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  • Alas, Poor Scrappy:
    • In Season 2, Shannon to those who still considered her a Scrappy. Just when she starts becoming a compelling character and not the vapid Rich Bitch, as well as we get to learn how much her Evil Matriarch stepmother crashed her dreams and broke her spirits... boom, shot in the stomach.
    • Also in Season 2, Ana Lucia got quite a bit of hate for killing Shannon, but she becomes more likeable just in time for Michael, yet another disliked character, to kill her.
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    • In Season 3, Nikki and Paulo. They are really hated, but to be buried alive (and by mistake because the Losties thought they were dead after being paralyzed by spider poison) is a terrifying fate.
  • Alternative Character Interpretation: This show is probably the poster child for this trope, and it can be applied to pretty much every character with explicit grounding in the show's subtext. Keep in mind, these are just some of the major ones:
    • Is the universe really such a rational place, or is Jack Shepherd just interpreting it that way because of his compulsion to fix things caused by his daddy issues?
    • Is the Island really guiding John Locke's destiny (or sentient at all), or is he just interpreting it that way because of his compulsion to discover his destiny caused by his daddy issues?
    • Are the Numbers really cursed, or is Hurley just interpreting them that way after a string of bad luck like this guy because of his compulsion to blame himself caused by his daddy issues?
    • Is the boar in the jungle really the spirit of Frank Duckett, or is Sawyer just interpreting it that way because of guilt over the accidental murder caused by his daddy issues?
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    • Is the world really such a hostile place, or is Ana-Lucia just interpreting it that way because of her accident and her overprotective mommy issues?
    • Is Sayid really in love with Nadia, or is he just interpreting his feelings that way because of his guilt and his need to be absolved?
    • Is Jacob a weary God-like character full of love whose hand is forced by fate? Or a callous, sociopathic momma's boy whose manipulations have caused thousands of deaths?
    • Is the Man In Black as much of an apocalyptic villain as Jacob says, or is he simply so desperate to escape the island that he's willing to resort to evil means?
    • How seriously are we supposed to take Ben's statement that the Others are the "good guys?"
    • Watching the series a second time knowing Locke has no real idea of anything he's talking about makes him a good deal less sympathetic, and more like he's trying to start a cult of personality around himself as the island's savior.
  • Ass Pull:
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    • The Man in Black's getting Mode Locked as John Locke. We never learn why, or how Ilana knows this. Basically, it was just an excuse to keep Terry O'Quinn on the show in the final season.
    • Likewise, the claim that the Man in Black cannot leave the island unless he kills all the candidates. This is never really explained properly. It's essentially a Hand Wave so that the character can do evil things, and thus give the audience a reason to root against him. For that matter, how was Jacob keeping him on the island? Did Jacob wave a magic wand and make a force field erupt whenever his brother tried to leave?
    • In Season 4, Hurley gets the ability to talk to ghosts out of nowhere, which is never explained. Even weirder, this is the same season that introduces a new character who can also talk to ghosts, so what was wrong with using him for these scenes?
  • Award Snub: Where to begin??
    • Many in hindsight feel that Terry O'Quinn deserved to win the Best Supporting Actor Emmy for his performance in the first season instead of the third, in which his part was arguably smaller.
    • Similarly, most fans would cite season 4 as Michael Emerson's most Emmy-worthy performance as Ben, more so than the fifth, for which he won. Some also feel he deserved to win for the sixth season over Aaron Paul, which is part of the reason for Youtube's minor Breaking Bad/LOST fandom rivalry.
    • Many critics deemed Matthew Fox's performance in "Through the Looking Glass" worthy of an Emmy, with him unfortunately not even being nominated until the final season.
    • With the exception of Elizabeth Mitchell's guest actress nomination, none of Lost's women were ever recognized by the Emmys, which is both surprising and unfortunate, since the show has so many talented actresses. Many fans were outraged by Elizabeth Mitchell not even being nominated for Best Supporting Actress in the third season, with the same being true for Yunjin Kim in the fourth. Evangeline Lilly and Emilie De Ravin also received much praise for their performances in "Whatever Happened, Happened" and "Par Avion" respectively, with many believing them worthy of nominations.
    • While both of them were only in the main cast for one full season, both Jeremy Davies and Adewale Akinnoye-Abaje were widely praised by critics for their performances, but were killed off too early to get major awards recogntion.
    • Josh Holloway was consistently praised for his portrayal of Sawyer, particularly in season 6, but never received any Emmy nominations.
    • Henry Ian Cusick's performance in "The Constant" was widely hailed as one of the best performances of season four and on television that year, but failed to result in any major nominations.
    • Ironically, despite "The Constant" being heralded as the greatest episode of the show, it failed to earn nominations for either writing or directing, making Season 4 the only season in the show's run not to be acknowledged by the writer's branch.
  • Awesome Music: It has its own sub-page.
  • Badass Decay:
    • Played with in Locke's case. He goes back and forth from awesome to pathetic so many times that this duality has basically become one of his main character traits.
    • Even though his badassery was only memetic, Richard Alpert could be said to have suffered from this, having spent most of Season 6 in a state of Heroic BSoD instead of actually doing anything badass. It's made worse because he BSOD'd after the first time he ever really ran into trouble. Before that, he got by on just standing around and looking badass without ever actually doing anything.
    • The Others. What started as a mysterious group of rogue jungle ninjas was soon revealed to be little more than a bunch of commune dwelling nobodies that played football and had a flare for the dramatic. Although shining the spotlight on anything scary will quickly reveal that it's just a branch scratching against a window.
  • Beam Me Up, Scotty!: Sawyer's "You too, Brutus?", from Shakespeare. Actually, Caesar is supposed to have said "You too, my son".
  • Bellisario's Maxim: Largely averted, due to the extreme amount of attention to detail and hidden clues. However, this often backfires, since fans attribute significance to every little detail, and minor things like getting the date of a real-world event wrong become central points of theories.
  • Better on DVD: For one thing, you don't have to wait an ungodly time between seasons. For another, keeping up with every Continuity Nod and Call-Back—and in general, the extensive lore—is much easier.
  • Broken Base:
    • See details of the criticism here. But then again this hardly scratches the surface in some people's opinion. Other points of contention include discussion of what season did the show go off the rails, those who think the writers were making it all up as they go along, and of course those who love the Kate/Sawyer/Jack love triangle and those who detest it and consider it to be the bane of the show.
    • Most Lost fans were a very cohesive unified base at one point, particularly around Season 1. Mostly due to sharing Wild Mass Guessing, in addition to all the alternate reality web stuff. But around Season 2 strain was starting to show. People were unsatisfied with the snail pace, the over exposure of Kate/Jack/and yes even Sawyer at the expense of everyone else. The tension and divisiveness only grew with every season.
    • The reveal about the Others. Some say it was ingenious and a great, unexpected twist, while others think it was anti-climactic and destroyed their creepiness.
    • The final episode "The End" was what finally broke the base clean in half. "It's all about the characters!" vs. "Where are my friggin' answers?!"
  • The Chris Carter Effect: As the show went on, more and more fans began to feel that it had become this, with this being the dominant image of the show in the mainstream media during its last couple of years. And it only became more contentious once the show ended. At any given time, exactly half of its fanbase believed that the show's creators were making the next Twin Peaks and had no idea what endgame they desired, while the other half argued that the threads were finally coming together, and a satisfactory revelation was all but guaranteed. In the end, it's a matter of opinion how it all turned out. The most diplomatic way to phrase it would be to say that there were two groups of fans: those who thought it was about the characters, and those who thought it was about the plot and mythology. The former seem to have generally been pleased by the ending, while the latter were generally very upset and firm believers that this trope was in effect. Generally, science fiction can have an open ending as long as the fates of the most interesting characters are resolved. Unfortunately, on Lost, a large chunk thought the island was the most interesting character.
  • Commitment Anxiety: Due to the show's Continuity Lockout, it was difficult for some new viewers to jump in at later seasons without seeing any of the prior episodes.
  • Complete Monster
  • Darkness-Induced Audience Apathy: The first major character death on the show was a legitimately heartbreaking moment, and marked the first major rift in the overall status quo. As the show progressed, however, and character deaths became more and more frequent, some people felt that the shock value began to wear off. While it did help break the taboo for TV series regarding character deaths, by the time of the later seasons when half the cast had been wiped out, it became hard to care about some of the newer characters, knowing that their chances of making it to the end of the season were slim. It doesn't help how dominating the influence of Lost was on mid-00s TV series, meaning that many other shows at that time were doing the same thing.
  • Draco in Leather Pants:
    • Sawyer, before he grew into a legitimately likable character.
    • Ben Linus. Even the show itself wants you to like him more than he deserves.
  • Ensemble Dark Horse:
    • Desmond and Ben started out this way with their popularity earning them major roles.
    • Rose and Bernard deserve special mention. They get only one Day in the Limelight, but manage to be more compelling there than the main Jack/Kate/Sawyer triangle.
    • Juliet, the resident Stoic Woobie Bad Ass Bookworm Action Girl.
    • Daniel Faraday, as is par for the course with characters played by Jeremy Davies, made a large impact with fans in the relatively little screentime he had on the show.
    • Mr. Eko came onto the scene in Season 2 and immediately earned an enthusiastic fan response, easily the most popular of the Tailies. His sudden death left many fans in despair.
  • Epileptic Trees: One wild fan theory was the Trope Namer. Yeah, it's that kind of a show. We've a very active Wild Mass Guessing page if you've got a crazy fan theory to share.
  • Everyone Is Jesus in Purgatory:
    • The fan speculation on this started early but several characters throughout the series espouse their own theories of this variety. Hurley, when they get off the island, thinks they died on the island and are in heaven because things are going well for everybody and he's seeing dead people. Richard Alpert thinks the island is hell after being disillusioned about Jacob, and because he can't die.
    • Most true in the flash-sideways universe, which turns out to take place after the main characters die, and they are all finding each other again and living/working through their unresolved issues before uniting to go to Heaven.
  • Fandom Rivalry: With Breaking Bad, over which is more deserving of the "Best Series Of All Time" title, as well as over certain actors from Breaking Bad beating out certain actors from Lost for Emmys.
  • Fan-Preferred Couple: Some fans prefer Sawyer/Juliet just because they're so damn sick of the Jack/Kate/Sawyer love triangle. And then it becomes the official pairing in the series finale.
  • Fanon Discontinuity: The only thing that isn't guaranteed to fall under here for someone somewhere is early-to-mid Season 1. Beyond that, it varies massively.
  • Franchise Original Sin: Seasons 2 and 3, before the show got a set end date, are often criticized for being overly slow and padded. Season 1 was actually the same way, the difference being that with our just getting to know the characters, the show simply couldn't help but give us new information on them in every single episode. Once we actually had a handle on who everyone was, the pacing issues were much more noticeable.
  • Friendly Fandoms: With Person of Interest, both being complex, cerebral sci-fi/action dramedies that are co-written by J. J. Abrams and share a star. In fact, a pretty good percentage of the Person of Interest fandom began watching the show BECAUSE they loved Michael Emerson's work on Lost.
  • Genius Bonus: In the finale, the flash-sideways universe was revealed as a bardo, or an "intermediate state", similar to what is detailed in the Tibetan Book of the Dead. Spiritual guru Ram Dass famously helped LSD researcher Timothy Leary translate the book in the 1960s, but Dass didn't go by that name back then. His birth name? Richard Alpert.
  • Growing the Beard:
    • Many fans were hooked right from the outset. But the fourth episode of the series, "Walkabout", where we find out Locke couldn't walk before the crash, is the earliest episode to hint at deeper supernatural elements on the island and is remembered for having the series' first big plot twist.
    • After a season many agree marked somewhat of a slump in the show's pacing and quality, Jack grows a literal Beard of Sorrow in "Through The Looking Glass", signaling a return to full form for the show's last three seasons.
  • Harsher in Hindsight: The mysterious disappearance of Flight MH370 of Malaysia Airlines in 09 March 2014 will inevitably get people thinking of the show.
  • Hilarious in Hindsight:
    • Since almost the beginning of the show, viewers have theorized, over and over, that everyone died in the crash and the Island is Purgatory, even after repeated debunking. The final revelation of the series? The flash-sideways timeline is Purgatory, or the next best thing — though the Island and all the events that happened on and/or off it in normal continuity was all real. It makes it even funnier when you realize that after being told the Island wasn't purgatory over and over again, NO ONE theorized that that's what the FS really is.
    • The January 4, 2011 U.S. Mega Millions lottery (worth $355 million) had a very significant amount of overlap with The Numbers, with 4, 8, 15, 25, 47 and the bonus 42. Playing The Numbers would have netted a person $150, and apparently there were 9,078 people who did just that.
    • Season 3's "The Man Behind the Curtain" gave us the weird scene where Ben has a conversation with a seemingly empty chair. This may have already been narmy to some, but five years later, along came Clint Eastwood...
    • Terry O'Quinn revealed in an interview during the first season that the direction he was given for the scene where Locke first sees the Monster was "It's the most beautiful thing you've ever seen." Then during the last season-and-a-half, the Man in Black was Mode Locked as Locke himself.
    • In the episode "Further Instructions", Charlie claims to know how clever polar bears can be from watching "nature programs on the Beeb" while he was high. Fast forward to 2013, and the actor who played Charlie now has his own nature program, Wild Things with Dominic Monaghan, on BBC America.
    • For anyone who found Jacob Unintentionally Unsympathetic as noted below, Mark Pellegrino's role as Lucifer in Supernatural is basically exactly what they wanted him to be like, deliberately playing on people's sympathies to hide how evil he really was.
    • Compare the way Evangeline Lilly handled a love triangle on this show to The Hobbit, where she made her choice early on, and he got killed.
    • In "Some Like It Hoth," Miles laughs off Hurley's plan to write the script for The Empire Strikes Back with "improvements." Ken Leung ended up appearing in The Force Awakens.
    • In 2016, the Chicago Cubs finally won the World Series. It was their first series win in 108 years. Especially considering that the show had the Red Sox winning as a major plot point...
    • In 2016, Emilie de Ravin was actually pregnant, leading many of her fans to note that was a familiar sight (only the cries of "Aaron" came short, given her baby turned out to be a girl).
    • It is Hilarious in Hindsight how much this show cribbed from Watchmen—the flashback structure, the clash of belief systems, godlike beings with a warped view of time, the heavy use of mythological, literary, and pop cultural allusions—now that Damon Lindelof is for real doing a miniseries adaptation of Watchmen.
  • It Was His Sled: The show's popularity and sheer number of crazy plot twists led to a lot of these, one of the biggest being Locke's pre-Island paralysis. Even to someone who hasn't finished Season 1 (or just didn't bother watching the show), it's pretty common knowledge by now that the monster on the island is made out of smoke. Lost's use of flash-forwards in the second half is also pretty well-known, despite being a huge twist when it was first revealed.
  • Jerkass Woobie:
    • Sawyer, at least for the first three seasons. After that, the jerkass part tones down.
    • Ben. Definitely a villain, Manipulative Bastard, unrepentant liar, and murderer, yet his Freudian Excuse and the fact that the writers seem to enjoy having him constantly get the pulp beaten out of him (even though most of the time, he deserves it) have the side effect of making him somewhat sympathetic. It also helps that he was redeemed in the episode "Dr. Linus".
    • Locke, at times. He's not a bad guy, but he definitely comes across as one to his fellow survivors on several occasions, most notably after attacking Sayid, killing Naomi, and becoming tyrannical once assuming leadership of a group of islanders. He only does all of this, however, because he knows that the Island is special and he feels he needs to protect it at all costs. It's the first time he felt he had a real purpose, as his life before the Island was one big heap of misery.
  • Launcher of a Thousand Ships: Claire. Paired in fandom with just about anyone she shared a frame with.
  • Memetic Badass:
    • Richard. Most cite his "beginning in badassery" to the episode "La Fleur", where Richard simply walks into the DHARMA Barracks compound, holding a torch, which he then slams into the ground and sits on a bench as if he owns the place. Not to mention the sonic death fence that surrounds the Barracks, which apparently doesn't harm him. Because he's Richard Alpert.
    • Juliet Burke has her own website all about her awesomeness.
  • Memetic Mutation:
  • Mexicans Love Speedy Gonzales: Lost is often a Snark Bait in Korea, due to characters speaking Korean in immensely broken accent (Jin's is over-the-top but still recognizable; others are often much worse) and egregious depiction of their country (like a few Korea episodes taking place in jungle even though the country is strictly in temperate zone; in reality, these scenes were filmed in Hawaii). In spite of this, the show is actually very popular there, because it's too unintentionally hilarious to really hate it. To them, the whole series is Fountain of Memes, and any moment someone talks in Korean results in an opportunity for Guilty Pleasures, Bile Fascination, and Mondegreen (for quick example, Jin-Soo Kwon's name is interpreted as "Jji-Jju Kkwa" because of how his actor says it). It's also a case of Germans Love David Hasselhoff, as Jin's actor, Daniel Kim, has great reputation in Korea because of this show.
  • Moe:
    • Claire, Charlie and Hurley can all be quite adorable.
    • And Juliet too! Especially in the flashbacks. Just look at her Broken Smile and tell me you don't want to hug her.
    • Ben isn't usually this, but just look at his smile in the episode "The Other Woman" when he lets Juliet into his house! "HI COME ON IN! I just need to get this ham out of the oven!" D'awwww. He's also quite frequently this in the Flash Sideways, as his afterlife persona is a genuinely nice guy.
  • Moral Event Horizon:
    • Ethan Rom crossed it when he hung Charlie.
    • Anthony Cooper crossed it when he threw his own son out of a building just for trying to reason with him, even after his son gave his kidney to save his life.
    • Martin Keamy shooting Alex dead right in front of Ben.
    • Jonas (in Richard's flashback) crossed it when he murdered his prisoners after they get stranded on the island.
    • The Man in Black tricking the main characters into activating his timebomb, resulting in the deaths of Jin, Sun and Sayid.
  • Narm:
    • In the flashbacks of "I Do", Kate screaming to her husband about how she hates taco night.
    • The sheer amount of characters who have horrible fathers. It was a regular joke among the fans that someone in the production team must have really despised their father as they seem to be literally unable to comprehend the possibility that anyone can have a healthy relationship with theirs.
  • Narm Charm:
    • One would argue that Michael's repeated shoutings of "WAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAALT!", given their justification, come off less narmful than anybody else in the same situation.
    • Similarly, Claire's "MY BAY-BEE!"
  • Paranoia Fuel: The ending of Season 6, while having an uplifting mood, may be this if you apply it to real life. Here you are sitting behind your PC reading this TV Tropes article... but actually you've died long time ago, your life is just a flashback of your past on Earth, and you have to move on to the afterlife. Unlike most other Dead All Along endings, there is absolutely no way to prove to yourself that this isn't the case, since the "flash sideways" are a perfect imitation of reality.
  • The Producer Thinks of Everything:
    • Despite a lot of the show's criticism claiming the contrary, anyone who actually watched the show through all six seasons knows that way too many things do add up for it to all be "made up as they go along". Locke's black and white stones. Adam and Eve (though a few centuries off in their timing). The DHARMA Initiative. They planned quite a bit of everything YEARS in advance.
    • Even in the first couple of episodes there was Foreshadowing of the events of the last couple of seasons, including the sounds of the Monster playing on the soundtrack during the final close-up of Locke at the end of "Tabula Rasa", and Locke's dialogue about backgammon in the very pilot ("a game played between two sides, one light, the other dark").
    • Locke mentions seeing a bright light after his encounter with the Monster in the first season, and later tells Mr. Eko that he looked into the heart of the Island and what he saw was beautiful, referring the light he mentioned, in Season 3. Towards the end of the series, it's revealed that the Island DOES have a "heart" filled with a glowing bright light, and it needs to be protected from The Man in Black/The Monster.
    • The Mr. Eko centric episode "The Cost of Living" basically foreshadows the fact that The Smoke Monster is the true Big Bad of the series. There is the aforementioned conversation with Locke, in which Eko replies "That is not what I saw" in reference to his encounter with the Monster. And at the end of the episode, after Mr. Eko refuses to confess his sins and says he did all he could to save his brother Yemi from the same fate, "Yemi" responds "You speak to me as if I were your brother", revealing that he is not Yemi's ghost. When Mr. Eko asks who he really is and follows him, he sees the Monster and realizes it was the Monster posing as his brother all along, right before it kills him. In his dying breath, he whispers something to Locke, which Locke claims to be "We're next". In the Season 5 finale, we see that Locke is not really Locke (the real one having been killed by Ben after all), but The Man in Black who was seen earlier in the episode vowing to kill Jacob, and in the season six premiere the Man in Black is revealed to be the Smoke Monster, and the true Big Bad of the series.
    • Even the brief image after Eko's death of young Eko and Yemi as children walking off happily together foreshadows the fact that the afterlife, where loved ones will be reunited, will be a factor at the end of the show.
    • The official story is that while the first season was written seat-of-their-pants due to the showrunner turnovernote , Lindelof and Cuse mapped out the major mythology and story beats before they started work on the second season.
  • Rescued from the Scrappy Heap:
    • After the pilot aired, Sawyer was said to be the character audiences hated the most, and he spent the rest of the season as a unsympathetic, antagonistic Jerkass. But thanks to character development, he became popular for reasons other than how hot he is with his shirt off.
    • Shannon, to the point where her accidental death actually saddened many people.
    • Jack's popularity within the fanbase significantly increased during Seasons 5 and 6.
    • Kate became much more likable throughout the last two seasons ("Whatever Happened Happened" in particular is considered very good for a Kate episode). Then she had enough awesome moments in the Grand Finale to put her in this category.
  • Romantic Plot Tumor: The Jack/Kate/Sawyer love triangle took up significant story time. Became especially grating when the series committed to a definite endpoint, and every second spent on this was one less second that could have been used clearing up the show's numerous mysteries and dangling plot-threads. Also because the writers proved that they could write relationship arcs that are well done and popular among the fans (see: Desmond & Penny)...yet suddenly they couldn't do the same with the main one. This is taken to insane levels in the Season 5 finale, where Jack wants to erase the entire timeline by blowing up a nuclear bomb... because his relationship with Kate didn't work out. He doesn't seem to realize that this would mean they'd never meet in the first place! Juliet was also added to this romantic plot tumor. Additionally, Juliet suddenly changed her mind about detonating that hydrogen bomb because she thought that her relationship with Sawyer might end because Kate came back to the island. Really, the way Kate, Juliet, Sawyer, and Jack felt about detonating that hydrogen bomb was extremely arbitrary and depended entirely on how they felt about their role in this love polygon from hell at a given moment.
  • The Scrappy:
    • Jack, the show's main character, is intensely disliked by many fans who view him as a Designated Hero. It doesn't help that practically every other character on the show is more interesting than him. He finally gets better towards the later seasons, but for many fans this was too little, too late.
    • Kate could also qualify. Her constant swapping between Jack and Sawyer did her no favours whatsoever. Not to mention she got captured so often and was rather useless in any situation, that it made Princess Peach look competent.
    • Nikki & Paulo were introduced in the third season because the producers of the show were often asked what some of the other survivors of the crash were doing. Viewers and TV critics wasted no time flaming them to hell and back.
    • A good amount of fans hated Ana-Lucia when she was introduced to the cast due to her bully-like attitude, but she had slowly been winning them over by showing a more sympathetic and level-headed side right before Michael (yet another disliked character) killed her.
    • Widmore's henchman, Zoe, in Season 6, is widely hated for being a pointless, annoying character who eats up valuable screen time that would be better spent on other characters. In the penultimate episode, Flocke kills her by slitting her throat quite violently, pleasing everyone who hated her.
  • Seasonal Rot: Some say Season 2, some say Season 6, some say the first half of Season 3 (especially the six episode "pod" at the beginning), but 2 and 3 got back on track as they approached the finale.
  • Shocking Swerve: "He wants us to move the island." Of course, that plot line was tied up quite well and it did prove to be invaluable to the Myth Arc, but at the time it was pretty weird.
  • Special Effect Failure: Not common, but glaring when it happens.
    • During the scene in which Locke is falling out of a building after his father pushes him. The green screen/CGI is pretty blatant.
    • Also happens any time one of the polar bears is shown closely. They look like they were modeled on a 10-year old Macintosh.
    • A rather unfortunate submarine in the fifth season is conspicuous, especially since they usually have good or at least passable effects, especially since the entire shot may have been CG and looked like a screensaver or something. The worst part of that effect was that it was completely superfluous, and seemed to be showing off.
    • The freighter explosion doesn't really look that convincing, especially when watched on Blu-ray. Usually the production values are pretty high though...
    • Compared to other underwater scenes, the Island underwater in the Season 6 premiere looks like an old screen saver.
  • Spoiled by the Format: In syndication, the series finale suffers by being cut into two parts and removing beautiful scenes to make room for more ads. This is really glaring on subscription services like Hulu, which, for reasons unknown, stream the edited two part finale, followed immediately by the uncut version. But you wouldn't know this if you're just watching all the episodes in order, so by the time you get to the uncut finale you've already seen it once.
  • Stoic Woobie: Juliet was a brilliant fertility expert with an ex-husband who controlled her every move, and had a cancerous sister who she was helping. She came to the island because she was mislead into thinking she was going to conduct experiments for a scientific company in Oregon. She found out her duty on the island was to try to prevent pregnant women and their children from dying, and she failed countless times. She then slowly became Ben's slave while her chances of leaving and seeing her sister became slimmer each year. Despite all these hardships she maintains a stoic demeanor, but when she slips you just want to give the girl a big fat hug.
  • Strangled by the Red String: In the series finale, it turns out that Shannon and not Nadia is Sayid's true soul mate. Nadia doesn't even appear in the episode. The fans were not happy.
  • They Wasted a Perfectly Good Character: Has its own page.
  • They Wasted a Perfectly Good Plot:
    • Towards the end of the second season, there is a major cliffhanger where Sawyer turns evil and, with help from Charlie (who had been shunned by the group after a drug relapse), steals ALL the guns the group had acquired to defend themselves. And then declares himself new man in charge, since he was the only one with the weapons the group desperately needed to fight off the Others. The plotline is flat out killed off the next episode, with Sawyer's Heel Turn being ignored and everyone effectively deciding to ignore Sawyer's proclamation that he is the new leader of the group. The closest thing to a pay-off is Hurley, who is the only member of the group who interacts with Sawyer in the next episode, calling him an asshole no one likes while engaging in an unrelated B-plot for the episode. Soon after the guns end up back in the hands of the group with zero fanfare.
    • Jack's idea to build up an army with Ana-Lucia in Season 2. This is introduced as a big cliffhanger after a confrontation with the Others, but nothing really comes of the "army" other than Sawyer snarking about it. Presumably with everything else going on, Jack never had time to get the whole army thing off the ground, but the writers knew at that point that Sawyer was plotting to steal the guns (see the other wasted plot mentioned above) and that Ana-Lucia would be dead by the end of the season. So what was their purpose in even bringing it up to begin with?
    • Walt's storyline in general could be seen as a waste, given how much emphasis was placed on his apparent psychic abilities, his tendency to appear as a vision in the middle of the jungle, the Others kidnapping him and running some sort of tests on him, etc. A lot of this was emphasized after Malcolm David Kelley was removed from the main cast of the show due to the actor aging too fast compared to the pace of the story. For the rest of the series, viewers got the occasional rare appearance from Walt (including one after a Time Skip when story time had caught up to the actor's age), and the occasional reminder that he was important from other characters mentioning him, but we never truly found out exactly why he was so "special".
    • Michael's ability to communicate with ghosts, and how this may or may not have had anything to do with Hurley's similar ability after leaving the island, was never really explained.
    • The outrigger chase, in the midst of all the time flashes in Season 5. The writers had actually penned the other side of that scene that would explain who was shooting at the Losties, but then they decided they didn't have enough time to circle back around to it later in Season 5 or 6.
  • Unintentionally Sympathetic: The Man in Black can invoke this response, especially after seeing "Across the Sea." When you consider that he's been trapped on the island for thousands of years, with Jacob determined to keep him there, it's possible to see him as a Well-Intentioned Extremist who has simply lost any empathy for those who stand in the way of that goal. Especially because the show never gets around to explaining why his leaving the island would supposedly cause the end of the world.
  • Unintentionally Unsympathetic: By the same coin, Jacob can come across as this. When discussing the episode as part of the web series "Totally Lost", Mark Pellegrino basically admits that Jacob knew sending his brother into the cave would have dire ramifications for his brother's well-being. But he did not care, as he wanted revenge for the death of their mother and since he could not kill him (and had been given vague warning that going into the cave would have dire consequences from his mom), he chose the next best thing to harm his brother and permanently trap him on the island.
  • What an Idiot!:
    • A great deal of the fan backlash against Kate is due to her seeming inability to think through the consequences of her actions, or explain what she's doing to others. Certainly she couldn't have disobeyed Jack's instructions to not follow him into the jungle and ended up needing rescuing that many times, but her stubbornness on insisting "I'm going with you!" is probably the #1 screw-up viewers tend to remember her for, and it's even lampshaded by both Jack and Sawyer later in the series.
    • Michael makes a string of increasingly poor decisions in Season 2, starting with crashing through the jungle screaming "WAAAALT!!!" at every opportunity despite being instructed to keep quiet by fellow survivors who have been terrorized by the Others. By the middle of the season, he's holding his friends at gunpoint and insisting he's got to run off into the jungle all by himself to find Walt, despite Jack offering to help and not trying in any way to prevent Michael from looking for his son. When this plan results in him being manipulated into doing the Others' bidding in exchange for Walt, he ends up fatally shooting two of his fellow survivors (which he was never explicitly asked to do) and framing Ben for it by shooting himself in the arm and letting Ben escape. Then in a feeble attempt to get the specific survivors to come along with him that the Others requested, he doesn't even come up with a good explanation for why he wants Hurley involved, and not someone like Sayid who has actual combat experience, which tips Sayid off that Michael might be selling them out. (Which in turn leads to a "What an Idiot" moment for Jack and Sayid when they decide to play along with Michael's ruse, resulting in the Others kidnapping Jack, Kate, and Sawyer, while Michael makes a clean escape from the island). Pretty much all of this could have been avoided if Michael had let Jack and/or some of the other survivors come with him in the first place.
    • Ana-Lucia's worst decisions can pretty much be chalked up to her blood running extremely hot all the time. She wants revenge on the man who shot her, so she persuades her captain (who is also her mother) to let the perp go so that she can hunt him down and kill him in cold blood later, without much of a real plan to cover her tracks. On the island, she further agitates an already terrorized group of survivors by constantly bossing everyone around, and her response when she thinks the Others are nearby is to shoot at the first sound she hears coming her way in the jungle, resulting in the death of Shannon and a less than ideal introduction to the rest of the survivors. She eventually signs her own death warrant by not communicating to anyone else about Ben's attempt on her life and seeking vengeance against him by stealing Sawyer's gun, only to find herself unable to kill Ben, ultimately leading to a desperate and unstable Michael killing her with the gun and letting Ben go free.
  • What Do You Mean, It's Not Didactic?: See below. Some people think that there seems to be a little too much religious symbolism for it not to have some sort of message. Not only are there mentions of yin and yang, the I Ching, dharma, karma...
  • What Do You Mean, It's Not for Kids?: The show is about a bunch of people on an island, but that doesn't mean it's another Gilligan's Island or Survivor. While it's tamer than many shows on nowadays and is TV-14, it still has lots of corpses and blood, multiple somewhat graphic surgeries, several murders including the gassing of an entire small town, multiple (albeit nudity-free) love-making scenes, Ben, some minor subplots relating to infidelity, several characters struggling with depression and self-loathing, and a main character with a severe heroin addiction, not to mention the many heavy philosophical themes that most kids wouldn't be able to appreciate. It's not an outright adult show, but should be kept in the 13 and up area.
  • The Woobie: Every. Single. Main. Cast. Member. Even the Big Bad during his Day in the Limelight.
    • Danielle Rousseau, probably the most tragic character of all. She was forced to kill her friends including the love of her life, had her infant daughter taken away, spent 16 years as The Aloner going nuts, and when she was finally reunited with her daughter she got killed off.
    • Locke. Name a time in his life. Go on, any time. If he isn't miserable, he's finally found something great that makes him happy. It won't last. It won't end well. And it just keeps getting worse.
    • Hurley. The butt of many of Sawyer's fat jokes, has incredibly bad luck and possible mental instability. But the worst times were during Season 2 when Libby, the only girl on island to reciprocate love toward him, is shot by Micheal and euthanized by being given heroin. Again, in Season 3, when his best friend Charlie dies, which makes the Season 4 opener much more bittersweet when he canonballs. Also the entire Season 4 opener flash-forwards.
    • Flashbacks to Ben's childhood deserve special mention: a dead mother, an abusive alcoholic father, and a lonely childhood all add up to a pretty sad life. It makes what he becomes all the more awesome (if still kind of creepy). His emotional speech to Jacob asking "What about me?" helps- only to be replied with "What about you?" What Locke says about how his years of devoted service were rewarded with him getting cancer, having to watch his daughter murdered, and then being exiled from the island. He gets beat up a lot on the show, too, to the point where you can't help but feel sorry for him.
    • Daniel Faraday is one of the woobiest characters on the show, especially when Charlotte dies in his arms, and later on when he gets shot and killed by his own mother.
    • Charlie Pace has his moments too. Thankfully, he also has some moments of real lightness and joy, which either balance it out or make it worse.
    • The Man in Black was pretty Woobie before he got all smoke-ified. His mom landed on the island and gave birth to him and his brother Jacob. Mom is then promptly killed by a woman on the island, who takes MiB and Jacob and raises them as her own children, never telling them about their real mother, so they could take her place as protectors of the island. Then MiB gets a vision of his birth mother and tries to get his brother to run away with him to a tribe of people on the other side of the island, and Jacob refuses after beating the crap out of him. So MiB runs away and only sees his brother every once in a while for the next thirty years. In that time he's been building a way to get off the damn island, which is all he's ever really wanted. Fake!Mom shows up and, after luring him into a false sense of security by hugging him and telling him she's sorry, knocks him out, destroys his machine, and kills every single one of the people he lived with for the past thirty years. He finds his Fake!Mom and kills her in a fit of revenge, immediately regrets it, and then Jacob finds him and beats him up (again) and drags him through the forest to the heart of the island. Jacob tosses him in, dooming him to a fate worse than death. All this because the poor kid just wanted to go home.

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