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Rand Enterprises

Rand Family

    Wendell Rand 

Wendell Rand

Species: Human

Portrayed By: David Furr

Appearances: Iron Fist

The owner of Rand Enterprises, husband of Heather and father of Danny Rand.


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    Heather Rand 

Heather Duncan Rand

Species: Human

Portrayed By: Victoria Haynes

Appearances: Iron Fist

The mother of Danny Rand and wife of Wendell Rand.


    Danny Rand 
See the Defenders page

Meachum Family

    Harold Meachum 

Harold Meachum

https://static.tvtropes.org/pmwiki/pub/images/harold_meachum.png
"I have no idea what an Iron Fist is. Sounds like a sex toy."

Species: Human

Portrayed By: David Wenham

Appearances: Iron Fist

Wendell's business partner, and father of Joy and Ward Meachum.


  • Abled in the Adaptation: Harold's legs were amputated in the comics.
  • Abusive Parents: He treats Ward like a henchman and a whipping boy rather than his own son and he is not afraid of physically disciplining him to get that across. Its very telling that Ward says the last time he was happy was when Harold died (Ward was 15 years-old at the time). Harold also had one in his own father, who used to beat him with his belt all the time. When Bakuto is preparing to (try to) decapitate him, Harold's last words to his children are to express how much of a disappointment Ward has been to him and glorifying Joy for being the better choice.
  • Adaptational Badass: In the comics, Harold was an crippled and broken old man who lost his legs. Not only is he much younger, able-bodied and capable of fighting, but he is also The Ageless as result of his ties with the Hand.
  • Adaptational Villainy: A downplayed example. While Harold was involved in the death of Danny's parents in the comics, he had absolutely no involvement with the Hand and was instead motivated by jealousy, as he was in love with Danny's mother. Harold in the show is also a more active threat than his comic book counterpart, who was much more passive and wanted to be put out of his misery by Danny.
  • Affably Evil: He acts polite and reasonable to those he's talking to and even when angry, he still keeps the same calm tone. However...
    • Faux Affably Evil: After Ward kills him, his politeness becomes more of an act as he starts to lose traces of his humanity.
  • The Ageless: Since dying, he hasn't aged a day in thirteen years.
  • Age Lift: A great deal younger than his comic counterpart, who is depicted as an old man. See The Ageless above.
  • Bad Boss: Though he initially tries to paint himself as a Benevolent Boss in his introductory scene by teaching the values of appreciating and rewarding employees to his son, they aren't particularly impressive as he demonstrate it by giving his assistant Kyle a day off...when it's about to hit midnight. His subsequent appearances show him being very condescending towards him which leads to Harold brutally murdering him in a fit of madness caused by resurrection after Kyle declines the fancy ice creams Harold bought for him and asks for vanilla.
  • Big-Bad Ensemble: With Madame Gao and Bakuto for Season 1 of Iron Fist. While the weakest of the three in terms of overall threat, and Gao and Bakuto are fighting to control him, Harold is responsible for the events of the series: he made a deal with Madame Gao's Hand faction to resurrect him after his cancer reached a terminal state, in exchange for using Rand Enterprises to move Gao's heroin over the world. When Wendell began getting suspicious, Harold got poison from Gao to kill the pilots of the Rands' plane, which resulted in the deaths of Wendell and Heather, as well as Danny heading to K'un-Lun. And ultimately, Harold is the last one of the three to be dealt with to end the season.
  • Brooklyn Rage: A martial arist and brutal fighter from New York.
  • Bunny-Ears Lawyer: Harold is a pretty quirky guy to say the least, and his Sanity Slippage doesn't help. It doesn't make him any less of a Manipulative Bastard.
  • Came Back Wrong: Every death and resurrection makes him a little less human and more prone to violence.
  • Composite Character: The more villainous qualities of Ward in the comics have instead gone to him.
  • Contrasting Sequel Antagonist: While Wilson Fisk, Kilgrave, Cottonmouth, and Diamondback were all defined by their horrible childhoods, Harold serves as a sinister patriarchal role to both his children and Danny.
  • Corrupt Corporate Executive: A very shady businessman.
  • Deal with the Devil: Made a deal shortly before dying. It was to make him Immortal, but a puppet of the Hand.
  • Disc-One Final Boss: He's the main antagonist for the first part of the first season of Iron Fist. Subverted, though, in that he returns in the finale to be Danny's last opposition.
  • Dragon Ascendant: He served as The Dragon to the Hand, but once Gao and Bakuto are out of the way, he takes his place as the Final Boss that Danny has to deal with.
  • Evil All Along: He wasn't exactly a nice guy to begin with, but one could mistake him for simply being extreme but well-meaning early in the season. He's eventually revealed to be a cold-blooded murderer and just as bad as the Hand he serves, having been screwing with Danny's life even before his resurrection.
  • Exact Words: When Joy asks that he assure her that he did not have Lawrence killed, he truthfully answers that he did not. Because he did it himself.
  • Face Death with Dignity: When it looks like Bakuto has him dead to rights, he does his best to console a wounded Joy and assure her how everything will be okay. Though it's tempered a bit by the fact that his intended last words are "Ward, you are the greatest disappointment in my life."
  • Faking the Dead: The world thinks he died of cancer, but he's actually alive and well. Technically, both are true.
  • Final Boss: Once Gao and Bakuto had been dealt with, he rises as the final threat to Danny for Season 1.
  • Fingore: Gao's thugs try to amputate one of his fingers as a lesson on foolishness. After Danny blows his cover and he's forced to kill them, Harold amputates his finger anyway to keep Gao from raising suspicion. It apparently grows back as part of Harold’s resurrection, as all ten of his fingers are plainly visible afterwards.
  • Fire Keeps It Dead: He's cremated to prevent resurrection.
  • It's All About Me: Ward openly says that the only person Harold really cares about is himself.
  • Kingpin in His Gym: He is frequently shown going to town on his punching bag or sparring with a physical trainer, to help establish that he's a physical threat in addition to a corporate criminal.
  • Like a Son to Me: Towards Danny, it's not genuine.
  • Manipulative Bastard: Harold spends most of the show manipulating Danny, his children, and even the Hand.
  • The Nothing After Death: How he describes the afterlife to a recently murdered Kyle. He goes into more detail as to what it's like to pass on when he reunites with Joy.
  • Orcus on His Throne: Initially played straight; he's been publicly dead for several years seemingly due to the involvement of the Hand. Danny Rand's return to New York City forces him to directly involve himself in the world again.
  • Papa Wolf: Seeing a bruise on Joy's face leads him to slice the owner of the offending fist...vertically. Only extends to his daughter, since he clearly despises and denigrates his own son Ward every chance he gets.
  • Parental Favoritism: Blatantly prefers Joy over Ward.
  • Posthumous Character: Averted Trope. The Hand resurrected him when he died from cancer 13 years ago, and is pulling the strings of Rand Enterprises in secret.
  • Rasputinian Death: He's impaled on rebar, shot, falls off of a skyscraper, and is cremated to prevent him from resurrecting.
  • Resurrective Immortality: When he dies, he wakes up three days later fully healed.
  • Sanity Slippage: Thanks to the Hand resurrection techniques, and since he wasn't a very stable or terribly kind person to start with, he didn't have far to fall.
  • Supernaturally Young Parent: Justified TropeHarold died 13 years ago but was subsequently revived by The Hand, and a side effect of the resurrection is him retaining the appearance of the age at which he first died.
  • That Man Is Dead: Ward considers Harold to have died 13 years ago. The man before him who looks like his father is a monster who had part of his soul left in the grave.
  • Wicked Cultured: As benefiting a top businessman, he's seen enjoying fine alcoholic beverages and when he returns to Rand Enterprises, he shows up wearing a sharp three-piece suit.
  • You Killed My Father: Killed Danny's parents because they discovered his illicit dealings with The Hand.

    Joy Meachum 

Joy Meachum

https://static.tvtropes.org/pmwiki/pub/images/mcu_joy_meachum.png

Species: Human

Portrayed By: Jessica Stroup

Appearances: Iron Fist

Harold's daughter, running Rand Enterprises with her brother Ward when Danny Rand returns to New York.


  • Broken Pedestal: Walks away from Harold when she realizes what a monster he is.
  • Daddy's Girl: Issues notwithstanding, she adored and looked up to her father. Joy becomes Daddy's Little Villain shortly after learning of his resurrection.
  • Daddy Issues: Joy is flat out stated to have this. Even joining with Harold despite his unwillingness to explain his absence for 13 years and her protectiveness towards him despite being affiliated with the Hand. Ward even calls her out on this for using him as a replacement for her acceptance because she couldn't get the same from her father.
    Ward: I didn't ask to be the heir to your daddy issues, so grow up, and stop begging for my approval! It's cliche; it's pathetic!
  • Defrosting Ice Queen: She's very cold to Danny when he returns but starts warming to him quicker than Ward does, especially once she realizes who he really is.
  • Determinator: Once Joy has a goal, she won't stop until it's achieved whether it's getting back into Rand, destroying Danny, or stopping Davos.
  • Evil Costume Switch: In Season 2, she's introduced wearing dark clothing and having switched the executive skirt for black leather pants.
  • Face–Heel Turn: Gradually becomes more corrupt over the course of the show, culminating in her decision to work with Davos to kill Danny. Even after discovering Harold has framed Danny for the Hand's heroin dealing, in the end she decides to collaborate with Davos to eliminate Danny.
  • Foil: To Jessica Jones. Both lost a parent (Jessica's mom, Joy's father) when they were a kid, and were secretly kept in the dark for over a decade about said parent actually being alive and well. They both find out about said parent being alive and well and reconnect with them, but the parent has turned out to become emotionally volatile and unstable. And by the end, said parent has been killed for real by their sibling (Trish, Ward). And both have become estranged from their support network (Malcolm and Trish in Jessica's case; Ward and Danny in Joy's case). The only difference is that Jessica is still a hero and working through her pain over losing her mom for real, while Joy's pain over losing Harold for good causes her to turn dark and begin working with Davos.
  • Hypocrite: Joy states that she's more open-minded than her brother's Black and White Morality. But at the end of the day, she's as obstinate as Ward in her opinions and is all too willing to side with her untrustworthy father despite Ward warning how dangerous Harold is, while spitting excuses for his behavior.
  • Heel–Face Turn: Joy starts season 2 siding with Davos to hurt Danny but when she realizes Davos' instability, she finds and delivers the key to stopping him without the help of any of the heroes (who have no idea she's even doing this). She later insists it was just because Davos had to be stopped, not to help the others, but Ward doesn't buy it.
  • Locked Out of the Loop: She isn't aware that her father is alive, not at first.
  • Love Makes You Evil: Joy loves her father and wants to please him, so much that she is willing to become more and more corrupted to keep up with Harold's immorality.
  • Morality Pet: Serves as one to Ward and Harold. Possibly also to Walker.
  • Related in the Adaptation: Her counterpart in the comics is Ward's niece, but they're siblings here.
  • Self-Made Man: Her ultimate goal.
  • Sibling Yin-Yang: While Ward is very obstinate and unfeeling, Joy is more reasonable and willing to listen. The pendulum then swings by the end of the season.
  • Vengeance Feels Empty: Her expression when she receives the video of Danny's defeat indicates this.
  • What the Hell, Hero?: In season 2, she calls out both Danny and Ward for repeatedly lying to and manipulating her and points out that Ward had pretty much their entire life to come clean but never did.
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    Ward Meachum 

Ward Meachum

https://static.tvtropes.org/pmwiki/pub/images/mcu_ward_meachum.png

Species: Human

Portrayed By: Tom Pelphrey

Appearances: Iron Fist

Harold's son, running Rand Enterprises with his sister Joy when Danny Rand returns to New York.


  • Adaptational Heroism: He gets to have a Heel–Face Turn whereas his comic counterpart did not. Up until that point, however, he's as bad as his comic counterpart was.
  • Adaptation Dye-Job: Ward Meachum is blonde in the comics, while here his hair is black.
  • Age Lift: He goes from being Harold's brother to Harold's son.
  • Agent Scully: He will always refuse to believe any of the fantastical stories accompanied by Danny including; the homeless man who walks in is Danny Rand back from the dead, Danny's story on Rand being used to smuggle heroin, The Hand holding a girl hostage in one of Rand's warehouses. He finally has a Heel Realization after he sees the decapitated head of a Hand member who failed to stop Danny.
  • Arbitrary Skepticism: He suffers a bad case of this at first: despite living in a city of ninjas, bulletproof men and mind-rapists, not to mention a full-on extra-terrestrial invasion, Ward has trouble believing Danny, officially stated as deceased, may actually be who he says he is. Though in his defense, he has problems admitting that because of how troublesome it would have been to his position in Rand Enterprises, it can get ridiculous that he still doesn't entertain the notion while speaking with his own father Harold, who was brought back to life by a evil ninja cult and whom Ward has been forced to serve as lackey.
  • The Atoner: Thanks to his Character Development, Ward tries hard to be a good guy in Season 2. While he successfully makes amends with Danny, Joy blows him off. He lapses back into addiction (this time getting shitfaced drunk in the morning) and starts atoning again.
  • Big Brother Instinct: While Ward has many flaws, he genuinely cares and wants to protect Joy even at personal cost.
    • In season 2, he also starts acting more protective and brotherly towards Danny, outright referring to Danny as his brother at one point. Seeing what Davos did to Danny drives Ward to get himself piss-drunk and pick a losing fight with a bartender twice his size.
  • Black and White Morality: Joy describes his worldview as being this way.
  • Bully Turned Buddy: When they were children, Ward bullied Danny. In season 1, when the long-lost adult Danny returns, Ward doesn't seem to think their relationship was that antagonistic, and by the time season 2 starts, they've become close friends.
  • But for Me, It Was Tuesday: He doesn't remember any of what he and Danny did together, including the bullying he did growing up, seemingly because it was so commonplace he doesn't care to remember.
  • Butt-Monkey: Ward does not catch a break at all. He's consistently being manipulated, kicked around, and forced to play second-fiddle to both Danny and Joy.
  • Character Development: Goes through some extreme changes, to the point he's almost unrecognizable at the end of the season then as the person we're first introduced to.
  • Crying Wolf: He lied to Joy about everything from the purpose of business deals to their father's death, so by the time he tries to tell her about how dangerous Harold is, she doesn't believe him and it contributes to her Face–Heel Turn.
  • The Dragon: To his father, Harold.
  • Establishing Character Moment: Literally the first childhood flashback Danny has of childhood with Ward is Ward refusing to follow the rules of the game they're playing when he starts to lose, kicking Danny in the balls, throwing all of the game pieces off of the table, and then blaming Danny for it when his parents show up a minute later. Danny helps him grow out of his Jerkass-ness by the end of the first season.
  • Everyone Has Standards: He's quite disdainful of the trust fund babies in New York City who live off their parents' money and don't work. While he too was born into a life of privilege, he and his sister actually run the day-to-day operations of the company their father helped build and earn their own salaries.
  • Face–Heel Revolving Door: Ward is a weak man who is full of Conflicting Loyalties and deeply desires to be his own man. As he tries to deal with the events of season one, he makes various deals and compromises with both the heroes and the villains and it is hard at times to figure out whose side he is on. By the end of the show, he's settled on "Face".
  • Fatal Flaw: Ward has a laundry list of flaws, but the top one is his hatred of his father, and more specifically his childish reaction to being ordered around. His biggest problems are caused when Harold orders him to back Joy on the Danny apologizing scandal, and Ward refuses to. Ward has been considering it until Harold orders him to go along with it.
  • Foil: To Cottonmouth. Both were shoved into positions neither chose to be in, and their arc centers around that struggle. Where they differ is that unlike Cottonmouth, Ward is actually able to find redemption and become a decent person.
  • Freudian Excuse: It becomes obvious early on that all of Ward's problem come from being treated like crap by his powerful and sadistic father while simultaneously getting very ruthless life philosophy beat into him by his father since childhood, and the stress of having to secretly deal with his father in the present day.
  • Functional Addict: He pops pain pills like they're candy, but otherwise seems to not be affected too much. Until he ends up hooked on the Hand's tainted heroin, that is, and he's forced to get detoxified.
  • Good Hair, Evil Hair: His slicked-back hairstyle can be seen as shady.
  • Grew a Spine: He starts season one as a weak minion of his father, but gets Character Development and starts to assert himself. He finally has enough and stabs his father to death. He has a Heel–Face Turn when he finally has the courage to do the right thing and stick with it.
  • Hate Sink: He was initially depicted as this, being a bully as a child and a Corrupt Corporate Executive as an adult. He does grow out of it after a Hazy Feel Turn.
  • Heel–Face Turn: By the end of the show, he has made a complete 180 and even offers to work with Danny as equals "the way our fathers should have".
  • Irony: Early in the season he has Danny incarcerated in Birch Psychiatric Hospital where he was treated as a mental patient by Paul Edmonds. Later on, Ward in the season he is sent to the exact same institute for being an addict and interrogated by the same psychiatrist.
  • Karma Houdini: Downplayed. While he ends up in a good position despite repeated attempts to murder Danny, it's hard to argue the sheer amount of suffering he goes through over the whole season isn't punishment enough, plus he ends up a genuinely better person because of it.
  • Mommy Issues: Is accused of having these by Joy in season 2.
  • One Steve Limit: Averted, as he's the second character in the MCU who answers to the name "Ward", alongside Grant Ward from Agents of S.H.I.E.L.D..
  • Out, Damned Spot!: Ward demonstrates this repeatedly. He first gets blood on his sleeve after Danny takes him to see the decapitated head of a Hand soldier who failed to stop Danny, which Ward tries to rub off. He later gets it again when he kills Harold by stabbing him to death, first seeing blood on his sleeve and hand before he starts seeing it everywhere, dripping from doors and walls. It doesn't go away until Harold comes back to life.
  • Patricide: Ward kills Harold in "Felling Tree With Roots". It doesn't stick. The first time, anyway.
  • Rage Quit: Danny's first childhood flashback shows Ward refusing to follow the rules of Monopoly when he starts to lose, then throwing all of the pieces on the floor.
  • Schoolyard Bully All Grown Up: Although not directly from the schoolyard, Ward is no less of a self-involved prick to Danny than from when they were kids. Their first on-screen interaction of them as kids had Ward cheating him out of Monopoly money; years later, Ward would grow up to embezzle millions of dollars from Rand Enterprise's pension fund.
  • Self-Made Orphan: He kills his father, Harold, twice. The first time by stabbing him to death after being fed up with being abused as his father's underling. This doesn't last since Harold returns from the dead. The second time he shoots an already impaled Harold off a building then had his body cremated to prevent resurrection.
  • Sibling Yin-Yang: While Joy is slightly more empathetic and reasonable, Ward is less forgiving and stuck in his ways. At first.
  • Slasher Smile: He gives one after he murders Harold, finally being freed of his abusive father.
  • Smug Snake: He's very condescending toward Danny upon his return, and doesn't immediately believe it's him.
  • Villainous Breakdown: His constant state for almost the entire season, with the strain of Danny's return and having to keep Harold's state of being alive a secret. The drugs don't help.
  • "Well Done, Son!" Guy: Was always treated worse then Danny by Harold, which he responded to by bullying Danny. This continues even to the present, with Harold welcoming Danny with open arms
  • Written-In Absence: He's on a business trip during The Defenders.
  • Wrong Genre Savvy: Ward would be a pretty effective villain in a corporate espionage thriller, but the poor bastard has no idea how far over his head he is, in a comic book superhero story.

Rand Board

    Lawrence Wilkins 

Lawrence Wilkins

https://static.tvtropes.org/pmwiki/pub/images/lawrencewilkins.jpg
"Don't expect anyone here to be listening to a kid who got his MBA from a Himalayan monastery."

Species: Human

Portrayed By: Clifton Davis

Appearances: Iron Fist

A member of the Rand Enterprises board of directors.


  • Boom, Headshot!: Harold Meachum shoots him in the head, and stages his death to look like a suicide.
  • Canon Foreigner: There's no Lawrence Wilkins in the comics.
  • Corrupt Corporate Executive: He is embezzling from Rand and hires prostitutes with company money. He also wanted to sell a life-saving medicine at ten times the production cost.
  • Even Evil Has Loved Ones: Despite having some skeletons of his own, Lawrence has kids, and a nephew in the hospital, all of whom he loves. Harold actually asks if he wants to preserve his image as a loving uncle/father before capping him in the head.
  • Fatal Family Photo: Has a photograph of his son on his desk.
  • Irony: Tries to offer Joy and Ward a severance package in the same amount that they had tried to buy Danny out for.
  • Office Golf: Has a putt-putt hole in his office.
  • Smug Snake: A backstabbing, swindling, no-good man that was all smiles and polite belittling of Danny and anybody that was against the bottom line.
  • Trespassing to Talk: On the victim end of this, courtesy of Harold Meachum.

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Rand Employees

    Kyle 

Kyle

Species: Human

Portrayed By: Alex Wyse

Appearances: Iron Fist

A young assistant attending to Harold Meachum's every whim.


  • Apologizes a Lot: He does this to Harold a lot, who mocks him for it.
  • Butt-Monkey: Harold likes to torment him in an indirect casual way, like giving him the day off when it's almost midnight.
  • Cruel and Unusual Death: Is killed by Harold with an ice cream scoop.
  • Disproportionate Retribution: Perhaps one of the most extreme examples: Harold brutally kills him with an ice cream scoop. What incurred this violent punishment? Asking if there was any vanilla ice cream in the selection of gourmet flavors Harold bought for him.
  • Extreme Doormat: He is so passive and submissive to Harold that he can't even stop apologizing about it even as Harold mocks him about doing so.
  • Manchild: Somewhat. When asked what he would hypothetically do with an immortal life, all he can come up with is eating ice cream for every meal consequence-free.
  • Morality Pet: Zig Zagged Trope. For most of the show, Harold is nothing but a rude and dismissive Bad Boss toward Kyle. After dying and resurrecting again he makes a genuine effort to bond with him, but this is when he winds up murdering the poor kid. Given that Harold's resurrection method causes its subjects turn on their closest loved ones first, in an incredibly perverse way the fact that Kyle was his first recent victim proves that Harold did care for him like a family member all along.
  • Sacrificial Lamb: His sudden death at Harold's hands is the first sign that resurrection is destabilizing Harold's mental state.
  • Secret Keeper: One of the few people besides the Hand and Ward to know that Harold is alive.
  • Sweet Tooth: Again, ice cream.
  • Yes-Man: Harold has him hanging on his every word.
  • Undying Loyalty: Takes Harold's abuse without a single complaint.

    Shannon 

Shannon

Species: Human

Portrayed By: Esau Pritchett

Appearances: Iron Fist

The head of security at Rand.


  • The Dragon: Not only is he the head of security at Rand, he's Ward's main enforcer in the early episodes.
  • Scary Black Man: A tall and imposing African-American that acts as a thug for his employer.

Harold's Enforcers

    Kevin Singleton 

Kevin Singleton

Species: Human

Portrayed By: Ramon Fernandez

Appearances: Iron Fist

A bodyguard and enforcer for Harold.


  • The Brute: He fills this role to Harold's Big Bad and Ward's The Dragon. He's tasked with destroying Danny Rand's hospital records and gets into a physical confrontation with him.
  • Noodle Incident: He mentions a task he performed for Harold Meachum in Miami that turned messy.
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