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  • Accidental Innuendo: Hard Man — as Seanbaby put it, "This guy's outfit looks like a frat boy's "Armored Penis" halloween costume, and his name makes you think of gay porn."
  • Alternative Character Interpretation: Commonly done by fans, which isn't surprising considering the borderline excuse plots of the games. One of the most common is interpreting Mega Man as a serial killer-esque character.
    • Quint is probably the absolute king of this trope, as he is almost so vague, people are bound to interpret him completely differently. MS Paint Masterpieces, in particular, depicts him as a Knight Templar.
    • This fan video offers a rather popular and twisted take on the series. Mega Man is a mindless, hypocritical psychopath who thoughtlessly slaughters robots by the hundreds because they stole some factories. The horrifying thing is, if you go off of the games and the games only, that's not entirely implausible. Bomb Man lampshades just how terrifying and disturbing an individual like (this) Mega Man would be viewed as in real life.
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    • How human the robots act is also up for interpretation. Sometimes they're almost human in every way, other times only Rock, Roll, Blues, and Bass act human while the Robot Masters only have shades of humanity. Even then some interpret Rock and Roll don't act entirely human either.
  • Annoying Video-Game Helper: Eddie is very infamous for giving you the power-up you don't need. Weapon Energy in a Robot Master level, which usually isn't long enough to warrant it, and a Health Pellet when you already have full health. The rare E-Tank or extra lives are always useful, though.
  • Anti-Climax Boss: Given his backstory, Quint should be one of the most epic bosses in the series. In practice, most intro bosses put up a better fight.
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  • Archive Panic: Thirty-one games in the Classic era alone, not counting ports, remakes and mobile game releases.
  • Base-Breaking Character:
    • Bass. Regardless of opinions about the game itself, many agree he was the best thing to come from Mega Man 7, and there was much rejoicing indeed when he was announced as playable for 10. With that said, fan reception to him post-debut is mixed; either he's an interesting counterpart to Mega Man and gives Wily the chance to have a robot who can actually counter him, or he's a cliché anime rival with no interesting characteristics other than being Wily's anti-Mega Man. Others dislike him for considering him a jealous, whiny brat.
    • Bad Boxart Mega Man is swiftly becoming this. First he was one of the iconic "what were they thinking" cases of Covers Always Lie. Then people started thinking it was funny. Then Capcom started making nods to it. Then it got progressively less funny. His appearance in Street Fighter X Tekken seems to have finally broken the base between "a bit of harmless comic relief" and "hasn't been funny in about six years."
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    • Be very careful when bringing up the topic of Zero amongst classic fans. Especially if you suggest that he should appear in the classic games since he's a creation of Wily's and was intended to be the original Mega Man's ultimate enemy/challenge. While some fans would like this plot point expanded upon in the classic games, others dislike how the tone of it clashes with the Lighter and Softer classic series and point out how Word of God specifically denied that Zero ended up destroying the original Mega Man.
  • Big-Lipped Alligator Moment:
  • Broken Base: Megaman Legacy Collection 1 and 2. Parts of the fandom complain about Capcom splitting the games in two collections instead of launching a single collection, like the Anniversary. And the lack of other classic games like Mega Man's Soccer, Mega Man: The Wily Wars, Mega Man & Bass, Mega Man: The Power Battle, and Mega Man 2: The Power Fighters is another issue pointed by the critics. Others think it was an interesting idea splitting the collection into the classic NES era and the SNES/PSX/Saturn era and this made possible the release of the first half to 3DS.
  • "Common Knowledge":
    • Mega Man is, as far as the fandom at large is concerned, well aware that Proto Man is his "older brother". After all, Proto Man states such in Mega Man 7 before his Bonus Boss fight, and it's the case in the Ruby-Spears cartoon and the Archie comic, so it must be true! However, in the Japanese canon, Mega Man (or Rockman) remains unaware of their relationship, and the references to it made in 7 were added by the translators.
    • Many believe every Robot Master in the series was created by Dr. Wily, when this is only partially true. He created the rosters of 2, 5, 7, and 8 (and for the latter two, about half of them were modified from pre-existing robots), while the rosters of 1 and 9 were built by Dr. Light, 3's were a collaboration between Wily and Light, Cossack built the 4 group (though Wily extensively remodeled them), and the Robot Masters of 6, 10, and 11 were each built by different creators.
  • Director Displacement: While he was the lead artist on all the games up to 8, Keiji Inafune didn't actually become the head designer until partway through production of 3. The first two games were designed by Akira Kitamura, while the third was initially designed by Masayoshi Kurokawa, who subsequently quit during production, forcing Inafune to take over.
  • Ensemble Dark Horse:
    • Proto Man, thus starting a tradition of red-colored side characters who steal the show whenever they appear.
    • Though not quite as popular as Proto Man, Roll is still very popular thanks to her kindhearted personality, her unique fighting style in Tatsunoko vs. Capcom, and her catchy theme song "Kaze Yo Tsutaete."
    • The Mega Man Killers. Combat-specialized Robot Masters with unique designs that are built with the sole purpose of defeating Mega Man? Pure, concentrated awesome. As if the fangasmic explosion of cheers when they were revealed as Bonus Bosses in 10 wasn't enough of a hint. Inafune himself considers Punk to be one of his favorite characters from the Classic series, and drew up the design for the Battle Network incarnation of the character.
    • If Dr. Cossack (and/or his daughter Kalinka) appears in any adaptation, especially outside of the game he actually was in, the fans WILL cheer.
      • Double points if Kalinka finds her way into a work based around Mega Man X. Triple points if she builds Axl.
    • Splash Woman is quite popular. We think you know why.
    • The Robot Masters in general tend to get a lot more love than the majority of one-shot bosses like Gleeok or the Armos Knights. It's probably their interesting designs, which ooze with character, and their catchy stage themes, which inevitably get associated with the Robots themselves. The Robot Masters of 1, 2, and 3 are especially popular, in accordance to their respective games. Cut Man, Guts Man, Shadow Man, Quick Man, and Crash Man get special mention.
      • Out of all the Robot Masters, Guts Man and Cut Man are easily the most well-known, mostly due to appearing in almost every episode of the cartoon show(though with the former it definitely helps that the Metall enemies share his design motif, bosses designed off of him keep popping up in later games, and, thanks to Memetic Mutation, his ass has become the butt of many jokes).
    • Mega Man 4 gained mixed reaction from fans, but it had two cool-looking Robot Masters that became quite popular; Skull Man and Pharaoh Man. The latter became even more popular from his animated adaption.
    • I CAN'T DEFEAT AIRMAN!
    • Time Man is far more popular than Oil Man. When it was announced he'd appear in the Archie Comics adaptation, there was much rejoicing.
      • Oil Man is also fairly popular, just not to the extent of his buddy. The fans rejoiced when he was announced to be appearing in the comics, too, with a slight redesign that made him look cooler.
  • Epileptic Trees:
    • Fans believe the RT-55J enemy in Mega Man X1 is an upgrade of Auto (or is at least related to him), owing to their shared color schemes and its location near a Light Capsule, even in spite of external material explaining it as a sumo wrestler robot with no mention of it being related to Dr. Light in any way.
    • People keep trying to link the Evil Energy in 8 and the Roboenza virus in 10 to both each other, and Mega Man X's Maverick Virus.
    • The various alien robots in the series, such as the Stardroids, Duo, and (possibly) Shadow Man, are often thought to be related. The Archie comic even took this and ran with it.
  • Even Better Sequel:
    • Mega Man 2 is considered one of the textbook examples in gaming history. It took everything that was great about the first one and improved upon it, and took out the things that didn't work or didn't matter. It was also less difficult, providing a difficult but not frustrating challenge.
    • About half the fandom believes 3 is even better than 2. The mildly slippery movement was finally fixed, Mega Man's sluggish ladder speed was upped, and this entry gives him his defining slide ability, which adds an incredible amount of depth to the game.
    • Some fans consider 4 to be the most balanced entry of the NES games, even compared to the above, thanks to a more balanced weapon roster and lack of major difficulty spikes like in the first three games.
  • Evil Is Sexy:
  • Fanon:
  • Fanon Discontinuity:
    • Many fans disregard all the entries not produced in the 8-bit style (meaning 7, 8, and Mega Man & Bass). Some of the more hardcore fans prefer to think that Dr. Wily got fatally crushed in 3 and so ignore everything from 4 onward.
    • On the spin-off side of things, Rockman & Forte: Challenger From the Future and both PC entries are often ignored, due to questionable Robot Master designs (most infamously in the former), poorly-written stories (even by the series' standards), and being all-around mediocre games.
    • Just try to tell some fans that Quint isn't a Copy Robot like they insist.
  • Fan-Preferred Couple: Mega Man and Roll are supposed to be siblings, but you wouldn't know that going by all the romantic (or worse) fanart involving them. Capcom has never helped themselves with this, portraying Roll as very clingy and a bit too fond of her brother in certain games and materials (Mega Man Powered Up being a major offender) while also making Mega Man and Roll actual couples in separate universes where they aren't related (Mega Man Legends and Mega Man Battle Network, although Legends has the same problem of Not Blood Siblings). It's common for the incest angle to be downplayed by certain fans due to both characters being robots with no actual genetic connection, although it ignores the fact that Dr. Light, their creator/father, views them as brother and sister.
  • Fridge Brilliance: The Wily Capsule schtick. Just think back to what almost happened to him at the end of 3.
  • Foe Yay:
    • Mega Man/the Robot Masters is inevitable. One of the most popular non-Robot Masters ship is Mega/Bass.
    • Metal Man/Cut Man is also popular given that Metal is Cut's stronger predecessor.
  • Game-Breaker: The series has enough to warrant a page unto itself.
  • Good Bad Bugs: A glitch in earlier games allowed you to make specific enemies disappear by aligning the place where they turned around at the edge of the screen. Very handy with those Goddamn Bats that moved across the ground quickly when you were level with them and were too short to be hit by the peashooter.
    • In the first Mega Man game, you could use any weapon (most often Elec Man's Thunder Beam) to repeatedly damage a boss by pausing the game frequently while the beam is in collision. Really handy for getting past the Yellow Devil.
    • In the NES games, if a weapon took more than one shot to use a unit from the weapon energy bar, you could more or less use it infinitely by pausing between shots.
    • If the player reaches an Eddie room and leaves before he teleports out, then he'll reset when the player returns, even if Eddie's already given out a power-up. As long as the player doesn't pick up that power-up (which will also cause him to leave) they get an infinite number of do-overs if Eddie gives them a power-up they don't want.
  • Goddamned Boss: Many fans will agree that all of the Wily Capsule fights introduced in almost all the games after Mega Man 4 are just plain annoying. All the fights are very similar and can be easily summarized: Wily teleports to a random spot in the arena, shoots Mega Man, then teleports away, waits a moment, then continues. The fact that Wily spends so much of the fight invulnerable and can appear near the top of the arena where Mega Man can't hit him can drive some people up the wall.
    • All of the "___ Devil" bosses, too. They also follow a closely related attack pattern: assemble itself from goo, eye opens and shoots, disassemble goo, rinse and repeat. Like the Wily capsule fights, the annoying bit about Devil bosses is that most of the fight is spent with them invincible: the eye is the only vulnerable part of it, and it's only open for a second after each cycle of the attack, and this drags out the fight quite a bit. Not helping is most of them also disassemble and reassemble themselves from goo in the exact same pattern every time, leading the fight to just being about monotonous memorization. And if you thought that wasn't nasty enough, 11 equips it with the Speed Gear with each of nine mini Devils hopping and running about to harass Mega Man, meaning if you don't keep up with it, you're going to eat a lot of damage.
  • Hilarious in Hindsight:
  • "Holy Shit!" Quotient: Bass's ending in The Power Fighters 2; Wily gloats to Bass about a robot he's working on that will surpass Bass and destroy Mega Man, and lowers the blueprints for Bass to see. It's Zero.
  • Internet Backdraft: The confirmation that the physical release of Legacy Collection 1 and 2 on Switch would only have the first part of the collection on the cart and the second as a download code did not sit well with Switch owners who wanted to buy the collection physically. Made worse when the file sizes for each collection turned out to be less than 4 GB, meaning Capcom could have used the cheapest cart size available for both parts but yet opted not to, resulting in accusations that Capcom was being "too cheap and too lazy."
  • It Was His Sled:
  • Jerkass Woobie: Bass. He was created to do one thing specifically (Kill Mega Man), but he's done nothing but fail and get effectively disowned by his father. He has Proto Man's independent spirit, alienating him from his creator, but because of his Hot-Blooded nature and obsession with killing Rock, he can't find any sort of absolution with Light either. Wily even calls Zero his greatest creation to Bass's face, making him The Unfavorite. As a Robot Master and not a Reploid, it's In the Blood for him to want to fight Mega Man without much he can do about it. It's hard to have any sympathy for him at times, but he's very high on the list of characters that need a really, really big hug.
  • Launcher of a Thousand Ships: Roll and Splash Woman, due to being the only female Robot Masters in the entire series.
  • Memetic Badass:
  • Memetic Loser:
    • Bubble Man is one both in and out of universe. Not only is his theme bubbles, but he's saddled with the Bubble Lead, one of the silliest weapons in the franchise.
    • Top Man, due to having a similarly ridiculous theme and having one of the hardest weapons to use in the series.
    • Spring Man is a distant third due to the inherent goofiness of his concept, which was brought to many a fan's attention in this fan animation. Said video, on the other hand, also managed to turn Spring Man into a strangely endearing character because of how silly his design is.
  • Memetic Mutation:
  • Mis-blamed: A lot of fans chastise Capcom for "running out of ideas" for later Robot Masters, without knowing that Capcom didn't make most of them. They're fan designs chosen by Capcom. If the fans have anyone to blame for the odd Robot Master choices, it's themselves. Though depending on what all designs were there, some might still be able to make a case for Capcom not choosing better designs.
  • Moe: As a rare male example, Mega Man himself qualifies, along with Roll and many others. Justified because the series is inspired by Astro Boy from story to design, of course.
  • Moral Event Horizon: Wily either crossed it when he kidnapped Kalinka and forced her dad to work for him, or posthumously in the next series.
  • Most Annoying Sound:
    • The death sound: Pow pow pow pow pow! You will hear it a lot.
    • The soundtrack for the Game Boy version of Mega Man II suffers from excruciatingly high-pitched instrumentation in just about all of the background music. It's proven to be a popular subject for remixes over the years, and most of these have actually been very well-received by fans, with the common consensus being that while the game's composer might have known what he was doing from a musical standpoint, he did an absolutely terrible job of executing it.
  • Most Wonderful Sound: While Pow pow pow pow pow! is horrible when it means you're dead, it becomes this when it's an enemy Robot Master dying.
  • Polished Port:
    • Mega Man: The Wily Wars for the Sega Genesis. It takes the first three games NES games and give them enhanced 16-bit graphics and updated sound effects, cranked up the difficulty, adds a save feature, and adds an all-new Wily Tower game once unlocked.
    • The Complete Works series of ports of Mega Man 1-6 for the PlayStation not only retains the NES version of these games, they also feature a new Navi Mode which adds a revised menus and HUD, a hint system for new players, memory card saves in addition to passwords (when available), and for those with a PocketStation can level-up Mega Man and the Robot Masters. These ports also fix the sprite flickering and slowdown from their original version, the ability to use the shoulder buttons to cycle through weapons in real-time, remixed music (the first three only had few taken from the two arcade games, while the later half of the Complete Works games have proper remixes), unlockable items to use in Navi Mode, a database with a wealth of information on characters and enemies, and a Mission Mode where players can complete various challenges. Unfortunately this series of ports never got an official English release; although the first four games in the Complete Works series were re-released through PlayStation Network in the U.S., they are not translated in any way and Mega Man 5 and 6 were never released overseas.
  • Porting Disaster:
    • The images featured in the ending credits of Mega Man 7 were missing in all three versions of Anniversary Collection because the developers (Atomic Planet) couldn't figure out how to properly emulate the Mode-7 features of the SNES. The Nintendo GameCube version of Anniversary Collection also received flak for switching the shoot and jump buttons. Regardless, the ports of these games are still very playable, and it was nice to not have the music get muddled by certain sound effects, as well as removing the sprite flickering. Having an actual save feature while keeping the password feature for the first seven games was also appreciated.
    • The GBA port of & Bass made Bass's dash far more difficult to perform due to the lack of a dedicated dash button.
    • The European version of Mega Man 4 was rendered near-unplayable due to severe PAL slowdown. The Virtual Console re-release fixes it somewhat, but it can still be noticeable when there are a lot of enemies on the screen.
    • The mobile ports of the NES games, which are probably the laziest Mega Man ports ever released (somehow even beating out the infamous Mega Man X port). The controls are imprecise and unresponsive (unforgivable offenses with the degree of precision these games require), but even worse, all six games run like molasses even when nothing but Mega Man himself is on the screen, despite numerous areas where the graphics have been noticeably downgraded from the original games.note  And, seemingly just to rub salt in the wound, they're priced at $1.99... for each game. The entire affair just reeks of half-heartedness.
  • Rescued from the Scrappy Heap: When first unveiled, Sheep Man was widely hated due to being seen as dumb and overly-childish. However after the game came out, he ended up becoming quite popular due to his powers, stage design, and Narm Charm factor.
  • Rooting for the Empire: Due to their distinctive designs and personalities, many fans find the Robot Masters more likable and interesting than Mega Man.
  • Scrappy Mechanic:
    • Or rather the Scrappy Mechanic being the lack of a mechanic. Some complaints against 9 and 10 are leveled at the lack of the slide and charge shot mechanics to make the games more like series darling Mega Man 2.
    • If you die to a boss, more often not you're dumped back at a one-way hallway between the main body of the stage and the boss room, minus whatever weapon energy you used up. You may end up having to use the far weaker Mega Buster over whatever weakness-hitting weapon you were using.
    • Enemies respawn once you scroll far enough for their respawn points to be off-screen. Meaning that if you destroy a rather annoying or dangerous enemy but something (like a hazard or a pit) pushes you back, you'll have to fight it again.
  • Scrappy Weapon: Due to how many entries there are in this series, there will always be one or two weapons in each game that aren't very good.
    • The Power Stone from Mega Man 5. It creates three or four rocks that make circles around the screen until they fly out of bounds. The problem? It never works like you'd want it to. It's very hard to hit anything with it and it's not as powerful as you'd think it is, making it one of the worst shield-type Special Weapons — if not the worst.
    • Top Spin is easily the most iconically bad weapon in the series, requiring Mega Man to make contact with the enemy in a game with collision damage, and the weapon is insanely finicky over how much weapon energy it drains (sometimes taking the entire meter in one go) or whether it'll even work at all. It's also the final boss' weakness.
  • That One Achievement:
  • That One Attack: The Wily Capsule in 7 probably wouldn't have his That One Boss status if it wasn't for that damn quadruple homing shot that required either pure luck or superhuman reflexes to dodge.
  • That One Boss: It has its own freaking page! The single most infamous one is without a doubt THE YELLOW DEVIL, who has destroyed many a player's childhood.
  • The Scrappy: Certain Robot Masters can end up like this if their design, level or fighting style turn out to be ridiculous or annoying. Examples include Bubble Man, Toad Man, Dust Man, Plant Man, Clown Man, Aqua Man and Sheep Man.
  • They Wasted a Perfectly Good Plot:
    • The second Game Boy game: Doctor Wily stole a time machine, travels thirty years into the future, kidnaps the future Mega Man, and reprograms him into Quint. What does this brilliant paradox-causing plan amount to? His boss fight consists of him jumping around on a pogo stick/jackhammer and not being particularly effective at it. With no given explanation as to what happens after you defeat him, although he shows up briefly with the rest of the Killers in V. Although there is some good fan fiction speculating on whether this is an alternate timeline that was changed, or part of what caused all the Classic characters to disappear for the X timeline.
    • Navi Mode in the 3 and 4 remakes. Not so much the concept, but rather the execution. The beings used as Mission Control for those two games each induce a Late-Arrival Spoiler. Proto Man in 3, who you fight on 4 occasions, and Kalinka in 4, who's been kidnapped. How'd she get to the radio room? Though it's kind of hard to have someone different in 4 due to the fact that Proto was rescuing Kalinka. The only option left would be Roll reprising from 2.
      But what makes Navi Mode in 3 a wasted feature is the person that could've been Mission Control. None other than the supposedly-reformed Dr. Albert Wily. Phase 1: He genuinely wants to secure the crystals, but his robots have secured them. Still, it's better to side with Mega Man here to keep Dr. Light's trust. Phase 2: With his 2nd batch stalling Mega Man, he still gives helpful messages to stall for time while he personally secures the crystals. Phase 3: Now that the plot is ripe, Dr. Wily could engage in Evil Gloating due to the fact that he still has Mega Man's comm frequency... and perhaps a key distraction here and there...
    • Mega Man 3, Mega Man V, and Mega Man 8 all introduce some level of alien involvement or presence, however the series never expands on this, the three mentioned extraterrestrial involvements don't seem connected whatsoever (the comic does do a fairly decent job at welding them together, however), and the semi-important plot point of alien robots is completely dropped by the time Mega Man X and beyond came along.
  • Uncanny Valley: As a general rule, Mega Man does not look good when realistically rendered, but since laughably ugly boxarts quickly became a beloved series tradition, Capcom has naturally rendered him so for kicks a good number of times. One "classic" example.
    • To be fair, at least Mega Man art is funny-ugly, not scary-ugly as most Uncanny Valley examples are. And seriously, how can you not laugh at Mega Man smiling mischievously while shooting out an enemy's genitals?
      • Then again, Capcom does need to consider effects on sales when designing boxes. You can find genuine Nightmare Fuel in certain fan art. You need to register to see that; there is no known way to unsee it.
  • Unfortunate Character Design:
    • Some take note of Hard Man's strong resemblance to a beer keg.
      • The character's costume, along with his name, gives him rather phallic undertones.
    • Bass could be considered this, because the fandom has taken him the wrong way.
    • And then there's Oil Man, who originally resembled a blackface stereotype from the 1920s before his colors were changed overseas to hide it.
  • What an Idiot!: Mega Man 9 has the Blue Bomber tricked by Dr. Wily where he believes that Dr. Light has fallen ill. Proto Man appears and flat out tells Mega Man that the Dr. Light in the cell is a robot. What does Mega Man do? He ignores Proto Man's warning on the assumption that the robot may be the real Dr. Light. Mega Man gets electrocuted as a result while Dr. Wily escapes and sets the castle to self destruct.
    • Proto Man also gets this as he watches all this happen and refuses to lift a finger, just to make a point.
  • The Woobie:
    • Many of the Robot Masters who are reprogrammed into villains by Wily. The Robot Masters from Mega Man 9 stand out, since they were about to be scrapped for parts when Wily enslaved them.
    • Bubble Man, who can't walk well due to his design and has the worst weapon ever. Wily could fix his walking problems, but doesn't because he thinks it's funny.
    • Dr. Cossack, a nice guy who Wily sets up as the Red Herring for his latest scheme by kidnapping the man's daughter. That's just low.
    • Dynamo Man from Mega Man & Bass used to have a job giving school children tours of a power plant. After King replaced his power generator to convert him into a Walking Wasteland (its energy output made him lethal to be around), he resented humanity for avoiding him and leaving him in isolation.
    • Also from Mega Man & Bass is Burner Man, whom King motivated to burn a forest to the ground daily by making him believe that if he didn't, a non-existent bomb inside him would blow up, destroying him.
    • Dr. Light as of Mega Man 11. The poor man just wanted to create truly intelligent robots, but thanks to a single moment of callousness towards Wily's Double Gear system, he's now the series' ultimate Unwitting Instigator of Doom, and every single bad thing that happens throughout the franchise (ultimately culminating in the extinction of mankind at some point before Mega Man Legends) can be traced back to him.
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