Follow TV Tropes

Following

YMMV / Better Call Saul

Go To

  • Alternate Character Interpretation:
    • As of "Pimento", does Chuck's disapproval of Jimmy becoming a lawyer truly stem from fear of the havoc that could be wrought by 'Slippin' Jimmy' as a licensed attorney, and from his deep respect for the responsibilities of the legal profession? Or is it all a thin excuse to cover his resentment at Jimmy suddenly thinking he is Chuck's equal, his brother taking a perceived shortcut to respectability after years of Chuck being seen as the responsible sibling and Jimmy as the perpetual screw-up? Or a bit of both? And to what extent is Chuck's betrayal driven by genuine moral concerns and to what extent is it driven by sheer pride?
    • Advertisement:
    • In the Season 2 finale did Chuck withhold their mother's last words purely out of spite, or also to protect Jimmy from the guilt of not being there when she called for him? Considering he at this point had already made envious references to Jimmy being the favorite despite being a criminal, and was snide and condescending when Jimmy suggested getting something to eat, it leans more to the former.
    • Is it in Jimmy's nature to be bad or was he, at least partially, a product of his environment? One could argue that Jimmy's father's repeatedly falling for hard luck stories of men like the Grifter started Jimmy on his Protagonist Journey to Villain.
    • In "Off Brand", Jimmy gives a reason he called in Rebecca (Jimmy said that he knew Chuck would need someone to help him when he lost.) Is this true compassion or just an excuse because he wanted to humiliate Chuck in front of her?
    • Advertisement:
    • In the season three finale, was Chuck's speech to Jimmy where he says he was never that important to him the truth, or just him trying to ensure Jimmy won't miss him when he's gone? Or could it have just been one last chance to hurt his little brother? Furthermore, how long had he been planning to end his life? Did he even plan to at all?
    • Was Jimmy making up Chuck's letter to him, knowing how painful the real thing would be for Kim?
  • And You Thought It Would Fail: The idea of a prequel series to one of the most critically acclaimed and fan-beloved shows in recent memory was naturally met with a ton of skepticism, especially when it was revealed Vince Gilligan himself went into it with no real idea what he wanted to do (he first tried to make it as a half-hour sitcom). The show's own creative team have outright stated "It shouldn't have worked." And yet, by the second season it achieved plaudits to rival its parent show and has retained that popularity ever since.
  • Award Snub:
      Advertisement:
    • Many fans were livid when Jonathan Banks did not win the Emmy for Best Supporting Actor in a Drama Series for his performance in "Five-O". Peter Dinklage, who won the award for Season 5 of Game of Thrones, was so surprised by the result that he specifically cited Jonathan Banks in his acceptance speech.
    • Michael McKean not even being nominated for Season 3, where his two major Villainous Breakdown scenes were universally cited as some of the best work of his quite distinguished career, got it started all over again, especially as Jonathan Banks was nominated again despite having a much less showy role.
    • Rhea Seehorn failing to earn nominations for Seasons 2 or 3 stood out to fans of the show as well.
  • Awesome Music: Just like Breaking Bad, this show has songs that can be considered good.
    • The intro theme, played at the beginning of each episode.
    • The original version of the intro theme can be found here.
    • This song which plays during the skateboarders' attempts at a good scam.
    • "Tune Down" by Chris Joss, played in episode #7 "Bingo" when Mike sneaks into the Kettleman's house at night to steal their hidden embezzled money and bring it to Jimmy.
    • And episode 10 features one of the greatest songs in rock and roll history: Deep Purple's "Smoke On The Water".
    • Bobby Bare's "Find Out What's Happening" as Jimmy treks into the forests to find the Kettlemans.
    • Ernest Tubb's "Waltz Across Texas" when Jimmy bribes the bus driver into stopping so he can solicit the passengers.
    • "Mi Cucu", the song that the ice cream truck driver is singing along to in "Nailed" when he's ambushed by Mike on the road.
    • Dennis Coffey's "Scorpio", during the episode "Inflatable", when Jimmy is trying to get fired by Davis & Main.
    • The cover of "Something Stupid" used in the opening montage of "Something Stupid".
  • Badass Decay: Chuck was once a brilliant lawyer, but by the time the show begins he has been overcome by a mental illness. We only get glimpses of just how good a lawyer he was.
  • Base-Breaking Character: Detractors consider the Kettlemans to be Flat Characters that are beneath the caliber of the show, and would rather see their time spent fleshing out the more interesting characters. Supporters of the Kettlemans maintain that people like them who take what they think they're entitled to and then stick their heads in the sand when it catches up to them are a very, very real thing that is rarely drawn attention to on television, but which professionals in all aspects of the law have to deal with all the time.
  • Bellisario's Maxim: It is a prequel but with the same actors, naturally they are older than when they were in Breaking Bad but the producers don't bother making them look five or eight years younger.
    • Raymond Cruz is quite noticeably older than when he was on Breaking Bad, but the fans were so happy to see him that no one cares.
    • The same goes for Jonathan Banks, though slightly less noticeable.
    • Similarly, scenes with young Jimmy merely have Bob Odenkirk wearing a wig, and certainly not looking like someone in his twenties, but hiring another actor to play Jimmy or altering Odenkirk's face with CGI would've probably just made the whole thing even more distracting.
    • Some have also questioned Kaylee's age and appearance here as compared to her in Breaking Bad. While the actress here does look younger, the time between her debut appearances in Better Call Saul and Breaking Bad was approximately 7-8 years, leading some to wonder if the two still look a little too similar to each other. Given how Kaylee mostly serves as a secondary character to Mike's character arc, it can probably be waved off.
    • Lavell Crawford, who portrays Huell Babineux, lost a significant amount of weight and visibly aged from his appearance in Breaking Bad to appearing in Chicanery; though the weight could at least be explained away, the aging can't. But fans who considered him an Ensemble Dark Horse of the former show were just reasonably happy to see him.
    • Ray Campbell appears to have gained weight as shown by Tyrus' scenes with Nacho in 'Off-Brand'.
    • Steven Bauer (Don Eladio) has likewise lost plenty of weight since Breaking Bad, and looks a fair bit older. Javier Grajeda (Juan Bolsa) however looks like he hasn't aged a day.
  • Better on DVD: Just like Breaking Bad, the experience of watching the show is greatly enhanced when viewed on Netflix, due to lack of commercials and no wait between episodes.
  • Broken Base: The season 1 finale was either an excellent falling action episode that gave Jimmy a good reason for breaking bad, or it was underwhelming and disappointing, especially following the acclaimed "Pimento."
  • Continuity Lockout: While not exactly hard to follow without watching Breaking Bad first, it does make for a rather odd experience as the show follows several long-running subplots that have no connection at all most of the time, and regular arrivals of new characters who are suddenly treated as greatly important to the story. Plus, each season opens with a black and white vignette of Jimmy's life after Breaking Bad, and the cold open of one episode is set during it with no explanation. It's also not until halfway through Season 3 that you get the slightest hint of the meaning of the show's title.
  • Crosses the Line Twice:
    • Squat Cobbler.
    • Jimmy's outrageous plan to get himself fired by Davis and Main.
  • Disappeared Dad: Howard Hamlin Sr. might be one. Howard Jr. rarely mentions him, and Chuck McGill seems to have functioned as a father-figure stand-in in a lot of ways, including tutoring Howard Jr. for the bar exam, and functioning as Howard Jr.'s mentor in Howard's early days practicing law. The show never explicitly mentions what happened to Howard Sr., although it's implied that he's retired. Maybe he died young, or maybe he was just too focused on work to be an effective parent.
  • Draco in Leather Pants: Ever since The Reveal that Chuck is the one who decided to not hire Jimmy at HHM and that he actually likes Jimmy very much, many viewers have been willing to overlook Howard Hamlin's more jerkass moments and behaviour and reintepret him as a selfless (to a certain extent) man who took a bullet for his partners. Given that Chuck was set up to be Jimmy's main friend and the extent of his betrayal this is sort of understandable.
    • This is becoming more and more subverted due to Howard Hamlin being more clearly on Chuck's side than Jimmy's as Season 3 demonstrates during the 'Court Battle of the Casette Tape' arc. Although he is shown less sympathetic and less villainous as it's not out of loyalty but fear of upsetting his major partner who owns half of his company and if it was for him they'll just let Jimmy slide.
    • He falls back to this after Chuck's declining mental health forces Howard to fire him.
  • Early Installment Weirdness: The first three episodes of the series focus on Jimmy getting tangled up with the cartel and Mike is more or less only in each episode as a cameo. The series transitions into what it will generally become with "Hero" and "Five-O" - equal time devoted to Jimmy's battle of wits against H.H.M. and Mike getting tangled up with the cartel.
  • Ensemble Dark Horse:
    • Tuco's appearance was met with open arms.
    • Omar, Jimmy's secretary at Davis & Main, is well liked because he's such a Nice Guy who's the only guy who's friendly to Jimmy even after the commercial incident and he's happy to help Jimmy move his stuff back to his old office after he was fired.
    • Howard has been well-received for having a much more sympathetic and complicated characterization than the 'villain of the week' caricature he at first seemed to be.
    • Lalo Salamanca, charming, Faux Affably Evil and incredibly effective.
  • Even Better Prequel: Some fans feel that the show is even better than Breaking Bad.
  • Evil Is Cool: Eduardo "Lalo" Salamanca, a charming and intelligent, yet psychopathic and completely terrifying Faux Affably Evil enforcer for the Cartel who proves himself just as dangerous as the Cousins combined. Bonus points for him being an incredible cook.
  • Fan Nickname: Many have taken to calling Ernesto "Ernestbro".
  • Genius Bonus:
    • The Adventures of Mabel, the book Jimmy and Chuck loved as kids, was the subject of a con: its author published it under a pseudonym, then used his day job as a teacher to write an article that praised it.
    • In the season 4 premiere, when Howard is reading Chuck's obituary to Jimmy, among Chuck's listed past achievements is that he had clerked for Delaware Chancery Court. A Chancery Court is a court that hears matters at equity—i.e. lawsuits between private parties. Less than a handful of states have them. The fact that Delaware has one, and that there's a huge body of settled case law in Delaware, is one of the things that makes Delaware attractive as a locale for corporations to incorporate. Delaware's Chancery Court is highly regarded, and Chuck clerking for Delaware Chancery Court would be a very prestigious clerkship.
    • In the first season Jimmy uses the phrase "the worm has turned" several times to mean that things are finally going his way. He obviously means "the tide has turned", whereas the expression he's using actually means "even the most passive of people will defend themselves when attacked". Jimmy becomes a lot less passive once he finds out that Chuck has been working against him.
  • Growing the Beard: Season 1, while not considered bad, was criticized for being slow-paced. Plus, considering that Breaking Bad was a Tough Act to Follow, it was bound to get some criticism. But season 2 was much more warmly received, with a much quicker pace, improved Black Comedy, and great Character Development. By season 3, with the introduction of Gus and everyone associated with his part of the drug trade, Better Call Saul has a much more Breaking Bad-esque tone.
  • Harsher in Hindsight:
    • In "Madrigal," when Mike was being interrogated, Hank offhandedly pointed out how the Philadelphia PD says Mike's tenure as a cop with them ended under, dramatic circumstances. Mike says "Not particularly," to which Hank agrees as he's more interested in probing Mike for any evidence of off-the-books work he performed for Gus. Season 1 of Better Call Saul practically all but confirms that Hank and Mike were referring to the death of Mike's son.
    • Mike's working relationship with Gus gets shades of this realizing that he'd only been working for Gus for less than 10 years by the time Breaking Bad came along, not decades as could've been originally implied.
    • In "Rebecca", Hector's reasoning when convincing Mike to tell the police Tuco's gun was his, to shorten this latter's time served in jail. "You're an ex-cop. They'll go easy on you." While the setting of that confrontation is 2002, consider the episode's premiere date predating another wave of controversial police-on-black incidents.
    • The little bell on Hector's wheelchair that highlights his pathetic condition and sometimes used for comedic purpose? As Lalo revealed, it was all that left of a hotel that they burned down because the owner crossed them.
  • Heartwarming in Hindsight:
    • Mike's protective relationship with Jesse during Breaking Bad becomes much more moving knowing about his backstory. Knowing that Matty was killed after Mike advised him to compromise his morality, it makes sense that Mike sees Jesse as a second chance to save a person who can still be saved.
    • Mike's murder of the surviving Salamanca cousin wasn't just him carrying out an order for Gus, but a chance to get payback for them threatening to kill his granddaughter.
  • He Really Can Act: Michael McKean had been a popular comedy actor for several decades - known primarily for his roles in Laverne & Shirley, This Is Spın̈al Tap, and Clue - but many fans were blown away by his dramatic acting skills in this show, with his "You're not a real lawyer!" Motive Rant in Season 1 and his Sanity Slippage leading to his suicide in Season 3 seen as especially impressive.
  • Hilarious in Hindsight:
    • How fitting that the last time Bob Odenkirk and Michael McKean worked together, on Bob's sketch comedy show Mr. Show, it was a sketch about law school.
    • Jimmy posing as Kevin Costner to get a woman to have a one-night stand with him. Then talk about the man who used Kevin Costner's identity to import cigarettes illegally.
    • Anthony Hopkins famously binge-watched Breaking Bad shortly after it ended, and declared Bryan Cranston's performance the best piece of acting he'd ever seen. Four years later, he was nominated for the "Best Actor in a Drama" Emmy for Westworld alongside Bob Odenkirk as Jimmy (they both lost to Sterling K. Brown).
    • After Nacho turned on Tuco for his increasingly unstable behavior, Michael Mando took the role of similarly psychopathic criminal Mac Gargan in the Marvel Cinematic Universe. Even before that, Mando's claim to fame was as Vaas Montenegro in Far Cry 3 who is even more psychotic, unhinged and Large Ham. In fact, Mando's Typecasting as "Tuco Up to Eleven" is both hilarious and further prove his acting's credence whenever he played the multi-layer Butt-Monkey Nacho.
  • "Holy Shit!" Quotient: Chuck burning down his house at the end of Season 3.
  • Jerkass Woobie:
    • Jimmy has done some greatly immoral things in his Slippin' Jimmy days. Even now, going into a legal practice, he wanders to the crooked side of the law a few times. However, one can't help but feel bad for how much stress he's under being a low-ranking and underpaid public defender with a disabled brother that can barely leave the house.
    • Howard by the end of "Pimento." He's still abrasive and sent Kim to the cornfield, but it's hard to not feel bad after finding out Chuck's been the one ordering him to not hire Jimmy, and has no choice but to go along with it, making him out to be a monster in Jimmy's eyes. Then it turns out he and Kim put in a good word for Jimmy at Davis & Main. It's not hard to feel bad for him when Jimmy's Mesa Verde scam affects his firm even though he landed Jimmy a job. He becomes more of a jerkass, yet somehow more sympathetic, as Chuck and Jimmy's feud drags on. It's easy to feel his struggle as he tries to balance maintaining the HHM brand name's reputation and catering to Chuck's self-centered whims, especially after Chuck's epic breakdown on the stand. Then when he suggests very mildly to Chuck that it's time to retire for the benefit of HHM, his oldest friend and mentor swiftly and cruelly betrays him. Howard manages to save HHM by destroying his own finances and likely his own future, but Chuck kills himself, which Howard tearfully blames himself for.
    • Gus Fring was already this to a notable extent in Breaking Bad, owing in part to his tragic backstory seeing his business partner and possible lover shot to death in a heartwrenching and horrific scene, but the fact that here he's attempting to take down an even bigger asshole in Hector, adds to him being oddly sympathetic for a sociopath.
  • Love to Hate: Chuck is a smug, conceited hypocrite driven by envy and rage to destroy his deeply flawed yet loving brother, which has earned him a lot of hate from the fandom. He is, however, also considered one of the show's strongest characters due to his complexity, how formidable he is as an antagonist, the genuine good points he makes about Jimmy from time to time, the humorous moments that come from his arrogance, and the tragedy of his bizarre mental illness (which is never played for laughs or as weakness). There's also Michael McKean's powerful and layered performance, which makes Chuck as fascinating to watch as he is eminently hateable. Notably, Chuck's death at the end of Season 3 has been met not with cheers or triumph but with genuine sadness from the fandom.
  • Magnificent Bastard: Mike embarks on a gambit that even puts his handiwork in "Mabel" to shame. He hits another one of Hector's ice cream trucks, but instead of robbing it, he engineers an ingenious scenario that involves planting drugs on the truck, by stuffing them inside a pair of shoes, which then deposit the cocaine powder when Mike shoots them from a hilltop with a rifle. The Border Patrol subsequently arrest the drivers when the sniffer dogs find the drugs. And we see that Mike has learned from the mistakes he made the last time he hit Hector. The robbery merely disrupted Hector's operation and got two people (the driver and an innocent bystander) killed. This time, Mike and Gus have guaranteed that the Feds come down hard on Hector and shut him down completely, as Mike had planned for the first job to do. Unlike last time, Mike ensures that this plan won't end with civilians in the crossfire. And as the flash-forward in the opening shows, this operation has caused Gus to gain an edge in the drug market.
  • Memetic Mutation:
    • Stickers.
    • Anything to do with Tony the Toilet Buddy.
    • Following The Reveal in "Pimento", we have "Fuck Chuck."
    • Jimmy's Chicago Sunroof, which made Jimmy owe Chuck for getting him out of the repercussions of it, spurred a few entries on Urban Dictionary making up what it is. Turns out it's defecating through an open sunroof, preferably when there aren't children sitting the in back seat.
    • Squat Cobblerexplanation 
      • Full Moon Moon Pie
      • Bostom Cream Splat
      • Simple Simon the Ass Man
      • Dutch Apple Ass
    • McGill Bowl has often turned up as a common name for the clashes between Jimmy and Chuck in season 3.
    • Ribs on a burgernote 
  • Misaimed Fandom: The fans have a massive hate for Chuck after the last couple episodes of Season 1, despite that Vince Gilligan and others have repeatedly said he does have a legitimate point, however much it sucks for Jimmy. Season 2 makes this more clear as Jimmy shows over and over that he really doesn't have any idea how to be a legitimate lawyer without slipping into his old self. However by Season 3, Chuck's legitimate point is immediately drowned out by his Moral Event Horizon con into getting Jimmy to confess, exploiting Jimmy's genuine (and undeserved) love for him to hypocritically play him just as Jimmy has played cons in the past.
  • Moral Event Horizon:
    • Chuck conned Jimmy into a confession. How? He faked retirement making Howard freak out and call Jimmy, when Jimmy showed up he played up his EMS condition through the roof (note that this is taking place right after Chuck put himself in a catatonic state when he needed treatment which scared Jimmy into thinking he lobotomized his brother) all so he could have Jimmy admit he forged the paper. Jimmy cons people by playing with their selfish nature but Chuck went lower and used Jimmy's goodness to get what he wants just like the grifter who ripped off their dad. Before that Chuck was an asshole but he made a point to not break the law to stop Jimmy from being a lawyer out of valid reasons but that added to the resentment he was shown to have toward his brother makes him look like his points were just excuses to destroy his brother and will bend the law a lot to get that (deceiving people for confession is a grey area depending on the lies). Chuck then SMASHES the Moral Event Horizon by using the tape as a Batman Gambit to get his own brother jailed for breaking and entering. If that doesn't qualify for smashing it, how about firing Ernesto, someone who has been nothing but good to him, as soon as he's outlived his usefulness? Fucking hell, Chuck.
    • If Jimmy's actions during Season 3 didn't count (using Crocodile Tears to sic the insurance company on Chuck and gaslighting Irene into settling the Sandpiper case), his con during the Season 4 did: During his appeal hearing before the bar, seeking to have his law license reinstated, Jimmy starts reading from the letter by Chuck left to him after his death, then shifts into a monologue about what Chuck meant to him as a brother and a lawyer despite Chuck's constant disapproval of him. It's a speech that brings Kim and the members of the bar committee to tears. But outside the courtroom, after Jimmy's reinstatement is assured, Jimmy nonchalantly reveals to Kim that he didn't mean a single word of what he said about Chuck. And to punctuate that this is indeed Jimmy's point-of-no-return, Jimmy tells a horrified and confused Kim that, "S'all good, man!"
  • One-Scene Wonder:
    • Tony the Toilet Buddy.
    • Mr. Sipes, the potential client who wants to secede from the United States.
    • Sobchak the Gun Nut, played by Steven Ogg.
    • Fudge Talbot, an elderly former client of Jimmy's who he uses to sneak a commercial shoot with FIFI, the last Boeing B-29, and keeps switching between his dementia-riddled persona and his rather sharper real personality.
    • Chuck's doctor. She only has two scenes in the first two seasons, but due to being played by Clea DuVall, is pretty memorable.
    • Gus Fring's first two episodes have him only get one scene each (first catching Jimmy snooping in the trash; then having a roadside meeting with Mike), prior to the fourth episode firmly establishing him as part of the cast.
  • Ron the Death Eater: Davis & Main are looked at as the bad guys by the fans just because they've lambasted Jimmy for producing a commercial ad without their consent. Despite the fact that they had every right to be upset as the ad did produce a scandal at their law firm.
  • Signature Scene: Jimmy's cross examination of Chuck during the disciplinary hearing and Chuck's ensuing Motive Rant in "Chicanery".
  • Squick:
    • Jimmy braving a nursing home dumpster to find evidence of fraud. Bob Odenkirk is a little too good at portraying how disgusting it smells.
    • The Title Sequence of the ninth episode in each season shows a shot of a urinal with one of Saul's card floating, getting pissed on. It's rather disgusting, and even unwanted if it wasn't for its symbolism.
    • In "Off Brand", Nacho, feeling trauma after having to beat Krazy-8 for being short on his payments, is not concentrating on his work when using a sewing machine to create car upholstery and puts the needle though the skin between his thumb and forefinger. The episode shows this close-up.
  • Tough Act to Follow: A given, considering that it is a spin-off of what is sometimes considered to be the greatest TV series of all time, one that is also considered to have ended nearly perfectly. However, even with that over its head, the general consensus thus far is that it is great in its own right.
  • Unintentionally Unsympathetic: Rebecca chastises Jimmy for giving up on his brother, saying that Chuck is mentally ill and Jimmy should be the better man. While from her perspective it is true, from the audience it's kind of undeserved since Chuck has been betraying Jimmy's trust since before he fell ill and Chuck would likely have refused his help again, making Rebecca look bad.
  • What an Idiot!:
    • This trope is the Kettlemans all over, doing things like writing government checks to themselves, firing their own lawyer just because her best deal isn't enough for them, and choosing a very poor spot to hide their money in their house.
    • Maybe those two skaters should have thought before calling Tuco's grandma a "bizznatch". It's true that they had no idea whom they were dealing with, but insulting anybody's grandmother is almost never a good idea. In fact, they came this close to Too Dumb to Live. Without Jimmy, it would have been shallow graves for two.
      • Not to mention that they were oblivious to the fact that Tuco's grandma WASN'T who their target was.
    • Daniel Wormald sells stolen drugs to Nacho, then uses the money to buy an expensive, flashy, and gaudy as hell Hummer. When Mike refuses to accompany him to a deal in this vehicle (due to how much attention it's bound to attract to what should be a quick and discreet meet), Daniel decides to go alone. Of course, he ends up the target of a burglary when Nacho sneaks a peek at his home address while inside the car. And despite being a criminal himself, he still reports the theft to the police, who are immediately suspicious of the man living in a relatively small house with an expensive car, and they have no problem finding where he hides his money due to the obvious "clean spot" he left on the otherwise messy ground when checking to see if the thieves took it.
    • Jimmy running the television ads without first getting the approval of any of the Davis & Main partners. What could have been an easily avoidable issue becomes a huge scandal that almost gets him fired from the firm. While costing Kim her job in the process.
      • There is also Jimmy and his film crew gaining access to the Air Force base under false pretenses, which would have been a good way to get the Feds and/or the military crawling up your ass in the year following 9/11. There are also some U.S. military bases which put out signs warning that they will shoot you on sight if you even approach them, so there's no telling if Jimmy was putting himself and his crew in danger with that stunt.
      • Another one for Jimmy when he basically ignores all of Kim's advice and breaks into Chuck's house to destroy the confession tape, playing right into Chuck's Batman Gambit. Granted, Jimmy went into a near-blind fury after learning about it, but still, he should've expected Chuck had more plans up his sleeve than just that.
  • The Woobie:
    • Kim after Howard tells her the truth about Chuck. She has to convince Jimmy to take the deal HHM offered him without breaking the bad news, but can do nothing but watch as Jimmy snaps. Season 2 adds more to that as Kim ends up doing grunt work for Hamlin & McGill thanks to Jimmy's actions in Davis & Main, which is the firm that she recommended to give Jimmy a job. And then in Season 3 she overcompensates for her guilt by association with Jimmy by taking on far too much work, cutting into her sleep time until she finally falls asleep while driving and is lucky to just crash into a rock by herself, left with a broken arm. Season 4 has Kim feeling guilty about her role in Chuck's suicide, Jimmy dismissing her repeated attempts to get him to come to terms with Chuck's death, and ultimately finding herself getting played by Jimmy's performance before the bar.
    • Chuck manipulates Ernesto into overhearing Jimmy's confession tape, correctly predicting that Ernesto will try to tip him off. Then when Jimmy commits the break-in, Chuck unceremoniously cans him after he has served his purpose, probably using the confidentiality he used to pressure Ernesto as a pretext. All for the crime of being Jimmy's friend.
    • Within just one episode is Irene, the main plaintiff in the Sandpiper lawsuit. With a sizable offer on the table but HHM insisting they can get more, Jimmy sinks to whole new depths as he methodically estranges her from all her friends, making her appear to be deliberately dragging the lawsuit out with far more money to burn than any of them, all to pressure her into making the deal as it stands and posing as the one person still standing by her.
    • Mike definitely is this after he reveals his guilt over his past as a Dirty Cop and how it led to his son Matthew's death.
Top

How well does it match the trope?

Example of:

/

Media sources:

/

Report