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  • Secret of Evermore has two super-rare weapons: The bazooka and the call bead. The former is a projectile weapon that deals tons of damage and can be loaded with three kinds of ammo, except said ammo is so rare and expensive you'd normally never fire it. The latter summons an ally who launches a very powerful spell, but since there are only so many call beads in the game you'd never use them. However, thanks to a couple of Good Bad Bugs, the Cryo-Blast rounds (Which happens to be the best ammo) don't deplete as you fire them and you can get infinite call beads thanks to a glitched event flag in Nobilia.
  • There are a multitude of items like this in Pokémon:
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    • The Master Ball is probably the most famous example, since it can catch any Pokémon regardless of how strong it is. However, you usually only get one during a playthrough, though it's possible to get more of them via the lottery, trading, or exploiting cheats. The fact that legendary Pokémon exist also makes it a bit easier to decide to actually use it — it just makes sense to use the item you only get one of to catch the Pokémon that you can only encounter once (though one can always save scum instead, and Platinum onwards lets defeated legendaries respawn after beating the Champion). Alternatively, one could use it on roaming Pokémon to save themselves stress or save it in the unlikely event they encounter a shiny Pokémon (especially if it's an Abra or a Graveler that knows Self Destruct).
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    • Certain healing items, such as Max Revives, can heal every Pokémon in your party to full health but can only be found once or twice in the game. In most games, there's only one legal way to get Sacred Ash (two in HeartGold/SoulSilver and Emerald, but only through the MysticTicket event in the latter), which is usually by catching Ho-Oh, who will be holding it... but the item's power is ridiculously awesome - it can revive all of the Pokémon in your party to full health (albeit only on the field), something you can normally only do by visiting a Pokémon Center.
    • Ethers and Elixirs can't be bought in stores, and are the only way to restore PP without visiting a Pokémon Center. If you use them at all, it'll probably be during the Elite Four battles. In the later games, Mysteryberries and Leppa Berries had the same effect, but you could replant them for more, thereby rendering Ethers yet another useless thing that garnered lots of cash.
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    • Rare Candy, a free level-up, is another example. However, since the higher a Pokémon's level is, the more experience it needs to level, saving them for later leveling lets you get the most bang for your buck.
    • Items necessary to evolve certain Pokémon (Elemental Stones, King Rocks, and the like) have always been notorious for being rare and hard to find (except for Red, Blue and Yellow, where the stones could be bought for cheap and en masse). Most of the time, you can only find a few on the ground, get them as gifts from characters, and very rarely, find them carried by wild Pokémon. Pokémon Black 2 and White 2, and Pokémon X and Y after them, made some of them more readily available so long as you fulfilled certain conditions.
    • Prior to Generation V, TMs (items that teach attacks to Pokémon). Some can be bought at markets and Game Corners, but others that you only get one of... ever. This might not seem so bad until you realize that TMs can only be used once, at which point they disappear forever. And if you're the kind of Trainer that switches up his/her team a lot, you may have just wasted a strong attack on a Pokémon you'll never use again. Even worse, you will most likely need multiple copies of certain TMs for high-level competitive play, but the only way to get those moves is by breeding, trading, or worse, restarting your game multiple times. Earthquake was a particularly big offender, given its high power, high accuracy, lack of negative side-effects, useful typing, and nearly everything being able to learn it. Worse, since only fathers pass down TM moves, the player was discouraged from ever using one-of-a-kind TMs on female or genderless Pokémon. Word of God has stated that the change to make TMs infinite use from Gen V onward was because of this trope.
    • Time Flutes in Pokémon Colosseum instantly purify any Pokémon, thereby giving them an extra move and whatever experience they should have gained through battle. However, there's only three throughout the entire game, and one of them comes from beating Mt. Battle. As a result, those unable to conquer Mt. Battle have only two Time Flutes they can use for whatever Pokémon they want, adding to the stress of determining who it will be used on. Luckily, there are a finite number of Shadow Pokémon in the game, so even the most indecisive players will use the flutes in the end.
    • Pokémon Black and White adds Gems, which grant a whopping 50% power boost to a move of the same element, but they're one-use, which means that after that initial blaze of power, your Pokémon is stuck with no item (although this is a good time to follow up with Acrobatics). You have to decide if the one-time boost is preferable to the constant 20% boost you'd get from a Type-enhancing item of the same element. These Gems are rather rare (only being found in certain spots or randomly-appearing dust clouds in certain areas), so it's more useful to use them in situations like Link Battles, the Battle Subway, and the PWT, where held items are restored between matches. The following Pokémon generation takes it Up to Eleven, in which you are given one Normal Gem (as a hidden item which occasionally respawns) but the other Gems? Completely unavailable (data exists for them, including one for the new Fairy type, but none aside from the Normal Gem can be found in the Generation VI or VII games).
    • Certain Berries reduce super-effective damage from a certain type, restore health, or raise a stat when at low health. They're consumed upon use. Especially problematic in Generation V, where the only way to obtain those berries easily (or at all) are on the Dream World website, or only obtainable from certain Join Avenue shops. Again, it's better to use them when in battles with restored items between rounds. A few berries are extremely difficult to get a hold of (often requiring beating battle tower, subway or mansion facilities, all of which have downright absurd RNG abuse) and although there's often a system to farm berries (except in Generation V as mentioned earlier), these berries take an extremely long time to produce a good number of them.
    • There's a lot of other good hold items that are one-use items which are best used only in the Battle facilities where you can get them back (or in player vs. player matches, which do the same), like Air Balloons, Focus Sashes, Eject Buttons, Absorb Bulbs, and White Bulbs and other stuff that greatly benefit Pokémon in battles. The shops at the Battle centers actually sell them, but you have to win a lot before you can gain enough credits to buy them, so it's best to only use them in the tournaments themselves.
    • The move Recycle introduced in Generation III is helpful in preventing this trope in that it causes consumed held items to respawn.
    • PP Ups (and PP Maxes, but these are just the equivalent of 3 PP Ups) permanently increase the total PP of a single move. In the several generations preceding Pokémon Black 2 and White 2, they cannot be bought anywhere, and only a handful exist in the field; if you're incredibly lucky or patient, you can collect more with the Pickup ability or through the Lotto, which requires lots of Pokémon with different trainer IDs. In the end, it's not really worth the effort to most people. Many players never use them, because even if you think you know exactly which move to boost, you might have to overwrite it later, making it a waste.
    • Pokémon Sun and Moon brings back the specialized Apricorn Balls from Pokémon Gold and Silver, which include the Fast Ball that works wonders on fast Pokémon and the Friend Ball that instantly sets friendship to 200 (dramatically cutting down time spent increasing it for friendship evolutions). However, a player can only get one of each per game. Pokémon Ultra Sun and Ultra Moon allows you to get a second set of Apricorn Balls, but only if you show a certain NPC a Pokémon that has been transferred from a Virtual Console version of Pokémon Gold and Silver and this can only be done once.
  • The Golden Sun games have a few instances.
    • The items that fall under this are Water of Life (revives a party member, you'd normally have to reach a town and pay a fee), Psy Crystals (restore full PP instantly), Vials (+500 HP, most characters won't have this much until near the end of the game with a full complement of Djinn), Potions (Full HP) and Mist Potions (heal everyone for ~300 HP, only outclassed by Pure Wish, which you need a lot of level grinding to get).
      You only find so many of them, and once you use them, they're gone. (If you sell them instead, shops can sell them back to you as rarities at 1.33x the price.) They eventually become useless when you learn Revive (the main character of all games is a Venus Adept, who can learn it by setting 4 Djinn of the same element; other Adepts can learn it in nearly any class that requires 4 Venus Djinn), gain access to equipment that regenerates PP in battle, and gain backup party members that can safely spam healing spells between fights while recovering their PP by walking around.
    • Summons. They deal massive damage (especially to bosses), boost the summoner's elemental affinity temporarily, and some have added effects. To use them, though, they require that you unleash your Djinn, which prevents them from giving you a better class and (probably) important spells like Revive. Although they will recover (at a rate of one per person per turn, when you need four per person to do any real damage), the immediate effect makes such a tactic a Death-or-Glory Attack. But, man, do they look cool!
  • In Super Mario RPG there are tons of these. At the end of the game you have enough of these that you have to actually start chucking the "lesser" amazing items when your inventory fills up. Thankfully most of the really awesome items have either multiple uses or easily-acquired substitutes. The game, to its credit, does try to avert this by occasionally allowing "Freebies", which mean the item is not used up.
    • The best example of an "easily-acquired substitute" is Kero-Kero Cola, a Megalixir-equivalent that can be repeatedly bought around mid-to-late-game for an expensive but not impossible 150/200 coins, depending on where you get them. By comparison, Max Mushrooms (which heal a party member to full HP) can only be bought at the Very Definitely Final Dungeon and Royal Syrup (which restores FP to full) can't be bought at all. Kero-Kero Cola does the same thing as both items combined, and on the whole party, too. Unless money is an issue (and given the genre, it probably isn't) you'll never be in a position where using the rare item is better than using a Cola, letting you treat them as Vendor Trash instead of worrying about saving them.
    • One of the biggest items of them all would be the Red Essence, which leaves a character invincible for three turns and is very hard to find.
    • Its actually quite easy to find multiple Red Essences, just sleep on the Dream Cushion and you have a chance of getting one for free.
    • Flower Boxes, Jars and Tabs completely recover your FP alongside raising it, so you'll often save them for when you start running low so as to save your normal recovery items.
    • Another one is the Rock Candy, which deals 200 damage to every enemy in the battle. Too bad that the average player will only find about three throughout the entire game. Most players know exactly what they're saving all the Candies for: Culex.
  • Mario & Luigi: Superstar Saga has Golden Mushrooms; there are only about 4 you can ever get in hidden courses, and they fully restore the bros' HP and BP. There are places where you can farm them though: Use Advanced Swing Bros on Fawful in the Bowser's Castle battle or on Popple in the "Popple and Birdo" battle to get one, then get killed. When asked to reload a save, reload from the place, and not the last save. This allows you to keep the Golden Mushroom for some reason, and now you can repeat the process for more Gold Shrooms.
  • Paper Mario:
    • Jammin' Jelly, and to a lesser extent, the Ultra Shroom. The latter gives Mario 50 HP when used, while the former gives you 50 FP. Since you can only level Mario's HP and FP up to 50 (to have more than that, you need the HP Plus or FP Plus badges equipped), chances are you'll have one or two still in your inventory when you beat Bowser.
    • You can combine the two into a "Jelly Ultra" which restores both HP and FP by 50. Doing this may seem like a good idea, but it often causes an extreme mental block which will prevent you from using the item when you only need to restore HP or FP, and not both. Other high-end recipes can also fall into this trope. Further, the Triple Dip badge grants you the option of using three in one turn, giving you the option to restore 85 more HP and FP than Mario can possibly have, you know, when the time comes.
    • Whacka's Bump is a healing item that restores 25 HP and FP... but you can only have a few per game, and only if you don't mind mentally damaging, and eventually killing, poor Whacka to get them.
    • Paper Mario: Sticker Star has this far too much, as any and all combat relies on consumable items. You will find yourself hoarding Thing Stickers and Shinies and Flashies to the point where some players start actively avoiding battles just so they don't have to use up their items. While every sticker is unlimited in number or has a point where they always re-appear so as to not make the museum sidequestnote  permanently missable, some of them are locked behind difficult courses. The Big Shiny and Megaflash Infinijump stickers both require trips to Long Fall Falls to grind, which is a reflex-demanding minigame where the player needs to avoid getting instantly killed by a giant Cheep Chomp or lose all five pieces of a raft.
  • Dragon Quest:
    • In the earlier Dragon Quest/Dragon Warrior games, you can pick a leaf from the World Tree which has the power to resurrect a dead party member without having to use a costly magic spell that has a chance of not working. However, you can only pick one of these at a time, and those that are hidden around the world were One-Time items. (A few of the games have them as Casino prizes, but that requires a lot of luck or Save Scumming.) Dragon Quest VIII permits you to buy or otherwise legitimately acquire two such leaves; however, it's possible to smuggle a third into the inventory via the game's item-crafting system.
    • Dragon Quest IV boasts the World Dew, medicine derived from World Leaves that can heal your whole party. Again, you can only have one at a time; though it follows a "one at a time" rule quite similar to the game's Leaf of World Tree. Fortunately, despite the limited supply, both were free.
    • Dragon Quest VII also boasts the World Dew, but unlike World Leaves, you have to buy it from a shop that was always crowded, and wait your turn in line. And it's possible for them to "run out" before you even got to the counter...
    • The wisdom rings are too awesome to use as well as it's rare, one of the only ways to recover magic points, and breaks after several uses. Same with Elfin elixirs which recovers all MP. Some games have them offered as casino prizes.
  • Breath of Fire:
    • Breath of Fire III has a pair of skills. Bonebreak is one of the game's strongest attack skills, and Celerity bestows godlike stat buffs. Both skills are usable at zero ability point cost. The catch? After using either skill, you have to wait five in-game hours for it to recharge. Considering that the game lasts about 30 hours and you get neither skill until very late in the game (and after tons of long, hard level grinding), it goes without saying that you'll probably never see either put to use until it's Final Boss Time—assuming you feel like expending the effort to acquire the skills in the first place!
    • The dragon form in Breath of Fire: Dragon Quarter is so powerful it can demolish any enemy with ease, even bosses. But using it increases your D-Ratio, which triggers a Nonstandard Game Over when it hits 100%, and there's no way to reduce it. And it still increases gradually even if you don't use your dragon powers.
  • Final Fantasy
    • In many games throughout the series, HP-restoring items are easy to come by, but MP-restoring items are rare. While Tents and Inns restore MP at save points, the ability to recover magic while dungeon crawling or during battle is sparse at best. This makes magic-restoring Ethers liable to sit in a player's inventory for a good long while. In some of the games, Ethers also cannot be purchased, and so are even more valuable unless they can be stolen and you know what to steal them from.
    • In every game, Elixirs restore all of a character's HP and MP, and Megalixirs work as Elixirs on the entire party. Unless you plan to spend hours trying to steal more of them from specific enemies, you'll only find a small handful of Elixirs in any given game, and probably one or two Megalixirs. One downside of the Megalixirs is that while they will fully heal and restore the MP of all party members, they will not revive from KO, so the chances of a perfect opportunity to use one where your party members are all standing but low on their HP and MP is a very specific circumstance to use a one-shot rare item.
    • Final Fantasy III:
      • Phoenix Downs can't be purchased in shops. Either keep a party member who knows Raise around, or be prepared to spend time farming weaker enemies for the items.
      • Shurikens, weapons existing specifically to be thrown by the ninja class, are in extremely limited supply, difficult to find, and can be thrown, once, for about 9,999 damage.
    • Final Fantasy IV:
      • Shurikens are powerful weapons capable of great damage when Edge uses them with the Throw command, but are only available from an obscure shop just before the final dungeon. Even then, you've got to go through a very long optional Chain of Deals sidequest before the shopkeeper will sell them. The ones you find before the shop opens will most likely still be in your inventory when you can finally buy them.
      • The same goes for unique swords that Edge can throw. Throwing these swords causes enormous damage, but once thrown they are gone from the game for good, as they cannot be purchased at vendors.
      • A greater example is the Spoon Dagger, renamed to just Dagger in some versions. Only one exists in the game and it requires going through an out-of-the-way optional dungeon twice to get it. It does an instant 9,999 damage to whatever you throw it at, so you're probably going to save it for the last boss.
    • Final Fantasy VIII:
      • The junction system essentially discouraged the player from using magic, since you'd either be saving up your best spells to junction with a specific stat or you'd have them junctioned already, meaning you were left with the lesser spells that weren't worth using on account of the stat boosts from the junctioned spells.
      • The Hero and Holy War items, which make respectively a single character or the whole party completely invincible for a short period of time. They have to be mugged off of certain bosses and are thus very limited in quantity... unless you go to the trouble of playing the card game. Winning the Laguna and Gilgamesh cards — a difficult task but not Nintendo Hard — and refining them with the Card Mod ability gets you 100 Heroes and 10 Holy Wars, more than enough to get you through all of the game's toughest boss fights.
      • The boss, GF, and character cards in Triple Triad are immensely powerful, but using them in a game risks the chance of losing them, and having to go through the hell of trying to get it back. Notably enough, if you grind the card game enough to unlock its secret quest, you can refine the cards and recover them an unlimited amount of times, essentially making the card game entirely a whole different level of Game-Breaker.
    • Final Fantasy IX has the Dark Matter item. Unstoppable 9,999 damage for zero MP cost, and there are only three in the game. Smart players, on the other hand, will keep it around just long enough so their summoners can learn Odin off it, and then use it on a boss.
    • Final Fantasy X has a special item called the Master Sphere. You obtain ten of them after capturing ten of each monster, and defeating all the Monster Arena bosses. They are capable of activating any node on the sphere grid, but you only ever get ten of them, and no more. Every node can be activated without them using more common spheres, so they're nothing but a shortcut anyway.
    • Final Fantasy XI:
      • Any item that has an "Enchantment" effect with a limited number of uses is almost always Too Awesome to Use... Even when it's not. Items such as Trick Staves, Anniversary Rings and Raphael's Rod are rare in that you can only hold one and they're actually hard to obtain, so players will let them collect dust in storage unless they know they can get another. Items with unlimited uses but high timers (Tidal Talisman, Nexus Cape) are sometimes Too Awesome to Use because you almost always find yourself needing their enchantment when you've already used them and still have days remaining on your timer. Items with limited uses that are easy to re-obtain (such as Warp Cudgels, Reraise Earrings or Emperor Bands) subvert this trope, unless those items are being held for resale. Then they're Too Awesome to Use because a "used" Enchantment item cannot be sold on the Auction House.
      • Every job has an ability that, once used, cannot be used for another two hours. But many of these abilities never get used because players either want to hang on to them in case the party gets into a bad situation or the like, at which point it's probably too late anyway, or a waste — Benediction results in the user getting much too much aggro to avoid being the enemy's target, and Hundred Fists, which allow the Monk to hit repeatedly with almost no delay, usually can't do enough damage to kill the enemy before it starts offing players late in a battle, for example. One exception is Corsair's 2hour, Wild Card, which can recharge 2hours for others in the party... except other Wild Cards. If you're lucky, you can make quite a bit of money on the side by having your level 1 Corsair use Wild Card for random people who'll pay you for success.
    • Final Fantasy XIII:
      • There are only four elixirs in the entire game. If you do dare to use them and do so intelligently though, one is usually enough to drop the scales in your favor.
      • Shrouds, which are field items that pre-buff your characters with every conceivable positive status or let you dodge enemies entirely. While they can be bought in shops, they're not available until almost the end of the game, and even then they're ridiculously expensive. On top of that, they almost never drop from enemies unless you either rank extremely low on a Random Encounter or have a certain accessory equipped. Needless to say, you'll want to save the twenty or so you get through the course of normal play for the endgame Bonus Bosses or the later Eidolon fights.
    • Final Fantasy XIII-2:
      • Elixirs, which there's only a handful of in the game. Using one fully heals and revives everyone on the field, fills the Feral Link gauge, and allows Meteor Javelin and Ultima Arrow to be used again.
      • Phoenix Blood, a rare revival item that confers full HP and Haste.
    • Lightning Returns: Final Fantasy XIII:
      • Elixirs take yet another step in usefulness and rarity: using one restores all of Lightning's HP and EP, fills all her ATB gauges and casts all otherwise rare buffs on her, all of above being even more significant than usual considering you start off being only able to carry 6 healing items in total and can increase it up a grand total of 10 on your first playthrough. The only ways to get one are to find and sell a total of 100 Soul Seeds (80 in New Game+) to the merchants that buy them or to find an Outerworld NPC that's selling one for the low, low price of 360,000 Gil, and doing either of above nets you an achievement or trophy.
      • Considering the relative difficulty in getting large amounts of EP on higher difficulty levels, even Ethers and Turbo Ethers count as this considering they're also only available as rewards from a select few sidequests or found from the Bonus Dungeon.
    • Bravely Default actually subverts this with the Megalixir. It works exactly the same, and is just as rare to find, as you'd expect...BUT you can also steal them from Guzzlers. And there's nothing stopping you from doing so until you have a full 99 of them, either.
  • Kingdom Hearts:
    • Megalixirs are more or less the same as in Final Fantasy, generally only available through costly synthesis, a few chests, or some other very time consuming method and serving the same purpose of completely restoring you and your party. Kingdom Hearts coded however averts it, by being able to buy them. Yeah, they cost 2000 Munny apiece, but then again there is a stat matrix cheat that allows you to multiply money (and health) drops by as much as 5 at cost of enemies being proportionally stronger, so if you're good at dodging, just make few trips to Olympus Coliseum Entrance and you should have enough money for them. They also completely heal Sora, remove any of his statuses and max his overclock gauge, meaning you can just use Finisher to obliterate everything.
    • Kingdom Hearts: Chain of Memories: The Random Joker cards. Exceedingly rare, and one Random Joker fits any critera for opening a door. If you manage to get one, you'll probably end up saving it until you reach the Final Boss, just in case you find a door with an even more insane requirement.
    • Kingdom Hearts χ has, in the Unchained rerelease, the No Cost skill medals. While they may seem easy to use (stick it on a medal with a powerful or costly special attack), what to use it on is the problem. Adding to it, you get them by buying event avatar boards with Jewels, and you only get one of them. They'll likely be sitting there gathering dust for a long time. In the title update to Union X, they've added SP gauge 0 and 1 medals, as well as ATK boost 3-4 and gauge 1-2. They're even more ludicrously hard to figure out what to use, since your strongest may have a low cost to begin with, and like No Cost, they're only available through Premium Boards. Unlike No Cost, they have a 100% activation rate (No Cost had 49% at max level), meaning you're going to be hoarding at least one for the right medal. Add in the traits and good luck.
  • SaGa / Final Fantasy Legend II naturally has these; almost every item has a durability counter. The ones you can't buy of course will fall into this. A lot of these can be found in the Nasty Dungeon. The Glass sword, which deals 1000+ damage ignoring all defense, breaks after one use. There is also the Hyper cannon, which will instantly win any non-boss battle, but it can only be used three times. You can equip the latter on a robot for one regenerating use, but the limited space on a robot itself is Too Awesome To Use. The DS version features even more of these.
  • The Key items in the Shadow Hearts games allow a character to extend a physical attack string according to their number, as long as the player can keep hitting a series of timed button presses.. The Third Key allows for three spins of the judgement ring, the Fifth five, and so on. The Eternal Key allows to extend a physical attack string infinitely. Get enough hits with one, and it'll kill literally any enemy in existence through overwhelmingly huge damage. Of course, there's only one in each game.
  • In Valkyrie Profile, there are two types of items that fall into this - Slayer weapons, and Great Magic staves. The first deal insane damage to certain types of enemies, but are breakable, and you'll never find one that isn't. Great Magic staves are stupidly powerful (the first one you'll find is in the triple digits for MAG when what your mage likely has barely breaks two digits), and naturally, unlock the specials for mages. They're also extremely breakable - some have a one in three chance of shattering. Unlisted are tricks for preserving these items (oneshot the enemy to keep the slayer, just don't use Great Magic to keep the stave), so newbies or inexperienced players let these sit.
  • MOTHER:
    • MOTHER 1:
      • People went through the game saving up on attack items like bottle rockets to use on the final boss, only to find out in the end that to beat him, you have to sing to him.
      • There is also a healing item called a Hand-Aid which recovers all your HP and PP, but there is only one of it in the game. Fortunately, EarthBound allowed you to buy the various types of bottle rockets (and for fairly reasonable prices considering how much damage they can do). So bottle rockets are no longer Too Awesome to Use.
      • Then there's the Bag of Dragonite, which turns one character into a dragon (although this just means a one-time powerful fire attack). If it weren't for the restrictive nature of the inventory in that game, they'd never be used at all.note 
    • MOTHER 3 repeatedly asks you not to do this, telling the player it's no use carrying around items you never use. At one point a woman asks if you're the kind of person who "stocks up on food and never eats it."
  • The Neverwinter Nights franchise has this. This is mostly the case with powerful or even ordinary potions and scrolls, especially if your character is not a magic build. A lot of mundane but tough fights could have been made easier if you'd just used that barkskin potion or whatnot, but you keep saving it for the boss fights.
  • The Elder Scrolls:
    • High quality arrows qualify as a series-wide example. Until being introduced in Skyrim's Dawnguard DLC, there has never been a way to craft your own arrows (outside of Game Mods). While you could find merchants with restocking sets of lower quality arrows (Iron, Steel, maybe Silver if you're lucky), high quality arrows (Daedric, Ebony, Glass) are typically only found in small, finite quantities (if available for sale at all) and otherwise must be looted from high-level enemies and dungeons. This leads to many players saving their best arrows only for the strongest foes, while making do primarily with lesser quality but more readily available arrows.
    • Morrowind:
      • The Skeleton Key is a lockpick which will never fail, but only has 50 "uses" before it will be gone. And by the time you get it (at the very end of the Thieves' Guild quest line), your Security skill is likely high enough that you don't really need it anyway.
      • The Scrolls of Icarian Flight can be incredibly useful if used properly, but there are only three of them and no way to get more.
      • Only one Elixir of the Imperfect can be had in the Tribunal expansion, and even getting it is tough. It's a potion that restores 20 points of Health, Magicka, and Fatigue every second for 15 seconds, essentially giving you god-like abilities for the duration. However, you only get one from the Imperfect, and unless you kill it quickly, it will use the elixir before you can kill it.
      • In the Bloodmoon expansion, one can find 5 Ebony Arrows of Slaying in a tree stump on Solstheim. They hit for about 5000 damage a pop, enough to kill any opponent in the game (not protected by a reflect spell) many times over (including the aforementioned Imperfect). But the odds of getting these arrows back is so low that you will almost always save them for a rainy day (that will probably never come until there is nothing left worth killing with them).
    • Oblivion:
      • Potions and antidotes. You'll instantly start collecting various buff, health and antidote potions, but when an opportunity arises to actually use them, you'll find some way to avoid 'wasting' them until that special moment when you really need them. As time passes, this simply has the effect of rendering the items useless, as a formerly effective health potion that just restores one hundredth of your now leveled-up character's hitpoints is no longer as valuable. Then you drop the junk because it weighs you down. To make room for new junk.
      • The Daedric Lava Whiskey from the "Wizard's Tower" expansion: Only one bottle in the game, does a slight amount of damage and paralyzes you in exchange for then healing a massive amount of health and summoning a Dremora Lord, which is one of the most powerful summonable creatures in the game
    • Skyrim:
      • The Dragonborn expansion awards the player the ability to summon the spirit of Karstaag, an extremely powerful frost giant. The downside is that, unlike most powers, which can be used once per day, Karstaag can only be summoned three times ever.
      • During the Dark Brotherhood quest line in Skyrim, you are tasked with assassinating the Emperor. You are given an extremely potent poisonous ingredient called the Jarrin Root to mix into his food, but it is quite easy to assassinate him (except it's not actually him) with other methods (like a bow) and keep the ingredient for yourself. If the Dragonborn is specialized in alchemy, it can then be used to create a ridiculously powerful poison that deals thousands of damage upon hit, but since only one Jarrin Root exists in the entire game, you can only use it once (possibly twice if you have the Sinderion's Serendipity effect, which has a chance to duplicate a created potion). No enemy in the game can survive an optimally-prepared Jarrin Root poison, not even Legendary Dragons, Alduin, or superbosses like Kaarstag or the Ebony Warrior.
      • High level arrows such as Ebony and Daedric greatly augment a bow's power, but are exceedingly rare. Arrows cannot be crafted in vanilla Skyrim either, hence many archer characters tend to keep them sitting in their inventories and use less powerful but more common arrow types like Elven, Orcish or Steel. Dawnguard rectifies this by allowing arrow crafting at any forge, and mods are available on PC which provide a similar service.
    • The Elder Scrolls Online has the Grand Amnesty Edict, which clears up to 100,000 gold of bounty (much more than you'll ever accrue at once) one time and then disappears. One is earned by completing the Thieves Guild main questline, and it can't even be banked, transferred or traded, so most people who complete that quest have it taking up an inventory slot forever, waiting to be clicked accidentally.
  • Parasite Eve 2:
    • The game presents a conundrum. The only way to buy items is with the in-game currency known as BP, which you get for killing monsters. Monsters don't respawn. This leaves you with the decision of what guns and ammo to use. Sure you can buy awesome weapons like an M4 assault rifle, the shotgun, or a single shot grenade launcher, but ammo costs add up real quick. So if you burn through ammo, you won't have enough for armor and other upgrades. Thankfully the most basic ammo is free in ammo boxes in certain places that have an unlimited amount in them.
    • Items left over after beating the game are added up as BP to use in your next New Game+. The more items you have, the more BP you get. If you want to earn as much BP as possible to obtain the better ranks, you'll have to perform a near Minimalist Run and try to use as few items as possible.
  • Fallout:
    • Fallout 2:
      • The Monument Chunk, a consumable chunk of rock which offered massive combat bonuses, but was available only once in the entire game. It almost always wound up in the trunk of the car until after the end of the game. You can get more, three or so more even... but that involves trying to steal from the giant stone head of your ancestor. If your Steal skill is less than 95% you're dead. The Monument deals 14,000 points of damage and melts you!
      • The three special Federation super-medkits which you found in the special encounter with the crashed Star Trek shuttle. They restored your health completely, no matter how hurt you were - but there were only three in the entire game. As a result they inevitably ended up in a chest or other container, from which they would only be taken when really needed. Or not.
    • Fallout 3:
      • The Experimental MIRV: a modified Fat Man that fires 8 mini-nukes at once. Unlocking its bunker requires you to find five holotapes hidden at various places in the Wasteland. The average player probably won't find enough mini-nukes over the course of the entire game to fire this baby more than two or three times. No fight in the game justifies the use of such firepower, so the weapon will most likely remain unused. Great for showing off, though.
      • The Fat Man itself is an example, as there are very few battles that justify or require its use (other than some of the Super Mutant Behemoths, or the multiple Feral Ghoul Reavers in the Presidential Metro).
      • The Alien Blaster will disintegrate any target with a headshot, but there are less than two hundred rounds of ammunition for it in the entire core game. It's also the only one of its kind, unless you find the second one in the Mobile Base Crawler near the end of Broken Steel, and can only be fully repaired with Alien Epoxy.
      • You could also classify the Firelance under the same banner as the Alien Blaster. Only obtainable in a randomly found event (of which you may not even notice and end up walking away from). It's a unique variant of the Alien Blaster that sets things on fire as well as having a pretty punch. Because of the fire effect, it gets an extra 50% damage from the Pyromaniac perk. Add the Xenotech perk from the Mothership Zeta Downloadable Content to add a further 20% damage to it, and you can easily drop the toughest enemies with a decent Energy Weapons skill. Sounds good and all, but the event only spawns it with 12 rounds, randomly thrown about the nearby area, so you're not likely to find even half of them. The total available ammo for it in the game is around 280: 120 from the crashed Alien ship, 12 from the Firelance event itself, and ~100-150 from Fort Independence assuming you have the Scavenger perk.
      • Mothership Zeta and Broken Steel also include additional ammo for the Blaster. The other alien weapons also suffer from this, since there is a finite number of power modules.
      • With "Operation Anchorage", there is exactly one Gauss Rifle, and without Alien Epoxy from "Mothership Zeta", there's no way to fully repair it. Even though you could practically be swimming in its ammo late in the game, there's a hard limit on the number of shots you can fire (unless you abuse a glitch to get a nearly indestructible version from the computer simulation out into the "reality" of the Capital Wasteland).
      • Although it has the highest damage resistance of any armor, there is only one standard T-51b Power Armor, so it can only be partially repaired, and is best used for companion characters, where it won't degrade. Conversely, the Winterized T-51b is practically indestructible, since the main game version has the same astronomical HP as the Anchorage Simulation version.
    • Fallout: New Vegas:
      • The Fat Man again. Just as it and its ammo were impractically rare in FO3, the same applies here but in even more heartbreaking fashion. There are only 14 Mini Nukes (down to 12 if you have Wild Wasteland trait) in the entire game!
      • However, if you have the Gun Runners' Arsenal DLC, the unique version Esther along with its special ammo appear in the Vendortron's inventory at the Gun Runners kiosk. Among them are Mini Nukes that separate into multiple Nukes, which will fondly remind players of the Experimental MIRV. Not only that, but the special variants of the Mini Nuke can be purchased again after a couple of days have passed. They may be tremendously expensive, but you'll eventually manage it and then enjoy your fireworks. This makes Esther an Infinity +1 Sword.
      • Holy Frag Grenades. Their damage and blast radius is similar to Mini Nukes, but there are only three of them so use them sparingly. Oh, you also need Wild Wasteland trait, meaning you have to choose between them and two of the mini nukes. Although the grenades are a heck of a lot lighter than the Mini Nukes and do not require a launcher to use, the throwing range is much shorter, especially if you have the Loose Cannon trait. A bad throw can see you blowing yourself up.
      • The Alien Blaster qualifies even more, as it requires Wild Wasteland trait to even get, and has been nerfed from its Fallout 3 counterpart.
      • The unique grenade machine gun Mercy. It uses 40mm grenades rather than the normal 25mm ones for the grenade machine gun. However these bulky rounds were priced, distributed, and weighted with single shot use in mind, so Mercy expends through ammo value and weight faster than anything else. It is actually pretty useful to use at Hoover Dam at the end of the game, but otherwise its overkill. Not to mention that in order to get it, you have to fight/sneak your way through a cave full of killer deathclaws, including the terrifying Legendary Deathclaw. In other words: in order to get Mercy, you have to go through a scenario in which you'd most likely need it. Perhaps it should be named "Irony" instead.
      • Similar to FO 3's T51-B, the Remnants Power Armor, although having the highest Damage Threshold in the game, also is one of the rarest armors, has the highest rate of degradation, and is one of the most expensive to repair. Best reserved for the final battle. At least this time around there's a perk that allows you to use other power armor to repair it, but even then such armor is rare.
      • The physiological reevaluation done by the auto-doc in Old World Blues. Even though it could allow you to milk traits and swap them when not needed, you can only do it once.
    • In an in-universe example, the Brotherhood of Steel have spent the last two games/centuries collecting this sort of stuff and locking it away in their vaults, only taking it out now and then to repair, polish, etc. The original plan was to hold onto it until "the time was right" to start handing it out and/or rebuilding the wasteland. But as years gave way to decades, then centuries, the Brotherhood has become increasingly resistant to the idea of actually using, let alone letting other people have access to, any of their carefully hoarded and preserved treasures.
    • Fallout 4
      • Power Armor has been revamped. It's no longer just a set of heavy armor; now it's full on Powered Armor. It drastically boosts your defense as well as other stats, protects you from fall damage should you accidentally fall off the top of a building, and just plain looks awesome. Unfortunately, the parts to the suit can get damaged and need occasional repairs. It's also powered by fusion cores, which are either hard to find in the wild, or really expensive if you buy them from merchants. This mostly restricts you to using it mostly for boss fights or for difficult dungeons... at least until you near endgame wher affording them will be significantly easier and you can stock your inventory with enough to keep moving for years.
      • On the subject of Power Armour, you can now outfit your suit with a functional jet pack! Helps you immensely with traversing terrain and repositioning quickly in combat, but it also sucks away your AP and drains your fusion cores at an alarming rate.
      • The Refreshing Beverage gives you a massive 500 HP recovery and removes all rads and addictions. Unfortunately, unless you scavenge constantly for the rare ingredients needed to cook it, you're unlikely to ever have more than 3 or 4 of them, so even in the most dire of circumstances, you'll probably never use them.
      • The Mysterious Serum gives you a whopping +5 Strength, +50 Damage Resistance and removes 10 rads a second over the span of one hour, with stackable effects. It becomes available after a certain quest, and you'll never have more than thirteen vials of the stuff unless you make a specific choice that gives you an unlimited supply, though only one vial and you need to go back and get another once you've used it. As you can expect, it's pretty easy to fall into the mental trap of trying to conserve these as much as possible.
      • The Nuka-Cide soda from the Nuka-World DLC. Even more awesome than the Refreshing Beverage, it heals an unmatched 1200 HP and boosts your max HP by 50, plus boosting your AP and max HP, your carry weight, and your rad resistance. You've got to collect one Nuka-Cola of every flavor to make one, however, so that dramatically limits how many you can brew up.
      • The HalluciGen gas grenades causes enemies to start hallucinating and attacking each other. You can only get them by crafting, which requires a specialized gas canister, of which there are only nine in the entire game—and one of them is used to complete a sidequest. Annoyingly, the canister are flagged as junk, and so may be automatically scrapped for the nigh-useless steel they are made of.
      • The Raider bosses at Nuka-World all have special grenades, but if you kill them all, you limit how many you can loot for the rest of the game. It's likely you won't have more than three or four of each at most.
      • If you complete his quest, the Yangtze's Captain will give you three beacons you can use to call in a tactical strike from his submarine. These can never be replenished, but because they're essentially a more-precise version of a mini-nuke, they're also not so overpowered that there's any real temptation to use them up in the first place.
  • Wild ARMs had the extremely useful "Ambrosia" potion that revives, fully heals health and magic points and removes all status changes for the entire party.
  • The Bard's Tale has Adder Stones, which allow you to heal instantly, restrain enemies, become immortal for a brief period of time, and do several other cool things. This can result in completely unnecessary hoarding in case they need to become immortal later — people have died sitting on a decent collection of adder stones and entered the final boss fight with 102 stones (one is needed to heal, and 3 for immortality).
  • Baldur's Gate: Various awesome potions and protections scrolls just pile up in your inventory until the endgame, when you don't really need them since your mages and clerics can cast far mightier buffs on you. However, Protection from Magic and Protection from Undead scrolls MAY prove useful in the final levels. And for all that's holy, do hold like glue onto that Cloudkill scroll you find in the Firewine Ruins! Party mage + Cloudkill = the Big Bad's henchmen gone before they even see you.
  • Ultima frequently features the Glass Sword, which is very much one of these, killing any enemy instantly but breaking after use.
  • Skies of Arcadia:
    • The Aura of Valor maxes your Spirit pool, allowing you to unleash your biggest attacks instantly. You only ever get three of them, tops. While the storyline bosses can be beaten without using an Aura, they're indispensable for some of the Wanted Battles, especially in the Gamecube remake when you start facing more than one enemy at a time.
    • There's also the Tropica, a fruit that gives any character a 200 HP boost. There's only two in the entire game, and one of them is very, VERY easy to miss.
  • Tales Series:
    • The All-Divide halves damage that the party receives and inflicts, and while it makes battles take longer, it makes it considerably easier to withstand enemies' attacks long enough to heal. Unfortunately, given how rare they are, most players will save them for That One Boss or not use them at all.
    • Lampshaded in Tales of Vesperia when you discover an hourglass, a very rare item that stops time for a few seconds, a skit triggers where the party discusses using the item, with Raven firmly being this trope. Ironically, Raven can use a spell that replicates the hourglass, though getting that spell is a big Guide Dang It! that is permanently missable.
    • An Elixir fully recovers a character's HP and TP (in games that use it) and cures any status ailment, including being knocked out. If you're both diligent and lucky, you might find three of them throughout any Tales game.
  • Arcanum: Of Steamworks & Magick Obscura features Fate Points. Put simply, they provide a guaranteed critical success to the next use of whatever specific skill you chose (pickpocket, spell, attack, etc.) or instantly refill a meter of some sort (like health). They are extremely rare (about 25 technically), only rewarded for completing specific tasks, and are sometimes rewarded for different results in the same task (in other words, impossible to collect all of them). Good luck choosing those few very special occasions to spend them on. Most players would probably default to using them to steal powerful items that could otherwise never be stolen without being caught, but even then there are more such items than you have points to spend. Although, there are several points early on where you can spend a fate point to get a Disc-One Nuke that help avert this trope a bit.
    • To a lesser extent, high-level spell scrolls. While the idea of casting a spell without spending a ton of character points first (in a game with an Absurdly Low Level Cap) sounds convenient, free scrolls are fairly rare, and the prices asked for them in shops are usually too high for a single-use item. The only potential exception is Resurrect, and you'll only want it if you have powerful mages in the party, as its tech equivalent is quite a bit cheaper (and craftable).
  • Shin Megami Tensei:
    • Across the series, there are items that fully heal the HP of your party (usually Bead Chains), items that fully restore the party's MP (usually Great Chakras), and items that do both at once (usually Beads of Life). These will often be very rare, appearing only as sidequest rewards or in chests on the field; if you can purchase them, they may come at a ludicrous price.
    • Shin Megami Tensei III: Nocturne:
      • Somas fully heal a character's HP and SP, but they're painfully rare and just begging to be stockpiled. There's only ONE that doesn't require finding Mystical Chests, the contents of which will actually change if you open them in the wrong phase. How do you get it? Through a very-easily missed vending machine that stops working after the Conception. In other words, it's only available to you for the first 15 minutes of the game. Missed it? Too bad. Not to mention it doesn't actually say it's a Soma when you get it, until after the Conception.
      • This is inverted with HP healing items. Your average healing items are available on shops, but they are expensive up until mid-game and you're better leaving those to tough battles. To help with this, there are Muscle Drinks and variants and Life Stones: the first one heals a huge deal of HP but can cause one of the Standard Status Effects on use - being a Nintendo Hard game, you do not want to get afflicted with these on boss fights. The other one always heal a fixed low percentage, so it's never enough in mid-battle and you're better using them on the map. While fairly common, those are only available as Random Drops, and demons like to use them as bargaining chips if you're trying to recruit one mid-battle.
    • Shin Megami Tensei: Strange Journey:
      • Incenses and Sacrifices. The first permanently raise one of your stats and fully heal your HP and MP, the second automatically revive and fully heal your main character when he takes an Expel or Curse instant kill attack, which would otherwise mean a Game Over. You only get a limited number of them, most of the times from completing determinate sidequests in a specific way, or finding very rare chests in areas swarming with high-level enemies. And you keep the Incenses between runs, while your stats reset, meaning a savvy player will stock up dozens of them to face the Bonus Bosses or the Boss Rush. Incenses, unlike every other game in the franchise, can be produced at the lab... but you need several of the unique materials that only the Fiends drop. For each.
      • Mirrors, who deflect all physical or magical attack on your whole party for a single turn, and have top turn priority just like other items.
      • Magic Stones aren't limited, but are annoyingly difficult to acquire, as each type of them needs certain materials to be gathered around or stolen from demons (and some can only be obtained through negotiation from certain demons - good luck getting anything at all from a demon of your opposite alignment!) and then processed back at your ship, while spending hefty sums of Macca in the process. And they're the only way a MA-Type Demonica can take full advantage of its stats, since guns that give access to similar skills are not only even harder to come by or alignment-locked, but those skill's damage is based on ST.
    • Shin Megami Tensei IV: Apocalypse:
      • Everything in Saint Germain's shop, incredibly so for the Diamond items. Complete Restoration Gems are Exactly What It Says on the Tin - full restoration for the entire party, especially valuable with the tremendous drop in effectiveness for all MP-restoration items. Relics of Revival will not only revive you and your entire party should you fall, but will also grant you eight Press Turns. Dimensional Hourglasses will grant you an extra Press Turn for the entire battle. The big issue is that each of these beauties costs five Diamonds, and even the gem-farming DLC isn't enough to trivialize either their acquisition or their use.
    • Persona 3 and Persona 4:
      • The "Soma" item returns, this time restoring the whole party's life and magic points. However there are only several in each game and they can't be bought from any store.
      • In the Updated Re-release "Persona 3 Portable", combination attacks now come in card form, purchasable from the antique store. Remember that Game-Breaker, Armageddon? It now cost 99 Malachite and 10 Opal. Don't worry, you'll have that many if you saved for 80 levels.
      • In Persona 4, MP restoration items can fall under this. The reason being that, unlike in Persona 3, you can't buy anything that restores MP, only farm them from chests in dungeons. Considering that the general consensus is that you can only have a single, really long dungeon run each month (for the most part) if you want maximum efficiency in Persona 4, you'll need to hoard those MP recovery items.
    • Persona 5 gives you a [Lover]'s Chocolate after you complete the Romance Sidequest for any Love Interest after Joker meets up with his lover. The chocolate completely restores SP to one character, which you can use on New Game+. You only ever get this chocolate once per playthrough, and it's after you've already beaten the Final Boss and the story is in its Dénouement. So if you want another chocolate, you have to beat the game all over again. Given how rare SP-restoring items are in general, a player will probably save it for the unlocked Bonus Boss or just never use it.
  • The golden potato in Barkley, Shut Up and Jam: Gaiden. One-Hit KO on any enemy, including the final boss.
  • Geneforge: The Jeweled Wand, which lets you use the extremely powerful "Diamond Spray" attack that you can't cast on your own; it hits up to FIVE enemies for quite a bit of damage. The item is extremely rare, as well, with most players probably only getting one. Players usually save the item for the battle with Trajkov, Goettsch, or the Bonus Dungeon.
  • In Albion, you're a brave space-pilot, stranded on a medieval-level world with your scientist friend. Favored weapons amongst the natives includes swords, spears and the like. In the wreck of your spaceship, you find a gun and a handful of bullets for it - and, needless to say, you're not likely to find extra ammo anywhere on the planet. Hence, you'll probably never use it at all, even as the game's progression gradually gives you access to to powerful magic-users and enchanted weapons that can equal and surpass the handgun's power - and towards the very end of the game, you actually DO find plentiful extra ammo, and more powerful guns as well. Shame you didn't use the gun back near the beginning, where it would've actually been really useful...
  • In the Dungeons & Dragons CRPG Ravenloft: Strahd's Possession, the heroes can find a handful of Arrows of Slaying Undead very early in the game. There are only a handful available in the game. Good luck deciding when to use them.
  • In the Monster Hunter games, there are Max Potions and Ancient Potions: you can only hold 2 and 1 at a time, respectively. Max potions will heal you to full and increase your max total health to its maximum; Ancient Potions will do that and do the same to your stamina (though stamina recovers megafast anyway, but the max deteriorates over time). Max potions can be crafted, and with farmable materials, but they're a hassle... and Ancient Potions also require Kelbi Horns to make, which can be tough to get. And inventory slots are valuable. So, pretty much never gets used. They do have a good use for when you get killed, as that resets your max stamina/health and they're the only ones who can increase max health during a quest... but then you're wasting the healing component, and most don't assume they'll get killed during a quest/plan around it.
  • In Hydlide, the Medicine will revive you to full health when you die, but only once. Saving it for the Final Boss is pretty much obligatory.
  • Dark Souls has the not-that-common Ring of Sacrifice and the Rare Ring of Sacrifice, which prevent you from losing souls and humanity upon death, and the latter breaking the otherwise hard to remove Curse ailment...and break upon use. And then there's the Ring of Favor and Protection, which gives a boost to health, stamina, and carrying capacity, with only two(and one of them well-hidden) in the game, and they break upon being removed. And then there's the Divine Blessing: A very large heal that cures any ailment except curse, and of which only a limited number exist in each playthrough. In the DLC there is the Elizabeth's Mushroom, which provides a unique and very useful health regeneration effect. Those who use a Divine Blessing or Elizabeth's Mushroom in multiplayer will often be accused of being a hacker because of this trope.
  • In Mass Effect 2, the M-920 Cain is essentially a railgun with the power of a nuclear warhead (to the point of causing mushroom clouds and bearing the radiation hazard symbol) that does enough damage to instantly clear an entire squadron of enemy troops. Unfortunately, it requires all of your heavy weapon ammo to fire once (unless you have the heavy ammo upgrades; getting them all will let you fire it twice). It has a four second charge time, and you have to charge it out of cover. It's just not practical in the many close-quarters firefights which populate the game because of its blast radius, especially since its projectile is relatively slow. The last boss is one of the fights you'd want to use it on, but he flails around like he's having a seizure, making hitting him an exercise in frustration, so you might save it until the end... and then completely blow it.
  • Fullmetal Alchemist and the Broken Angel has a system where you can turn things into weapons using alchemy; you can make the basic weapon and a more advanced one, and can add on elemental bonuses to them. You can, for example, create a broadsword and attach fire to that, which is pretty powerful, or you can make the more advanced weapon, a katana, but it comes at a cost; you can't attach an element to it, and, while it is powerful enough to take out an enemy in a single hit, it is used up after about six hits, leaving you running around wildly looking for something else you can turn into a weapon.
  • Class skills in AdventureQuest generally fall under this trope, especially with the newer/revamped classes introduced after Skill Points were released. Class-based attacks and defensive skills are some of the best in the game, but nearly all of them come with prohibitively high SP costs. Class-based attacks are also prone to missing just as often as regular attacks, so using them will basically amount to wasting a boatload of SP, even if it actually does something. Okay, so what about the unchanged classes introduced before SP came along? They tend to act as a Mana sink instead; conserving Mana is very important, since you will probably need to cast a healing spell at least once a fight regardless of what armor you decide to equip.
  • The Dark Chips from Mega Man Battle Network 4 and 5, extremely powerful battle chips that in addition to inflicting a negative side effect on the player, permanently reduce Mega Man's maximum health by 1 with each use. While 4 includes a New Game+ feature, the HP reduction isn't erased across playthroughs, making the lost HP into Permanently Missable Content. 5 introduces a way to safely use the power of Dark Chips by channeling them through your Soul Unisons, turning your charge shot into the Dark Chip sans glitch or HP loss. Getting the timing wrong on the charge shot will spawn a dangerous enemy, though, so Chaos Unisons are still impractical, unless you use the pause trick.
  • Opoona has the Popcorn Shower item. It can only be bought from the OMP Point Shop for 1000 points, the equivalent of 100,000 Matia. It does almost 1000 damage to every enemy in a battle... but even the game's burliest random encounters only have around 400 HP, so few fights require that kind of firepower. There are a few where it would be worthwhile (such as against the Boss in Mook Clothing enemies), but in areas where they appear, they aren't as uncommon, leaving players to wonder if they're really in a bad enough place to use it.
  • Radiant Historia has a few, ranging from valuable but reasonably obtainable to absurdly rare:
    • Celestial Dew restores 200 MP to the party, and there are only 2 of them in the game. The Celestial Tea and Celestial Oil (full-party 50 and 100 MP restoration respectively) are a subversion, as while they are equally hard to find and cannot be bought in shops, they can be stolen from a few late-game enemies. Radiant Historia's stealing mechanic tends to have a fairly high success rate and the enemies can be respawned, so it is not too hard to maximize your stock of these. The same goes for Healing Fruit, Superior Tea, and Divine Water (full-party 300 HP restoration, single-person 150 MP restoration, and single-person revival and 500 HP restoration), which are valuable but can be purchased late in the game.
    • The Medibranch, which has about the same rarity as the above and restores 1000 HP to the party (most characters, by the way, will not have that much HP even at level 99).
    • To a lesser extent, the Shield Seeds, which can block attacks and are also unavailable in shops.
    • Finally, Mana Crystals can only be used at save points but will fully restore the party's HP and MP, and aside from the three you get for free at the beginning of the game, they are hard to find and relatively expensive to buy. Players might want to save them for late in the game when the restoration will be of a greater magnitude (since, naturally, the player characters will be at higher levels and have greater maximum HP and MP values). Then again, since most save points also allow you to warp to any other save point in the game, most people will just use them to warp to the nearest Trauma Inn whenever they're low on HP and MP, warp back and continue where they left off, making the Crystals' use questionable at best.
  • Eternal Sonata has the Saint's Mirror item, which revives anyone that is KOed and restores them to full HP. However, there was only to be found normally as treasure in the main gameplay. Another was available as a drop from a boss fought only in Encore Mode. While there was a regular enemy that dropped them in the Bonus Dungeon, Mysterious Unison, it was an extremely rare drop. Further complicating things in the original Xbox 360 version was that they carried an item weight of 10. The PlayStation 3 version changed this to 2, making their inclusion in your inventory at least more practical.
  • In Riviera: The Promised Land, the battle system is based entirely on consumable items (weapons break, potions run dry, magic orbs lose power etc) and there are several items which have very low uses, sometimes even only one. Among them are the Infinity +1 Sword weapons Fanelia and Longinius, which deal truly excessive amounts of damage; however other than against the Final Boss, there's no real reason to actually use them, so 99.99% of the time they'll just occupy your item slots (of which you have only 15!). Thankfully, there is a training mode where items are not consumed which is great since leveling up in the game only works with training the use of the consumable items, some of which have less maximum use than mastering them takes to begin with!
  • Fate in Fallen London. If you're not willing to shell out the real-life cash for Nex, a currency that lets you access more in-game stories and areas, you can use Fate instead. However, the stories that give out Fate are so scarce and give such piddling amounts that you'll almost certainly end up hoarding them.
    • Darkdrop Coffees, which give you 10 free actions immediately. You get about four of them in the early game stage through tutorial cards, but after that the only sources of them are the very occasional holiday/promotion event and a rare success on a single, specific card that can only be accessed within a certain Persuasive range.
    • You can draw Mood cards that give you a huge +30 boost to a specific attribute. However, the effect lasts for only one hour and the cards are extremely rare (and have few practical uses for players who have already maxed out their attributes).
    • There's also the Magnificent Feast, an item that refreshes all your actions (up to 20 or 40 for Exceptional Friends), heals all your Wounds, Nightmares, and Irrigo, and has even more positive effects on you. Unfortunately, this magnificent item can be obtained only once per year at Christmas so you'll undoubtedly hoard it if you're aware of just how good an item it is.
  • Miracles in the Lufia series are like Elixirs, except they also revive and cure any status effects. Even though you get more of them than you tend to get of Elixirs, they'll often end up hoarded.
  • Etrian Odyssey has Formaldehydes in all games and Coupons in The Drowned City. To put the former's importance in perspective, the franchise places immense importance on enemy drops; they are the primary source of money and the store's wares fluctuate depending on their stock of said drops - consume enough medicine, you'll need to hunt the monsters whose organs form the basis of the same. Using Formaldehyde on an enemy and killing it in the same turn will guarantee it will drop all of its spoils, even its conditional drops (something normally impossible). It's possible to create more Formaldehydes in IV and The Millennium Girl... but they require extremely rare drops from the Sixth Stratum. Coupons, on the other hand, will halve the cost of any one given item - whether you choose to use it on the Infinity +1 Sword or a cheap-ass Medica is your business. However, there are only eight in the game. Ever. New Game+ doesn't restock them.
  • The Legend of Heroes: Trails in the Sky has the EP Charge EX, which is this for at least most of the game. It restores 300 EP to one character (for comparison, a character's maximum EP will likely vary from about 200 to 600 depending on who it is and what quartz they have equipped). You will find only 7 of them in the game (and 5 of those are in The Very Definitely Final Dungeon), and they cannot be bought until almost the end of the game.
    • In the sequel, it's called EP Charge II. It's noticeably easier to come by there (partly because you can buy them earlier), but it also introduces a third tier. EP Charge III items restore 500 EP and cannot be bought at all. There are also the Zeram Powder and Zeram Capsule, which revive, restore HP to full, and restore either 100 or 200 CP (i.e. Limit Break points) respectively. They can be bought only in the casino and only on New Game+, and you need to win medals to buy casino prizes. You'll probably find about a dozen EP Charge IIIs, 8 Zeram Powders, and 4 Zeram Capsules through the course of the game.
    • Both games also have the Deathblow 2 Quartz. Equipping one causes your next attack to inflict guaranteed instant death on the target, but the quartz permanently breaks afterwards, and you only get a few in the game. Deciding what to save it for it hard enough, but you'd better how what you do decide to use it on isn't immune to instant death...
    • Powerful food items also fall under this; while you can make them yourself once you learn their recipes, they tend to require a lot of rare ingredients, and you usually only get one freebie (a notable exception being the Nirvana Tea). The 100 Victories Steak is noteworthy for being an item found in Chapter 2 that restores 10000 HP and buffs your STR, when most characters are unlikely to have that much HP until the final chapter. (Tip: Don't treat the attack items this way, because their damage does not scale with your characters' stats, and they're all basically underpowered to the point of uselessness once you reach the Final Boss.)
  • Undertale seems to be deliberately invoking this. Early in the game, you receive a slice of butterscotch-cinnamon pie that restores all HP. If you take the normal path and actually save it all the way to the Final Boss, because the pie is his ex-wife's special recipe, the smell will weaken his resolve, reducing his Attack and Defense. You can also use it during the True Final Boss fight, to instantly win the "I Know You're in There Somewhere" Fight against both the aforementioned neutral-path Final Boss and the character who gave you the pie. And due to the way the game's endings work, you might actually use the same one slice of pie to do both of these in the same run.
  • Torchlight II has Vendor Boon Scrolls, which summon a vendor of unique items that normally must be found and cannot be bought, with the equipment he sells depending on the level of the area you're in. However, the scrolls are incredibly rare (Though they can technically drop at any level from any place you can find scrolls, it may take hundreds of hours to ever find one) and can only be used once. If you do decide to use one and take a look at Boon's wares, he walks away and permanently disappears (Similarly to the enchanters that sometimes appear) regardless of whether you purchased anything, and the items he sells are highly expensive. However, a bug exists where you can prevent Boon from disappearing by quickly opening up a Waypoint Portal and entering it before he disappears. As long as the waypoint is active, Boon will never disappear.
  • Granblue Fantasy has Sunlight Stones, Damascus Bars and Gold Bars. The former can uncap summons regardless of rarity, while the latter two can uncap any weapon type and are also used for certain rare weapons. All of them are extremely scarce and hard to obtain, so many players only use them for select priority items.

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