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Headscratchers: The Simpsons
  • In The Simpsons, the episodes always take place in the year they were produced. In the late Scully Era/Early Jean era we see that Bush was President, and it's been shown Obama's president in recent episodes? The Simpsons Movie obviously takes place in 2007, so why is Arnold Schwarzenegger president? It was even said he was elected. Does this mean the movie is the true finale or what?
    • One of the staff said they didn't want the movie to become dated, so they substituted Bush for a fictional president, which will only become dated when Schwarzenegger dies.
    • Which could have been completely sidestepped if they had just used Renier Wolfcastle
  • In "Moonshine River" Bart goes back to his old girlfriends just to get rejected. How come they didn't feature Laura Powers from "New Kid on the Block," Jessica Lovejoy, Rainer Wolfcastle's daughter Greta, or Shauna from "Beware My Cheating Bart?" Could they not get the voice actresses to return or was the guest star list at maximum capacity?
    • The guest stars probably didn't want to have to come all the way back to the voice recording studios just to say one short line. Also, I agree that the guest star list was at maximum capacity.
    • Laura never dated Bart because he was too young for her. He broke it off with Jessica, she didn't reject him, so dating her wouldn't go against Lisa's claim that all his girlfriends left him. Shauna I had to look up, but from what I remember she had loose morally like Jessica and is also Larura's age, something he could have realized when thinking about his old girlfriend's as a whole. I can't think of an in universe reason to skip Greta.
  • It's well established that Matt Groening exists in the universe of The Simpsons, where he's the creator of Futurama. This mostly averts the Celebrity Paradox, but it makes you wonder...would Futurama still have gotten made if Groening hadn't become famous as the creator of the mega-hit The Simpsons? Also: if he wasn't occupied with The Simpsons early in his career, did Futurama come out a lot earlier in this universe? Did Futurama start out as shorts on the Tracey Ullman Show? (Kind of makes you wonder what the 1987 versions of the cast look like...)
    • Plausible answer: his career started with a different show in The Simpsons that, unlike The Simpsons, eventually ended at, I dunno, season 7, and was fantastically popular. Futurama came afterwards, on a different network, that cancelled it after...say...fourteen episodes, just long enough for it to become a cult sensation.
    • Probably the above scenario with the different show being Life in Hell, the idea Groening originally intended to present to The Tracey Ullman Show before deciding against it at the last minute. Supported by the Life In Hell merchandise sometimes seen around Springfield, and offering an interesting take on What Could Have Been.
      • It is explained in the infamous "That '90s Show" episode: Matt Groening was poor, but made "Futurama" in 90s.
      • What if he threw together the Futurama characters to pitch to Fox instead of The Simpsons?
  • In "Marge on the Lam," why did Homer get ballet confused with seeing a little bear driving a mini-car at the circus?
    • Hell, he's not the only one. Lenny had exactly the same misconception.
      • Because they're stupid, and that's funny.
      • Bear + Valet = Ballet?

  • In the Homer's Evolution couch gag showing Homer going through evolution (with Moe devolving into a rat creature): Does this mean Moe evolved from rats or did the rats evolve from Moe?
    • Yes.
      • Probably the latter, considering he's devolving, but it's probably just a sight gag about Moe's ugliness and primitive nature.
      • It also could have been because he was going in the opposite direction.

  • Does a lost episode called "Dead Bart" really exist?
    • No. It was made up by people on the internet.
      • Whew. That's a relief.

  • Why does Marcia Wallace keep being called a special guest voice in the credits? Shouldn't she be in the Also Starring category?
    • I asked this question in real life a few years back, and the answer seemed to be because of name recognition. People know who Marcia Wallace is and so they don't want to relegate her to the "also starring" category, because the "guest star" category is more prominent. Of course, as someone who knows far more about Tress MacNeille and Russi Taylor than Marcia Wallace, it does seem strange.

  • Why didn't the Simpsons buy one of those baby translators for Maggie?
    • Why didn't Herb give them one free? Why NO ONE has one in later shows? Why? WHY? WHYYYYYY??? (Maybe weekly reset, or they don't care about Maggie enough.)
      • The baby translator, as previously said, had ramifications so far-reaching and society-altering that the writers placed in under Negative Continuity.
      • Would you want your baby's cry's, coos, and gurgles translated in Uncy Herb's voice?
      • The translator doesn't work on pacifier sucking noises.
    • See Reed Richards Is Useless.

  • While the episode "Round Springfield" was a superb episode, one part seemed a little strange. Why are both Dr. Hibbert and Dr. Nick performing surgery on Bart? Isn't that like mixing oil and water? On the other hand, it did give us this:
    Dr. Nick: Hey, I smell gas. Pleasant gas. Night-night gas.
    • Maybe the surgery was so complex that it would have required two doctors to perform.
    • The Question should be why two General Practitioners, one of them a Paedatrician, are performing complex surgery in the first place.
      • The question was more why Dr. Hibbert and a certified quack ("Calm down, you're going to get skin failure.") are doing surgery.
      • There are several episode where it's hinted that Hibbert is a bit of a quack himself.
      • Even if so, it's not nearly as blatant as Dr. Nick, and as the original poster said: oil and water.

  • If there really is a "Simpson Gene" that makes the male Simpsons into complete idiots age age 8, then how does that explain Bart when he is shown to be clever with pranks at age 10? Is this really a non-canon episode?
    • It seems like the writers forgot about it. Another later episode(HOMR) proved that Homer was actually a genius, he just had a crayon lodged in his brain. Bart is also shown to be extremely smart when he's on Focusyn.
      • I also noticed that this episode is written by Ned Goldreyer, who also wrote the non-canon Treehouse of Horror VIII.

  • Maximum Homerdrive: "Maybe it's time we ditched the high tech gizmos and went back to driving like our daddies did... Using our hands and our wits... it has meaning and dignity... Nah. Let's just find some other scam."
    • So in this world, there really is a chip that can drive a truck for you, flawlessly, around windy cliff roads? And the "dignified" thing to do is to hide its existence from the world and continue to make a living driving with your flawed (and speed-addled) brains and hands? I'm pretty sure that *is* another scam.
    • Reed Richards Is Useless.

  • Don't get me wrong; I loved the episode "Homer to the Max", but one part of it was a little confusing. Why was Marge grossed out, or at least very weirded out, by the idea of actually having sex with Homer instead of just snuggling with him? Remember the escapades of "Natural Born Kissers"?
    • It was Homer changing his name to Max Power that weirded her out, not the sex.
    • And it was also Homer describing sex with Max Power as "Strap[ping] yourself in and feel[ing] the G's." It was Marge basically reacting to how out of character Homer has become due to his name change.

  • This troper has always been annoyed by the ending of the episode "The Front". Grampa wins a writing award for the Itchy & Scratchy episodes Lisa and Bart wrote with his name on them, and at the ceremony he goes off on a rant about how sick and horrible the cartoons (which he'd never seen before) are, and gets booed off the stage. Okay, whatever. But why does Lisa agree with him about a cartoon she helped write?
    • Maybe she wanted to express her creativity in a way that the public would see. As a child, and a fan of Itchy and Scratchy, she saw the medium of ghost writing episodes as a way of doing that. Sure the show goes against her morals, but at least her work got on TV. I watch some things that I wouldn't agree with in the real world, but that doesn't mean I'm going to stop watching them. And before you go on about how she doesn't get any credit on the work, she's a child. Children don't get credit for writing professionally! Haven't you read Enderís Game?
    • Didn't she satisfy her goals? Wasn't the basis of the plot that Lisa and Bart thought they could write better episodes than the ones they had been watching?

  • Why did Homer and Marge take Bart off of the Focusyn? Sure, it was making him crazy, but he was completely correct about everything he freaked out about. Plus overdosing didn't appear to have any negative side effects.
    • Because they were being good parents and decided that Bart's happiness was more important than grades?
    • He might have been right, but he went completely insane. I mean, he steals a *tank* for God's sake, I'd take him off the drugs too.
    • Even in the real world, drugs can have good effects but be unsuitable for a person. Birth control can regulate hormones and make periods less severe and painful but can worsen depression, OCD medication can reduce destructive thoughts but cause a person to have migraines, mood stabilizers for Tourette's syndrome can cause kidney damage. Sometimes the risks outweigh the benefits.
    • Bart may have been right about everything, but in the universe of The Simpsons being right isn't actually worth all that much. It's a recurring theme in the show that intelligent, talented people are doomed to failure and misery while idiots blunder their way into success and happiness (see "HOMR", "Lisa's Rival", "Homer's Enemy"). That's what's going on here: Bart uncovered Major Leage Baseball's diabolical conspiracy, but no one cared so long as they got to watch a guy hit some dingers. The Simpsons live in an insane world, and Focusyn made Bart far too sane to survive in it.

  • Why isn't Martin Prince a member of MENSA? His IQ is 216, which is higher than the other members.
    • Maybe he was planning to after he heard that Lisa had joined, but after the crazy stuff the MENSA members did, he figured it would just be better just to settle for the Super Friends (the local school's nerd group, not the super hero one).
    • Funny enough, in the game Tapped Out, he is a new member of MENSA.
    • When Bart reveals he cheated on the IQ test, he doesn't say how he cheated, just that he cheated, so Martin's intelligence goes unnoticed at the time. They probably just never bothered to administer a second IQ test.

  • When Reverend Lovejoy and wife leave Springfield, why does Marge say, "It's as if God has left Springfield"? Is it possible that their church is the only church in the whole town, even only considering Presbyterians?
    • Because, as seen in "Homer the Heretic", "She of Little Faith" and "The Father, The Son and The Holy Guest Star", Marge has absolutely zero respect for other religions or alternative forms of worship. Reverend Lovejoy's departure probably means that the one true way to worship or contact God is gone, at least to Marge.
    • It's possible. Springfield only has a population of about 25,000. Unless the writers need it to be bigger, of course.
      • Wait. Springfield has a set-in-stone population?
      • My town of 8000 has more than fifty churches. Just sayin'.
      • 1400 people. At least 4 churches, maybe more.
    • Presbylutheran. To be more precise, Western American Reformed Presbylutheran. Anyway, other episodes have established E-piss-copal (Lovejoy's phrasing, not mine) and Catholic churches. I can't remember if "She of Little Faith" included other Christian places of worship, but it's clear that other ways of finding God, as it were, exist in Springfield.

      Though to answer your question, it's possible that Lovejoy is one of the most highly influential men of faith in Springfield of any faith and that's how losing him would be like losing God.
    • Dr. Hibbert began attending a more "boisterous" church.
    • It's not just the only church, it's the only religious building in Springfield. I mean, Krusty attends the church despite being Jewish, because there is no other way to worship God in Springfield. The only problem with that is the Catholic School Bart once attended.
      • Actually, its been shown in other episodes that there's not only synagogues, since Krusty's father is a rabbi and his temple has been shown several times, but also a Buddhist temple. Like so many other Simpsons things, its simply a matter of what is convenient for the plot. Lovejoys church is a common scene for the show, since its the one the Simpsons and Flanders attends, and rather than filling up the seats with generic background characters, they put in supporting characters, even if it makes no sense for them to attend, like Krusty and Apu.
      • Yeah about that, why is Apu seen in that church even though he is Hindu? I bet someone got fired for animating that mistake!
      • Again, its not a matter of consistency, characters frequently appear in settings that makes no sense, its simply a matter of having familiar characters wherever the main characters go rather than having to design a dozen new ones. Apu and Krusty have no reason to be in Lovejoys church, but go there anyway because they're among the most recognizable supporting cast.

  • Lisa and PETA. You'd think a girl like her would know about them. Then again, she does go back and forth between being wise beyond her years and having the mindset of a child. Plus, not that many people know much about PETA.
    • Maybe Lisa believes all those crazy stories about PETA are just propaganda made up by the conservative media?
      • Didn't Bart say that Lisa was in PETA, after Marge refused to let him sign up for the army? "I think she just answers the phone", was Marge's response.
    • Easy: PETA are jerks. Now, I agree that animals have no right to be treated bad because they are not human beings. But they are not the best people on the most part when it comes to be talking about what's right in my mind. So after Lisa joined (as the troper above pointed out), she saw how bad they were: their leader using insulin (something that was invented using ANIMAL TESTING), trying to call a rabbit a smeerp by naming fish "Sea-kittins," trying to get McDonald's to treat their animals better by flipping them off (yes, because a mult-BILLION dollar company is going to change the way it does things because a bunch of people give their employees the bird) and about 96% percent of the animals they get are put down. And and that's just the REAL LIFE PETA. Since this is the Simpsons (who exagerate things), they would be the type who burn down half a town, knock out a family, take their kitten and 'free' it by dumping it off in the woods. Lisa, wanting people and animals to share the Earth without trouble, quit after seeing what PETA really is. FYI, no offense to PETA, but I just don't think they are effective at what they try to do.

  • In "In Marge We Trust", why did Ned keep running from the bullies throughout the night? Surely it would've been better to just give in and just let them beat him up?
    • It wasn't just the fact that he kept running that was weird. Apparently, Ned's impressively ripped muscles are just for show.
      • Impressively ripped muscles or not, Ned is a total sissy. He wouldn't consider letting himself get beat up, or beating up the bullies as an option.

  • If there was an episode about Bart and Lisa both being in the third grade, then why not have an episode about Ralph Wiggum in the first grade and Martin Prince in the fifth grade?
    • Because the entertainment from that episode comes from the conflict of Bart and Lisa being in the same grade. It also has quite the plot twist with Bart actually doing a lot better than Lisa.

  • In "The Homer of Seville," why does Homer play Rodolfo and Count Almaviva although they are both tenor roles and Homer is clearly a baritone?
    • Also, why on earth would Homer take part in an opera or any kind of musical theater judging by his obvious bias - he called the Phantom 'the gayest supervillain ever', and made fart noises during a performance.

  • Why oh why, aren't there many teenagers shown in The Simpsons? I'd just thought of that, other than the bullies at Springfield Elementary (Dolph, Jimbo, and Kearney (even though later episodes reveal that Kearney isn't a teenager; he just looks like one), Laura Powers, the Squeaky-Voiced Teen, and the college geeks from "Homer Goes to College" and "Faith Off," the teenage population seems to be extremely low for a small town. It bothers me especially when later episodes show evidence of Springfield University, not to mention Homer/Marge's high school flashbacks.
    • Possibly because there are no teenage Simpsons. There's a baby, some kids, adults, and seniors, but no teens.
    • On the audio commentary for the short-lived cartoon series Mission Hill, Bill Oakley and Josh Weinstein state that they created the show as a response to exactly this (well, not just teenagers, but also young college graduates. Close enough).

  • In the episode "Hurricane Neddy", it's stated that the Flanderses don't have insurance because Ned considers it a form of gambling. This wasn't a throwaway gag - the family's lack of insurance meant they couldn't have their house rebuilt, and the shoddy job the townsfolk did when they rebuilt it out of charity broke the dam and caused Ned to unleash all his pent-up anger. However, Ned is shown driving a car in several episodes. Maybe America is different, but don't you need insurance to drive?
    • Ned probably has the legal minimum required insurance for his car. But it still doesn't make sense that he doesn't have home-owners' insurance unless he owned that house free and clear. Mortgage lenders require the buyer to have property insurance as a way of protecting the lender's investment.
      • Who says Ned didn't buy the house in full in the first place? If he thinks insurance is wrong, surly he finds something wrong with loaning money.
      • It's also possible that he inherited the house.
      • Possibly, but keep in mind that he has at least ONE mortgage on it, since the failure of the Leftorium in When Flanders Failed caused the bank to repossess the house.
    • America isn't different. You need insurance and your license on you to drive. This doesn't stop people.
      • Yeah, but Ned has always been shown to be incredibly law-abiding. Driving without insurance strikes me as exactly the sort of thing he wouldn't do.
      • Well it looks like he's got a moral de-diddly-lemma there. What do you do when your moral system says you should follow the law, yet the law goes against your moral system? He probably read over Matthew 22:15-22 a few dozen times, then called Reverend Lovejoy in the middle of dinner to resolve that doozy of a choosy.
      • Marry me.
      • In California at least, you have to have proof of insurance or a certain amount on deposit. Also, maybe Ned sees a difference between insurance-against-acts-of-man versus -against-acts-of-God.
    • It's established in one episode that Ned is actually a senior citizen - chances are that he's already paid off any mortgage he originally took out on the house; and while he had a mortgage, he would've been required to have a certain minimum amount of insurance on the place by his mortgage lender, which he would have abided with; ditto with needing to have minimum insurance on his car. But he doesn't get any more insurance than is absolutely necessary (obviously he doesn't have any life insurance then).
    • Real-life Muslims are against insurance for similar reasons, and usury is outlawed in Islamic countries. What do Muslims in the US do when buying a car? If they're super-religious, maybe they feel a little guilty while signing the papers. In Ned Flanders' case, just make that "very, very guilty".
      • Or they may set up a surety-bond, or certified deposit which many states allow as an alternative. It's also common for many Christian groups. Even the Amish.
      • There's actually no dilemma. The compulsory insurance required for driving is liability insurance i.e. the type that protects the other guy in case of an accident.
    • Along with everything else, remember that the show has never been strong on continuity in the first place. In one episode, Rod and Todd tell Bart that Ned considers dice to be wicked, and they only move one space at a time when playing "Good Samaritan". And yet, in another episode that includes a flashback to the 1980s, Rod, Todd and Bart are shown playing the same board game with dice.
      • Well, Ned's religious fanaticism has increased so much over time that he's the namesake for Flanderization. It's possible that in the past he wasn't extreme enough to think that playing board games with dice is a sin. And even if we're supposed to think he's always been as extreme as he is, it's possible that it never occurred to him that it would be problematic to use dice for any reason - even for pure entertainment (as opposed to gambling)- until, say, he heard a televangelist say so.
      • Also note that in the flashback, the dice were in a plastic bubble that was shaken to move the dice, that is to say, kept the children from touching the wicked dice directly.

  • I heard that the plot for Bart the Mother was actually a B-story that had been unused for a long time due to it having no place in the plot. The original story was Homer finding a bird's nest in one of the nuclear plant towers and trying to find a home before the winter comes. Did they ever use that plot? Will they ever use it?

  • Why does everybody have yellow skin?
    • That's just how the show portrays Caucasians. If you watch some of the early episodes (like the one where Marge goes to jail for a month), the show's Asian characters are depicted as having pale white skin.
    • Because if they were blue and white, they'd be Smurfs.
    • Alternate universe where man evolved slightly differently?
      • Then why do the Hills (of King of the hill, in their cameo appearance) and the Archie gang lack it?
      • Because that's what they look like in their home media; I guess that's honored when it comes to fictional guest stars.
      • Besides, this troper remembers the promos for 'Bart Starr' depicting the Hills with yellow skin, and it just looked weird.
      • Then why did The Critic's Jay Sherman appear yellow during his two guest appearances?
      • The Critic was a Gracie Films production. They were keeping it in the family; they might have considered animating the Hill family in the classic style an insult.
    • Because Matt Groening can't draw.
      • The Animation Studio is the one that originally did that, not Matt.
    • Or he lost his peach colored crayon.
    • If they were flesh colored, some "hair" would actually be pointy bits of flesh, especially for Bart.
    • I think they said it was originally to catch viewers eyes, and it stuck
      • This is true, they did it because they wanted people to think the color on their TV was off.
    • Groening has also stated that he felt flesh-colored cartoon characters looked weird, noting the creepiness of Mickey Mouse being made Caucasian in Fantasia, when he had always been a cartoony literal black and white. I guess he got over this by Futurama.
    • IMDB.com says the characters were made yellow to catch the attention of anyone flipping through channels, and IMDB never lies.
    • It was caused by radiation from the Nuclear Power Plant and waste run-off from the other polluting industries that Springfield seems to hold.
    • Actually, the way I heard it was that all the Simpsons' odd anatomical stuff, like yellow skin, overbite, and hair that's indistinguishable from skin, were because Groening's original drawings were intended just to give the animation crew a general idea. He was actually surprised when they copied his rough designs exactly.
    • Matt's original drawings for The Simpsons (which he came up with in ten minutes while waiting outside James L. Brooks' office) were in black and white. It was the idea of one of the original color designers on the Tracey Ullman Show (her name escapes me) to make them yellow. The idea was so they would look different from anything else on television. Matt loved the plan and considers it one of the keys to the show's early success. Conversely, he refused to color the Futurama cast yellow because he wanted to send the message that the show wasn't just going to be "The Simpsons in space."
    • I said SKIN (as in the muzzle, arms, and belly), not fur (the blue and possibly white stuff)!
      • There's a video on Youtube where David Silverman explains why the Simpsons are yellow. See here.
  • If Homer has brown hair, and Marge has blue hair, how are Bart, Lisa and Maggie all blonde?
    • Marge dyes her hair. She could be blonde, but I think she was brunette in a flashback episode.
    • Homer's mom has red hair (explaining Bart's hair in No Loan Again, Naturally, BTW) and Marge's hair is naturally blue(but turned gray at 17). (BTW, ever notice how people with blue hair have blond children? Like in Sailor Moon?) Marge once burned her hair brown with an iron (Really) and made her whole hair brown for that night.
      • Actually, (as far as I know) Marge's natural hair color is unknown. The reason her hair is blue is explained by Homer in the episode "Secrets of a Successful Marriage"; "She's been as grey as a mule since she was seventeen".
      • In "Fear of Flying" Marge is depicted as a 4-7 year old to look exactly as she does today, except smaller. Same hair style, hair color, dress and pearls.
      • Didn't women that went grey used to dye their hair blue? Around the time Matt Groening's mother would have gone grey?
      • One of my older aunts did, a very dark blue, so you might be onto something.
      • I don't think it was on purpose. I swear there's a trope for that... also other characters on the show have blue hair, like Milhouse and his parents. And a lot of children who are blonde as kids end up with brown hair as adults.
    • Blonde hair is a recessive trait. In real life, two brown-haired people can produce a blond child, so Marge and Homer doing so isn't that unusual.

  • In The Simpsons Movie, why didn't anybody try to get out of the city by digging under the dome?
    • This was lampshaded by Lou in The Fool Monty.
    • Springfield has an average IQ of about 60, and that would be lower without Lisa, Martin, Dr. Hibbert and Professor Frink pulling them up.
      • Plus there were helicopters, soldiers and Jeeps around it to ensure no-one got out. If everyone tried to burrow through the same hole, half of them would be drugged and shipped back in by the end of the day.
      • Yes, but let's not forget that Springfield has its own Mensa chapter; you'd at least expect them to come up with some sort of plan...
      • I remember the episode where Mensa featured. The members probably started arguing about whether to use the giant laser or the giant drill, and got all into a sulk.
    • Frink had an acid drill that could get trough anything. It was just outside the dome.
    • They could've done when no one's watching like in The Great Escape. They were able to rescue Bart from the well by digging to the bottom.
      • Only because they had Sting to help...
      • I doubt they would have been conserned about soldiers and such catching them and sending them back if they had dug. At one point they were doing all they could to break the dome, in clear view.

  • I have another question about the Movie. While it was a funny joke, how did Moe become Emperor of Springfield? It seems more like something Mr. Burns or Sideshow Bob would do.
    • Wasn't Bob in Italy at the time? As for Burns, when the situation went to hell, maybe the people decided to rise up against him and bring him down from his power for once. Heck, maybe Burns did become Emperor, but then got overthrown by Moe.
      • I forgot about the Italy part. Now that I think about it, maybe it's a good thing Sideshow Bob didn't become Emperor; he probably would have turned Springfield into an Amish community.
      • On the other hand, if Bob had been around, Springfield probably would have prospered under the dome. If only to get them to take off the dome so he could go find Bart and kill him.
    • Um... was Moe ever Emperor according to anybody other than Moe?
      • Well that dome was making them all crazy.

  • For 400 episodes, how come Springfield still allows Homer Simpson to live? As far as I can remember, one of his few good accomplishments to the city was preventing a nuclear meltdown he himself caused by being careless. And, if you wish, in The Movie, he was not only the one to blame for trapping the city in the dome and condemn the whole population to be exploded with it, but also ruined almost everyone's chance to escape the dome. Back to question: what is keeping people of Springfield from throwing him away of town(or even killing)?
    • To be fair, most of the really outrageous stuff only occurred in the later seasons, when they turned Homer into a Jerkass. Before that, his blunders were mostly personal or low-key, and not to the level of sheer lunacy he climbs to in later seasons.
      • They did try to kill him in The Movie. Also, did you watch the episode with Frank Grimes?
      • Yep, I know. But it's still too few times for my common sense to bear. Actually, every time I watch the series lately I think to myself "Yep, I know exactly how Frank Grimes felt now..."
    • There was the 500th episode where they kicked the Simpsons out of town for property damage, but of course it didn't last long, and they can't have the same plot twice. As for killing, maybe they just don't have a death penalty?
      • Yes, they do. It's come up several times over the course of the show.
      • So is that the only thing stopping them from killing Homer?
      • Springfield does have a death penalty.
    • If you're referring to "Homer Defined", Homer didn't cause the meltdown(s). He just averted it by randomly pressing buttons until something happened.

  • Did the offensive baseball cap actually say Show Me Your Tits?
    • The commentary says that the baseball cap says Show Me Your Tattoo, but you can take that as you wish...

  • In the episode "Yokel Chords", if Bart was able to get spaghetti to fake a Dark Stanley murder, why couldn't he just eat the spaghetti instead of making up the story about Dark Stanley?
    • Maybe he wasn't in the mood for spaghetti.
    • They explained this, Bart himself came to the realization he made up Dark Stanley because he crazes the attention (more then spaghetti).

  • Something really bugs me about the episode Moms I'd Like To Forget: Negative Continuity aside, how come we've never seen those scars on Bart and those other kids before? It doesn't seem canon, like The Principal and the Pauper mentioned below. Even in other parts of the same episode(especially earlier on), it's not there.
    • That kind of stuff is hard to animate, so they only show that kind of stuff if it's needed. Krusty has a number of things on this chest (a third nipple, a scar), but has been see shirtless without those.

  • In the episode "Itchy and Scratchy the Movie", couldn't Bart just get the Itchy and Scratchy Movie DVD instead of waiting forty years to see a replay in the theater? On another hand, why would Homer go as far as to ban Bart from seeing the movie ever? I think that was the first sign of Homer being a jerkass.
    • Not if you take the ending as canon. Homer preventing Bart from seeing the movie made him straighten out and become Chief Justice of the Supreme Court instead of a sleazy male stripper. Or maybe Bart became both, like the late Earl Warren.
    • DVDs weren't around when that episode was written.
      • VHS then, same concept, really.
      • Because they had a Beta, and Snake stole it.
      • He probably did see it on DVD/VHS when he moved out, but pretended not to for Homer's sake.
      • He probably just wanted to finally see it on the big screen. It's unlikely Homer was willing or able to prevent him from never ever ever seeing it, but sometimes for some people a film on DVD just isn't the same as at the cinema, especially one hyped up so much like this one — there's old movies I've seen that I'd drop everything to see at the cinema if I happened across a screening. He wasn't exactly hunting out the movie; they just happened to come across it, got to reminiscing and decided 'what the hell'? As for Homer's line, he could simply have been joking.
      • Homer still allowed Bart to watch TV. What if he saw it on TV when Homer wasn't there?
      • Debunked! Tonight's new episode ends with The Simpsons seeing the re-released 3D version of "Itchy and Scratchy: the Movie" at a Drive-In and Bart was there and wearing 3D glasses too!

  • In the movie, whatever became of the pig?
    • I assumed it was killed and eaten by the mob.
    • In a deleted scene, it shows the pig, Santa's Little Helper and the mutated chipmunk helping rebuild the Simpsons' home, and the pig shows up in one of the couch gags at the beginning of the next TV season. So it's probably still alive.
      • It does appear in the next Halloween episode, so it's probably alive somehow. Not that it counts as solid evidence, but still...
      • In one of the comics, Krusty tries to find the pig as his commercials were popular. He gets disguised as Ploptimus Prime and escapes with the family. I forget where he ended up. I think Cletus's farm?

  • Why do the writers always give Homer such a low weight? According to one episode he is 239 lbs. That might sound a lot, but for a heavily built man over six feet tall and given how much he eats it isn't actually particularly much.
  • This annoys me too. He says he has to reach 300 pounds to get put on disability. I weigh close to 400, and I don't have to wear a muumuu.
    • When he says he had a glandular condition, he's not in denial. He is only slightly overweight, but his glandular problem swells him out and makes him look fat.
      • What about the episode "King-Sized Homer" where Homer purposely gains weight so he can work from home? That wasn't a glandular problem.
      • Because he deliberately gained 61 pounds of pure fat in days?
      • The glandular problem described doesn't make any sense. If you have a glandular problem, it causes you to gain weight, not weigh the same and look plump. If something is swollen, what is it swollen with?
      • There are plenty of developmental disorders, congenital conditions, and drugs (primarily steroids or other therapy to treat autoimmune disorders) that result in low muscle tone and high relative body fat. Not to mention edema, which is essentially fluid buildup (an extreme version of this is actually the cause of elephantiasis). I've always imagined him to have a cartoon-surrealist version of lost muscle tone and edema brought on by extreme inactivity.

  • Major Fridge Logic in the episode "24 Minutes" (the 24 parody episode): how could Jimbo stay unmasked with the stink bomb opened, if one single drop made the hamster suffer that way?
    • Jimbo has no doubt set off a lot of stink bombs in his time (why else are they making a much more potent one?), he's probably built up an immunity to it.

  • In Girly Edition, how come Kidz Newz got replaced with the Mattel and Mars Bar Quick Energy Chocobot Hour even though that was barely legal as it is? Was the Kidz Newz even less legal because of child labor laws? And why was the Mattel and Mars Bar Quick Energy Chocobot Hour barely legal in the first place?
    • Probably copyright issues.
      • No, it looked like an advertisement for Mattel in what we saw. It may be more along the lines of excessive chocolate plugging. Or a recurring villain themed on dental hygiene.

  • In ''Homer the Whopper, why wouldn't they look at the Polaroids that compare Homer thin and fat in the Everyman costume and not have his weight constantly changing in the shots?

  • Not something that bugs me, but is rather strange. In the beginning of the episode "The Last Temptation of Krust", Marge takes the kids shoe-shopping. Since when did Marge acknowledge the necessity of buying new shoes? In other episodes, she seems to think you only need one pair of shoes and you're set for life.
    • When did Marge ever say that having just one pair of shoes for life was good enough? I don't remember anything like that.
      • In one episode, she did react to someone having three pairs of shoes as "unnecessarily extravagant". But keep in mind that those shoes belonged to a fully grown woman; I'm sure she wouldn't object to buying her growing children a new pair of shoes occasionally. Also, keep in mind that she buys the shoes ridiculously over sized, so she probably only buys one pair every few years.
      • Owning three pairs of shoes at the same time is extravagant; buying new shoes when your existing shoes wear out is normal.

  • In Bart's Comet, the airport may have been on the other side of the only bridge out of town (which of course begs the question of how would they drive to outside places on the other side of town. Yeah, yeah, flexible geography but that still bugs me) but clearly there is at least one working helicopter that Arnie Pye was flying, so wouldn't that be a way to airlift some people out of town? They could have just as easily had him saying something like "And as I own the only helicopter in town, I'm outta here!"
  • What was really in that mystery can, according to Word of God?

  • Everyone is forgetting one thing that bugs this troper: how are The Simpsons able to go up to the celebrity guest stars without being pushed away by bodyguards and such, and what are all these celebrities doing in Springfield?
    • Wouldn't you want to visit a town that seems to have everything? As well as that, when a celebrity visits Springfield and consequently, the Simpson family, they have a chance to meet the most interesting characters on telly. Imagine the stories the family could tell!
    • It's especially odd considering the fact that in the episode "When You Dish Upon a Star" from the tenth season, Homer was court order to never be allowed within 500 miles of a celebrity.
    • Not to mention it is small town hell, maybe they may heard of them but the insane fans are almost non existent. Annoyances maybe but when you are famous it is nice to be pushy for once and not worry about the Hollywood biz on your ass.

  • In "The Springfield Files" how how HOW does Homer know the "alien" appears every Friday night after only seeing it once? I've tried wrapping my head around it every which way, but I just don't see how he could have possibly known that.
    • Homer's an idiot who based his hypothesis on insufficient data. He just happened to be right.
      • Not to mention that he said he saw the "alien" on Friday night, but he actually saw it at 1:00 AM, so technically it was Saturday morning.
      • And remember, there's a time frame, so they probably couldn't show Homer and Bart seeing the alien again. But you're probably right. Rule of Funny, yes?
    • He was basing his theory on the alien's resemblance to Urkel. Which means there is no way he could have been wrong.
    • That's great!
    Homer: The alien has a sweet, heavenly voice... like Urkel! And [ergo] he appears every Friday night... like Urkel!

  • So did the rapture actually occur or was Homer dreaming? It's possible that Moe may have sold his sushi place and gotten his bar back, and Marge, Bart, Lisa and Maggie could have been looking for him the whole time he was up there. Also, when did Bart and Lisa no longer have to wear those hairpieces that Marge made for them? Remember, we didn't see what happened to them at the same time when Homer was going up to the Mesa, or otherwise at 3:14-3:16 AM on Thursday, May 19th, 2005. Also, before we see Homer ascending into heaven, it's nighttime, and when we see God undo the apocalypse, it's sunrise.

  • There was an episode where Homer headed up a bowling team, and Mr. Burns became a member because he sponsored it and could use his position to do so. With the exception of Mr. Burns, both teams seem to roll nothing but strikes. So, there comes a point where Homer's team is two points behind and Mr. Burns is the one that has to score the points. How does that work when it was shown that each of the Holy Rollers were as good as the good members of Homer's team?
    • Homer's team seemed to have improved greatly over the course of the season. They might actually have been better than the Rollers when you consider that they made it to the league championship despite the handicap of having Burns on the team.
    • Speaking from experience, two really good bowlers can lift a mediocre bowler quite a bit. WE tied for second place and I was scoring just over 100 points a game. This is not as far fetched as it seems.

  • The son of Frank Grimes. That bugs me on several levels. Firstly, that Frank Grimes has a son in the first place. Secondly, he looks just as old as Frank at the time of his death. What, did Frank sire him at the age of three? Thirdly, we discover that the long-suffering, inspiration-TV-snippet-inspiring Frank Grimes sired his son because he happens to like hookers. And finally, if Junior is an illegitimate child of a hooker and a good man too busy trying to improve his sad lot in life, how is it that he knows anything about his father's misfortune? I would have accepted the motivation of "Homer is a Jerk Ass and is deserving of killing" better than this "avenge my father" bullshit.
    • Frank seems like he was an absentee father to me. Junior probably has all sorts of dad issues, and Frank's death just brought it all to the surface and cause him to snap (insanity seems to run in the family.)
    • As surprisingly dark and edgy as "Homer's Enemy" was for The Simpsons, I got to admit it was kind of funny when Frank Grimes, Jr. said his father happened to like hookers. So, Mr. Perfect had a dark side.
      • It sounds more like a thoughtless Hand Wave. You can imagine some exchange between producer and writers: "Wait, but how does Grimes have a son? Wasn't he lonely in that episode he appeared?" "Um... he liked hookers?" "Well, that'll have to work..."
      • Possibly, he was born of a hooker and a man who might have looked like Frank Grimes, but wasn't. So therefore, his mother tried to pass it off as being born to Grimes because Grimes was a hard worker. Hey, Wild Mass Guessing, why not?
      • Grimes' life has been miserable. Being alone and not getting any respect, he visited a hooker to relieve stress.
    • Again, time may pass differently on the outside. Grimes, Senior and Junior may have spent most of their lives outside Springfield and only came in when the former found work and the latter had the opportunity to avenge his father.
    • I think what bugs me most is the fact that Junior would call himself by the last name Grimes, rather then his mother's last name.
      • Either Frank Jr. is ashamed of his mother for being a hooker (wouldn't you be?), he was raised in an orphanage and never knew his mother (in which case how did he learn about his father and Homer, yeah yeah, I know), or he took his father's name out of sentiment and/or so Homer would know damn well who he was avenging. Take your pick.
    • My two cents: Perhaps, to explain the age thing, Frank was really young, say, thirteen-fourteen? Bad schooling or growing up poorly, friends all had girlfriends who put out, he didn't, hired a hooker to compensate? Then, few years later, hooker came back and dumped the kid on him? Then, unable to hold him, a friend looked after the kid while Frank tried to keep in his son's life, but had to transfer to Springfield. Maybe the friend was a mechanic, and Grimey Jr became one while living with them.

  • Why hasn't Ned become a man of the cloth himself? He obviously knows the Bible cover to cover and does the best he can to live by it. He isn't even Catholic so being married and having children isn't a problem. What is stopping him?
    • A lot of gags hinge on his "Christian humility" being grotesquely hypertrophied; he really doesn't think much of himself. Why else would he treat Reverend Lovejoy as an authority on anything at all?
    • Maybe he just doesn't have the time? He's a single father running his own business, after all.
    • Ned isn't that much of a Bible expert. He forgets which animals the Four Horsemen ride and he seems to think God will flood the Earth again. Played for laughs, of course.

  • In the episode "Homer Badman" he had to take the babysitter home. Why? She showed up at the house without his help. She's a college student so she's definitely old enough to take care of herself. It doesn't seem likely that she walked to the house, since it looks like Homer's driving her through down town to get her back home, so it isn't an issue of letting someone walk home in the middle of the night. The only reason for it is to set the plot of the episode in motion. And usually that's just fine with me, but I woke up this morning with this gnawing on my brain and it's really, really bothering me. Let the most-likely-over-age-21 babysitter take her damn self home!
    • Perhaps it was meant to be a kind gesture for looking after the kids. Also, things can get rougher in some places when it gets dark.
    • It was a cheap way to get the plot going (i.e., the plot of Homer being branded a pervert when he takes the missing Venus candy off the baby-sitter's butt and the baby-sitter mistakes it for sexual harassment). The Simpsons does this a lot.
    • Possibly she had a ride to the place (say her friend) but no ride back. Or maybe she took the bus which only ran till a certain hour. Or perhaps she took a taxi and Homer was just being nice for taking care of the kids. Or maybe...

  • I know this might not sound like much of a Headscratchers entry, because I also know Homer isn't exactly the brightest bulb in the hardware store, but one of his running gags does just bug me. Why does Homer keep saying God doesn't exist when he's actually met Him? Sure it was by way of dreams, but still.
    • Negative Continuity.
    • The fact that he only met god in dreams seems like a pretty good reason to me.

  • In the episode "When Flanders Failed", Mr. Burns is attempting to open a can but cannot because he is left-handed. All this while Smithers, who is right-handed, was just standing around doing nothing. Why didn't he just ask Smithers, considering Mr. Burns doesn't usually have any problem admitting to having trouble doing basic tasks that he could be expected to do, let alone one that would require some seriously counter-intuitive torquing?
    • Burns eventually does give in and ask Smithers to open the can: it's possible that it was a point of pride for him.
    • And this was well before "Homer the Smithers".

  • What's with Gil's poverty, Barney's alcoholism and Moleman's many deaths?

  • What happened to Colin after The Movie and the 19th season premiere's opening?

  • In The Movie, how can Arnold Schwarzenegger be president? You have to be American-born to be president and Schwarzanegger was born in Austria.
    • Simpsons universe had a constitutional amendment which eliminated that requirement? That's how they got him to be president in Demolition Man.
    • For that matter, why not make Rainer Wolfcastle president? It's the essentially the exact same character. And I think there are very few people who wouldn't get the joke (same goes for the EPA guy sounding exactly like, but not being, Hank Scorpio).
      • Scorpio was going to be the villain, but was dropped for some reason. Must have been pretty far in if they brought Al Brooks back in to the voice. Also, Schwarzenegger was actually going to modeled after the Real Life version, but, again it was cut. Seizing control of the East Coast is probably a better ending for Scorpio than becoming head of the EPA, anyway.
      • Hank Scorpio is one of the most fan-beloved character of all in The Simpsons (Despite being in only a single episode), mostly due to his combination of ruthless supervillain and Benevolent Boss. To make him the straight-up villain, actively working against the Simpsons and the rest of Springfield, would have been a massive kick in the teeth to all the long-time fans.

  • Hmm, how and why would Mr. Burns, a self-proclaimed all-American man, have Red Chinese masters?
    • I'm guessing it's a reference to The Manchurian Candidate, so maybe Mr. Burns underwent the same kind of brainwashing procedure as the soldiers in that movie? Even if there's no brainwashing explanation, this is still the same man who expressed no guilt about stealing a trillion dollars from the U.S. government, nor for his actions that resulted in the trillion dollars going into Fidel Castro's hands (just as he was about to give up on maintaining the communist regime because it was bankrupt.) If the Chinese paid Mr. Burns off, it fits with his character that he would do their bidding.
    • You do know that Burns also made shells for the Nazis, like Oskar Schindler, don't you? Except that his worked, dammit!
      • I still like him more than George Steinbrenner.

  • Seriously, what's the deal with Smithers? I'm not talking about his being gay—that's perfectly normal. What I'm scratching my head over is the fact that he's attracted to a 100+-year old trilobite, as Snake once aptly described Mr. Burns. Is he one of those people who's just attracted to much older partners?
    • I don't think he is ever being shown as finding other old men attractive, so that's probably not it. More like, working with Mr. Burns and having to do everything for him gave him a lot of time to get to know him and spend with him, and seeing his power and personality and himself liking to be subservient... something clicked.
    • "As you can see, the real deal with Waylon Smithers is that he's Mr. Burns' assistant. He's in his early forties, is unmarried, and currently resides in Springfield. Thanks for asking!"
    • He might be attracted to Burns' power as well as the man himself. Then add on the fact that Burns is personally and professionally dependent on him...
    • Meh. As far as this troper is concerned, that's Smithers' business and his alone.
      • Just remember that Burns is Smithers' substitute father (after indirectly causing the death of his real father). He loves his "daddy", a little too much.
      • No evidence of him being a substitute father. Burns probably sent him to live with a foster family until he was old enough for boarding school. He was probably a mentor figure for the young Waylon.
    • Love doesn't have to be rational.
      • That was actually kind of sweet.
    • Word of God says that while Smithers is gay, he's really attracted to Mr. Burns, "if Burns was a woman, Smithers would be straight, he's a "Burnsexual"
      • Doesn't explain his dates with John and other gay men.
    • Seems that Burns just melts Smithers in the right way, but Smithers is aware that Burns is (presumably) uninterested. He'll always love Burns, but Smithers has still got his own life, and he's living it.

  • What is wrong with Marge's sundaes?
    • Cyanide. Or maybe it's the fact that she actually wants them to eat it. Would spinach have been so bad if your mom didn't dog you to eat it so much?
    • Or maybe it has blue hair in it, like the soup from the Mary Poppins parody or the casserole on the episode where Marge goes to jail for shoplifting.
    • On the subject of food, in the episode "Grade School Confidential", what was wrong with the oysters that it gave Martin's party guests terrible stomach-aches?
      • Seafood in general goes bad very easily if it's not properly refrigerated. The weather might have been too warm, and considering the Crapsack World this series is set in, the people handling the oysters probably didn't do a good job storing and transporting them.
      • That would explain why Martin's father was annoyed: "I told you we should have served cake instead of oysters!"

  • In "To Surveil With Love", the British guy they hired brought together seven people to monitor Springfield to keep crime down. Seconds later, when we see the surveillance room next, only Marge and Ned Flanders are left. What happened to the other people who were supposed to monitor things?
    • And how was it that nobody ever thought of knocking out the cameras until the end? The clearly didn't like the cameras being there.
    • The others got bored with it and quit. They were volunteers; the city didn't have the budget to pay full-time officers to man the station. And the citizens were either too afraid to knock out the cameras or didn't want to. Remember the cameras were approved by nearly everybody at the town meeting.

  • In the episode "Springfield Up", Homer fakes being rich by borrowing Mr. Burns' summer home, and explains that he did it by inventing a condiment pen. How on earth did he not get rich with that pen? It was a genius idea!
    • He was too dumb to actually try patenting it, and by the time someone pointed out what a good idea it was someone else had already stolen it? Or maybe he didn't actually invent one, and was somehow faking it when he demonstrated? I thought the same thing.
    • What bugs me is that no-one has made it in Real Life.
    • Challenge accepted.

  • In the episode "Flaming Moe's", when Moe steals his idea, why doesn't Homer just sell the recipe to someone else? (OK, Homer's not too bright, but he tells his family, so any of them could have had the idea).
    • I think that's the theme of the episode. Homer is so enraged at being betrayed that he'd rather destroy Moe than profit himself.
    • Also, Bart gives a show and tell in which he intends to make Flaming Moes for the class, so clearly he didn't recognize the value of the recipe. Furthermore, Mrs. Krabappel confiscated the ingredients Bart brought, so she should known the recipe too.
      • She only confiscated it because it was alcohol. She told Bart he could "have what's left at the end of the day". Even though he did bring enough for everyone.

  • Everyone's talking about the couch gag for the most recent episode ("MoneyBART"), but what's with Lisa eating pepperoni pizza with the Little League team to celebrate their recent win?
    • It was an animation error. After the initial shot, Lisa's pizza appears to be topped with mushrooms and green peppers like what would make sense.
    • Speaking of MoneyBART, during the couch gag in the sweatshop we see the laborers painting on cells. Why? The Simpsons has been painted digitally for years, making all their labor pointless.

  • In "Trilogy of Error", Bart's story eventually connects with Lisa's story (specifically, when he exits the sewer and is bumped on the head by Marge's car). This basically means Bart and Milhouse were running away from Fat Tony and his goons in the caves for HOURS until he crossed paths with Marge. Seems pretty unlikely, unless both parties agreed to take a breather before resuming the chase a few times. This plot hole was even addressed in the audio commentary on the season 12 set.
    • This plot made no sense! Tell the people!

  • "I'm a level five vegan. I won't eat anything that casts a shadow." So... he just drinks water and that's it?
    • Well, it could be water with vitamins, minerals, and other nutrients dissolved in it at low enough concentrations not to make the water opaque. I suppose it depends to some extent on how you interpret "casts a shadow."
    • Keep in mind he also says he was into Yoga "before it was cool". Either he's in his 40s or he enjoys making things up to sound impressive.

  • Is Waylon older or younger than Homer? In one episode we see Waylon Smithers as a baby and Homer is 12. But Troy McClure said that Waylon was in his forties. Mutation from the plant?
    • Older, I bet. His dad's body was partially decomposed.
      • That doesn't happen over a few days or weeks? He was hardly preserved, especially where Homer discovered him.
      • It doesn't help that some episodes show Smithers and Homer in High School together.
      • Your argument is moot. Waylon Smithers Sr. was killed prematurely. If it helps, Waylon Jr was an infant when Waylon Sr. died.

  • In the episode where Santa's Little Helper gets a mate and impregnates her, The Simpsons give away the puppies, but what happened to their mother? (Also, why did they let Mr. Burns make money off the Puppies racing? Homer says at the end he's depressed he gave them away, but they didn't, Burns stole them!)
    • They were giving the puppies away for free, actually. They just didn't want to give them to Burns, hence his dastardly scheme or stealing them out of the box while the Simpsons' backs were to him. In the end Lisa and Bart could see that Burns loved the puppies like any good owner, so they let him keep them. Homer was depressed because they turned out to be champion racers. As for the female greyhound, I'm guessing she eventually was given away as well.

  • It bugs me that Homer starts out not knowing a thing about music, but as the show progresses, Homer is seen to have musical talent in several forms: he was in a boys' choir, he could sing opera if he was flat on his back, he was in a barbershop quartet that won a Grammy, he could play a rake with a leaf and make it sound like a guitar, he went to some kind of rock and roll camp and he was in a grunge band for several years after high-school. Many of these examples mess up the continuity of the show. For example, if Homer was a grunge rocker, then why didn't anyone recognize him when he was doing the thing where he gets shot in the stomach with the cannon? If he can sing along with a quartet, why does he sound so bad when he sings by himself?
    • Why, it's almost as if the writers are making things up as they go along!
    • I'm gonna go with the guess that every season has a different continuity. It would make sense that Homer doesn't remember - what with the brain damage and all. And he could be insecure and feels the need to sing with others.
      • Not really. Several events are alluded to across-seasons, like Sideshow Bob's escapades, Homer being an astronaut, Maggie shooting Mr. Burns, Bart owning Stampy, Maude dying etc. etc. That said, the show mostly adheres to Negative Continuity.
  • Why is it that Marge tries to be a Moral Guardian (at least in the earlier seasons), but in one of the Halloween episodes, she has no objection to Bart dressing up as Alex deLarge?
    • It's a classic film. That makes it okay.
    • There's also the possibility that Marge just doesn't know who he is. Marge never struck me as the type of person who was very well-versed in movie trivia.
  • Here's a bit of Fridge Logic from the third season episode "Black Widower," when Sideshow Bob and Aunt Selma are married. During the episode, the Simpson family is seen watching a VHS recording of Bob and Selma's honeymoon ("And after we watch this, we can tape over it! Heh heh heh."). The events on the tape, which portray Sideshow Bob's need for a gas fireplace (plot point), ends with Selma asking that they make love. This cuts (almost immediately, if I'm not mistaken) to Bob running to the bathroom to clean up after having sex with Selma. This implies that little, if any, time was allowed for the VHS tape to travel from the hotel to the Simpson's home. Like most of the inconsistencies in the show, I presume this is another case of Rule of Funny.
    • It's possible they were having sex on another occasion. Bob would have to continue playing the role of loving husband, after all. But the way it was cut just makes it funnier.

  • in Homerpalooza, why doesn't Homer wear something to protect his stomach? sure it would've ruined the act he was doing but he wouldn't of ended up having donuts from HFIL
    • Because apparently, part of his act is to appear topless to prove that he isn't cheating and protecting his stomach. It is a freak show...

  • In Homer's Paternity Coot, a sign near the tire fire says it's now smelled in 46 states. What are the four states that it's not smelled in? I'm pretty sure it might include Alaska and Hawaii, but I'm not sure what the other two could be.
    • Maine and Florida? They're both on the longitudinal extremes of the Eastern Seabord, so a smell that can be smelled elsewhere might not be smelled there.

  • In "Flaming Moe", what happened to Mr. Largo? He found his soul-mate, got replaced and then... his replacement moved away but... he didn't come back. What becomes of the music class? Unless there was a scene showing him coming back and I just missed it...

  • Can we find a version of Diatribe of a Mad Housewife without the voiceover? Like, maybe on the Season 15 DVD?

  • At the end of "Old Money", Grandpa Simpson decides that the money he'd inherited from a short-term romantic partner should go towards improving the facilities at the retirement home. This is after having selflessly decided not to spend the money on himself, after Lisa convinced him that those who really deserved the money were the homeless/sick/needy, and after visiting a casino in an attempt to increase the total amount available (figuring that he could help more people that way). So why does he still spend the money on people already living in private accommodation and who are being looked after by full-time carers, when he'd previously decided there were people far more deserving of the money?
    • To be fair, the treatment the people in that home receive has been consistently shown to be terrible. It's a little selfish to spend it on his own home, yes, but those old people must have pretty miserable lives, living in the cheapest retirement home their families could find, and apparently hardly ever getting visits. Grampa seems better off than the rest of them.
    • You obviously didn't watch the episode. Grandpa's rest home suffered from a leaky roof, damaged furniture (the pool table didn't have any netting in the pockets, for example) and was generally falling apart. Like the previous poster noted, Grandpa and the other rest home tenants were living in squalor, something which is often Truth in Television, sadly enough. Fixing the retirement home allows the residents to live in comfort and dignity, something that Grandpa Lampshades in the last line of the episode when he invites the other residents into the Beatrice Simmons Memorial Dining Hall.
    • AND it's shown in later episodes that the staff are all either lazy (Destroying the "Zii" so the old folks would go back to being listless, and therefore easy to care for; A nurse swapping an IV drip and a full colostomy bag in order to speed up the end of his week...) or negligent ("Okay, let's start by doubling your medication!"). At least the BUILDING is nice for the old folks.

  • In the episode where Marge starts hanging out with some old friends, and Bart has to hang out with her friend's children, they pressure him into sliding down a hill on an ice cube or something. And Bart has DOUBTS about it, finding it "too dangerous", and doesn't want to hang out with the other boys much. Seriously, Bart is supposed to be a "bad boy". Hell, past episodes have shown him doing MUCH more dangerous things. What was the deal with that?
    • It could be a sign that Bart is starting to mature, or remember that Even Bart has Standards. Or he knew that sliding down the hill was obviously dangerous and didn't realize how dangerous some of the other things he has done were.
  • There's something I've never been able to figure out about the episode, "Black Widower", and this, why? Why did Sideshow Bob want to kill Selma? The episode indicate that it was premeditated, but what was the motive? I doubt it was revenge because Bart doesn't strike me as someone who would miss Selma too badly.
    • It's said earlier in the episode that Selma won a lot of money in a lawsuit. Sideshow Bob probably didn't plan her murder until sometime after they met and fell in love.
    • Possibly it was a long con. As soon as Sideshow Bob found out who Selma's family was, he was probably planning her death. As soon as he marries her he's technically part of the family. After her tragic death, he was probably counting on the Simpsons being kind and hospitable enough to allow him to stay with them while he "grieved". Voila, instant access to Bart.

In, "Holidays of Future Passed" why does Maggie still remain mute even when she's a rock star

Also, exactly how are Marge's twin sisters still alive?

  • Why are there two versions of Treehouse of Horror XVII? I noticed there's a normal credits version and a halloween credits version.

  • While I enjoyed the episode "Homer the Great", there was one part about the ending that was a little confusing. #1 laments that "As long as we are Stone Cutters, he will control our lives." Wait a minute, what are they worried about Homer controlling their lives for? He can barely run his own.
    • I think that's the point. Instead of being the power behind the scenes, they're going to spend all their time re-enacting the civil war with monkeys.
  • The episode where Homer decided not to go to church - Marge and the kids go to church, despite it being so cold that they end up being trapped inside the church due to the ice. Why couldn't Marge just skip one day of church? Why would she risk the lives of her and her children like that?
  • What race are the Simpsons? It seems that "Yellow" is the equivalent to "White" for Caucasian people in the Simpson's universe, for example Jessica Lovejoy refers to part as "Poor yellow trash" and prior to her birth Homer says it doesn't matter if Maggie is a boy or a girl as long as she has "Yellow skin and four fingers and toes" or something to that effect but the show has referenced "White" people on a few occasions, such as a black comedian on TV comparing white and black drivers and I think on a few other occasions as well.
    • Speaking of this, why did they add the notion that their art style is the actual anatomy of the people? Most cartoons make it seem like an art style, but they're supposed to look like we do in real life.
      • Probably by the time celebrity cameos and other people that were not the original cast started to be depicted in a more-or-less realistic manner. In fact, the Simpsons(the family) might be the only people in the show with that anomaly where your hair and your forehead are indistinguishable(yes, I know, a lampshade was hung).
  • In the episode "The Ned-Liest Catch" (season 22 episode 22) what exactly is so bad about Krabappel having to stay in a room all day with pay? I'd use that time to catch up on my books and TV shows. Or, if I was feeling more ambitious, it sounds like the perfect time to study and change into a career that's not so soul crushing.
    • Maybe I need to watch it again, but I think they didn't allow any such thing to be brought in. It's punishment, after all.
      • They were allowed. The rules were - shoes remain on, cellphones remain off, and no Wi-Fi.
    • Not everyone likes cooping themselves up inside with books and TV as their only partners?
      • True, but in the episode, people were resorting to staring at cracks in the wall. I think anything else would be better than that.
  • It just hit me: how can Homer and Bart start playing con tricks on Kent Brockman, Dr. Hibbert and the salesman when pretty much everyone know them? It really hit me with that trick where Bart pretends to be blind. And to have a deaf sister. And apparently be Homer's brother. Yes, what.
    • They're just idiots. Next!
      • You know what the real headscratcher here is? Did they actually plan for Willie to be arrested and not tell him about it?
  • From "The Ned-Liest Catch" that kind of bugged me: How can a straight-laced, ultra-vanilla conservative Christian like Ned know who Aerosmith drummer Joey Kramer is, especially to the point that he recognizes him by sight alone? Just doesn't make sense.
    • Ned has Guilty Pleasures like the rest of us, he was once shown liking sitcoms, and he is a fanboy of the Beatles. Rock music is probably another one of his hobbies he does not like admitting.
    • Lots of Conservative Christians enjoy rock music.
    • Or he just learnt about Aerosmith on a Christian Parent's Guide To Sinful Music website.
  • In "It's a Mad, Mad, Mad, Mad Marge": If Becky hates heavy metal, what was she doing at a concert during Otto's flashback?
    • It may have been a music festival with metal and other types of music.
      • Correct. The episode says that they met specifically at Woodstock '99, which was most definitely not just Metal acts.
  • In the episode where Maggie is believed to have an IQ higher than Lisa, why is it someone as smart as Lisa is unaware that age is a factor in calculating someone's IQ?
    • Because she's 8?
  • I've had one that's been weighing on my mind since I was 12: Why is it that Bart (and, to a lesser extent, Lisa) still helps Krusty out of every single problem that he has (one or two choice exceptions aside)? Krusty can't even remember Bart's name, let alone all he does for him, which is actually referred to in one episode where after Krusty asks his name, Bart tells him how he saved him from jail, reunited him with his estranged father AND saved his career, none of which Krusty can remember. True, Krusty is a jaded drug addict and cares little for anyone, but you'd think he'd remember such monumental occasions, and you'd also think that Bart would begin to see his "Hero" as not all he's cracked up to be (As I recall, he shrugs off the occasion that Krusty smoked crack in front of him). This may seem nitpicky, but am I really the only one who's been wondering?
    • Bart knows how bad Krusty is, but chooses just to idolize the character he plays on Krusty the Klown Show anyway. In what episode its shown that Homer is such a bad father that Bart looks for father figures everywhere, including Krusty. As for the second problem, the drugs might be affecting Krusty's brain, and Krusty spends most of his time drunk and not able to remember anything anyway.
    • In Like Father, Like Clown, Bart does lose faith in Krusty after refusing to come to dinner.
    • Bart helps Krusty for the same reason Hank Hill still helps Buck Strickland. In Bart's mind everything Krusty does is at worst a minor inconvenience, as Krusty at his worst is still in Bartís eyes exponentially better than Homer who repeatedly ignores him, physically abuses him, and constantly tells him heís an unloved accident.
  • Are the characters ever going to age, even a little?
    • In Season 1, Marge had a birthday. Homer's had a few birthdays. Bart and Lisa both had birthdays in season 3, plus others later. Yes, I know this barely helps.
  • Ok this is bugging me for a long time and I have no idea how it even works. Ok in "Homer Scissorhands", Taffy breaks up with Milhouse because she thinks that Milhouse is still in love with Lisa just because Lisa stalked them? WTF!!! I mean there isnít a single scene, nor even a single line of dialogue, where Milhouse shows himself to still be in love with Lisa, he never mentions her in front of Taffy and he doesnít even let out a swooning sigh when Lisa intrudes on them at the end. Just what is wrong with Taffy? I mean if I introduce someone I was once with to my fiancee' then this wouldn't happen. I'm guessing Taffy really is so thinly conceived and her story so flat that sheís only in three scenes... and they couldn't even spell her voice actress' name right. But seriously she breaks up with Milhouse just because Lisa stalked them...EXPLAIN EPISODE, EXPLAIN!
    • Two Things: Seasonal Rot and Fanon Discontinuity. Remember them.
      • I actually don't know that those mean. Explain please.
      • Have you tried clicking the links?
    • Alternately, Status Quo Is God.
      • I still say that is the worst excuse for a break-up ever. Also they never reveal why Taffy liked Milhouse in the first place.
    • Would you want to date a guy whose kinda-ex creepily stalked you through the woods? I'd blame him and say he was still in love with her just so I didn't end up buried in somebody's basement.
      • I like to think she had a crush on Lisa, saw that her plan to get Lisa jealous was upsetting her, and she just wanted her to be happy.
  • In that one flash-forward episode, why did Bart's girlfriend dump him just because he was leaving to save his sister?
    • Bart's girlfriend wanted somebody who could do something with his life and well Bart just can't do that. The reason why he saved his sister, was because she had a brighter future than he did.
  • What kind of terrible car company only has 82 thousand dollars between it and bankruptcy? Granted the "Homer" was a massive flop, but that one prototype cost Herb his entire company?
    • I'm not sure that it was the cost of the car that ruined Herb's company, it was the fact it was so god awful. He was effectively saying that he's ruined because said car was going to absolutely wreck his reputation on top of costing a huge amount of money to make.
    • Further, when Herb reappears one senses we are meant to take at face value the fact that Homer ruined him. But in a very real way, Homer was a bystander to those events. There was no malice in Homer's actions, just ineptitude, but the true ineptitude was Herb's, since he entrusted the fate of his company to a virtual stranger and even ignored all advice to the contrary. I find I watch the later episode with more sympathy for Homer than Herb, who is being vindictive while ignoring the fact that the real blame is his.
    • You're misunderstanding the episode. Herb's company didn't only have $82,000 left, but each "Homer" car would be priced at $82,000. That's an absurd amount of money to be paying for any car, even a high-class one. The price, combined with the fact that the car was so ridiculous that no one would ever buy it, meant that Herb's reputation was ruined. There are also signs that Powell Motors was in trouble long before Homer came along. In a few conversations with his executives, Herb mentions that Powell Motors is losing ground to the Japanese and "getting killed on the foreign market." Chances are that this was Herb's make-or-break effort to save his company.
  • In HOMR, it's explained by the researchers that Homer sticking crayons into his nose must have been the cause for his stupidity. Seems reasonable at first, but he would have to be stupid enough to shove sixteen crayons into his nose in the first place. Especially at age six.
    • Maybe he was experimenting something and it backfired.
  • In "Bart The Fink", Krusty apparently dies in a plane crash. At the funeral, Troy McClure announces more funeral services later, adding "You must be over 18 for the ten o'clock. It gets a little blue." What does this mean?
    • "Blue" can mean "obscene".
  • Lisa is an atheist, right? But wasn't there an episode where Mr. Burns bought out the town's (only?) church? And then Lisa goes on a crusade to end Burns' control of the church, right? But if she's an atheist, why should she care?
    • She's a Buddhist IIRC.
    • That was actually the episode where she became a Buddhist. Before that her religious beliefs were basically whatever suited the episode best.

  • Why exactly is 90% of Springfield's citizens idiots and there is a handful of smart ones like Lisa and the members of the Springfield Mensa. Oddly enough the African American citizens are shown to be more smarter and competent with their work like Carl, Officer Lou, and Doctor Hibbert, and they don't pull similar mistakes the other citizens would pull.

  • How come Marge objects to Lisa having wine yet is okay with Bart?
    • Because Lisa has a hope in hell of being successful.
  • What's with the increasing inconsistencies in the show? Throughout the series, Homer's dead dream to be a rock star was mentioned from time to time. He was never able to fulfill the dream because of family, and there was even an entire episode dedicated to this. Yet in a newer episode, Homer was shown as inventing the Grunge genre and being a successful rock star for a period of time. What?
  • In "Homer the Heretic", the fire which burns the Simpson's house takes place during church, so how could Ned (who attends the same church as the Simpsons) see the house on fire?
    • For that matter, when is church in Springfield? Other episodes have it taking place on Sunday morning, but in "Lisa the Greek", church is seen happening the same time as the Superbowl. The Superbowl doesn't usually start until early evening, and even pregame coverage isn't until the afternoon.
      • Some churches hold evening services.
  • Homer's unbelievable stupidity aside, in the Treehouse of Horror VI vignette Homer≥, why did he try to jump across the massive & ever-expanding wormhole in the 3D plane, when he could have at least attempted to run around it and reach Bart safely?
    • Because Bart told him to?
    • Not counting his idiocy, Homer's brain functions in a very bizarre manner. My position is that Homer realized it was a shorter distance to go straight across the hole. It would be longer to go around. On a more logical level, Homer may have thought the hole would have sucked down the sides by the time he ran around. Maybe it was just a gamble on Homer's part.
  • In "Girly Edition", it's established that the junkyard is a long distance from the studio, long enough that Lisa wonders if Bart will be able to make it in time on his bike. So how did Lisa get to the junkyard so quickly on her bike?
    • Because she rode it very fast?
      • We're talking a distance so far that Bart would rather take the chopper instead. Is it really likely that Lisa was able to make it to the junkyard on a bike before the Bart's People segment concluded? I doubt it.
      • Or maybe the junkyard isn't that far and Lisa was just goading Bart because she knows who Bart will encounter when he gets there. Claiming to have a chopper could have been Bart goading her right back. Did we ever actually see it?
  • Why is it that in-universe, there's the movie company "Mixar", but Lisa says she's all their movies... Except Cars?!
  • In the Halloween segment "Time & Punishment", Homer says "I'm the first non-Brazilian person to travel backwards through time!" What's that a reference to? Admittedly, when I was a kid, I thought he said "brilliant."
  • In "Marge's Son Poisoning", Marge is sad that nobody wants to ride her tandem bike with her, yet she only asked Homer, Bart, and Maggie. Why was Lisa left out?
    • Knowing Lisa, some silly ultra-liberal reason.
    • She secretly hates Lisa for being a vegetarian. Remember her mentioning that she slips a little meat into Lisa's food?
    • Uh, I think Lisa could simply be busy at that moment and we just don't see what she was doing when Marge asked her. Man, you overcomplicate something that could be easily responded.
  • So Nedna's official. But I'm confused on the status: are they married, engaged, or simply dating?
    • Dating.
      • No, they're married now.
  • The Treehouse of Horror episode "Don't Have a Cow Mankind" makes no sense to me. How many supplies did the Simpsons have to last almost a month trapped in the house? Why did the writers make a real illness like Mad-Cow Disease the cause of the zombie apocalypse? Why wasn't the burger at Krusty Burger spoiled from sitting there for a month? Why didn't the military just take a sample of Bart's blood to make a vaccine? Why was Bart immune in the first place? Why was Shelbyville a safe zone? Why was it that Marge didn't know about communion? Was that a shot at Christians? Did Seth McFarlane make that joke? How does Bart bathing in soup make a cure? How was the cure administered to the munchers? Why the heck wasn't Homer cured? It just raises too many questions.
    • Okay, let's try to answer these in order:
      • The simpsons have been seen to have a bomb shelter, as in the Tracy Ullman shorts, plus marge has been seen to stock up on literally hundreds of cans of soup from their version of costco; not to mention that as long as they can force homer not to eat it, their fridge probably has weeks and weeks worth of a normal person's caloric intake contained within.
      • The same way that 'mutated rabies' was the cause of 28 Days Later. It's specifically mentioned that the mad cows are ground up and fed to OTHER mad cows, and then again a THIRD time. So possibly the virus may have mutated as a result of that.
      • It's a KRUSTY burger.
      • Because the anti-muncher enzyme probably requires Bart to be continuously made.
      • Because he eats so much Krustyburger that he's immune?
      • Because all the remaining nuclear radiation from the NUKE going off there in 24 Minutes stopped the virus from manifesting?
      • Communion is a Catholic tradition, and Marge has been shown not only to not understand Catholics, but openly despise them. My guess is that the Western Branch of American Reform Presbylutheranism doesn't practice it.
      • Skin and hair flakes, possibly they contained the materials needed to stop people catching the disease.
      • Probably because immunisation doesn't mean it's a cure.
    • The Halloween episode doesn't make sense? Surely not.
  • Did they make "The Food Wife" just to say "WE KNOW WHAT VIDEO GAMES AND FOOD BLOGS/FOODIES ARE!"?
  • The Simpsons occasionally decides to slightly misname celebrities (as "Woodsy Allen," for example) and licensed characters, but does this so rarely that it's jarring. In one episode, Marvel characters are renamed "The Thung"(The Thing) and "The Mulk"(The Hulk)... why? I'm guessing Stan Lee, who has guest starred on the show, will not sue!
    • Especially when weighed against the startlingly accurate portrayal of D.C. copyright characters like Plastic Man and Marvel ones like Iron Man in "Homer the Whooper."
  • The show frequently mentions the real franchise Star Wars. Yet in "Co-Dependent's Day", Star Wars apparently doesn't exist and is replaced with an expy franchise called Cosmic Wars. I know it's done for the purposes of parody, but it's still very strange.
  • Of Apu and Manjula's octuplets, how many are male and how many are female? The show is never clear on this.
  • Krusty. On some episodes he's practically unknown local low budget kid's show host, in other episodes he's a media empire on par with Disney.
  • Why does Lisa constantly say that she has no friends despite her friendships with Janey, Ralph, and Alison? it doesn't make sense! Or she just forgets she has friends.
    • Janey has recently suffered Chuck Cunningham Syndrome, possibly due to being a Flat Character.
    • Lisa seems to have a lot of emotional problems (which might make up for her Mary Sue air). Perhaps she just can't manage to commit to friends. Or perhaps she's really very shy and only acts pedantic to hide her shyness.
  • It may be just me, as I haven't seen every episode, but have Bart and Maggie ever had any sort of character interaction at all?
    • Well, he gave her that teddy bear...
    • In "Homer Defined", Milhouse's mother forbids him from playing with Bart, so Bart tries playing with Maggie instead.
  • I don't get how Moe can be completely poor when he runs his own business. He has a pretty damn successful bar with many regular customers, and yet he resorts to using a rope for a belt in one episode?
    • He only has about half-a-dozen regulars - Homer, Lenny, Carl, Barney, Sam and Larry and there doesn't seem to be much drop in trade, judging by the reaction when someone new comes in. And he probably owes a lot of money to the bank for those times he has re-vamped the bar into an English pub, a theme restaurant and a hangout for hipsters.
  • Now we know why Lindsay Naegle has different jobs (She's a sexual predator) and with Gil it's obvious, but is there a excuse why Squeaky Voiced Teen, Sarcastic Middle Aged man, and "That jerk who always says "M'yeeeesssss"?" have different jobs every time we see them? This is never explained yet Lindsay and Gil are the only ones with reasons behind their different jobs.
    • The man who says "yeeeesss" is identical to a character who appeared many times on The Jack Benny Program, where he was played by Frank Nelson. So if you want to know why he's had so many jobs, ask Jack Benny.
    • Perhaps they're Identical Strangers?
      • I don't think a teenager can hold one job for long thus explaining Squeaky Voice Teen's changing of jobs. As for the other guys, I don't know.
  • In the episode "You Only Move Twice", wouldn't Bart and Lisa have met with their new principal and discussed their strengths and weaknesses before heading to class? Or do the teachers at that school use the "sink or swim" approach? The remedial class notwithstanding.
  • Pranks and Green: This episode has one annoying problem. Why did Andy prank Skinner so badly in the origin for Skinner's strictness? I could understand if it was a small friendly prank, or if Skinner was an a-hole, but he trapped him in a pool full of worms for three days, and turned the cool principal the kids actually liked into a super strict militant principal.
    • Andy's shown to be a huge dick.
    • Yeah, but still, that was a massive Kick the Dog moment. Principal Skinner was shown to be an awesome and fun loving guy who actually made school fun for the kids, and he decided to lock him without food or water in a pool full of worms for DAYS. Just replacing the water with worms was enough, he didn't have to then close up the pool to keep him trapped.
    • It was so distant from the original, fun tone of the Simpsons' Golden Age and Dude, Not Funny!
  • In "The Boy Who Knew Too Much", why does Skinner need Bart to admit he was at the Quimby party as proof that he was skipping school, when he *saw* him skipping school, *and* they have his forged letter giving an excuse?
    • He may have not realized he could prove it with those things.
  • In Homer Goes To College, why wasn't Krusty allowed to show ''Burning Down The Mouse'' (the one where Scratchy wins for a change) again in a million years?
    • It might have just been an exaggeration on Krusty's part.
    • It might have been too unbelievably violent and gory even for an Itchy & Scratchy cartoon. It's not uncommon; a lot of Looney Tunes cartoons are permanently banned from television for various reasons, too.
      • It's pretty much just the Censored Eleven, and almost entirely for racism.
  • In "The Computer Wore Menace Shoes", when Comic Book Guy clicks onto Homer's website (which is meant to be confidential as to who is running it), you can clearly see Homer's face in the frame for a second, until the bag goes around his head. Why didn't someone see Homer's face and figure out that he was running the website? It bugs me.
    • Most Springfieldians are idiots and that bugs me as well. I mean if Springfieldians were smart then they would know "El Barto" is Bart but with a "El" and a "O" added to it.
      • Yeah, but in an earlier episode, Comic Book Guy was shown in Springfield's Mensa group. You'd think he would notice.
    • This requires about as much explanation as the fact that Apu's mother is never suspicious of Marge's claim to be married to Apu on the grounds that the children don't look remotely Indian, or the fact that the patrons of Lollapalooza characterize Homer as a "fat Jamaican guy" solely because he's wearing a Rastafarian hat. In other words: part of the joke.
      • So you mean that the sheer stupidity of Springfield is played for laughs, it just horrifies this troper if there really was a entire city full of morons and the stupid have power while the smart are outcasts... then again can the "smart" characters be funny too?
      • I'm not sure if depicting a character (or everyone) as comically oblivious is the same thing as depicting them as stupid.
      • Maybe Comic Book Guy doesn't know who Homer is?
    • Why has everyone failed to mention just how exactly did Homer's actual face show up on the website? We're expected to believe that he put a picture of himself on the website, then went to all the trouble of finding a picture of a paper bag and layering that over the picture of his face? Why didn't he just use a picture of himself wearing the paper bag mask that he clearly owns? And why, oh why, oh why, doesn't Comic Book Guy have a faster internet connection? In the episode where Homer sets up his Hypo-global-mega-net company, he's shown to have a very advanced knowledge of computers, and I'm fairly sure he plays MMORPGs, which would require a decent internet connection...
      • I know I'm the original poster, but I'm fairly sure that this was part of the joke. Homer is so stupid that he would do that. And about the internet connection, in the Compu-Global Hyper-Meganet (I looked it up) episode, it took him about a minute to download a pornographic image. The Computer Wore Menace Shoes was made 2 years after this episode. I know The Simpsons uses Negative Continuity, but he could have got a bit faster. Also, as a website programmer, I'm sure that you can't layer pictures on top of one another.
      • Maybe it was a .gif?
  • In Bart the Genius, Bart wrote his name on Martin's intelligence test papers, which allowed him to attend a gifted school. At the end of the episode, he admitted to cheating on the test. So shouldn't Martin be attending the gifted school instead of continuing to attend Springfield Elementary?
    • Maybe because he personally doesn't want to?
    • Bart admitted to Homer that he cheated on the test; we don't know if the school board was ever informed. It's possible Bart just dropped out of the gifted school without publically coming clean about having cheated.
      • He told the psychologist.
    • Maybe he never said how he cheated, and the school didn't pursue it? If they didn't know what he did, they wouldn't know there was another boy who qualified at Springfield Elementary. Skinner certainly wouldn't have helped them, as he's desperate to keep his good students where they are.
  • This troper and a friend are still debating about this, now Mr. Burns is known for constantly forgetting Homer's name, now she thinks it's because Burns is a evil boss and evil bosses are known for forgetting names on purpose For the Evulz, now I believe the reason he forgets his name is because Mr. Burns is senile, he is so senile that he believes Greta Garbo is still alive... so which one of us is right?
    • It has been well establish that Mr. Burns is senile. He also seems to be stuck in the late 19th century.
  • Why is it that Apu's children age (going from newborn babies to toddlers attending preschool) when no one else does?
    • Same thing with Sideshow Bob's son, Gino. It's probably because toddlers are easier to work with - they can do a few things older children can do, but still require the same amount of care and attention babies do.
  • In "Bye Bye Nerdie", Lisa concludes scientifically that school bully Francine Rhenquist, purely on instinct, only beats up the smart kids. Then why did she also pick on Milhouse and Ralph Wiggum? Milhouse may be nerdy, but he's not particularly smart, and Ralph Wiggum...well, he a former trope namer for the exact opposite of "smart".
    • Well if Lisa's theory about Francine is true then why do the bullies pick on Bart? Bart is not a nerd he's a bad boy just like them but with standards.
    • Personally, I think that Francine would just beat up almost anyone she didn't like and that Lisa's explanation was a coincidence.
      • Milhouses intelligence varies depending on the episode. In certain episodes it shows Bart calling him book smart and has him applying Chemistry analogies to every day situations. And in others, he's not. And Ralph Wiggum was in the locker with Milhouse, but he never said that Francine put him in there. For all we know, Ralph stuck himself in the locker on his own.
  • One would wonder what comes after "Why you little.." everytime Homer shouts it?
    • In Wedding For Disaster, Homer says, "Why you little bastard!"
  • In Sweet Seymour Skinner's Badass Song, Skinner is shown to be a trained soldier and decorated sergeant. This would count for his records, his reputation with his fellow soldiers and senior officers as well as some numerous momentos from his days in vietnam, including a photo of him and his platoon. So if The Principal and the Pauper is to be considered canon, how the hell did Skinner get away with flying so low under the radar within the army that not one single person ever realized that they were leaving the lives of many soldiers in the hands of a single untrained punk from the streets with no actual experience in command, even if his own men hated him?
    • Simple. They don't. Skinner, who had been reached and changed by the real Skinner, says he asked that he be one to notify Mrs. Skinner that her son was dead, and when she mistook him for her son, it's only then that he pretends to be Skinner. But aside from a one-off joke when Lisa, after losing Snowball II and her replacement cats, decides to save on new dishes when she finds a cat identical to Snowball (Skinner questions the morality of this, Lisa calls him by his real name, Skinner drops it), it doesn't seem canon due to the show's severe Negative Continuity.
  • Radioactive Man deals with Milhouse's hatred of being an actor. However, that pretty much starts immediately after the audition where he's chased home by a swarm of would-be fans. Clearly Milhouse never wanted anything to do with acting, so why did he audition?
    • I haven't seen the episode for a while, but I'm pretty sure it's explained that Milhouse's mother made him audition. Problem solved?
  • In the episode Miracle on Evergreen Terrace, wouldn't the other Simpsons have gotten suspicious when Bart nonchalantly said "including the tree" between sobs, even if the crying was staged? Or is it like Seinfeld, and they don't ask those kinds of questions anymore?
  • A lot of the sequences with Homer and Marge tracking Bart on the website in "Lost Verizon" bug me. First, Bart is tracked by his own face. How weird is it that they somehow hacked the website to show Bart's own face wherever he was? Second, the website was upgrading Bart's position about 100 times a second. How? Third, Marge somehow was able to continue tracking Bart via the Internet while she was in a car. How? HOW? Fourth, the bullies have their own position on the map. Invasion of privacy, much? There's a couple of others, but those are the ones that stand out...
  • What I don't get about the Frank Grimes episode is why does Frank say that Homer's life is so great? I mean, if he looked into Homer's life a bit more, he would know: the house was falling apart, his car is made from old soviet tanks, his wife was going bald from stress, his son is failing in school, his oldest daughter is an outcast (I don't know what to say about Maggie other then the not talking much thing, but that's just Maggie's choice I guess), working at the plant has killed his sperm, he has massive head injuries and a heart problem, when he was sent into space a carbon ROD stole his thunder (for the SECOND time), he when he met Smashing Pumpkins it was through a mix of his kids calling him old and almost KILLING HIMSELF in a side-show, met President Ford after a long, draw out fight with former president Bush, dropped out of the public eye after winning the Grammy, AND his mother left him when he was young, giving him major issues for a good part of his life.
    • Maybe it's because of all the Jerkass and idiotic things Homer has gotten away with why Frank says that Homer's life is so great.
    • That's just it; he didn't look properly into Homer's life. He saw Homer getting away with idiotic stuff, and when he was at the Simpsons house, they were trying to win him over, so everything was presented as best they could; Frank was already too angry at Homer to realise they were making an effort for him, and assumed that the kids were always polite, and they always had the best, and he didn't ask for the stories behind the pictures. If he'd got to know more about Homer, he'd have realised how things really were, although even then, Homer still has more than he does, for less work, and no matter how being an astronaut and winning a Grammy turned out, those were both still amazing experiences for Homer. Basically; Frank didn't see everything about Homer's life, and even if he had, it was still better than his.
      • Its true that Homers life is better than Grimes, but not nearly to the extend he seems to think
  • How did the carbon rod steal Homer's thunder in Deep Space Homer twice? Why did the carbon rod become worker of the week and take all the credit for saving the day? I guess everyone must really hate Homer, and they felt that he never deserves to be happy or succeed/achieve at anything.
    • Well, it's kind of a good metaphor for real life. Lot's of people don't get credit. There's the man who works hard all the time but stays in the same low-level job, well some idiot who doesn't know what he's doing get's onto the chair room board just because he's related to someone. Or take a movie. This is something even this show pointed out; the director, lead actors and guys like that get awards, but not the boom-mic operators or guys like that. Sure, their names are in the credits, but must people don't read all of them. Or take history. We celebrate Columbus for finding the new world, but native people had been there since the stone age and vikings landed in Nova Scotia in the Dark Ages. Thomas Edison got credit for the inventions, but he had hundreds of men helping him make prototypes. Elvis is famous for Blue Suade Shoes, but Alan Perkins sang it first. Lot's of people don't get credit for their hard work, (albeit, most of them were likely not as big of jerkasses as Homer), and some of them are OK with that, just being happy that they worked hard to make something great.
  • How did Mrs. McConnell forget Bart and Lisa on the field trip to Capital City when they were going back to school? Wouldn't she have noticed if they weren't there?
    • She's an adult in The Simpsons. She may be smarter academically than most of the others, but she still has idiotic tendencies; her's being that she relies completely on the buddy system, and therefore only notices when one child is on their own. If everyone is paired up, she assumes everything is fine.
  • Aside from becoming the most polluted city in the history of the planet, why exactly else did Springfield deserve to be blown up in The Movie?
    • I thought it was because Cargill got scared some more citizens would escape, or someone would spot this doomed city and wonder what was going on, and since he was insane by this point, decided the best solution was just to destroy the place altogether.
  • An upcoming episode, The Man Who Came To Be Dinner. What are Kang and Kodos doing in a canon episode? Have the show makers forgotten their own rules?
    • They also appeared in Gump Roast.
      • Yes, but I heard that that episode is also considered non-canon. Maybe this episode will also be!
      • In The Springfield Files, the FBI asks Homer which alien did he see (Kang or Kodos was among them) and in Sideshow Bob's Last Gleaming had a small yellow alien with a probe. So at this point I think it's safe to say that aliens do exist in canon episodes.
      • Actually, The Springfield Files is also non-canon, so the only alien known to exist in canon episodes so far is the one from Sideshow Bob's Last Gleaming.
      • There is nothing to suggest 'The Springfield Files' is non canon except for Mike Reiss describing the single scene showing Kang as "the most illegal shot in Simpsons history". Also, there is an alien featured in Homer The Great, named Number 51.
  • In the Season 16 episode Future-Drama, Apu and Manjula's son Anoop talks to Bart. Why does a child born and raised in the United States speak English in an Indian accent? It's highly unusual for second generation Americans not to have American accents. Unless he's spent his entire life in a room with only his parents speaking English to him, he would develop an American accent at school and from public and media. I say this as a second-generation Australian. I have a general Aussie accent. My parents don't.
    • As a fellow Australian, you must have met young vietnamese and chinese children that speak english with an accent due to learning their parent's native language at home before learning english later on. Presumably Apu and Manjula speak Hindi to each other at home (and have been shown to in episodes). The children would pick up on that, as well as the accent; they would probably lose it as they start coming into contact with more American-accented children, such as in preschool. But at such a young age, it's not strange.
  • What's up with Lisa in "You Only Move Twice"? She seems to be out in the woods (without a grown-up, I might add) at the same time Bart is in school. What's up with that?
    • Perhaps the second grade class is on holiday?
  • In "We're On The Road to D'Ohwhere", Marge is perfectly happy to sell expired prescription drugs - but how could someone like Marge even consider doing something like that?!
    • She might be consider it a good thing, to be giving people who need medication at far cheaper prices than normal, and too naive to realize people were abusing them.
    • Marge may be naive, but she'd usually have enough sense to realise that selling expired medication to others is extremely dangerous.
  • Watched the episode The Way We Was a year ago, Marge's hairdo was just as tall when she first styled it the way it is for the senior prom as it is in the show's present. Earlier in the same set of flashbacks, though, it was shorter and straight. Even with filling, there is no possible way it could have reached as high back then as it does nowadays.
  • Why do Bart and Lisa go on the same field trips? They're two grades apart, and there aren't any third or first graders with them.
    • The plot of that episode was Bart being moved down to grade three and Lisa being moved ahead to grade three.
  • I've been meaning to ask this but why do characters contradict themselves and forget events from previous episodes and in turn create lots of series continuity errors? Such examples are when Marge thought Grandpa was gay just to brag to Helen Lovejoy, why doesn't she remember that her sister Patty is a lesbian, also in "Fear of Flying" Marge had a fear of flying the whole time yet she flew to Washington in "Mr. Lisa goes to Washington" without throwing that fit. Or why was Sideshow Bob watching "That 30's Show" on TV yet in his previous appearance he almost nuked Springfield unless they get rid of all television. Plus there's the whole issue of Cosmic Wars existing in the Simpsons verse even though Star Wars has existed the whole time and was parodied and mentioned by name hundreds of times. Why do they allow Continuity errors to happen? Aren't the writers afraid of being fired of making a continuity error so bad that it might confuse a viewer and die hard fan? The only time someone pointed out a continuity error is when Comic Book Guy pointed out that The Simpsons did have a horse and Marge did have a gambling addiction.
    • I've said it before and I'll say it again: Negative Continuity.
      • The question is why does Negative Continuity even happen, let alone allowed to happen?
      • A better question is why is continuity important?
      • So they would remember the things they did in the past and it would make sense. It's like the only time Continuity is canon is if a character died and they stay dead... yet Dr. Marvin Monroe and Dr. Nick Riviera somehow survive their "deaths".
    • The writers think that continuity is disposable if it hinders the story. Thankfully they only get rid of it either when it would seem like nitpicking or when it would conflict with a decent story. That's good...unless we're talking about "The 90's Show." That's bad.
  • Why are futures even considered non-canon in the first place?
  • You know what grinds my beans about Lisa, are two things: First, she thinks failing gym class will stop her from becoming President, hasn't she heard of Franklin Roosevelt, who was secretly crippled due to polio, and second, in the ending of Pranks and Greens, she called Andy a loser, even after getting a writing job for Krusty, I mean, what the heck?
    • Hypocritical Humor, Soapbox Sadie, and Know-Nothing Know-It-All. We might as well combine all three and call it The Lisa.
      • Can you be more specific please?
      • Read the tropes. Lisa is practically a poster child for all three.
      • The way this Troper sees it, with the first point, Lisa hates failing anything. She feels that any blot on her permanent record will stop her from succeeding in the future- remember when she pitches a fit because she gets less than an A for conduct at the end of the year? Also, at the end of Pranks and Greens, she calls Andy a loser because she views him as being unoriginal, as he is planning to use the exact same material he was using back in Elementary school, meaning that he hasn't grown up in the slightest. It's been a long time since this troper saw that episode, though, and with many other episodes in between, it may be a bit fuzzy now. Feel free to argue, the recollection of the episode Pranks and Greens may be less than perfect.
    • Remember, Bart and Lisa are 10 and 8 years old. They are prone to having overactive imaginations (Bart thinks $500 was a fortune after all) because they are very impressionable. So just because what they think is true, doesn't mean it is.
      • Would her attitude on University of South Carolina ("I will not be a Gamecock!") and thinking people from Brown wind up as frequently wasted bus drivers like Otto add up to that?
  • In "Marge Be Not Proud", when Bart is thinking about stealing the Bonestorm video game, why are Mario, Luigi, Donkey Kong, and Sonic, the good guys, persuading him to steal?
    • Because the point wasn't that they're good guys, but that they're video game characters.
      • And they're Bart's imagination, likely his way of justifying stealing the game.
  • The character Karl in "Simpson and Delilah" really baffles me; I mean, he basically shows up out of nowhere, throws his entire life under the bus for Homer, a man he's only just met, and then disappears forever. One could say it's Rule of Funny, except his character, by Simpsons standards, is played pretty seriously. Seriously, does anyone have ANY ideas about the logic behind his actions?
    • It's been suggested that he's gay; the Simpsons Wiki at least has a lot of info on the subject matter. He was also supposed to reappear with his male lover in a later episode, but his voice actor declined. To summarize, he's probably an extremely intense man who also happens to have a serious crush on Homer, and probably vanished after he realized his advice did Homer wrong.
  • Abe Simpson is generally somewhere in his 80s, bordering on his nineties. If Mr Burns isn't treated super-ancient for laughs, he's a centenarian. If so, why in "Curse of the Flying Hellfish" is WWII-era Burns treated quite younger than the 40-year old looking Abraham? Not just in appearance, but in attitude as well.
    • Negative Continuity. This was before they decided to make Burns a one note joke about being incredibly old (it was around this time that he told Homer that he was only 81, and his mother, as of "Homer the Smithers", was 104 and still alive). As to why Burns looks 20 years yonger than Abe in the flashback, it could be that Abe is older but takes somewhat better care of himself in his senior years, and in general is built differently than Burns. It could also be that Burns, in his youth, just looked young for his age.
  • Now we know in the opening Bart would write messages in the chalkboard because he is being punished by Mrs. Krabappel but why are there times Bart writes things that make no sense and have nothing to do with bad behavior such as "I am not a 32 year old woman", "All work and no play makes Bart a dull boy", "There are plenty of businesses like show business", "This is not a clue... or is it?" (this made people think Mrs. Krabappel shot Mr. Burns), "I'm so very tired", "Does any kid still do this anymore?", "Je ne parle pas franÁais ("I do not speak French.")", "Have a great summer, everyone", "I will not wait 20 years to make another movie.", ""End of Lost: It was all the dog's dream. Watch Us." and "It's Kristen Schaal, Not Kristen Schall". Now why would Mrs. Krabappel make Bart write these nonsense messages?
    • Because it's a credits gag joke and nothing more.
    • In some cases (such as him claiming to be a 32-year-old woman), it's likely a combination of Bart Simpson insisting on making outrageous claims and Mrs. Krabappel looking for any excuse to punish him. It's also possible that she leaves for a smoke before Bart starts writing so he's free to write whatever he wants.
  • In Homer Alone, Mayor Quimby demands that Marge be released from prison because otherwise he would "kiss the chick vote goodbye". While it's obvious Quimby would care about the chick vote, why would Marge being in jail affect how the chicks voted? And Marge's opinions usually don't seem to be popular with the public (like in A Star is Burns when Marge has a reputation for suggesting ideas that the townspeople don't like, or in $pringfield where they all expect Marge to be against legalized gambling, though those instances came after this episode). Although before that she was successful with her SNUH campaign in Itchy and Scratchy and Marge, but for the most part it seems the townspeople (especially the women) don't really respect her enough.
  • If the Simpson gene is now considered non-canon and it's a crayon up Homer's brain that makes him dumb, then what explains why Bart and Grampa are idiots? They can't have crayons up their brains too!
    • Grampa's senile and Bart is actually shown to be quite clever on occasion, he just can't be bothered most of the time.
      • Bart also uses television as an excuse for not remembering things. And for the same reason as Naruto, Bart was neglected and put down one time too many by a heartless kindergarten teacher. As a result, he had to focus more on making a spectacle of himself just so he could be noticed. Whoa.....
      • So Bart is dumb by choice? Is it even possible to be dumb by choice?
      • Barts intelligence varies depending on the episode, but most likely its a combination of ADD, poor attention span, and plain old "just does not give a shit". Bart doesnt care about school, he doesnt care about learning, or much of else for that matter, which translates into what looks like low intelligence.
  • In Pygmoelian, why is a daytime soap opera being broadcast live?
    • Maybe it was a special episode, like (fairly) recent episodes of Eastenders and Coronation Street which were broadcast live.
  • When Maggie Roswell quit the show, why did the writers specially kill off Maude Flanders and not Helen Lovejoy, Luann Van Houten, or Ms. Hoover?
  • Another Lisa-related question: Any reason why she was jealous when Millhouse was dating Taffy, despite snubbing his advances numerous times?
    • While we're on this subject, why did Taffy think that Milhouse was still into Lisa? Because Lisa was stalking him?
  • What was in that one room at the box factory that made it the most popular part of the tour?
  • If the Treehouse of Horror episodes are strictly non-canon then how did ‹ter (he was introduced in Treehouse of Horror VI) and the Leprechaun end up in the main canon?
    • There's no reason why elements that start out as non-canonical need to stay that way. We have a trope for this: Canon Immigrant.
      • But the Leprechaun clearly came from a Simpsons canon that is supernatural and surreal, but normal Simpsons canon is supposed to be normal and surreal, oh let me a guess... a wizard had something to do with it!
      • This is a different matter to canonicity, and comes close to transgressing "Headscratching is not complaining."
      • Canonicity, especially multiple canons, are not that useful of a concept when it comes to The Simpsons, as it takes place in this extensively plastic universe (try to resolve "The Computer Wore Menace Shoes," for example, with the rest of the series). By and large, it works on the concept of Broad Strokes — broadly speaking, writers give themselves the latitude to ignore or not ignore anything they feel like in an individual episode. Nor are the Halloween episodes a separate canon — each segment of each episode is self-contained, rather than constructing a coherent alternate plotline. Appearances by the Leprechaun have a larkish "Throw It In" feel, but a lot of things on The Simpsons do.
  • Me and my friends are still debating this but was there ever a episode that didn't reference/mention/parody TV shows nor movies? Consider this a challenge to anyone who has seen every episode at the moment.
  • Ok so in "A Milhouse Divided" Kirk was fired from the cracker factory for "being single" and this raises several questions. Why the hell didn't Kirk sue because that is actually discrimination and grounds for Kirk to sue and when he went back to Luann I think does that mean he got his job back? I actually believed being single can get you fired!
    • There were probably other reasons not mentioned onscreen like him being an alcoholic. This is more than likely due to Rule of Funny.
    • There's also the fact that the factory owner is Luann's father, so he may have only gotten his position there through his marriage to her.
  • In the episode 'Bart Gets Hit By A Car', Homer attempts to sue Mr Burns for a million dollars, fine. Mr Burns offers him $500,000 outside of court. Homer rejects the offer on the basis that Mr Burns will lose the trial and have to pay a million. Mr Hutz's fee for taking the case is 50% of whatever Homer gets, which means Homer is essentially being offered what he would have had if he had won the case. My issue is that Marge doesn't point this when Homer starts ranting about Burns believing him to be foolish enough to accept the deal.
    • It's a matter of principle in this case for Homer, simple as that.
  • If Hans Moleman claims to be 31 according to "Duffless" and his drinking made him look elderly, then why is he sometimes seen at the Springfield Retirement Castle? 31 is not a age to be Elderly!
    • Visiting Papa Moleman?
  • Why does Ned Flanders let Lisa babysit despite what happens at the end of "My Sister, My Sitter?"
  • Where is Lisa's daughter Zia in "Days of Future Future?"
  • I've now watched the first seven Treehouse of Horror episodes and discovered that the title screens never actually say "Treehouse of Horror". It's always "The Simpsons Halloween Special [insert roman numeral here]", not "Treehouse of Horror [insert roman numeral here]." So why do so many people and even episode guides call them "Treehouse of Horror"? Is it just a Fan Nickname that people use because it sounds cooler?
    • Originally, they were called Halloween Specials. Later ones were titled Treehouse of Horror as a reference to the first one, which took place in a treehouse, and the name was retroactively applied to the earlier ones.
  • In the episode where they create Poochy, everyone comes round to the Simpson's house to watch his first episode, which nobody likes. Everyone leaves, voicing their displeasure (except for Ned, who thinks it was 'the best episode of Ippy and Zippy I've ever seen'). The last person to leave is Nelson, who proceeds to punch Bart in the arm before he does so. He does this in complete sight of Marge. Why in the world didn't Marge say anything? Would you really have some kid hit your son then walk out of your house? It just seems to be a bad element in the ep itself: why not have Nelson do his traditional 'ha-ha' or something?
    • He only punched Bart in the arm, she probably thought it was just kids roughhousing.
  • So if Home was going on about how he can't have a handgun, how did they have things like shotguns for zombies and Homer's Holdout jacket. Also with Brick Like Me, why didn't they use the regular lego set instead of specialized lego minifigs?
    • The shotgun is from the non-canon Treehouse of Horror episode, and is just intended as a horror movie prop.
      • They probably used different models so it wouldn't blatantly be a 22 minute advertisement for the figurines.
  • Lego!Comic Book Guy spinning his head around to reveal an angry face in the Lego episode. How does this make sense? The characters can already change expressions, and the joke worked in the movie because the two-faced officer had a different character to each face.
  • In "Simpson and Delilah", did Homer realize that the demoxinil would run out eventually? I assume he believed he'd be rich by the time he ran out, but at the rate he had to use it (he went bald OVERNIGHT)? Also, of all the times the family has suddenly ended up having the opportunity to splurge, it's never ONCE occurred to Homer to use that money to buy more of the stuff...
    • They never specify how much each dose takes, presumably the bottle he originally got was intended to last for quite a while.
  • So why exactly are most of the townspeople dimwitted, Took a Level in Dumbass and To Dumb To Live anyway? Plus their constant failure to recognize their own stupidity? This Troper did not realize this until the episodes "HOMR" and "They Saved Lisa's Brain", and even that episode lampshades it as Hibbert asks "Why do we live in a town where the smartest have no power and the stupidest run everything?" They also don't do anything with their hyper-incompetent police force! This is enough for Fry to tell them to stop being stupid!
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