Tabletop Game / Monopoly

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"Sometimes we do awful things in our lives, even if we don't know it. Sometimes the only proof that we've made mistakes - terrible mistakes the UNIVERSE ITSELF punishes us for - is that we look around and find we're playing...Monopoly."

Parker Brothers claims the 1930s as the creation date of its signature board game Monopoly (and says Charles Darrow, who patented it in 1935, invented the game). Players receive $1,500 in starting cash, then roll dice to move their tokens around the board, where they may land on property squares, Chance squares, Community Chest squares, and even Free Parking. The goal is to bankrupt all the other players by buying, improving, and collecting rent on various properties.

Properties make up the cornerstone of the game. If a player lands on an unsold property square, they may buy the property at its listed price. If they decline, the property is sold at auction to the highest bidder. (Neglecting to do this is not only one of the most unintentionally followed House Rules, but extends the length of the game considerably.) When a player lands on a property square owned by another player, he must pay the listed rent on the property deed to whoever owns it (players face no charge for landing on their own properties). Should a player collect all the properties in a specific color group, they may build houses and hotels on those properties. Buildings dramatically increase the amount of rent players have to pay for landing on their spaces — landing on Boardwalk when it has a Hotel often bankrupts the unfortunate soul who lands there. Between turns, players have the option to broker trades for money, properties, Get Out of Jail Free cards, or any combination thereof with other players.

Chance and Community Chest cards can award the player money, take it away, or whisk him off to another square (including Jail). Free Parking is Exactly What It Says on the Tin (when the players own all the properties, it's one of the few no one is charged to land on), but its actual use varies wildly based on House Rules; it either serves as a "blank" square, awards a player cash from the bank, or does something in the middle of those two extremes. Passing or landing on the starting "Go" square during a turn will award a player $200. Oh, and the Jail square exists, too. If a player lands on Jail, they don't go there (the board has "Just Visiting" printed just below the Jail cell) — but if a player rolls doubles three times in a row, lands on the "Go to Jail" square, or draws a "Go to Jail" card from Chance or Community Chest, then you must go to Jail. Go directly to Jail. Do not pass Go. Do not collect $200. A player can either pay $50, use a "Get out of Jail Free" Card, or use a turn in an attempt to roll for doubles to get out of Jail (if the doubles attempt fails three times in a row, a player must pay $50 and move according to the final roll).

The board also contains two utilities (Electric Company and Water Works) as well as four railroads (the B&O, the Pennsylvania, the Reading, and the Short Line). Players who own both utilities or more than one railroad can collect raised rent from players, but cannot build on these properties.

The original version of Monopoly named the colored properties after streets in Atlantic City, New Jersey. Foreign versions of the game rename the properties after local features and use the local currency (London, for example, has Mayfair [a very high-end residential area] take up the £400 slot).

Because of the customizable nature of the game, there is a Monopoly variant for virtually every concept you can imagine: cities, universities, sports teams, fictional properties, you name it, including Grateful Deadopoly, The Simpsons, a 'Vegas' version with a green felt board, wood paneling, and gold and silver pieces, and a "Gayopoly" with a triangular board and real-life gay bars and coffee shops from all over the US as properties. See Themed Stock Board Game.

A lawsuit over the game Anti-Monopoly that lasted from 1976 to 1985 revealed inaccuracies about Parker Brothers' story behind the game's creation: Elizabeth Magie applied for the first patent on a game similar to Monopoly in 1904, at least 30 years before Charles Darrow applied for his patent on the game. (Magie created it so that she could easily demonstrate the ideas of Georgism, i.e., the ideas of economist Henry George, especially on land value taxation and the "citizens' dividend" - hence why the bank offers you $200 when you pass through Go.) When Darrow first approached game manufacturers about publishing the game, they rejected it by sending him a letter claiming "52 fundamental errors" existed in the game. Undaunted, Darrow manufactured his own sets and sold them himself — and he often sold out each run he made. Parker Brothers decided to publish Monopoly only after it had heard of the game's success.

In 1990, Merv Griffin produced a twelve-episode Monopoly Game Show for ABC as a companion for Super Jeopardy!. Michael Reilly, a former Jeopardy! contestant, served as the host.

Doing a pub crawl based on the London board layout has become a popular drinking activity — and a quick way to get drunk.

Oh, and someone also made a fully playable Monopoly in Microsoft Excel. Allows playing against both other people, or AI, with up to four players.

The game only has an indirect relation to the other kind of monopoly.

The following properties are featured in Monopoly:

  • An Aesop: The game was devised as a teaching tool to show the effects of severe wealth inequality. Anyone who has played the game by the rules as written (i.e. no House Rules) knows that once any single player has a noticeable advantage, that player is virtually guaranteed to multiply that advantage and bankrupt everybody else in a relatively short time. That's deliberate.
  • All There in the Manual: According to The Monopoly Companion, Rich Uncle Pennybags' full name is Milburn Pennybags (Mr. Monopoly itself is a Red Baron), the guy in jail is called Jake the Jailbird, and the police officer who takes you to jail is named Officer Edgar Mallory.
  • Announcer Chatter: The version on the current generation's consoles has Uncle Pennybags narrating every action in the game. Not too bad, but his lines can get really repetitive. Fun fact: you can hit Y to cut him off.
    • Said chattering also includes a few bits of Lampshade Hanging over some things, such as the probability of landing on one set of properties:
      [Upon landing on an orange property] One thing I like about this lot: Location, Location, Location
    • He also has the tendency to drone on a lot. Yes, we know what a Community Chest space does!
  • Artificial Stupidity: Some of the trades offered by the video games' AI are...unusual.
    • ESPECIALLY in the Super NES version, where it is common to see a computer player willingly trade away a property from a complete set for something asinine like a railroad they don't need... and then, one turn later, try to get it BACK.
    • The Japan-only Monopoly 2 ironed out this problem somewhat. After a few rounds, the CPU opponents start trading with each other like mad; however, the AI is more reluctant to trade a property which will grant you a monopoly. Also, there will always be one Smug Snake among the four who is a total dick.
    • In some versions of the game, computer players will make you the same offer EVERY TURN, no matter how many times you've refused. Or, if you place a trade offer, the PSP Mini version's AI will always alter the deal to include ALL the money you currently possess.
    • The NES version lets the player make offers on the AI's properties, which the AI will agree to a certain percentage of the time based on the amount of the offer. However, since there's no limit to how many times a player can make an offer per term, it's easy to get the computer to hand over properties for next to nothing.
    • The Pogo.com game's AI takes the rules wording of "for any value" too literally and will ask for properties in exchange for... just cash. Luckily, being an online multiplayer game, you can just block trades from them after a while.
    • In Monopoly Streets for the Wii, the AI will offer nearly nonsensical trades, such as asking for a single railroad (from your collection of all four) in exchange for a single red property (from their collection of two), and a sum of about eight dollars (sometimes from their end, other times from yours). On easier settings, the computer can be broken quite easily into giving you almost anything for about $1000. This applies even if they have no need for the money, and they know that going through with the trade will give you a monopoly.
  • Awesome, but Impractical:
    • Practically no one ever lands on Boardwalk or Park Place. Besides, you need a steady cash flow before you can even develop the blues. That being said, if they are developed at least somewhat, and a couple of players are unlucky enough to land on them, you can go from worst to first in a hurry; it's therefore not a bad idea to pocket them just in case, if only to keep anyone else from doing so.
    • The Green properties are even worse in this regard. High rents, and a powerful group if you can get them developed... but they cost more to fully develop than any other color group in the game (the Dark Blue properties cost less to fully develop because there are only two of them), and they are in the shadow of the Go To Jail space, making them less likely to be landed on than many of the lower-priced color groups before it.
    • It's a waste of money to buy Utilities (at least at full price). Railroads are also a money drain unless you manage to snag all four - which, statistically, turns them into one of the biggest moneymakers (due in part to occupying four squares on the board and the influence of cards).
  • Bail Equals Freedom: In Jail? All you have to do to get out is pay $50. Enforced by the fact that going to Jail in the first place is completely random and there are no actual "laws" to willingly break or "trials" for doing so.
  • Bowdlerize:
    • The earlier artwork for the "Bank pays you dividend of $50" card showed Uncle Pennybags leaning back in his chair and blowing a smoke ring with a cigar. Around the mid 90s, the cigar was changed to him tossing up a handful of money (but the pose remained the same).
    • In Monopoly Junior, "jail" is replaced by "lunch", or "restrooms" depending on the version. Justified in that that game is set in an amusement park. The Disney editions of Monopoly Junior were set in either an studio lot (Disney Channel edition) or Cinderella's Castle (Disney Princess edition), with "lunch" being the only square on both versions, as it was intact. The characters are shown on both versions: Ms. Darbus and Dr. Drakken (Disney Channel edition) or Ursula the Sea Witch and Maleficent (Disney Princess edition).
  • Boring but Practical:
    • Statistically, in a long-run scenario, the light purple, orange, and red sets have the highest chances of being landed on. Someone just coming out of jail (the most-visited square, as there are four separate ways to end up there) has a high chance of landing on at least one of these properties.note 
    • The famous "3-house" strategy used by tournament players. The value of your property jumps significantly when you reach the 3-House mark. A devious player will ignore Hotels entirely. (See "The Plan")
    • If you manage to snag all four railroads, they can become quite the cash cows.
  • Broken Aesop: While there are still vestiges of the original message that unrestricted capitalism is oppressive to the poor, it's rather obscured by the fact that the player who gets everyone's money is the winner. This is because the version Darrow pirated didn't include the full set of rules as devised by Magie. Specifically, he neglected to include the option to, at any point, by consensus of three out of four players, switch from the capitalist rules to a more socialist game where public services are nationalized, the only tax levied is on the unimproved value of land, and everyone is rewarded when wealth is created.
  • Cardboard Prison: Whenever you go to Jail, you can get out for just $50 (or whatever value you set for the house rules), or rolling a double. Or use a "Get out of Jail Free" Card.
  • Cherry Tapping: Can happen quite by accident and to hilarious effect. Example: You've just had a REALLY unlucky run of the board. You've landed on pretty much every rent trap the other players have lined up. ALL your properties are mortgaged. You have $1 left. You manage to end up in jail, so you're at least safe for a few turns... right? Except that on your very next turn, you roll snake eyes. You wind up on Electric Company. It isn't yours. Bye-bye!
  • Crutch Character: The Cyan properties. They are cheap to acquire, cheap to develop, and give a good return on investment, which means a player that gets all three early can develop them quickly and so build a very nice lead. The downside is that they generally aren't powerful enough by themselves to bankrupt an opponent except possibly in the early game.
  • Damned by Faint Praise: "You have won second prize in a beauty contest! Collect $11!"
  • Death-or-Glory Attack: In the later stages of the game, depleting your cash assets to upgrade a set of properties as a group of players approaches becomes this. With luck, at least one or two will land of your newly upgraded properties and you'll make your money back easily. If not, you could find yourself bankrupted on your very next roll.
  • Do Not Pass Go: Trope Namer. Most cards that tell you to advance to such and such space (example, "Advance to Illinois Ave.") imply that you move your piece clockwise around the board (as if you were rolling the dice to move) and allow you to collect $200 if "Go" was a space you passed over. The exception, obviously, is the "Go DIRECTLY to Jail" card: you are NOT advancing clockwise around the board, you are just putting your token in the Jail space.
  • Exact Words: Used by the sneakiest of players whenever possible. Playing with the House Rule that states landing on Go nets double salary? Plan to take $400 when you get a Chance card that says "Land on Go, collect $200"? Fat chance, it specifically tells you to collect $200, not $400.
    • "So, I get $400 for landing on Go and then another $200 as instructed by the card? Sweet deal! I got $600!"
  • Expansion Pack: Three different versions of a stock exchange gameplay mechanic, an electronic device that keeps track of what goes on in the game, two skill-based minigames, and as of 2009, a bonus die with a 1 in 2 chance of turning any roll into a Game Breaker. The Other Wiki goes into more detail on all of that.
  • Extra Turn: Rolling doubles grants the player another turn. However, rolling doubles three times in a row sends you straight to jail.
  • Face on the Cover: Rich Uncle Pennybags is featured on all box covers.
  • Fictional Currency: Possibly the Trope Codifier, depending on how you define the term. Spinoffs like Monopoly City use "monos" (a takeoff on Euros), making an unambiguous use of the trope; also, licensed versions for non-English-speaking countries sometimes use their own names, such as the German Spielmark ("play mark"). "Monopoly Money" is a regular euphemism for buying things with counterfeit money or simply with money you don't have.
  • Follow the Leader: Easy Money by Milton Bradley. Officially, both games are based on an older game called The Landlord's Game, but Easy Money was released as a direct response to Monopoly's success. Continues to be published, under license, by a third party company.
  • House Rules: If you're playing by the official game rules, nothing happens on Free Parking. Coming up with a use for it is one of the more popular house rules of any board game.
    • Most house rules for Free Parking involve some kind of monetary reward; for example, setting aside any money lost due to the two tax spaces, Chance or Community Chest and making that the Free Parking prize. The official game rules actively discourage using Free Parking for this purpose, since the more money there is in play, the more difficult it is to force other players into bankruptcy. And games take long enough as it is. A possible solution offered by a number of online sites is to also add a win condition for reaching a certain amount of capital.
    • Another house rule happens to relate to the houses (or, specifically, hotels). Officially, if there is a house shortage, no property with a hotel can be mortgaged until the housing shortage is taken care of. A common house rule is to permit the skipping of houses in the building cycle in both directions, provided that the player can afford 4 houses on all properties AND THEN the hotel for each one.
    • The most frequently ignored official rule is this: if you decline to purchase a property that you landed on, it is supposed to be immediately put up to auction for anyone to buy. Most house rules simply declare a turn to be over if this happens, skipping the auction process. This rule, more than any other (even Free Parking = Cash Bonus), is responsible for Monopoly's reputation as a glacially-slow exercise in tedium. The faster the properties are bought up, the faster the real game (i.e. the trading) can get started. Ironically, most people ignore this rule because the auction process sounds tedious.
    • There used to be rules on the web of a two-board variant called Mafia Monopoly that required four players minimum, with each board being home turf to a gang. They were later removed.
    • There's a house rule that forbids buying property until you've completed one lap round the board (intended to Nerf the obvious massive advantages of going first), which can prove frustrating if you keep on landing in Jail and never getting anywhere.
  • Joisey: The default (and official tournament) board is based on Atlantic City. Part of the concept of it—building houses and hotels—is based on the economy of Atlantic City (and the rest of the Jersey Shore): running hotels and rental "shore houses" for tourists is a common thing there. Quite a lot of people with a little extra money in New Jersey, Philadelphia, and New York will buy a shore house to have a few weeks out of the summer and rent out the rest.
    • In fact, if you visit the Atlantic City boardwalk, there are signs shaped and painted like the various Monopoly squares indicating where the real-life streets are located.
  • Joke Character: Several properties qualify.
    • Mediterranean Avenue. When it has a hotel, it only earns you $250 if someone lands on it, which is only 80% of what you paid for it. At least Baltic Avenue is somewhat better, earning you 145% of what you paid for when fully upgraded.
    • The Utilities. If you have both, the rent is 10x what is shown on the dice. Too bad that maxes out at $120, barely half of what it cost to purchase both properties in the first place, and they cannot be upgraded in any way.
  • Kingmaker Scenario: A sort of inversion frequently happens when a player who's ahead will be shut out of trades because the other players don't like said player and/or don't want that player to get further ahead; instead, they choose to deal with a second player who has a chance of winning. At least one Monopoly championship was decided in exactly this manner.
  • Lethal Joke Character: Savvy players will often use the cheapest properties to stash houses. It only costs $400 to load both up with 4 houses each and later in the game, when the inevitable housing shortage hits, other players won't be able to build as many houses on their much more lucrative properties. If you have other properties you want to build houses on, you can upgrade these properties to hotels for a mere $100 extra and suddenly you free up 8 houses to put on your other properties. And because so many players view these spaces as Joke Characters, you can often get them in trade as throw-ins or for extremely meager sums.
  • Lethal Joke Weapon: Those first two properties (either purple or brown, depending on revision) are capable of getting you $450 rent, once hotels are on them. Most video game adaptations that allow the salary to be changed cap it at $400.
  • Licensed Pinball Table: Designed by Pat Lawlor and released in 2001 by Stern. Click here for details.
  • Lighter and Softer: Monopoly Junior. Anyone who has played this game knows there is virtually no way to lose. Either that, or they're Too Dumb to Win.
  • Metagame: Unsurprisingly, for a game of such age and popularity, it has a rather thriving one.
    • A large part of this is due to the official rules, which state that anything can be part of a trade as long as all parties involved in the trade agree to it. The implications, in the hands of the creative, can be downright absurd, silly, or devious.
    • One of the first things to nail down is who gets what piece. Expect fights for the car, battleship, and top hat, while some have to settle for the iron or the thimble.
  • Might as Well Not Be in Prison at All: Both in and out of universe.
    • In-universe, you're allowed to manage your assets in Jail, buying and selling properties and talking with the banker. The only thing you can't do is, obviously, walk into a house to talk with the realtor, but if it goes up for auction they let you listen in and bid.
    • Out of universe, staying in Jail is actually a good late-game strategy. If you're not moving around the board, you can't land on your opponents' houses and hotels. They can still land on yours, though. That said, you get kicked out after three turns. There are some house rules built to fix this, however, by having the jailed players not able to trade, and if anyone was to land on a jailed person's space, they don't have to pay them.
  • No Pronunciation Guide: "Reading Railroad" is commonly called the REED-ing Railroad, but it's actually the REDD-ing Railroad (i.e. past tense of "read", not present), which served Atlantic City until 1976 (and was named after the city in Pennsylvania and, by extension, the city in England).
  • Officer O'Hara: The Sega Genesis and SNES versions plays a speech-clip of an Irish policeman whenever you get out of jail: "Don'cha be comin' back here, now!"
  • One-Hit Kill: Landing on Boardwalk when that player put a Hotel on it. $2000 rent. This is enough to tip most undeveloped players into bankruptcy. And even if you are not dead after you land on it, you are pretty much crippled unless you have a VERY large stash of cash and assets.
  • The Plan:
    • Another Gambit involves never upgrading houses to hotels. Each property can have up to four houses on it (which can then all be traded back to the bank for a hotel) but there are only 32 houses in a Monopoly set. If they are all on the board, no one can build houses until someone sells the houses back or trades them in for a hotel; nor can they skip houses and go straight to hotels, for that matter. It's All There in the Manual, and called a "Housing Shortage."
    • In tournament play, however, if you want to break hotels down to houses to create a shortage, other players get the opportunity to buy houses before you. This is an Obvious Rule Patch implemented to make it more difficult for a player to "back into" a housing shortage. This is why not upgrading to hotels is the preferred strategy.
  • Poison Mushroom:
    • The "Take a walk on the Boardwalk" card can be this. The most infamous example occurred at the 1980 tourney in New York. Read it and weep.
    • Cards that tell you to go to St. Charles Place and Illinois Avenue can be this late in the game. Finally there is the "Go Back Three Spaces" if you land on the Chance in the Red Zone.
    • The Railway cards are this late in the game, especially if someone has all four. Due to the special rule that the Railway cards have, you have to pay $400, which is a large chunk of change.
    • Playing the trope straighter are the cards that force you to pay cash to the bank (such as the assessment for repairs to your properties). The "Chairman of the Board" card also counts, as it forces you to pay $50 to each other player. "Go to Jail" cards are a straight example in the early game, but a subversion in the late game.
  • Prison: Go to Jail. Go directly to Jail. Do not pass Go, do not collect $200.
  • Ridiculous Future Inflation: Inverted, as the prices are still the same as they were in 1932. Boardwalk (Mayfair in the British version), the most expensive property, can be yours for a mere $400 (£400). This also applies to all the weird Monopoly variants mentioned in Recycled Premise.
    • The variant "Monopoly Here and Now: The World (and U.S.) Edition(s)" plays this straight, though; every $100 in Monopoly money is worth 1 million "monos" (the "mono" being a Fictional Counterpart of the euro, down to the stylized letter representing the currency).
    • Post-2008 editions of "classic" US game upped the luxury tax from $75 to a whopping $100. They also changed Income Tax to a flat $200, as opposed to a choice between that and 10% of your assetsnote . The 10% only made sense early in the game (if a player lands there on his/her first turn for instance, $150 is the payment since each player starts with $1500; on average, a player gains about $170 in assets every circuit of the board), or if a player was nearing elimination anyway.
  • Rouge Angles of Satin: The correct spelling of the housing area just south of Atlantic City is Marven Gardens. Monopoly's spelling is considerably better known. In 1995, Parker Brothers issued a formal apology for misspelling the name for the past sixty years, but elected to keep the "Marvin Gardens" spelling.
  • Rule of Symbolism: The original tokens. The car, battleship, horseman, cannon, and terrier represented the rich; the wheelbarrow, iron, thimble, and boot represented hard work.
  • Rule of Three: Rolling three doubles in a row sends you directly to jail.
  • Screw the Rules, I Have Money!: Late-game, the best place in the game is in jail.
  • Serious Business: At least one game of Monopoly you play in your life will devolve into an argument about the rules, and then into an argument about who lost the rule sheet. And let's not get started on Tournament Play... Well explained here:
    It is now the turn of each player to explain their theory as to how the person who goes first should be decided. While the game rules stipulate a simple dice roll contest, anyone citing this will be told that they are wrong, and that a different rule is correct. You may see some of the following expounded, typically by the person who would benefit the most from them: Youngest goes first; oldest goes first; people born during a seasonal equinox go first; a fight; all the money is thrown in the air and whoever grabs the most goes first, like in The Crystal Maze ; the last person to kill themselves while Phil Collins' "Sussudio" is on an infinite loop goes first.
  • Taking You with Me: It's possible to do this inadvertently: If Player A bankrupts Player B while B has mortgaged properties, A must pay the interest on those mortgaged properties immediately. Depending on how many mortgages B has and the current value of A's assets, it's entirely possible for Player A to be bankrupted by the bank immediately afterwards just by being unable to pay B's mortage interest.note 
  • Taxman Takes the Winnings: It's possible on the same move to receive $200 by passing 'Go' and then land on 'Income Tax - pay $200'. (Earlier editions have "Pay $200 or 10% of your total assets", but few players have the patience to total it up and those who do quickly find that $200 is almost always cheaper.)
  • Themed Stock Board Game: At first, there was only Star Wars Monopoly, but thanks to the USAopoly company, there are: Nintendo Monopoly, Simpsons Monopoly, Family Guy Monopoly, Pokémonopoly, John Deere Monopoly, Pittsburgh Steelers Super Bowl Champions Monopoly, Scooby-Doo Monopoly...
    • This page attempts to maintain a current list.
    • There are two main lines: Most "<blank> Monopoly" games are officially licensed by Parker Brothers, while most "<blank>opoly" games are unlicensed and made by Late For The Sky.
    • There's also "Make-Your-Own-Opoly," a kit which allows you to print out personalized street names and other details for a customized, one-of-a-kind game.
  • Unstable Equilibrium: The original game designer, Elizabeth Magie, deliberately used this to make her point. See also: the entry for An Aesop. To wit: Have you ever played someone who, once they got a lead, started swiftly and utterly annihilating his/her opponents? How that player starts making horribly one-sided deals and started charging outrageous rents? You remember how frustrated you got? How helpless you felt, knowing that you now had no chance of winning? How you wanted to flip the board over in a pique of anger and shout at the player for being so cruel? That's the whole point of the game. You're supposed to be angry at how badly those with loads of money can screw over those without.
  • Violation of Common Sense: Being sent to jail usually means you cannot progress on the board until you are set free, which means you can't attempt to buy unsold properties or get a chance at picking up a Chance or Community Chest card. And early in the game, you do want to stay out of jail as much as possible. However, most players are savvy enough to know that once someone acquires a lot of properties and starts building houses and/or hotels on them, going to jail frequently means you can waste turns sitting in jail and avoiding the risk of landing on an opponent's properties. Of course, it's not easy to get sent to jail directly due to the randomness of the dice and cards.
    • In tournament play, this is a very common and very advantageous strategy due to the addition of the third die: rolling triples allows you to go to any space on the board that you wish. World Championships have been won by players whose final play was voluntarily going directly to jail (presumably wearing shades with their feet up resting on the bars) and just waiting for their opponent to go bankrupt.
    • The further you are from Go the more expensive building and renting is, which makes the more expensive properties seem like a better investment. However, these things don't increase at an even rate. New York Avenue earns $1000 while Illinois Avenue earns $1100, and St. James Avenue earns $950 while Kentucky Avenue earns $1050, but the cost to fully upgrade the Red set is $2250 while the cost for the Orange set is only $1500, a 50% increase in cost with only a 10% increase in rent. Landing probabilities aside, the Reds are a money sink compared to the Oranges. To a lesser extent the same applies to the Yellow set vs. the Green set.
    • The Dark Blue property group actually costs less to develop than any of the three groups before it ($2000 to fully upgrade, compared to $2250 for the Reds or Yellows, and $3000 for the Greens), and charges (by far) the highest rents, but it's also the least-landed-on property group in the game for two reasons: it's only two properties big, and it's in the extended shadow of Go To Jail (Park Place and Boardwalk are seven and nine spaces away, respectively, which are both high-probability numbers when rolling two dice, especially seven).
  • Whammy: Depending on the board conditions, getting the Property Assessment, "Advance to Boardwalk" or "Advance to Illinois Ave." cards can instantly cripple you, or knock you out of the game completely.

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