberus involves having one alliance getting shrunk and then being eaten by the monster to fight it on the inside while the other alliances continue fighting on the outside. The party that gets swallowed up will build up cumalitive damage from the beast's digestive juices while they attack the stomach wall and defend themselves from creatures inside. Destroying all parts of the stomach wall causes the boss to collapse and become immobilized while the party gets forced out via regurgitation.
    • Losing by certain conditions against Bismarck treats you to a scene of the massive primal sailing towards you mouth agape, implying to swallow you and the entire mini-island whole.
    • A few other bosses will do this to one player at a time, basically taking them out of the battle for a while while damaging them through digestion.
  • Take That, Audience!:
    • A scene with a disbanding party pokes fun at players that bicker at their party for not doing their jobs in battle properly; two of the party members blame the healer for not healing their leader fast enough, getting him killed in the process while the healer blames the victim for running outside of the range of her healing magic. It takes a much darker turn during the events of the hard-mode version of Tam-Tara Deepcroft, where the healer who got blamed for the death of her fiance snaps and uses a dark power to merge the man's head and soul onto a body, but said body was an Ahriman. The healer then commits suicide by jumping into a Bottomless Pit once you defeat the monstrosity and she goes out with a creepy smile.
    • A humorous one occurs when unlocking the Rogue class, post 2.4. Players, typically having long stuffed away or discarded their starting gear, often end up spending their first few levels in their underwear when starting a new class. SE took notice of this, and has the Rogue Guildmaster informing the player that he's gotten quite annoyed at the recent influx of new rogues showing up wearing nothing but their smallclothes, so he'd like it if you came back to speak with him after equipping your first set of daggers, while also wearing appropriate rogue attire, not nearly naked.
    • Complaints were made by the fans that one of the pre-order items for the Heavensward expansion was yet another chocobo chick minion. Namely, a black chocobo chick, which already existed in game as a "veteran" bonus for loyal players, with the only difference being the Heavensward pre-order one wears a courier's hat rather than still being half in its shell. Not to mention the boredom of there already being a half-dozen other chocobo chick minions. The devs caught wind of this, and decided to intentionally poke fun at the player's complaints, by making this one actually fly around the player, rather than walk around, and had this message on its description from the Minion list:
      "Spiteful claims that this adorable black chocobo hatchling is, in fact, simply another plain yellow chocobo colored with pine tar in a feeble attempt to prey on prospective buyers have only fueled the natural-born flyer's passion to take to the skies."
  • Take That Me: In Shadowbringers, one of the many new FATEs introduced in the expansion is entitled "Pray Destroy the Waking Sands". While it doesn't involve actually wrecking the base, it seems that Square-Enix took notice of all the times they forced the player to trek back to that old base.
  • Take Your Time: In true JRPG fashion but with some additional MMO flavor. There are several times throughout the story where a villain of some sort will be in the process of enacting the final schemes of their plan and there is a sense of urgency to stop them, but there is nothing stopping you from often just leaving and playing games in the Gold Saucer instead. Furthermore these climatic showdowns are often in dungeons and trials, which players must que for in order to access, so depending on what class you are playing and role to player ratio for them you may also end up waiting an additional 15-30 minutes before you can go save the world.
  • Talking Is a Free Action: Averted, though not with actual talking but with the echo flashbacks. Most of the time when you get one, you are in a completely safe situation so nothing bad can happen. But two times in Stormblood, an echo flashback occurs at a bad time. The first time happens when the Warrior of Light and Alisaie are interrogating an Imperial soldier they captured. When the Warrior of Light goes into a flashback, the soldier tries to use the moment to cut them down, but Alisaie manages to kill him first. Later, one of the less important Scions who is also an Ala Mhigan who has a weaker use of the echo has an echo flashback in middle of a battle and nearly gets killed for it.
  • Talk Like a Pirate: Everyone in Limsa Lominsa, obviously.
  • Tastes Like Chicken: Parodied with an NPC at the camp in Outer La Noscea where he's clearly eating a chicken leg and says "Tastes like chicken...because it is chicken."
  • Team Mom: "Mother" Miounne, the proprietor of the Gridanian Adventurers' Guild. She is very warm and welcoming to the player, and when they advance to certain points in the low-level portions of the main questline she tells them she is So Proud of You, or simply comments on how you know how to make "Mother" proud. If you talk to her after completing the final quest in the 2.0 storyline, she'll express happy surprise at your return, and ask you to sit and regale some greenhorn adventurers with your tales (though you don't actually do that).
  • Technicolor Eyes: Au Ra have an option for "Limbal Rings", which is a second and much more striking ring on the outside of their irises, and you can color both the rings and the actual iris separately. Combined with the option to have a race with Heterochromia, an Au Ra can have their eyes be at least three different colors.
  • Temporary Online Content: A good deal of the content related to the pre-ARR 6th Umbral Era storyline was permanently removed from the game upon the release of ARR (2.0), as it was intended as a reward for players sticking with the game during the rebuild. This goes from relatively minor Lodestone achievements (some of which were only available between 2 patches!) to several storyline quests. There is also a unique Goobbue mount that could only be obtained in that time. Many seasonal event rewards also fall under this, though of course the season will come around again.
  • Tempting Fate: In patch 2.55, Alphinaud's words at the alliance celebration—in which he celebrates their successes and declares that a new age of peace is about to descend on Eorzea with the re-entry of Ishgard into the Alliance—absolutely reek of this. Naturally, things fall apart rapidly shortly after, with the assassination of the sultana and the Crystal Braves betraying the Scions.
  • Thanatos Gambit: The ultimate endgame of the Griffin — to allow so much death, despair, hate, horror and vengeance from his "resistance" members as they're crushed by the Empire that they give rise to a brand new Primal. The Griffin/Ilberd's suicide is enough to give the creature life at last.
  • That's No Moon!: Dalamud isn't really a moon but a prison for Bahamut! The Binding Coils of Bahamet and the Crystal Tower quests then reveal that this was no mere prison either, but a way to use Bahamut's immense power to help gather solar energy, much like the Crystal Tower itself. Emperor Xande of the Allagan Empire however, used it to gather the power of darkness for his own purposes
  • The Alliance: The Eorzean Alliance that was formed from the unity of the 3 main city states during the first Garlean war that happened 15 years before the start of the game. Events in the Grand Company questlines have you reform the Alliance due to the threat the empire suddenly poses... again.
  • Theme Song Reveal: Every Primal boss fight with lyrics has them sung either from the perspective of the Primal itself, or the perspective of its worshippers as they extol the Primal. Every fight, that is, except one: Shiva, the Lady of Frost. There is a very significant reason for this. This later also applies to Tsukiyomi, aka Yotsuyu, once again with good reasons for it.
  • The Unfought: A boss fight with Siren is set up...but you only wind up taking out her minions. Patch 2.1 introduced the Pharos Sirius where Siren awaits and is fought there.
    • The giant Kraken at the end of Hullbreaker Isle initially; you only force it to leave by fighting its tentacles. Then like Siren above, Patch 2.4 introduced the Hardmode version of Sastasha with a rematch against the Kraken at the end, instead of just its tentacles.
    • Ramuh and Leviathan were this in the main story among the Primals, but were also added in later patches.
    • In Stormblood. The Four Lords post-game storyline is about the impending unsealing of the most powerful auspice, Kohryu. The other auspice keep mentioning the extreme power possessed by Kohryu and how the player character is very alike to Tenzen, the hero who sealed Kohryu. So Genre Savvy players will assume that the re-sealing will ultimately fail leading to a fight with Kohryu...instead the re-sealing succeeds and the threat of Kohryu is over without a fight.
  • The Very Definitely Final Dungeon: The Praetorium marks the end of the game's first main story arc of the Garlean Empire having suddenly made their move after the steady build up the entire game. After that the story consists of dealing with The Binding Coil of Bahamut to start a new subplot. Since patch 2.1 onwards, the plot picks things up where the main story left off following the player's victory.
    • In Heavensward, Azys Lla: an ancient Allagan research facility, which imprisons both the elder dragon Tiamat, and the game's iteration of the Warring Triad.
    • In Stormblood, Ala Mhigo itself, the culmination of the Warrior of Light's struggle of liberation against Zenos yae Galvus and the Garlean Empire.
    • In Shadowbringers, you experience a flashback to the fall of Amaurot; the Ascian's old capital. Here we see first-hand the horrors that drove the Ascians to their initial summoning of Zodiark, and the beginning of the downfall of their once magnificent empire. The first two-thirds of the dungeon are set against the backdrop of a modern, art-deco inspired city that wouldn't look out of place in Rapture, burning as it's assaulted by eldritch horrors. It culminates in an Astral Finale where you view the un-shattered Source from space, seeing how far-reaching the devastation is.
  • 30-Day Free Trial: A fourteen-day time limit on the free trial used to be the case in older patches. As of Patch 3.56, the free trial now has no time limit, but comes with several other limitations, the most important of which are being unable to progress above Level 35 and a few different restrictions on interacting with other players and the economy.
  • Title Drop: From the final cutscene in the main storyline:
    The three leaders of the Grand Companies: Let it be writ that on this day...by the light of the Crystal...Eorzea ushered in a NEW era! The Seventh Astral Era is come! And thus ours is a realm reborn!
    • Parodied with the hairstylist quest where a rather eccentric 'aesthetician' declares people that are transformed by his hairstyling work "a beauty reborn".
    • While we're on the topic of puns and snowclones, the quests needed to get your relic weapons are called "A Relic Reborn".
    • In a straighter use, you can buy a brand of champagne called "Realm Reborn Red" during the rising event, using it has the action load as "a Realm Reborn".
    • Two cases in Heavensward: the bodyguards of the Archbishop of the Church of Ishgard are collectively named the Heavens' Ward and are the final bosses of the 3.0 storyline and the final quest of the 3.0 story is itself named "Heavensward."
      • In addition, the story of "Heavensward" is being narrated by Count Edmont de Fortemps as he writes his memoir, titled "Heavensward".
    • Shows up for Patch 3.5note  itself in the Baelsar's Wall dungeon:
    The Griffin: I'll give you a glorious end, Warrior of Light! Come! See what awaits you at the far edge of fate!
    • Stormblood continues the tradition from Heavensward, with its final main scenario quest simply titled "Stormblood."
  • Title Theme Drop: "A Cold Wind", the title theme for Heavensward, plays towards the end of the cutscene where Nidhogg interrupts your peace conference and tries to murder Hraesvelgr. Similarly, the title theme for Stormblood plays whenever you set sail for a new locale.
  • Timed Mission:
    • FATE missions always have time limits, as part of their dynamic nature. They'll spawn when the Random Number God feels like it and end some minutes later (usually ten or fifteen, though some larger ones can go as long as 30), and if you haven't accomplished the goals by then, well, too bad for you.
    • Instanced duties also universally have time limits, but this is less part of the challenge and more a way to prevent undergeared players from spending eleven hours trying to accomplish tasks they simply aren't ready for.
    • The FATE against Odin takes the trope to the next level; alongside with the standard FATE time limit, when Odin reaches low HP it will begin preparing Zantetsuken. Failure to beat him before the move is readied results in everyone in the FATE being instantly KO'd and the FATE immediately ending in failure, regardless of the time remaining on the clock.
    • The Forbidden Land, Eureka has a three-hour time limit. Unlike other instanced duties, this is pure Anti Poop-Socking.
  • To Be Continued: Every content patch and expansion ends with a black screen and a short Haiku in golden text that graciously recaps the overall feel of the patch, and gives a slight hint towards the next.
  • Tome of Eldritch Lore: The forbidden tome Necrologos, implied to be a book used in rituals to summon demons - I'm sorry, voidsent. It figures in a number of guildleves that have the basic formula of "gather up fallen pages from the Necrologos, then beat down whatever fiend is summoned from the pages."
  • Took a Level in Badass: The "Midlander" guy in the opening cinematic for the first version of the game. He's a rogue-like archer in the opening cinematic. By the time of the ending cinematic depicting the release of Bahamut, he's clad in heavy armor and wielding a giant axe. In the Heavensward trailer, the same Midlander character makes an appearance as he ditches his axe and Warrior attire to become a Dragoon. In the Stormblood trailer, he takes up the garb of the Monk to spar with Lyse then is shown in the robes of a Samurai. Finally, in the Shadowbringers trailer when confronted with an angel, he starts as Bard then cycles through Warrior, Dragoon, Monk, Samurai as each job is defeated before finally crushing his opponent as a thematically appropriate Dark Knight.
  • Too Awesome to Use: Averted for high end potions like X-Ethers and Hi-Elixirs, where they used to be too rare for people to want to use freely until patch 2.1 made them a common loot drop for end game dungeons.
  • Top-Heavy Guy: Titan is built with a massive frame and huge arms, but he has a small waist and short legs. The Amalj'aa beastmen also have a similar build, but it's not as extreme.
  • Tournament Arc: The Omega raid.
  • Trademark Favorite Food: Qiqirn are just crazy for eggs.
  • Trailers Always Lie: Combat in 1.0 was nowhere near as flashy as in the CGI intro trailer. A Realm Reborn, however, had its combat redesigned to be much closer to that in pre-rendered cinematics.
    • The trailer for patch 3.2 briefly shown a scene with the player confronting General Rhauban in an arena of flames, both drawing their weapons. Without any context, the trailer made it appear that the Flame General had sided with the Ascians. In truth, this was simply the final fight in a friendly battle royale between the city states, similar to an Ishgardian equivalent to the original Olympics.
  • Trailers Always Spoil: Patch 4.4 has Thancred, Y'Shtola, and Urianger collapse after some sort of vision that all the Scions are experiencing, with Kan-E noting that she cannot sense a soul within Thancred's body, when he is the first to collapse. A few months later, a teaser trailer for 5.0 comes out, and in it we see Thancred up and running about, looking just fine (without the usual eye-patch even), implying that they get their souls back in time for the next expansion.
    • The prerelease trailer for Shadowbringers had one particularly wham-tastic line that a lot of people were surprised was even included prior to the release of the game:
    Solus: But, they are Gods after a fashion, yes. The eldest and most powerful...of Primals.
    • Played with in regards to Innocence. Pre-release material revealed it as a prominent Primal-esque trial encounter in Shadowbringers. What they didn't reveal was Innocence is Lord Vauthry; however, going into the fight having seen the prerelease artwork will have one realise Vauthry is referred to as Innocence at the start of the fight, and will very likely turn into the more aesthetically pleasing angel seen in the artwork.
  • Training Dummy:
    • Some settlements will have wooden dummies that you can attack to gauge your damage and practice your rotation. You can also see an NPC using a dummy as well. Eventually, dummies became placeable outdoor furniture items, so you (or more likely, your Free Company) can place up to three at your house.
    • Patch 3.2 introduced the Stone, Sky and Sea personal instance which pits you against a training dummy scaled to have the defenses and HP of a given end-game boss. While it doesn't show you your raw numbersnote  or teach you mechanics, success in destroying the dummy within the time limit proves that at the very least you can pull your weight against the real thing DPS-wise.
  • Transhuman Treachery: Ishgardian Heretics who side with Nidhogg's brood will often, as a final show of their devotion for the dragons or hatred of Ishgard, drink the blood of a dragon, which due to the murder of Ratataskr by the Knight Twelve a thousand years ago will transform them into various kinds of draconic monsters.
  • Trash the Set: 1.0 ends with Eorzea getting razed by Bahamut.
  • Treasure Map: Starting at level 40, miners and fishers can find treasure maps that show a small portion of the world map where the treasure chest is located. Every chest is rigged to unleash monsters on you and defeating all of them will grant you access to the loot inside, which is usually gil, crafting materials, and sometimes rare armor or accessories. Each map has different tiers of loot depending on what material the map is made out of. There's also an Unhidden Leather Map that you can sometimes get from a treasure hunt, which is basically a bonus map for you to use and its treasures may sometimes contain very rare loot.
  • Tron Lines: This seems to be a recurring feature of Allagan technology. Amon's cape is covered with glowing blue lines, as is Xande's body.
  • Troubling Unchildlike Behavior: Lalafells can provoke this reaction among players. While the Lalafells you interact with are undoubtedly adults, it can be a little jarring to hear them talk dirty or act ruthless, which many of them, especially in The Syndicate, frequently do.
    • The touched slyphs kind of fall into this despite their cute fairy appearance, they totally fine with threatening or trying to kill. One beast tribe quest has one tell you they're going to gouge your eyes out.
  • True Companions: The Heaven's Ward have this dynamic, particularly Janlenoux and Adelphel. They're villains, and the group contains a couple of genuine scumbags, but they ultimately seem to be of one mind and lay down their lives together for Thordan's sake.
    Ser Adelphel: With me, Ser Janlenoux!
    Ser Janlenoux: Ever and always, brother!
  • True Neutral:
    • In-Universe, Sharlayans are agreed to be this by everyone else. They accumulate knowledge for knowledge's sake, but as Urianger notes when posthumously talking about Moenbryda's reasons for coming to Eorzea, he mentions that Louisoix choosing to leave Sharlayan and share their knowledge with the outside world, even to prevent a world-ending disaster, was considered such a breach of their morality that he went from one of the biggest members of their society to a social pariah. In Heavensward, you learn while training as an Astrologian that the Sharlayans are SO neutral, that they treat anyone leaving for any reason as reason to outcast them at best, and outright kill them at worst, due to their leadership being xenophobes who throw around the same "savages" mentality as the Garleans and believe their knowledge is theirs and no-one elses.
    • The Sui-no-Satsu village is this as well. They don't want to take part in anything of the outside world outside of trading with the blue Kojin, to the point where, when the heroes try to get their aid in finding an object belonging to the Kojin, they just tell you to get lost.
  • Turns Red: Ifrit and Garuda get significantly more difficult when you reduce their health below 30%, and Titan does the same after shattering his heart, which is generally the point where an unsuccessful party goes to pieces. It'd probably be easier to list the Primals that don't use this trope in some form.
    • Yiazmat and Construct 7 in the Ridoranna Lighthouse raid both literally turn red when low on health signified by Yiazmat casting "Growing Threat" and Construct 7 casting "Annihilation Mode". This massively reduces the delay between their attacks, reducing casting time for attacks and increasing their movement speed. In the case of Yiazmat it also causes him to spam his more annoying attacks one after the other and in the case of construct 7 causes some of his attacks to have increased duration.
  • Twist Ending: The ending of 4.3 played with a lot of player's theories on where the story was headed. While many players correctly predicted that the supposed-to-be-dead Zenos was now Elidibus' meat puppet, the real twist came from the repeated faux-foreshadowing of the Scions warning not to let anyone see them inspecting Zenos' grave. Predictably, an Ala Mhigan soldier sees the act. Less predictably, the soldier in question is Zenos himself, Back from the Dead via Body Surf using his artificial Echo. While this possibility was also explored by the players, many thought that it would only be one or the other, not both.
  • Undesirable Prize: Many of the hard mode version of some dungeons in the A Realm Reborn content will have some good gear to obtain after a tough boss fight. Many other times, the chests will contain nothing but crafting material, which you will likely be unable to use or sell on the market for a good price (due to the market being flooded with the items) unless you're a crafter yourself that can take advantage of the materials and make them into items to be sold. Later patches changed it so that both gear and crafting items always appear.
  • Unexpected Gameplay Change:
    • The Hard Blow side quest in Stormblood has you proving the effectiveness of a blowgun to an NPC by going into first person and shooting targets. A few other side quests also make use of this mechanic.
    • The "Merchant for a Day" side quest has you tending to a stall and pitching sales to customers that approach.
    • The Rising event in 2017 has a dungeon crawler mini game with a password that has to be decoded.
  • Unflinching Walk: Okay, so you're not actually walking, but when The Manipulator is destroyed in the final floor of Alexander Gordias it collapses in a heap and explodes. As the camera zooms out to show your party they all have their backs so it as it blows up.
  • Unscrupulous Hero: 30 minutes in Ul'dah/Thanalan is usually enough to put any discussions of "the good guys" to bed. The Syndicate-backed government is astonishingly corrupt, merchants are often seen openly bullying civilians, and even the Immortal Flames are described as being the most bellicose of the three Grand Companies.
    • The Sultana does genuinely care about the people and wants to institute reforms and help the disenfranchised... but she has virtually no power to actually do so under the current system — she's little more than a figurehead... and some parties are interested in her losing the support needed to be even that, for fear of her gaining more power and fighting the city-state's corruption.
  • The Unpronounceable: Seeker of the Sun and some Keeper of the Moon Miqo'te names have aitched H'es in them that most people have to give an uncomfortable phlegmy, hissing noise to make. Only other Miqo'te can reliably make this noise in-universe, so names like this tend to either have a second, softer pronunciation for the sake of dealing with other races, or (for the sake of simplicity) drop the H entirely.
  • Unreliable Narrator:
    • The framing device for Ultima Weapon's hard mode. After telling a minstrel about the story of how you defeated Ultima Weapon, it's implied that you relive a heavily embellished and abridged memory of the encounter through his music. The same set-up is used for the Savage raids and various other non-canon difficult encounters.
    • The Encyclopedia Eorzea is a real life book created by the lore team to give a rich insight almost everything seen in the game and the history of civilization up to the end of the 3.3 story. While most of the book's content is considered to be truth according to Word of God, the team also stated that the book is written mostly in character from an unseen and unnamed NPC in the game and the book has some biases as a result. What also makes the statement even funnier is the book was discovered by fans to have a lot of errors in regards to names, dates, and other facts due to the lore team's mistakes, which would be quite realistic since such a book would very likely to have some form of errors.
  • Unwinnable by Design: Dungeons and boss fights all have a time limit and it is possible that you can't win simply because you don't have enough time left to beat them. Some primals and many bosses in raids also have a hidden "enrage" timer where if the party takes too long to kill the boss, said boss will One-Hit Kill everyone.
  • Unwitting Instigator of Doom: Momodi gives the Warrior of Light a message to meet with Alianne at a specified place. She never shows but he/she finds a suspicious vial at the rendezvous point. Upon returning to The Quicksand, Momodi advises him/her to keep it just in case. The same vial would be used as evidence to pin the Sultana's murder on the Warrior of Light.
  • Useless Item:
    • Various tiers of potions, ethers, and elixirs can be useful to new players, but the amount of HP/MP they recover is pitiful when you're at a high level and all the potions have cooldown, meaning you can't use other potions or other related items for a few minutes. Likewise, Phoenix Downs, which are difficult to obtain, only work if the user is not in battle and if the target is in the player's party. Most players will just opt to respawn and return to the party rather than suffer the Weakness status or wait for the party's healer to revive them with a spell even in the middle of the battle. The introduction of the Palace of the Dead boosted the potency of healing potions and they have become useful again due to the player's HP being at much lower values and the possibility of having a group with no healers. Phoenix Downs also get a use in the palace for the same reason.
    • Elemental ward potions, which were supposed to boost your resistance to an element, were practically never used due the effect being too marginal to make any significant difference. Eventually, their effects were removed entirely (along with elemental materia and most elemental resistances as a whole), with the in-game justification that all the remaining potions had "aged" into a concoction that acts as weapon or armor dye (ironically, making the potions much more useful than they originally were to most players)
    • Materia for combat classes are generally worthless, though it is zig-zagged. For a new player or a player that is leveling up a new class, melding materia on your gear is pointless since you will have your gear replaced fairly often until you hit the level cap. Even at the level cap, a lot of the end game gear can't even have materia melded onto them. Hardcore raiders (back when the Binding Coil of Bahamut was new) managed to make materia useful by melding them onto gear that was a step below the best gear and then use a lot of materia to help offset any weakness the gear might've had. However, materia once again became useless by 3.0 due to the developers trying to make the Alexander Savage raid much more difficult by using more complex and difficult mechanics, which means people couldn't simply beef up their stats and hope for the best), along with changing the secondary stat bonuses gear would have. 3.2 attempts to compromise by allowing players to meld materia onto end game gear, but they cannot overmeld (putting more materia than the number of slots available).
  • Useless Useful Spell:
    • Averted for most spells and abilities. Most enemies are vulnerable to handful of debuffs and even crippling ones like Stun and Sleep work quite well. Of course, there's stronger enemies and bosses that can resist certain effects. Naturally, PVP makes all sorts of debuffs not only be handy, but also vital in strategies that can turn the tide of battle.
    • Shockingly, played straight for some limit breaks. A tank's limit break involves the use of barriers on the party that can either reduce damage or even make the party invincible for a few seconds, which would be handy except that a healer can easily negate the damage done to the party. Healers have a limit break that can heal the entire party, which is handy for low level healers, but it quickly gets outclassed by a healer's stronger healing spells. A level 3 limit break for a healer can fully restore the party's HP and fully revive KO'd allies, but the person using the limit break is rooted in place for several seconds and the revived players are forced to accept the raise, which means they could get attacked without having time to get away and recoup.
    • A prime example is Monk's One Ilm Punch. An attack that offers the game's one and only player-available dispel effect. You'd be forgiven for forgetting that the attack even exists because the amount of enemies that are affected by it can be counted on one hand, and the amount of those that are bosses at endgame levels can be counted with one finger. To top it off, the attack has pathetically low potency, and absurdly high TP cost, to the point where whatever damage you make up for by removing a buff is immediately lost by reducing your DPS and potentially burning out your TP. Stormblood changed the skill to be a bit stronger and causes a stun effect instead before it is removed altogether in Shadowbringers.
    • The Lancer's Feint weapon skill. It's primary purpose is to inflict the Slow status, with a max duration of 20 seconds. However, at Level 50, enemies are either completely immune to Slow, such as Primals and bosses, or die so quickly, there's no point using it. The ones who aren't immune, but also have the HP to make somewhat worthwhile, likewise build resistance with each usage until Slow hasn't been used on them for over a minute, each time cutting duration by about half with each usage, and takes time away from a Dragoon doing what they do best, ultra focused high output burst damage. Final nail in the coffin? Black Mages get an ability on a less than a half-minute recast that inflicts a slightly lower duration Slow, but also includes Heavy with it, doesn't cost anything to use and is instant cast, while those of the Arcanist class and its jobs, get Shadow Flare, which provides a 30 second long, reduced effectiveness (but not resistance increasing) slow for any enemy inside of it who isn't immune to slows. The revamp of the skills in Stormblood changed the skill completely where it reduces the target's strength and dexterity by 10%. It's also a cross role skill.
    • Some of Black Mage's ice spells falls squarely into this, as Freeze was an area-target spell which inflicts the relatively useless Bind effect. On top of its low damage, it grants only one Umbral Ice stack, and casting it in Astral Fire removes the effect without replacing it with Umbral Ice, making it only useful for showing off to other players. After Shadowbringers is released, it no longer has to be area-targeted and can be fully transitioned from Astral Fire to a full stack of Umbral Ice, while the Bind effect is replaced with one stack of Umbral Heart. Blizzard II become even less useful though, since it had lost the Bind effect with practically nothing to compensate for it.
    • Out of all the ninjutsus accessible from the Mudras, Hyoton has the lowest potency for a single-target attack, with only Bind effect for it, and even then, it is dispelled the moment the target is attacked. While Hyoton itself remains as useless as ever in Shadowbringers, a high-level Ninja is capable of upgrading Hyoton's mudra with Kassatsu into "Hyosho Ranryu", which multiplies its potency well over fourfold on top of its guaranteed critical hit, making it the hardest hitting Ninjutsu available in the Ninja's arsenal.
    • While still on the subject of binds, there is the Summoner's Tri-Bind spell (originally called Tri-Disaster before Heavensward). Like Hyoton and Frost, it does low damage, has a mediocre status effect, and takes more MP to cast than any of Summoner's other spells with the exception of Summons and Ruin III. On top of all of that, Summoner can cross-class the previously mentioned Blizzard II from Black Mage, which takes less MP than Tri-Bind, does more damage, and (though centered on the caster) hits in a bigger area (5 yalms as opposed to Tri-Bind's 3).
    • Some abilities start out as borderline useless when first acquired until they receive passive upgrades or synergy with other abilities. The monk's Mantra is a great example - it's a 5% increase in healing power to the entire party, which is effectively nothing, that is, until a few levels later where you get its related trait, at which point it becomes a 20% healing increase, which is not only significant, it can be life-saving. Stormblood would revamp most of traits so that skills would have a fixed potency instead of relying on a trait to make them stronger.
    • Black Mages and Thaumaturges have Surecast, an ability that ensures the user's next cast will not be interrupted by enemy attacks. But the ability is rarely useful due to the attacks that can break the cast being few and far between, especially at endgame. The learning of Swiftcast obsoletes this skill by removing the cast bar, having the same effect as Surecast while also allowing the user to move and use another ability during the global cooldown. The skill revamp in Stormblood made Surecast a cross role skill that not only retains its original effect, it also prevents draw in and knockback effects. While more useful than the original version, most people don't find it useful enough to use it.
      • Averted with Surecast in the Omega raid encounters. The majority of bosses there have at least one pushback/draw-in effect, many of which are instantly fatal if not mitigated. Being able to ignore those mechanics and keep churning out damage spells is a godsend for any caster, but most especially for Black Mages, whose entire play-style centers around finding ways to minimize movement.
    • Stormblood introduced several new skills that could be used across several jobs, but a good chunk of them are pretty worthless. Drain has an extremely low potency and only a portion of the damage inflicted is absorbed to your HP. A Red Mage can dualcast it and Black Mages can use Triplecast with it, but it's hardly worth the MP cost. Erase heals a party member and removes one debuff, but the cure potency is extremely low and it has a high cooldown while Esuna can remove debuffs as quickly as you can cast it. Break is used by almost nobody due its very poor potency and the additional effect of causing Heavy is hardly needed. Arm's Length prevents knockback and draw in effects and inflicts Slow on the target that used said effects, but buff only lasts 5 seconds and most targets that do cause knockback/draw in are immune to Slow anyway. Crutch works exactly the same as the Paladin's Tempered Will skill, which removes Heavy and Slow, except Crutch can only be used on a party member and it's too situational to have slotted when you can have something more useful and frequently used instead. Foot Graze and Leg Grze causes Heavy and Bind respectively and both are almost never used by any ranged DPS due to most enemies being immune to such effects anyway.
    • Elemental crafting is borderline useless. The purpose behind the "Brand/Name of X" abilities for crafters is to let them increase progress at a decent rate when dealing with a recipie associated with an element. Only a handful of recipes deal with elemental crafts while the rest do not. The concept of elemental crafting was absent entirely in Heavensward, and Shadowbringers rolled all these spells into Brand/Name of Elements, which is available for all crafting classes.
    • Skills that inflict Sleep, Bind, and Heavy are generally never used since most enemies are either immune to the effects or will shake off the effects (except heavy) when attacked since most players will gather as many enemies as possible in one spot and burn them down with AOE spam. However, Palace of the Dead and Eureka has the status effect work quite effectively on most enemies, which is handful for crowd control and solo play.
    • Rescue is a healer skill introduced in Stormblood where it can pull another player towards you. The ability is very situational since you have to time the pull just right to yank someone out of danger. Time it wrong and you'll very likely either screw the player over in their damage output/rotation or even pull them into an attack (it's just as bad with lag). Due to high accident potential with Rescue as well as people using the skill to troll other players, you'll likely get yelled at or be accused of trolling. Ergo, most healers don't bother using Rescue at all unless they know exactly what they're doing.
  • Utility Magic: Thaumaturgy was originally magic used in funerary rites for the ritual cleansing and preservation of corpses, and was later adapted to combat — for obvious reasons, Player Characters only learn the latter application.
    • Conjurers likewise play an important rule in Gridanian society and culture, but players do little of what that entails outside of class quests.
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