troperville

tools

toys

SubpagesAdvertising
Awesome
AwesomeMusic
BaitAndSwitch
BerserkButton
Characters
ComicallyMissingThePoint
Comicbook
CouchGag
DethroningMoment
DrinkingGame
FanficRecs
Film
Franchise
Fridge
Funny
FunnyAneurysmMoment
Headscratchers
Heartwarming
HoYay
Laconic
Main
Memes
NightmareFuel
NoodleIncident
Pinball
Quotes
Radar
Recap
ShoutOut
TearJerker
Trivia
TropeNamers
VideoGame
WMG
WallBangers
WesternAnimation
WhatAnIdiot
YMMV

main index

Narrative

Genre

Media

Topical Tropes

Other Categories

TV Tropes Org
random
Heartwarming: The Simpsons
"Oh, there are pictures [of Maggie]; I keep them where I need the most cheering up." Homer puts up with, and does, a lot of crap. Now you know why.

The Simpsons may be known for its satire, but that doesn't stop it from having some really heartwarming moments anyway.


    open/close all folders 

    Season 1 
  • The end of "Life on the Fast Lane", where, after accepting an invitation from a suave French bowler to his apartment, she decides to go to the Nuclear Power Plant, with music resembling "Up Where We Belong" playing in the back, where she tells Homer she loves him, and Homer joyously proclaims to tell the boss that "I'm going to the backseat of my car with the woman I love, AND I WON'T BE BACK FOR TEN MINUTES!"
    • His fellow co-workers cheering for him is a bonus CMOH.
  • The beginning of "Bart the General". Bart has been insulting Lisa all morning. Upon getting to school, one of Nelson's cronies takes a batch of muffins Lisa had baked earlier. That's all it takes to attack the cronie and winds up punching Nelson in the face and is challenged to fight. Bart ends up having nightmares about Nelson very night. It's the first sign in the series that Bart isn't a total jerk towards his sister.
  • "Simpsons Roasting on an Open Fire," the scene where Bart and Homer take in Santa's Little Helper after finding him running away from his abusive owner.
    Bart: Can we keep him, Dad? Please?
    Homer: But he's a loser! He's pathetic! He's—
    (Santa's Little Helper whines and licks Homers face. Homer smiles)
    Homer: A Simpson.
  • "Moaning Lisa", way back in season 1: Lisa is deeply, profoundly sad. Marge encourages her to fake smile and pretend to be happy—but then when she sees how Lisa is being patronized by her teacher and fellow pupils, she pulls her back in the car, and has one of the all-time great speeches: "If you want to be sad, honey, be sad. We'll ride it out with you. And when you get finished feeling sad, we'll still be there. From now on, let me do the smiling for both of us." Then, when she tells Lisa it's okay for her to not smile, Lisa gives the CMOH payoff line: "I feel like smiling!"
  • Near the end of Season 1's "The Crepes of Wrath" when Bart finally understands enough French to tell a police officer that he's being abused by his exchange family and that they're selling wine tainted with anti-freeze and the officer taking him to the station with Bart telling him, "Mon savieur. Vous aurez toujours une place dans mon coeur" (Translation: "My savior, you will always have a place in my heart")
  • At the end of "Some Enchanted Evening", Homer makes a fool out of himself when he releases a wanted criminal the kids tied up (thinking that the kids were once again tormenting the babysitter) and is embarrassed when he watches it on the news. Marge cheers him up by saying that he must be a good parent if he raised three kids who can take down a dangerous criminal.
  • Homer and Bart playing catch in "Bart The Genius" (during the scene of Bart struggling to tell Homer that he doesn't belong at the genius school because he cheated on the test, but puts it out of his mind — until the chemistry lab explosion — when he realizes that he and Homer actually had a good time together).

    Season 2 
  • "Lisa's Substitute" four words - You are Lisa Simpson.
    • In Mr. Bergstrom, not only does Lisa find appreciation for her intelligence, but inspiration to learn and a teacher who actually cares about his students. This would all prove hard to come by later. Lisa still holds Mr. Bergstrom in reverence.
    • Homer pulls off a good parenting hat trick - comforting Lisa over Mr. Bergstrom leaving, then cheering Bart up over losing the class election and finally giving Maggie her pacifier.
      "Everyone special to me is right under this roof."
  • When Homer eats a poisonous fish and only has twenty-four hours to live in "One Fish, Two Fish, Blowfish, Blue Fish", in his last day of living, he goes around to do everything that he could, including having a man-to-man talk with Bart, listening to Lisa play her saxophone, making a video for Maggie, being nice to Flanders for once and spending his last night with Marge. Each scene itself deserves to be a CMOH. But the best scene is when Homer reconciled with his father. He went to Abe, who acted indifferently to him at first, until Homer told him that he loved him. Then, both started crying and ended in an embrace. And for the rest of the afternoon, despite wanting to do other things, Homer stayed with his dad to do some father-and-son things with him that they never got to do before.
    • Marge's tears of joy when she finds out that Homer's still alive:
      Marge: "Homer! Your drool is still warm! (crying) You're alive!"
  • "Bart vs. Thanksgiving"
    • Bart giving the two bums he befriended twelve bucks.
    • Bart finally saying sorry to Lisa, with her accepting his apology. After seeing that, Homer and Marge, who have been wracked with depression and doubt over how they treated Bart earlier, realize that they're not such bad parents after all.
    • "Oh lord, on this blessed day, we thank thee for giving this family one more crack at togetherness".
  • The ending of "Old Money", when Grandpa decides to donate his late girlfriend's money to Springfield Retirement Castle, especially when the Bea Simmons Memorial dining room is unveiled: "Dignity's on me, friends." This really has an impact when you think about the... less than flattering way that old people are usually portrayed on this show.
    • Even before that when Homer prevents his father from striking out and losing his money in a casino, despite appearing to have a winning streak, saying "For the first time in 36 years, I'm proud to have had children". Later, the two have a moment together when Homer asks him if he's decided what he's going to do with the money, while eating a baguette. When Abe sees the elderly people get off the bus. He tells Homer that he has, and wipes the mess made on his shirt.
  • The ending to "Dancin' Homer", where after Homer tells his story to the bar patrons while feeling like a loser for giving up a great opportunity, he patrons tell him his story was great and ask him to tell it again, making Homer realize he's not such a loser after all.

    Season 3 
  • In the episode "Saturdays of Thunder", Homer had taken a father quiz and realized he knew nothing about Bart. So he decided to help Bart make his racing car for the Soap Box Derby. Only for Bart to ditch Homer for a much better, faster car made by Martin. He was initially upset by Homer's disappointment. But just before the race start, Bart saw Homer on the stands, as he proclaimed (with a full mouth) "Do it for your old man, boy!" In the end, after winning the race, Bart presented the trophy to Homer and they both embraced.
    • But right at the very end, in a quick blink-and-you-miss-it moment, we see that the whole race was monitored by the same people who made the father quiz. And two men, the father and son he met earlier at the Father-and-Son Bonding clinic, embraced as well upon seeing Bart and Homer do the same thing.
    • When Homer at first refused to go to the race, because he was so hurt. He goes into the kitchen, notices the quiz on the fridge, and starts miserably answering the questions. When he realizes he now passes the test, he rushes to support Bart.
  • The episode where Bart and Lisa convince Krusty's father to finally accept his son's career path, culminating in him guest starring in an episode of Krusty's show.
    Krusty (tearfully): "WE HAVEN'T SEEN EACH OTHER IN TWENTY-FIVE YEARS!"
    • Krusty and his Father singing "Oh mien papa" also counts.
  • Four words: "Lisa, It's Your Birthday". Bart did not give Lisa anything for her birthday, and then meets a man who believes he is Michael Jackson. They write and perform the song for Lisa, proving that Bart doesn't truly hate her after all.
    • Made all the more touching and heartbreaking by the fact that Michael Jackson, who, under the name of John Jay Smith, portrayed the guy who sang that in the episode, died. In his honor, FOX reran the episode.
  • The end of the episode Brother, Can You Spare Two Dimes?, has Homer's half-brother Herb forgiving him for inadvertently destroying Herb's car company. When Herb regains his fortune with an invention that he designed with $2,000 he borrowed from Homer, Herb not only buys Homer the vibrating chair he initially wanted to purchase with the $2,000, but he also forgives Homer and recognizes him as his brother, coming full circle from the Downer Ending that ensued in the episode when Herb first appeared.
  • "I Married Marge" provides probably the simplest explanation for why these two got married:
    Marge: Homer, do you know why I married you?
    Homer: Because I knocked you up?
    Marge: No, because I love you.
    • Homer's proposal (which Marge reads because he misplaced the card) and his reaction to her acceptance.
    • Another one in 'I Married Marge' is when Selma realises how depressed a pregnant Marge is without her husband, she tells her where she'll find him. Selma may loathe Homer as much as Patty, but it's shown she still cares for her younger sister and her happiness.
  • The end of "Colonel Homer", where it becomes clear that Homer's inability to pick up on Lurleen's increasingly blatant romantic advances ("Oooohhh... there isn't a man alive who wouldn't be turned on by that... well, goodnight!") has less to do with Homer's typical cluelessness and more to do with his devotion to Marge, followed by Lurleen's final song to him hoping that Marge knows how lucky she is. Actually, no matter how many times Homer & Marge's marriage is threatened, their reunion makes for a CMOH.
    • A little earlier when Lurleen makes her intentions clear and actually kisses them, all of his previous romantic efforts flash before his eyes. They're all pretty pathetic and full of rejection (a girl smacked him in the face during a game of Spin the Bottle and the end of his first date was met with a surly "Thanks for dinner!" as his date drove off in her car), of course, but then we get to Marge saying "I'll love you for the rest of my life." Upon snapping back to reality, Homer pushes Lurleen away and leaves.
  • Despite his nefarious Jerk Ass tendencies that got Flanders into the position in the first place in "When Flanders Failed", Homer genuinely feeling remorse for inadvertently sending Ned into debt and later helping him and his store out by showing it to the various citizens of Springfield is incredibly heartwarming. The end is just one of the most beautiful scenes in the Simpsons.
  • There's also the episode "Bart the Lover", where Bart is in trouble (again) with Mrs. Krabappel because of yo-yos. He discovers the personals in a magazine, and initially, he gets revenge by setting her up with a fake beau named "Woodrow" with a picture of Gordie Howe as his profile, and for the clincher, setting her up on a fake date. When Bart sees that she's crying because she's been stood up, he enlists his family's help in writing one last, but very sweet letter (topped off with Homer's "with a love that will echo through the ages") to her, explaining why "Woodrow" had to leave town.
    • After the death of Marcia Wallace in October 2013, Fox reaired "Bart the Lover" before the premiere of "Four Regrettings and a Funeral".

    Season 4 
  • "Lisa's First Word", another Whole Episode Flashback. Not only what Lisa's first word is (it's "Bart") but also...
    Homer: You know Maggie, the sooner kids talk, the sooner they talk back. *switches lights off* I hope you never say a word. *leaves room*
    Maggie: *removes pacifier* Dad-dy.
    • A bit narm-y but there's also some special significance to this, as the episode had shown that Maggie is the only of the three Simpson children to call him "Daddy" rather than "Homer" as a baby — made all the more sad by the fact that Homer missed his one chance at hearing his child call him "Daddy."
  • "Homer's Triple Bypass" shows everyone's overjoyed reaction to Homer being alive, and him weakly waving back.
  • "Lisa the Beauty Queen" has a few of these, such as Bart boosting Lisa's spirits when she says the other girls are prettier than she is: "Lisa, as your brother this is the hardest thing I've ever had to say, but... you're not ugly". And this exchange earlier:
    Homer: "There's no one prettier than my little girl!"
    Marge: "You're looking at her through a father's eyes."
    Homer: "Well, if I could gouge someone else's eyes out and shove them in my sockets I would, but to me she's beautiful!"
  • From I Love Lisa: Lisa giving Ralph a card after seeing him crying over not getting a Valentine, Ralph's dramatic performance of George Washington (which was fueled on being humiliated by Lisa during the Krusty The Clown 29th Anniversary Show), and Lisa giving Ralph the "Let's 'Bee' Friends" card.
  • In "Duffless", Homer gets pulled over for drunk driving and is persuaded by Marge to give up alcohol for a month (and is even forced to ride a bicycle after getting his license suspended). Even though he gets tempted by boredom and advertising, Homer eventually starts to spend more time with his family. After visiting Moe's and seeing the other drunken, miserable people there, Homer leaves and instead chooses to go for a bike ride with Marge, ending with the two singing "Raindrops Keep Falling on my Head" as they ride off into the sunset.
  • After a hectic experience at Duff Gardens with Bart and Lisa in "Selma's Choice", Selma and Homer have a rare moment where the both of them express the closest to an expression of affection between the two of them they probably ever have, where she admits that she doesn't feel cut out for being a parent and appreciates what Homer goes through.
    • And if you look, he even holds her hand in sympathy. Daaawww....

    Season 5 
  • The end of "Homer Loves Flanders". Flanders is shunned by those in the church who think he was arrested on a DUI, whilst Homer is praised for his charity work. Homer's breathing through his nose causes Flanders to lose his patience, and everyone turns on Flanders more so. However, Homer leaps to his defense:
    Homer: "If everyone here were like Ned Flanders, there'd be no need for heaven... We'd already be there."
    • Flanders turns to Homer with tears of gratitude and thanks him for being a true friend.
  • During "Rosebud", Maggie has Mr Burns' teddy bear from when he was a child. He tries to get it back from her through various means, ending with trying to snatch it and failing. He asks that she value it more then he did and she gives him the teddy bear back.
    • Also, Homer refusing to take the bear away from Maggie, even for a million dollars.
  • In "Lady Bouvier's Lover," Grandpa says to Jacqueline (Marge's mother), "you remind me of a poem I can't remember, and a song that may never have existed, and a place I'm not sure I've ever been to." It's played for laughs, but given the context - an old man falling in love for possibly the last time - it's very poignant and sweet.

    Season 6 
  • The end of The Simpsons episode "And Maggie Makes Three". A Whole Episode Flashback is triggered by Homer being asked why there aren't any pictures of Maggie in the photo album. Homer explains how Maggie's birth forced him to quit his dream job working at Barney's Bowl-a-rama and return to his job at the Nuclear Plant, which he had quit months earlier (and hates). To add insult to injury, Mr. Burns installed a plaque in Homer's workstation reading "Don't forget: You're here forever". Bart asks what the point of Homer's story was, and it's revealed where the photos of Maggie are: Homer has posted them all over his workstation, strategically covering up the plaque so that it reads "Do it for her".
    • During the actual birth, Homer is trying to be happy, but he's also clearly bitter over the setbacks he's had to endure up to this point. His eyes light up, however, when a little hand grabs his thumb.
      Marge: Homie, I think someone's trying to say hello.
  • Also, the climax of "Lisa on Ice" in which Bart is set to score the winning shot and Lisa is ready to block. While the crowd cheers for the two to defeat each other, they flash back to all the times that they were more than just brother and sister — they were each other's friends (Bart helping Lisa get a cookie from a cookie jar which she shared with him, Bart making shadow puppets for Lisa's entertainment, Lisa patching Bart's injured knee, and, most heart-warming of all, Bart sharing his ice cream with Lisa after hers falls off her cone) and decide to throw the game in the name of their friendship and sibling-hood (which naturally leads everyone in the audience to riot and burn the hockey arena to the ground — except for career criminal Snake, who tears up and comments that if pee-wee hockey was around when he was a child, maybe he wouldn't have turned out the way he did).
  • The episode "'Round Springfield" actually has one from Bart, of all people. When Lisa is absolutely crushed that she can't get the last copy of Bleeding Gums' album for a tribute after his death, Bart spends all the remaining money from his recent legal settlement involving Krusty the Clown's cereal to get it for her, because she was the only one who believed him when he said his stomach hurt (somehow getting appendicitis from swallowing a jagged Krusty-O).
    • Followed by another one, when a random lightning strike increases the power of the local jazz station enough so that everyone in Springfield can hear the album being played.
    • Followed by another one, as Bleeding Gums appears in the clouds a la Mufasa from The Lion King, says good-bye, and disappears...only to return for one last jam session with Lisa.
    • The song itself counts too, especially with Yeardley Smith going full out on the vocals.
    • Homer is the first person shown trying to comfort Lisa after Murphy's death. That in itself is heartwarming.
  • In "Bart's Comet", Ned Flanders has been forced out of his own civil defense shelter by his selfish neighbors, and is left to face the comet that signals Springfield's impending doom alone. However, each of the neighbours begins to feel increasingly guilty about forcing him out, and - starting with Homer - one by one leave the shelter to join him. Ned, resigned to his fate, stands on a hill near Springfield quietly singing 'Que Sera Sera' to himself... only for the entire town to suddenly appear and join him in the chorus.
  • In "Another Simpsons Clip Show", Marge was trying to encourage her family about romance. However, the stories either ended in heartbreak (Bart getting rejected by Laura in "New Kid on the Block" and Lisa yelling at Ralph in "I Love Lisa") or were revelations of near-infidelity (Homer falling for Mindy in "Last Temptation of Homer" [with Homer explaining that, after that incident, Mindy became an alcoholic and lost her job at the plant] and Marge almost sleeping with a French bowler in "Life in the Fast Lane"). Feeling dejected, Marge was about to give up, until Homer pointed out that not all romance stories end like that. And we flashback to how Homer and Marge met during their prom on "The Way We Was":
    Homer: (to Marge) "I've got this problem. As soon as you stop this car, I'm gonna hug you and kiss you and then, I'll never be able to let you go."
    • Made even better with Lisa's following comment and Homer's reply.
      Lisa: "Your first kiss."
      Homer: "But not the last."
      (shows montage of several kisses shared between Homer and Marge, finishing with them kissing in the present while the kids go back in the living room to watch cartoons)
  • During "Lisa's Wedding", Marge, Bart and Homer all go to see Lisa before the actual wedding and each one provided a touching family moment. Marge gave Lisa a lock of her hair for "something blue" for the wedding and they wordlessly hugged. Even Bart said that his sister looked beautiful in his own words (before revealing that he was comparing Lisa's beauty to a dancer he saw at a strip club). But the one that got this Troper the most was Homer.
    Homer: "Little Lisa. Lisa Simpson. You know, I always felt you were the best thing my name ever got attached to ... I just want you to know I've always been proud of you. You're my greatest accomplishment and and you did it all yourself. You helped me understand my own wife better and taught me to be a better person. But you're my daughter and I don't think anyone could have had a better daughter than you."
    • Then, Lisa would later return the favor back to Homer and her family. Her fiance Hugh had intentions of returning to England and separating Lisa from her family forever, even insulting them in front of Lisa. Angrily, Lisa gave him back his ring and walked out.
      Hugh: "You complain about them more than anyone."
      Lisa: "That may be, but I still love them, and I don't think you understand that.
    • Despite having been excited all week about the prospect of his prospective son-in-law wearing his pig cuff-links during the wedding, Homer is completely understanding when he realises that Hugh doesn't want to wear them. Particularly heartwarming when you realise that he's just been denied the only thing he was allowed to do during the entire wedding, but accepted it because his daughter's happiness was far more important to him than his own.
    • And then there's the ending where Lisa and Homer bond after Lisa visits the fortune teller. On its own it's nothing special, but in the context of the episode, Lisa's enthusiasm in hearing about Homer's day at the Renaissance Fair is just about the sweetest ending the show has ever done.

    Season 7 
  • The episode "Mother Simpson", where Homer meets his mother for the first time in a long time. She sadly has to leave again. He drives her to the pick up point and stays there, staring at the stars. Instead of the normal end credits, they keep this shot and play a charming song. The commentary points out how hard the crew fought to prevent commercials from playing during its premiere.
  • There was one episode where Maggie, Bart and Lisa were put in custody at the Flanders after Child Welfare officers accuse Homer and Marge of neglecting their kids and providing a squalid living environment for them. Both Bart and Lisa note that Maggie is much more happier with the Flanders than she is with her own family. Then came the choice whether she should go with the Flanders or the Simpsons. From Maggie's point of view, we see that the Flanders was a bright, cheerful family with bunnies and butterflies. When looking at Homer, Bart and Lisa, all she saw was a dark, gloomy place with frogs. So she began walking towards the Flanders. Only to see Marge coming down the hill. As soon as she saw Marge, she reached out and Marge delightfully held her up and spun her around, ending in a glorious, realistic portrait of a sunset behind them.
    • Earlier, Bart and Lisa leave a message for Homer and Marge: "Simpson Kids Miss Mom and Dad." Doubles as a Tearjerker.
  • When Lisa manages to make a group of new friends in Summer of 4 Ft.2 Bart's jealousy leads him to expose all the geeky things that made her so unpopular back home. Lisa is crushed and believes her newfound friends will quickly disown her. Instead it turns out that they genuinely found her a cool person because of her geeky knowledge, one character explaining that "You can't fake the sort of good person you are" and they decorate the Simpson family car with seashells in tribute to her (until Homer finds out — despite that Homer's car is the purple four-seater and Marge's is the station-wagon and yells, "SWEET, MERCIFUL CRAP! MY CAR!").
    • And Bart, actually feeling remorse over what he'd done, brought the empty unsigned yearbook he'd showed the kids to prove that she was unpopular back to them, and they filled the Yearbook with a load of heartwarming messages.
  • At the very end of "Bart Sells His Soul", when Bart, after resorting to various desperate measures to re-obtain a piece of paper that supposedly represents his actual soul, Bart turns to prayer, tearfully begging God to give him back his soul. It's Bart at his most vulnerable and honest; truly afraid that his soul will never come back and that he'll never be the same again.
    • At the end of the episode, Lisa gave Bart a lecture that implies his soul is not a piece of paper that can be sold or bought; and yet, she used her secret money to buy it back anyway.
  • In "Lisa the Iconoclast", the fact that Homer completely believed Lisa when she discovered the truth about Jebediah Springfield and did all he could to help her spread word to the town, which is even more amazing when you take into consideration that Marge of all people refused to listen to what Lisa had to say.
  • The Simpsons family standing by Apu and helping him pass his citizenship test during "Much Apu About Nothing.".
    • Groundskeeper Willie standing up for Uter when the other kids are bullying him for being foreign is sweet...until it whiplashes into sarcastic humor when Principal Skinner tells Willie to pick on someone his own size.

    Season 8 
  • Homer getting divorced so he and Marge can get remarried (even though "Wedding for Disaster" reveals that Reverend Lovejoy's license to wed expired and that Homer and Marge aren't legally married) and not end up like Milhouse's parents.
  • Homer's speech in "The Itchy & Scratchy & Poochie Show" at the end in character as Poochie about how he knows they've gotten off on the wrong foot, but he would like to start over, because he feels they could make people happy together.
  • Bart secretly helping Lisa when they're at military school.
  • In "You Only Move Twice," there's just something really heartwarming about watching the citizens of Springfield bid goodbye to the family as they leave, especially considering that The Simpsons Movie and the 500th episode "At Long Last Leave" depict the entire town wanting The Simpsons kicked out of town.

    Season 9 
  • After Lisa wasn't able to see the Egyptian exhibit in "Lost Our Lisa", Homer sneaked the two of them into the museum to see it. Cue Homer trying to get a closer look at the mysterious Orb of Isis and ended up knocking it to the ground. Only to realize that the Orb was in fact a music box and that Homer and Lisa are the first people to hear its song in over four thousand years. Just the thought that Homer and Lisa shared this incredible discovery was a CMOH on its own.
    Lisa: It's kind of humbling, isn't it? The music we just heard might never be heard again.
    Homer: Yeah, but it'll always live on because we'll never forget it.
  • As maligned as "The Principal and the Pauper" is, it does hit some good notes following the reveal of Seymour/Armin:
    • Following getting to know the "real" Sgt. Skinner, Edna and Agnes complain about him being an annoying weenie. After Marge points out that the old Skinner was a weenie, too:
      Edna: But he was our weenie!
      Agnes: Now there was a weenie you'd be proud to call your son.
      Marge: Did you ever tell him that?
      (Agnes suddenly looks sad)
    • After the extended group goes to Capitol City to convince Armin to come back, he refuses and gets rather defensive.
      Agnes: Seymour! I didn't bring you up to use language like that!
      Armin: Well, you didn't raise me at all!
      Agnes: The hell I didn't! I've been taking care of you for twenty-six years! I'm the only mother you've ever known!
      Armin: But you have your real son.
      Agnes: You are my real son! You've been my son longer than he has, and he doesn't need me, and I don't need him! Now you march yourself downstairs and get in that car!
      Armin: (meekly) Yes, Mother.
  • Lisa's Sax (the plot of Homer choosing a saxophone for Lisa rather than air conditioning for the family, not so much the plot of Bart becoming a bad kid after his kindergarten teacher crushed his self-esteem, unless you count the part where Bart wins over the other kids by cracking jokes, as it shows that Bart found a way to cope with his depression). Homer bought Lisa her first saxophone, with the inscription "Dear Lisa, never forget your daddy lov-D'OH!" (He dropped it). He buys her a new one after the story, with the inscription of "Dear Lisa, may your new saxophone bring you many years of-D'OH!"
  • The end of "Lisa the Skeptic":
    Marge: I guess you were right, honey... but you have to admit that when the angel started to talk you were squeezing my hand pretty hard.
    Lisa: (uneasy) Heh, well, it was just so loud and... Thanks for squeezing back.
    Marge: Anytime, my angel.
    (they walk off hand in hand)

    Season 10 
  • Homer's treatment of Pinchie in "Lisa Gets An A". Originally his intention was to raise and fatten the lobster for a home made meal, however as becomes more endeared to it, he doesn't have the heart, and begins raising and playing with him like a dog (it even wags it tail before him) and even giving him a seat on the family table, ignoring his family's complaints. Turns into a Tear Jerker when he accidentally boils Pinchie in a hot bath, and eats him heartbroken ("Pinchie would have wanted it that way *sobs*").
  • In the season 10 episode, "Bart the Mother", Bart accidentally shoots a bird only to feel miserable afterwards. Out of remorse, he then takes care of the orphaned eggs; when the hatchlings turn out to be bird-eating reptilians, Bart is told they need to die for the greater good - so he's faced with the Adult Fear of losing who, technically, he thinks of as his offspring. He cries and tells Marge that "maybe she doesn't understand", to which Marge replies she obviously does. And then they hug.
    • Even more touching is earlier when Marge discovers the eggs, convinced he is up to no good again, she storms into his treehouse to find his incubator. He explains meekly that he didn't want to kill them like he did their mother. Marge attempts to start a lecture, but eventually can only muster a loving "Oh, sweetie, come here" and hugs him.
    • "Bart the Mother" being dedicated to Phil Hartman (whose murder was recent news at the time). Doubles as a Tear Jerker and, for a lot of people, the moment when The Simpsons stopped being worth watching.

    Season 11 
  • In "Hello Gutter, Hello Fadder", after Homer loses his fame for bowling a perfect game and attempts suicide (only to be saved by a bungee-jumping Otto), Homer decides to dedicate his life to his children, but Bart has found male role models in everyone else except Homer and Lisa is too smart for him, so Homer tries to bond with Maggie. The problem is, Maggie is afraid of Homer and every attempt at bonding ends in disaster. It's not until Homer drowns in the ocean and Maggie saves him that Homer realizes that Maggie does care for him. Also the ending where Homer and Maggie bond at the bowling alley and as Homer is tickling Maggie, Homer bats away the "300 Game" balloon that floats down near him, showing that Homer (despite being a Jerk Ass and a cartoonish idiot at times) is really just a sympathetic bumbler who wants to be loved and recognized, be it by thousands of fickle fans or just one member of the family.
  • After losing his wife in "Alone Again, Natura-Diddily", Flanders was determined not to go to church, briefly losing faith in God. But he ends up going anyways and arrives just in time to hear a song sung by Rachel Jordan, about how not to lose faith in God.

    Season 12 
  • In "HOMR", Homer increases his intelligence (after having a crayon removed from his brain), and starts to bond with Lisa, only to be ostracized for his newfound intelligence, so he has another crayon lodged up in his brain to decrease his intelligence. As Lisa is despairing about this, she finds a letter her father wrote for her before he lost his intelligence, saying that he now knows what it's like to be smart in a world where being average or below average is the norm. Overjoyed, she embraces her father, as he thinks, "Mmmm...hug."

    Season 13 
  • In the episode "The Frying Game", even though the whole being framed for murder and being sentenced to execution became a total ruse for a 'FOX' reality TV show, it was so sweet to see Homer taking the rap for the whole murder to save Marge at the cost of his own life.

    Season 14 
  • From "How I Spent My Strummer Vacation", there's Homer drunkenly announcing "I don't care about the color of your skin, Lenny. You're my friend." It's sweet because the barflys are never really shown to care about each other apart from that moment and in season 24's "The Saga of Carl".
  • The last part of the season 14 episode "Brake my Wife, Please". At the beginning of act 3, a stressed-out Marge and Homer began to fight over the little things to the point where Homer thinks Marge is trying to intentionally harm him and they go to couples' therapy. What does Homer do to win her back? He invites most of Springfield - excluding the Flanders family - to a surprise "We Love You, Marge" dinner in the Simpsons' backyard for Marge. Homer even gets Jackson Browne to sing about how much he loves Marge and how far their relationship has come.
  • There was this one episode where Homer, Bart and his boys community group goes up against Milhouse, his father Kirk and his group, until things get worse at the baseball game, erupting in a full-out riot with them and with everyone in the audience. Marge begins to cry and they show her crying face on the Jumbotron, where everyone saw it. And slowly, they began to stop and then, they all link hands in a giant maple leaf and join in singing "O Canada".
  • All of Special Edna, from Bart hanging out with Edna to Seymour Skinner finally proposing to Edna. The fact they broke up a few seasons later doesn't diminish that.
    • A more humorous example comes when Bart sees how depressed Mrs. Krabappel is. He nominates her for a major teaching award, and in the video he submits to the judges claims that Mrs. Krabappel deserves to win because she's managed to survive teaching him. The judges are shocked to discover that Bart is real (his exploits being so legendary that many teachers think he's just an Urban Legend), and decide that if Mrs. Krabappel has "danced with the devil in the blue shorts and lived", she's a clear winner. Mrs. Krabappel is very touched by Bart's gesture.
  • In "I'm Spelling As Fast As I Can", Lisa expects Springfield to hate her for being 2nd place in the national spelling bee, but instead she's treated like a hero for being "the biggest winner this town's ever produced".
  • "Life don't seem so hard no more."

    Season 15 
  • The end of "'Tis the Fifteenth Season", despite Homer's selfishness and foolishness throughout the rest of the episode, the entire town joins together singing 'Hark the Herald Angels Sing' (even a crippled Moe).
  • The episode "I (Annoyed Grunt)-bot". Homer, realizing that Bart doesn't look up to him, pretends to be a robot that he built so that Bart would finally look up to him. This goes to the point where he fights in a robot dueling competition and sustains a great number of wounds, nearly dying, all the while saying to himself "Doing it for the boy. Pain is love. To bleed is to care".
  • In "Milhouse Doesn't Live Here Anymore," Bart and Lisa become best friends when Milhouse moves out of town. When he moves back, Bart hangs out with him again and ignores Lisa. Later, Bart tries to interest Lisa in a game of Monopoly, which she reluctantly agrees to. However, she then sees that Bart replaced the chance cards with favor coupons. The episode ends with her redeeming the card "Good for one hug."

    Season 17 
  • Homer and Lisa's "daddy-daughter dance" at the end of See Homer Run.
  • In "Regarding Margie", Marge gets amnesia after hitting her head. She quickly starts remembering people around her... except for Homer, who is understandably distraught. Despite many tries to get her to remember him, she ends up being disgusted at his behavior and tells him that forgetting about him is the best thing that's ever happened to her. Her sisters then suggests she tries speed-dating, and when she does, she quickly meets a nice guy whom she goes to have dinner with, Homer following them and starting to think to himself that if Marge is happy, then he'll be happy... before falling in the sea. The guy Marge had met immediately leaves when he hears she has three kids, but before he can get away, Homer, covered in seaweed, verbally smacks him for doing so.
    Homer: "You idiot!" (the man screams) "Do you know what you just gave up?"
    Man: "Who the hell are you?"
    Homer: "The wisest, wettest man you'll ever meet."
    Man: "Go on."
    Homer: "You just walked away from the sweetest, most beautiful woman a guy could want. In ten years, she never had the last slice of pizza and she's never complained. Every election, she wishes she could vote for both guys because they both seem nice. And there's a light inside her that makes everyone else look better. And you blew her off."
    Man: "Dude, she's got three kids."
    Homer: "I... really? Well, she's still great."
  • In "Kiss Kiss Bang Bangalore", the audience is led to believe that Homer has been an oppressive cult leader to his new employees in India, only for it to turn out that, unlike so many others, he's been treating his employees as equals, and giving them the rights and benefits they deserve, such as overtime (though the Indian workers only go along with it because they don't speak or understand English and had to do something to make it look like they understood Homer).

    Season 18 
  • In "The Wife Aquatic" Homer sees how nostalgic Marge is for the place that she went to as a little girl for the summer that he puts the home movies on different devices and takes her back there.
  • "The Haw-Hawwed Couple" has Homer reading a story to Lisa as the subplot and he ends up reading ahead while Lisa is at a sleepover and finds out that it has a Downer Ending. To try and protect her, he makes up a fake over the top happy ending and once Homer leaves, Lisa reads it for herself and decides Homer's ending was better.
  • Marge calling the town out on driving Bart to suicide and sticking up for her son on "The Boys of Bummer," though that's pretty much by default since most of "The Boys of Bummer" was so vicious and cruel.

    Season 19 
  • At the end of the episode "Eternal Moonshine of the Simpson Mind", Homer, believing that Marge was cheating on him with Duffman and that in his anger, he hit her, tries to jump off a bridge. Only to find out that that Marge was actually planning a surprise party for him and Duffman was helping her. And how Marge got her black eye was because Homer accidentally popped a wine cork at her eye. And what happens later is before Homer fell into river, he landed on a moon bounce, where the surprise party was waiting just for him on a boat. The look of wonder and surprise on Homer's face as he realizes that he wasn't dead and that tonight was going to be the best night of his life was just a CMOH on its own.
    • How could we forget this part that happened at the end of the episode?!
      Marge: Homer? Aren't you going to have a beer?
      Homer: Nope. I want to remember this night.
  • (combined with Crowning Moment Of Awesome): Ralph actually going through with being a candidate for U.S. President (even though he was written in as a joke and isn't old enough to be President [in America, the age to be U.S. President is 35]) on "E. Pluribus Wiggum," because he wants to bring about world peace. Also, the end where he's sitting on the Lincoln Memorial's lap (as if he were a Mall Santa) and one of the things on his wish list is "a brighter future for America." It really shows that Ralph isn't just some mentally slow kid who spouts out hilarious one-liners (much like the season four episode "I Love Lisa" when he put on an excellent dramatic performance as George Washington in the school play).
  • "That 90s Show" has been derided (both on this website and other review sites) for showing Marge as a shallow, heartless witch and for messing with the show's continuity. However, there are some heartwarming scenes to be mined from this slog of an episode:
    • Homer's "Margerine" song and music video.
    • Marge dumping her professor and taking Homer back by dragging him to the hospital, thinking he's overdosed on heroin (he was actually in diabetic shock after drinking too much Frappacinos and needed his insulin needles to stay alive).

    Season 20 
  • From "Homer and Lisa Exchange Crosswords", the secret message Homer leaves in the crossword puzzle for Lisa. Helped by the heartwarming song that plays after Lisa finds out and the two reconcile.
  • In "No Loan Again, Naturally", Flanders buys the Simpsons house after they lose it and rents it back to them. They start to move their stuff back inside, but Homer stops them and says he should go in first because he left a little "surprise" for the new owners. He quickly runs up the stairs to what we assume is a dump he took on the carpet. It turns out to be a vase of flowers and a card that says "Please love our home as much as we did."
  • "Eeny Teeny Maya Moe": Episode rundown: Moe meets Maya, a woman he's been talking to online and finds that she's only three feet tall. Moe falls for her, despite feeling that others will make fun of him for it, so he starts cracking jokes about Maya's height, which she likes at first, but hates after a while and breaks up with Moe because she feels that all he cares about is her height. Heartwarming moments — two:
    • A rather twisted one where Moe opts to become surgically shorter just to win Maya back (it fails when Mr. Largo [the Ambiguously Gay music teacher at Springfield Elementary School] ends up getting the shortening surgery instead of a sex change).
    • A more conventional one at the end where Homer points out that even though things didn't work out with Maya, Moe should be happy that a woman actually loved him and remain hopeful that he'll find love again.
      Homer: Moe, this is a great thing for you. You went from sitting on the sidelines to getting in the game! Sometime, when you least expect it, you'll realize that someone loved you. And that means that someone can love you again! And that'll make you smile.
      • The very end of the episode, which showed how much Moe had taken Homer's words to heart. Moe is still looking down while cleaning the bar, but then slowly smiles:
        Moe: Hey, Homer was right. Who would've thought such a little woman could make me feel so big.
    • In the subplot of the episode, Homer leaves Maggie to play on a playground that turns out to be full of bully babies. When Marge gets suspicious about it, she puts a camera in Maggie's bow and sees what's been happening and is just about to punish Homer for it when on the tape, he finally does find out about it and tries to save Maggie, only to get beaten up by the babies, which makes Maggie get dangerous and rescue Homer in return. When Homer walks into the room, Marge hugs him and calls him a good father.
  • In an episode where Homer and Marge have to get married (to each other) for the THIRD time (after Reverend Lovejoy reveals that he wasn't qualified to marry Homer and Marge during the events on "A Milhouse Divided"), someone seems to be sabotaging the thing by kidnapping Homer. When Bart and Lisa find out it's Patty and Selma, they blackmail them into giving their parents the wedding they deserve — and Patty and Selma give it to them.
  • In "The Good, the Sad, and the Drugly", Bart's attempt to save a duckling results in either the duckling being hurt, or him being hurt. Granted, it's an act, but the fact he takes the beating speaks volumes.
  • This scene from "Coming to Homerica":
    Lisa: I'd just like to remind you that we were all immigrants at one point.
    Homer: Yeah, and you were a baby once. Does that mean you still like milk and hugs?
    Lisa: Yes, and I'd like both right now.
    Homer: *gives her a glass of milk and then hugs her* MMPH. Hey, this is alright.

    Season 21 
  • In "The Devil Wears Nada", Homer and Marge's relationships gets a bit strained when Marge becomes popular for her erotic calendar and Homer is hired as Carl's new assistant. Earlier in the episode, Marge uses a sexy dice game to spice up their love life, but it comes up with a lot of weird suggestions (like "Whisper into Ass"). In the end, the two play the game again. Marge kisses the dice and the dice come out to a correct response: "Love wife."
  • The episode "Chief of Hearts", where Homer befriends Clancy Wiggum after making him a sandwich. Their friendship was nice and refreshing (even though they hung out before on "Marge on the Lam" and seem to be on friendly terms in other episodes prior to this, despite that Homer usually ends up getting arrested by Wiggum for yet another wacky scheme). Also: Homer telling Chief Wiggum that he doesn't have faith in Wiggum's awesomeness (because faith is for things that aren't real); he believes in his awesomeness because it's real.
  • The ending of the Season 21 Mother's Day episode "Moe Letter Blues" features a montage of characters with their mothers, set to "I'll Always Love My Mama" by The Intruders. The final image of Homer and his late mom clinched it.
    • The resolution of the episode itself as well, especially Moe's explanation that he set up the events of the episode because, having no one he wanted to teach Homer, Apu and Reverend Lovejoy not to take their wives for granted, Mrs. Lovejoy taking her Rail Enthusiast husband on a romantic trip on the Orient Express, and Mrs. Bouvier seemingly haven gotten over her hatred of Homer.
  • In "Judge Me Tender", Santa's Little Helper wins an ugly dog contest (not knowing that Bart just drew a face on his rear end and showed that to the judges) and becomes incredibly depressed, hiding in his doghouse. Lisa comes out to visit him and tells him she understands what it's like to be insecure about your looks and then lists all of his good qualities. By the end, he's smiling and wagging his tail as she hugs him.
  • The ending of the twentieth anniversary episode. Krusty leaving his bride at the altar precisely because he loves her too much to saddle her with a loser like him, only to come back to her months(?) later when she's in France.
    • The stinger at the end, thanking viewers for 450 episodes and 20+ years (and, depending on what version you've seen, either promising the best to come or chastising viewers for wasting their lives on this cartoon).

    Season 22 
  • The end of "Homer Scissorhands" in the Lisa subplot in which after breaking Milhouses' heart once then unwittingly ruining Milhouses' newfound relationship with a fifth grader, Lisa comforts him and kisses him.

    Season 23 
  • So many parts in Holidays Of Future Passed (which was originally supposed to be the final episode, but when money issues at FOX were resolved, the show was greenlit for two more seasons).
    • Homer actually being a fun and loving grandfather to his grandsons, proving that he had learned from his and Grandpa's mistakes. Especially his telling his grandkids that Bart isn't so bad.
    Homer: Everyone thinks their dad's a jerk. And everyone's right. But, when you get older, you realize how much you love them. Your dad may be a little bit immature, but I know he loves you. So, you ought to give him a chance.
    • Bart's sons hugging Bart.
    Bart: Boys, I have acted like a ten year old for the last thirty years. And I swear to you, I will grow up and act like a twenty year old, the way a divorced forty year old should.
    Bart's Y.Son: You're going to have to do better than that!
    Bart: Boys, I'm a deadbeat dad. I live in a school. It's Christmas. The only thing worth anything in my life is you.
    • Lisa and Bart getting drunk in the treehouse, and reminiscing about their lives.
    • Zia hugging Lisa.
    Zia: I look up to both of my parents, but I especially look up to you.
    • Homer hugging un-frozen Grandpa.
    • Maggie's identical daughter.
    • Homer and Marge growing old together.
  • The 500th episode's ending where everyone in town decides that, as bad as The Simpsons are, they can't live without them (a nice metaphor for why the show has been on for as long as it has, despite claims and proof that it's not the show it used to be in the 1990s) and decide to live in the Outlands with them.
    • It seems Skinner is the only one who was left in Springfield... until Bart comes after him. True, Bart then makes Skinner bump against some buildings, but he still came after him.
    • The stinger at the end thanking the viewer for supporting the show for 500 episodes (and counting), then advising viewers to go outside and get some fresh air before coming back in to inevitably go online and bitch about how crappy the episode was.
  • In the episode Moe Goes From Rags to Riches, Bart's increasingly desperate attempts to regain Milhouse's friendship are all oddly heartwarming.
    • Even though the poem he reads to Milhouse was written by Lisa, the fact that Bart was actually willing to read it at all is a testament to how much he values Milhouse's friendship.
  • In "Beware My Cheating Bart", Homer is asked what his goal in life is and, without any hesitation, responds that he wants to grow old with Marge and live long enough to "be one of those couples who just sit in the park holding hands".

    Season 24 
  • In "To Cur With Love" Abe Simpson reveals how he had to give Homer's beloved dog Bongo away to a farm run by a Lesbian couple when he was six in order to protect him from Mr. Burns, whom the dog had bitten protecting Homer. At first the dog doesn't want to leave Homer, but Abe gives the new owners Homer's sweater to get him to stay with them. To appease Burns' wrath, Abe agrees to feed his attack dogs for a year wearing a very ineffective protective suit and then afterwards forced to wear a bolo tie and slippers, which he does to this day. The worst part though was he always thought Homer was angry with him ever since not knowing what he went through to save his pet.
    • Homer then reveals months after he went to get Bongo back, but saw that he was already happy in his new home and was no longer his. Since then he's been unable to get close to dogs, including "Santa's Little Helper", because they were "disloyal". Abe then shows Homer a photo Bongo's new owners sent of him sleeping on Homer's old sweatshirt, saying that his dog never stopped loving him. After a few false starts and failed attempts Homer and his father finally hug.
    • The episode ends with Homer and his dad on the couch fallen asleep and Homer holding Santa's Little Helper. Bart tries to get SLH but Homer still asleep holds onto him murmuring "My dog!". Bart smiles and lets his father have his dog for the night.
  • In "The Changing Of The Guardian", Homer and Marge are trapped in a bank and Homer has a note for the rescue team for who should be rescued first, Marge.
  • "Gone Abie Gone"
    • Bart helping Lisa keep her college fund through poker because he secretly cares about her.
    • Abe choosing not to go to Europe with Rita so he can watch over Homer.
    • Abe and Rita reuniting and singing their song at the end.
  • In "The Saga of Carl Carlson": Homer, Lenny, and Moe convincing the people of Iceland to forgive Carl's family.
  • In "Dangers on a Train", Homer gets a mall train that he and Marge had a memorable ride on during their first anniversary.
    • What's especially endearing about this is that Homer had spent the entire episode working on this project with his friends. He really went all out to give Marge a fantastic anniversary gift.

    Season 25 
  • "Four Regrettings and a Funeral": The first episode to air after the death of Marcia Wallace, who played Edna Krabappel, the chalkboard gag had Bart simply writing "We'll really miss you, Mrs. K".
  • "Married to the Blob": Comic Book Guy is depressed because of how lonely he is, but then he meets a Japanese mangaka that takes interest in him. It almost ends in disaster when his girlfriend's overbearing father tries to break them up. However, Homer manages to convince him to let Comic Book Guy keep dating her. The episode ends with them getting married, with Stan Lee as the priest. After Worst Episode Ever, it was nice to see Comic Book Guy get the bone thrown to him.
    • Kumiko's dad saying to Homer: "We have much in common. We both love our daughters and discipline our sons."
  • Bart's friendship with Diggs in the episode with the same title. The ending with Diggs thanking Bart for being his friend is really touching.
  • Lisa getting Pokey the guinea pig.
  • After Homer realizes Lisa chose him as a last second swap, he considers taking a bribe. Later on, he decides to refuse to take the bribe that the Brazilian gangsters offered for the World Cup and become the hero that Lisa talked about.

    Unsorted 
  • From "The Way We Was" and "I Married Marge." Three words from Homer: "Marge, pour vous."
    • The way Homer fixes the strap on Marge's dress seems to imply he figured out what happened and chose not to pry into the matter.
  • At the end of the Maggie centric short "The Longest Daycare". Maggie is dropped off at Daycare and finds it dismal until she finds another kid smashing butterflies onto the wall. She then finds a caterpillar and a book that tells her that caterpillars grow into butterflies. The other baby approaches Maggie menacingly and Maggie RUNS to get away from the other baby as the caterpillar turns into a butterfly. She eventually is cornered by a window and it appears that the butterfly gets smashed under window blinds Maggie leaves, and the butterfly is revealed to be Maggie's bow. pan out shot to Maggie in the Simpson family car, and the butterfly is safe on Maggie as her bow it begins moving and flies out the window as Maggie giggles and waves goodbye. D'AWWWW.

Shaun the SheepHeartwarming/Western AnimationThe Simpsons Movie

random
TV Tropes by TV Tropes Foundation, LLC is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike 3.0 Unported License.
Permissions beyond the scope of this license may be available from thestaff@tvtropes.org.
Privacy Policy
73307
4