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  • When the Inquisitor was first unveiled, it was noted by some that he resembled the Son, a character introduced in Star Wars: The Clone Wars that was the embodiment of the Dark Side of the Force. Because of this, when Son spoke, his voice would shift to feature elements of users of the Dark Side of the Force, such as Emperor Palpatine or Starkiller. With that in mind, the resemblence between Son & the Inquisitor suddenly makes a lot of sense - if his voice contained elements of the Dark Side users, then it stands to reason that the same could apply to his physical appearance.
  • In the beginning of "Rise of the Old Masters", Kanan clearly isn't thinking the lesson through. He hands Ezra a lightsaber before he teaches him basic lightsaber safety, the cartons are thrown at a much faster pace than Ezra can handle, and he's got Zeb and Chopper annoying Ezra despite the fact that Ezra never learned how to work without distractions, much less with them. Kanan is mostly stalling until he can find Ezra a better teacher, so it makes sense that he's just doing whatever he remembers rather than actually thinking about the lesson. At the end when he decides to teach Ezra himself, there are no distractions and he's throwing at a slower pace, which are much better conditions for a beginner.
  • The creatures in "Out of Darkness" are Super Persistent Predators, willing to go through waves of explosions and blaster fire to get to Hera and Sabine. Given that their last known meal was that gunship from the Clone Wars, it's possible they've been trapped in that base for years and are starving.
  • Given what we know about her identity now, Fulcrum using Fort Anaxes as a drop-off point makes sense. Since she's also a Force-user, she can likely pacify them through the Force as well.
  • When Ezra was orphaned, no family or friends took him in. Given that the Bridgers were arrested, it's possible that most of them were already under suspicion, and severing their ties was the only way to protect themselves.
  • Sabine's taunt in her introductory short where says she "read their book" and that it was a "short one" is actually the truth: She's a disillusioned former Imperial officer cadet. She really has read their book.
  • In the pilot, Ezra goes to save a Wookiee child after seeing his father calling out to him. It's not just Chronic Hero Syndrome, it's an inversion of Ezra's own situation, hence why he was willing to risk his life to reunite them.
  • While it's there to accommodate the blaster, Ezra's lightsaber has a knuckle guard. Since he hasn't trained well enough to handle a lightsaber safely (nearly stabbing Kanan in "Rise of the Old Masters"), it's fitting that he would have a lightsaber with a full, practical hand guard. The design may also be meant to prevent the lightsaber from being Force-pulled out of Ezra's hand (As the Inquisitor did when Ezra tried using Kanan's lightsaber in "Gathering Forces").
    • It also makes the weapon look more like a unique blaster, as opposed to a lightsaber. Practical when you live in an Empire that killed most of the people who used lightsabers in the past, and want to keep yours Hidden in Plain Sight.
  • If one carefully examines both Sabine's Starbird motif, as well as the Death Watch insignia, it is very clear where her symbol originated. It would appear that Sabine took the Death Watch logo, rounded out the forms, and made it more organic, more of an animal. Fitting for a Mandalorian Rebel.
  • Given how the Imperials are so willing to arrest people that slight them, it initially seems odd that they don't arrest Old Jho when Senator-in-exile Gall Trayvis appears on the Holonet feed in "Empire Day" after he refuses to shut it down on their orders. That's because Trayvis is The Mole for the Empire through leading a False Flag Operation, as revealed in "Vision of Hope". They were likely trying to sell the deception. Also, at that moment, the troopers are mostly focused on finding Tseebo.
  • It sorta makes sense that when the clones show up again, Gregor's the one that's gone slightly senile. Per Word of God, the stitch-marks on his helmet in The Clone Wars indicated the headwounds it saved him from. Maybe he finally took one too many hits to the head.
  • The stormtroopers disregarding the courier droid's (Chopper in disguise) missing escort may seem like a lapse of judgment on their part, but as was shown in "Breaking Ranks", stormtroopers are specifically taught to only care about themselves, and show no regard for their comrades. Those two must have been good students, since their only concern was that they were running late.
  • The Inquisitor's lightsaber: it is a saberstaff which has the emitters in a ring rather than in a straight hilt. This means the emitters can spin independantly of the hilt to be used as a thrown weapon or spun quickly for defense. Of course its weakness is the hilt itself - if it is separated from the emitters, or destroyed, the saberstaff falls apart.
  • Kanan using Ezra's lightsaber and rapidly switching between modes makes more sense when you look at his moniker - the Cowboy Jedi. Hell, look at when he uses both his and Ezra's sabers against the Inquistor...
  • Ahsoka wasn't mad at the crew of the Ghost for not following her orders to lie low. In fact she seemed ready to support them considering that she herself traveled to Lothal to pick the Ghost up and also had other ships ready to help should the need arise. It seems that Snips remembers how it was to be a reckless and headstrong young padawan as she once was.
  • The battle over Mustafar is an awesome moment for all parties involved. It's only later that you realize the significance of all of those ships dropping out of hyperspace. This battle is the birth of the Rebellion that we all know and love. We have just watched one of the most momentous and grandest events in all of Star Wars, and it is AWESOME.
  • In the first season finale, it's fitting that the Rebels gain the help of a Big Good while the Imperials gain a Big Bad. And that it's two of the main protagonists from the previous show. Seems Ahsoka is being set up as a Foil to Anakin/Vader.
  • The incident over Mustafar could have long-term repercussions for a certain imperial character. Being forced to abandon a Star Destroyer in the middle of a friendly formation due to the actions of a tiny group of infiltrators might just sour somebody on the idea of ever evacuating again. Particularly in one's moment of triumph.
  • Everyone on the crew donated parts for Ezra's lightsaber, except for Zeb. Ezra probably got the idea of a blaster-saber from Zeb, whose bo-rifle is also a combination of short-range and long-range weaponry. In other words, Zeb donated the concept.
  • "Breaking Ranks":
    • It seems odd that they're taking what are obviously teenagers and training them to be stormtroopers. However, it's likely that this particular training program is not for becoming actual stormtroopers. It's likely an equivalent of ROTC or, more appropriately given the setting's influence, Hitler Youth: meant to drill military discipline into kids to make them ready to enlist once they become 18. Alternatively, they would be assigned to non-combat rear formations until they became old enough for the frontlines.
    • Since they use the words "academy" and "cadet" its more likely they're meant to eventually become officers rather than regular stormtroopers, especially if it's supposed to last for years before the Empire actually gets some use out of them.
    • The tie-in novels introduce an officer who teaches at a similar academy, and who believes that the Empire should train its soldiers from a really early age, maybe even as infants. That officer? The future General Hux's father.
    • The Legends continuity had COMPNOR (the Commission for the Preservation of the New Order) as a subset of the ISB, and one of COMPNOR's programs was the SAGroups (Sub-Adult Groups), quite obviously heavily inspired by the Hitler Youth. And Rebels is drawing on both the ISB and Schrödinger's Canon rather heavily. . .
  • The Ghost crew have a brilliant strategy for avoiding getting caught in a big-big galaxy. They're constantly jumping into hyperspace to escape the Empire before doubling back to Lothal. In a huge galaxy, it's easy to thing to assume they're jumping to countless other planets. When, in fact, they're always coming back to the same planet with lots of Tarkintowns that don't track their comings and goings.
  • At the end of "The Siege of Lothal", Darth Vader refers to Ahsoka as "The Apprentice of Anakin Skywalker" and he and the Emperor continue to refer to Anakin as if he were a different person. They had "previously" done this in The Empire Strikes Back, which at the time, sounded confusing with the later infamous reveal of Luke's parentage. The fact that Vader does it again seems to refer to his belief that Anakin is dead and gone and that he's only a husk of the man he used to be.
  • During Ezra and Kanan's duel with Vader, the latter brings a squadron of stormtroopers with him. When Sabine throws her bombs at the walkers, the stormtroopers scatter in order to escape the blast. Considering that most of the Lothal garrison can't recognize a bomb to save their life, it is evident that these stormtroopers are of a higher calibre than the ones the heroes regularly encounter. Those familiar with other Star Wars works may remember Vader's personal legion — the 501st Legion — had a reputation for being superior to other stormtroopers. Evidently, he brought a division of the 501st with him.
  • Kanan's reasons for not wanting anything to do with the military are pretty self-evident, given how the Clone Wars ended. In the first issue of Kanan, it was shown that his master Depa Billaba disapproved of the Jedi's role in the war, and their last real conversation was teaching him peaceful dissent. Clearly, he doesn't want to make the same mistake.
  • Ezra's recklessness makes sense given that studies show that homeless and runaway youth have a tendency toward high-risk behaviors. Basically, he's been forced to do dangerous things for so long that he doesn't think twice about it, even when the risk outweighs the possible benefit.
  • In "Wings of the Master", Hera seems uncharacteristically reckless and impatient, until you realize that the Empire's blockade of Ibaar and the resistance on the planet reminds her of the Battle of Ryloth and her childhood.
  • One could argue that some of the Fifth Brother's actions earlier on are less being incompetent and more about keeping others from getting credit. Remember, while it isn't as apparent as the Seventh Sister, he wants the position of Grand Inquisitor as much as any of the other Inquisitors. The failures won't be put on him if he's just doing his job or finds an excuse to make someone else accountable for the mission's failure. He evens says in his debut episode, "I care not for your struggles. I will succeed where [Konstantine] and Kallus have failed." Let's review:
    • He called Konstantine away, costing Kallus his victory, since Kallus could've caught the rebels if he had air support.
    • Refused backup, because he was so sure that he could get the rebels himself, thus, getting all the credit.
    • Tried to kill Ezra after the two Inquisitors made themselves known. Letting him live longer runs the risk of him escaping and causing further problems in the future.
    • Did not kill Zeb, but had the parrot droids do it. If the droids failed, then because they're Seven's property, it's her fault for not having competently programmed droids.
  • The Fifth Brother, like Vader, doesn't have the lightness or agility the Grand Inquisitor or the Seventh Sister have. One wonders if Vader sent him as an experiment to see how well he would fare against the nimble Ahsoka.
  • As cooler as it would've been to have Gregor and Wolffe along, as the two-parter demonstrated, their behaviour (crazy and paranoid, respectively) has shown that they would be liabilities. Obviously, you can't have your soldiers getting killed in surprise-suicide missions or have someone ratting your plans out to the Empire. The point of the mission was to recruit just Rex so to gain an adviser, not another soldier (and as Stealth Strike shows, he's not as good as he was in his prime).
  • More like Fridge Sadness, but there have been some complaints about how Zeb's antics with Ezra seem childish and immature. But after learning more of his backstory, his apparently childish behavior seems like a coping mechanism for him to deal with the loss of his people, painting his apparent immaturity as the actions of a Stepford Smiler or Stepford Snarker.
  • People have complained about how gullible the new Inquisitors are in "Always Two There Are" because of how obvious it was that Zeb's message indicated he'd be hiding on the ceiling. But then I realized that the reason they fell for it wasn't because they were incompetent. After thinking it over for a while, I realized that Zeb's plan was actually a hastily constructed Kansas City Shuffle/Batman Gambit that relied on the Inquisitors' Genre Savviness leading them to believe that the painfully obvious trap was a Red Herring.
  • In light of reveals from "The Honorable Ones", Kallus's behavior towards Tua during "The Siege of Lothal" is seen by many as the most jarring characterization in comparison with his recent behavior. While Kallus's words about only doing his duty can likely be taken as true, this does not Retcon the fact that he does have other issues (while oblivious to the Empire's true nature, supplementary material says he enjoys his job). At least two of them play a part in their relationship and both of their characterizations: his Pride and probable dislike of politics and politicians.
  • There's a rather interesting almost-shot-for-shot parallel between Tua as she leaves the Imperial Complex (as well as the office scene) in "The Siege of Lothal" and Kallus in the ending of "The Honorable Ones".
    • Generic shot: Pan up to the Imperial complex / Imperial Star Destroyer above a planet.
    • Empty hallway shot as a door opens for Tua to exit / Kallus to enter.
    • The only other Imperial is Kallus / Konstantine, who both have negative responses to the other officer's presence (Smug Snake / Unacknowledgement).
    • The Imperial that is not Kallus (Tua / Konstantine) walks away from him.
    • Kallus opening a door to enter / closing a door to exit to a private room (Tua's office / Kallus' quarters).
    • The occupant of the room is left to contemplate on recent events.
  • "How Jedi choose to win," first said by Yoda to Ezra with regards to winning strategically rather than winning by itself takes on a whole new level of meaning when you realize he is referring to the Jedi as a whole, and the only way for them to win, i.e. his choice, was to sacrifice the many so that the few could succeed. The brilliance? In order to secure victory, you may need to pay any cost, which is what Yoda ultimately does by Return of the Jedi.
  • The Inquisitors are all at least in their 20s-30s, with the Grand Inquisitor being older than that. Now we see why: the strongest Force users who accessed the Dark Side to better understand it were the Temple Guards, who used lightsaber pikes, and detached themselves completely from the world and focused entirely on the betterment of the Jedi by understanding the Force as a whole. Who better to corrupt into your Jedi hunters than the guys sworn to protect them?
  • Meaning of several names:
    • Kanan Jarrus:
      • "Canaan" means "purple" in Hurrian. This could be a reference to how his master's master, Mace Windu, was in possession of a purple lightsaber. Dark side users tend to have red lightsabers while generally non-dark siders have either blue or green. Combine red and blue and you get purple. This may be referencing how Kanan may not be considered by some an orthodox Jedi. Also put into consideration that Mace and Depa have had history with tapping into the dark side in both canon and Legends.
      • The origin of "Canaan" may have came from the Hebrew word "kana"; to synchronize. One interpretation could be that as he is a main character for a show that is the first new major entry in a rewritten canon, his story is effectively re-syncing ideas (be it new, Legends, or always established) together to create a brand new story.
    • Ezra Bridger:
      • Remove the Z and you get "era bridger". Fitting for the protagonist of a show that bridges the Prequels and Originals (and possibly the Sequels) together.
      • Ezra is the name of a religious and social reformer in The Bible. It also means "help" in Hebrew. Our Ezra is a rebel against an evil government and is a Jedi that isn't being completely taught under the same principles as the Clone Wars' Jedi believed in. It's also an Ironic Name, as the biblical Ezra was concerned with purity, homeland, and the revival of the old ways, while this Ezra is The Corruptible, has lost his home, and is even more unorthodox than his master when it comes to Jedi tradition.
    • Sabine Wren:
      • The Sabines were taken over by the Roman Kingdom (which became the Republic, then the Empire) when they came to Central Italy. The Sabines and Romans also fought in a series of wars against each other. In Legends, Mandalore has had several conflicts with the Republic and the Jedi, and in canon, the chaotic state of Mandalore after a civil war and being taken over by the Republic would mean that it would be assimilated into and watched carefully under the eyes of the Empire.
      • Besides sharing her clan name with the Knights of Ren, "Ren" in Japanese can mean "lotus" or "love". In Welsh, it can also mean "ruler". She is House Vizsla, and thus related to Death Watch leader Pre Vizsla. Wrens being a type of songbird is also a reference to the bird motif in Mandalorian culture (Nite Owls, Rook Kast, shriek-hawks being the Vizsla emblem, etc.).
    • Hera Syndulla:
      • Hera is the Greek goddess of marriage and childbirth, infamous for her hostility towards her husband Zeus and his lovers. This is an Ironic Name, as our Hera is the crew's Team Mom and heart.
    • Garazeb "Zeb" Orrelios:
      • Zebadiah is a Biblical name, meaning "gift from God" in Hebrew. Zeb is the Chosen One in a prophecy set up by the Ashla/Force.
      • Flip "Aurang" in "Aurangzeb", take out the U and N, and you get "Garazeb". Aurangzeb means "honouring the throne" in Persian. Zeb was the Captain of the High Honor Guard unit that protected the Royal Family.
      • Orrelios sounds like a corruption of "Aurelius", a Roman name derived from "aureus", which means "gold, gilded" in Latin. Gold tends to be associated with elite statuses and occasionally ancient societies.
    • Other characters:
      • Kallus: Callous. Worth noting that because he didn't disclose his first name to Zeb like the latter did back in "The Honorable Ones", it means that he still sees himself as part of the Empire and not as an individual.
      • Ketsu Onyo: Ignoring what "Ketsu" by itself means in Japanese, "ketsueki" means "blood" in the same language. Onyo means "warning" in Swahili. Ketsu debuted in "Blood Sisters" and is considered Sabine's surrogate sister. "Warning" could be referring to events to come or how her role changed Sabine's life.
      • Mira Bridger: Related to "wonder(ful)" in Latin, "peace" in numerous Slavic languages, "ocean" or "limit" in Sanskrit, and "light" in Hebrew (when short for Miriam). She is a martyr and a hero to Ezra, having non-martially fought for peace and inspiring her son to fight. The "ocean" part could be a reference to the ocean in front of Lothal's Capital City, which is more noticeable in Ezra's vision of what could have been a better world.
      • Ephraim Bridger: "Fruitful" in Hebrew. There is also a Biblical verse saying: [Joseph] named the second [son] Ephraim, "For," he said, "God has made me fruitful in the land of my affliction.". Even in the dark times of the Empire, the Bridgers still had joy in their love for their son, even going so far to rebel against the Empire for his and many others' sakes.
      • Zare Leonis: Zare means "God has helped", and is Romanian for "brilliance, summit, horizon". Ezra, a Force-user, helped Zare get his sister back. Zare is also the protagonist of the Servants of the Empire series. Leonis is also used to describe several of the stars in the Leo (Lion) constellation. Lions are symbolic for wisdom and strength. To survive in the Empire and get what he wanted, Zare had to be smart and brave. Zare is also an anagram of Ezra.
      • Ryder Azadi: Ryder means "knight". Azadi is Persian for "liberty, independence". He was a leading figure that wanted to break free from the Empire.
      • Fenn Rau: Fenn is derived from Fenn Shysa from Legends. Rau is a nickname for "ruffian" in German, which is partly an Ironic Name, because he isn't as bloodthirsty as compared to Sabine or the other Mandalorians. Rau can also mean "friend", which served as Foreshadowing to him possibly genuinely joining the Rebellion in the future or at least becoming an ally.
      • Fifth Brother: In the Biblical sense, 5 is the number of God's grace. Ironic Name, because unlike the other Inquisitors, he isn't as elegant (regarding fighting and social skills). He's like Vader, albeit with a little more viciousness than boldness.
      • Seventh Sister: In the Biblical sense, 7 is the number of the basic principle of God's word, and the number of perfection, completion. From what is seen so far, the Seventh Sister seems to be the most qualified and ambitious to be the next Grand Inquisitor.
      • Eighth Brother: In the Biblical sense, 8 is the number of rebirth, a new beginning. He is a Last Episode, New Character, debuting in the Season 2 finale, where Nothing Is the Same Anymore.
  • People somehow not knowing about Kanan and Ezra being Jedi despite being depicted in the HoloNet News wielding lightsabers can be justified as the news likely only being local, meaning Lothal and planets very close to it are the only ones that probably know. This applies to Leia and Azadi in "A Princess on Lothal", as the former comes from the distant world of Alderaan and the latter had been in prison during that time.
  • It's a common theme in the show about characters overcoming their Dark and Troubled Past in order to progress in the future. But it's worth noting that in these cases, it's other people that make those characters confront their past, because those other people have some sort of relation to them, like being Not So Different, We Used to Be Friends, Archenemies, et cetera. They serve as reminders of the characters' pasts; thus, the characters are haunted by their pasts. The people they confront are basically their ghosts. And those ghosts are being haunted by their own pasts as well, also fitting in with the unity and family theme.
    • Kanan's ghosts are Hera (A New Dawn, because she reminded him of the goodness the Republic and Jedi stood for, leading him to become a rebel), Ezra (the reason why he takes up the sword again), Rex (a stand-in for the Rebellion; reminds Kanan that he should not let his hatred control his actions and that while War Is Hell, he isn't alone in not just knowing that, but that he'll be backed up), and the Inquisitors (what pushes him to protect the people he loves, making him stronger and eventually a Knight).
    • Hera's ghosts are Kanan (she became softer and kinder after befriending him, whereas she was more detached in A New Dawn and prior), Chopper (her pride and joy, maybe her only joy back on Ryloth), and maybe Cham.
    • Cham's ghost is Hera, because he got so absorbed in the Twi'lek Resistance that he forgot to take care of the original reasons why he fought; Hera and her mother.
    • Chopper doesn't really have a ghost, because he isn't really haunted by his past, but he might be AP-5's ghost instead. Them both being veterans of the Ryloth campaign allows AP to see that because Chopper has friends, he has a future, whereas he's alone, and AP can change that by joining the Rebellion.
    • Zeb's ghosts are the survivors of Lasan (bringing up who he was before the fall of Lasan and that he can still do great things) and Kallus (Both him and Kallus initially have a Black and White Morality of the conflict due to trauma and use each other as ways to vent out their hatred and grief).
    • Kallus' ghost is Zeb. Because of Onderon, Kallus was blinded by his anger and misconceives that all rebels and Lasat are evil and chaotic. His description of how he got his bo-rifle is vague as to whether or not he felt immediately guilty about the massacre or if it was a retrospect view and he now regrets it. Upon being isolated with a Lasat, Zeb demonstrates compassion and Kallus begins to realize that if both people ruthless and people compassionate will fight together against the Empire, then something isn't right.
    • Sabine's ghosts are Ketsu (Shadow Archetype of what Sabine could've been like without her surrogate family) and Rau (him nearly killing Hera reminds her that the crew is her only family left, and even her own people don't seem to accept her).
    • Ketsu's ghost is Sabine, again, being Shadow Archetypes.
    • Rau's ghosts are possibly Kanan (reminder of what he stood for before Mandalore bowed to the reign of the Empire) and Sabine (he and his Protectors are reminded that Mandalore is an independent culture and if the let the Empire boss them around, then they aren't as strong as they thought they were).
    • Ezra's ghosts are the crew (he once again has a family, and this time, he won't let them be taken away so easily again), Tseebo (he lashed out at the idea that his parents are still alive, which he interprets to mean that they abandoned him), Trayvis (thought he was like his parents, until it turned out he was not only a coward, but a liar, twisting everything the Bridgers ever stood for), and Azadi (returned the hope that his parents were alive and escaped, but instead, it meant that he had to let go).
    • Ahsoka's ghost is Vader. For years, Ahsoka likely pushed aside her attachment to Anakin, under the belief that it was what he would've wanted, as well as allowing her to move forward to continue the true legacy of the Republic; only for it to turn out that his shell is everything they never wanted. And now she must end one of the few still-lasting things from her past for the sake of the future.
    • Vader's ghosts are Obi-Wan (other Jedi as well to a lesser extent), Ahsoka, and the twins, because they represent the goodness (his failures) he once had, and he believes that none of it is his fault.
    • Maul's ghost is Ezra, as both of them at their worst are survivors (having survived against the odds, but lost their family in the process), and are passionate; Ezra gives him hope that he can cast his revenge and gain power. Ezra wants power, and possibly revenge as well if things go badly.
    • The Inquisitors have no ghosts, because they likely do not remember anything from their past.
  • To tie in with the above entry, several characters like Sabine/Ketsu, Zeb/Kallus, Ezra/Anakin, Kanan/Obi-Wan, Chopper/AP-5, etc. are basically if the latter had familial support, then they could have been like the former and found a better road to follow.
  • Someone on Reddit pointed out that another set of overarching themes in the show is overcoming the Dark Side, using Yoda's quote that "Fear is the path to the Dark Side; fear leads to anger, anger leads to hate, hate leads to suffering." and applying each of those ideas to each consecutive season. It is also worth noting that these themes do not just apply to Ezra or Kanan, but many other characters as well.
    • Season 1's theme is fear. Ezra had to overcome his fear of abandonment and not being good enough to train or protect others (noticeable in the pilot and "Rise of the Old Masters"; closed in "Path of the Jedi"), while Kanan had to overcome his fear of not being good enough as well (trying to skip out on his teaching like in "Droids in Distres" and "Rise of the Old Masters"; closed in "Fire Across the Galaxy"; "I have nothing left to fear."). The Grand Inquisitor's main psychological weapon also seemed to be invoking fear. Once Kanan overcomes fear, the Grand Inquisitor starts panicking and eventually loses due to fearing Kanan.
    • Season 2's theme is anger (this sort of edges into hate). Each character usually overcomes their anger and comes to forgiving whoever they place their anger on by the end of the season. In "The Siege of Lothal", we even get an exchange between Ezra and Kanan about this ("I'm not afraid." "That's what worries me.").
      • Kanan is upset that he and his crew are joining another war and holds a grudge against the clones for half of the season.
      • Ezra has become more impulsive after the revelation that his parents have died. He is the only character that has yet to overcome his anger.
      • Sabine was angry that Ketsu left her for dead and that Rau nearly killed Hera. Sabine forgives Ketsu, while she also has Rau taken captive rather than killed.
      • Zeb was mad at himself for not protecting Lasan as well as he should have and also mad at the alleged perpetrator, Kallus. Zeb begins to forgive himself when he succeeds in finding Lirasan and fully does so when he and Kallus are isolated together.
      • Kallus misplaced his anger on Zeb, who had nothing to do with the Onderon incident besides sharing the same species as the mercenary. He closes this when he realizes that his generalizations of the rebels and Lasat are incorrect.
      • Hera and Cham were estranged due to Cham getting obsessed with the Rebellion and Hera running off. They forgive each other once Cham allows Hera to prove herself and does so successfully.
      • Ahsoka seems to be angry with herself for letting Anakin and the Republic fall.
      • Vader is... well... angry about a lot of things, including Ahsoka leaving, the corruption of the Jedi Order, you know...
  • If you pay attention to the fight between Ahsoka and Darth Vader, you will notice it is a rearrangement of "Duel of the Fates".
  • If you have paid attention to Vader's helmet, you have probably noticed it does not look like how it normally does. Well... It gets destroyed at the end of Season 2. Obviously, it can't be the same helmet. Continuing with this, fans have often wondered why Vader's helmet was symmetrical in Revenge of the Sith but asymmetrical in A New Hope. Now we know.
  • It's easy to blame Ezra for trusting Maul. But the thing is, he didn't trust him. He held him at swordpoint when they met, snarkily said "I don't know you" when asked if he trusted him, and refused to give him his name. That was, until Maul laid out his backstory, and Ezra empathized with him. Ezra's always had a talent with connection, after all, and that runs both ways. It's also easy to miss that this ends up saving Ezra in a way, in that it's Maul that deludes himself that Ezra would be willing to follow him into becoming his apprentice.
  • For the Sith to have Dark Side Force-sensitives serve them without violating the Rule of Two, they'd have to refrain passing on their darkest of secrets to the Inquisitors. This also works against them, because as shown in "Twilight of the Apprentice", Inquisitors are not trained to take on a rogue Sith.
  • There sure are a ton of things that relate to fire (mostly in regards to "burning", sometimes shooting), loss, and rebellion.
    • Throughout Season 1 (and arguably the entire show), a "Spark of Rebellion" ignites a "Fire Across the Galaxy".
    • The Arc Symbol is the starbird/phoenix, which we know becomes refined into the Rebel Alliance insignia. In the latter half of Season 1, it turns out Sabine's symbol has a bottom half, which looks like set of wood or bones set on fire. As in, a reborn phoenix rising from the ashes, as if to mean the ashes of the Republic are being reborn into the Rebel Alliance. There's also Phoenix Squadron.
      • Phoenix Squadron is split after Season 3, but reorganized into the other flight squadrons.
    • Ezra's house and Tarkintown are burnt down.
    • Lasan was exterminated via disruptors, which burn victims into ashes.
    • Kallus, when speaking of the Lasat mercenary back on Onderon, includes the description of how he "walked calmly through smoke and fire".
    • The Grand Inquisitor, Minister Tua, Mr. Sumar, Sato, Konstantine, and Kanan die in a blazing inferno.
    • The Special Edition Title for "Jedi Night" and "DUME" has ashes raining from the top of the screen In Memoriam of Kanan, who died before the title card of "Jedi Night".
    • The moment where Kanan loses his eyesight, there's smoke from his wounds.
    • The Syndulla Estate gets blown up as well.
    • The Bendu falls to the ground in a fiery blaze after Thrawn has him shot down, then later disappears, implying he may return one day.
    • Sabine has a fear of water according to the comics. Not only is it a part of her Dark and Troubled Past and it can it wash away art, but it can put out fires.
    • It is implied Mira and Ephraim were shot to death when they died.
    • The surface of Atollon is made uninhabitable after Thrawn has it fired upon, with nothing but burnt organic matter left.
    • In the Season 4 premiere, Sabine's superweapon turns anyone who was caught into ashes.
    • In the second half of Season 4, Kanan is killed in an explosion, but has joined the Force and has become a new being.
  • Fridge Sadness: Kallus not sharing his first name while Zeb revealed his nickname could mean that Kallus still does not see himself as an individual, but still an extension of the Empire's will. To get an idea of what this means, remember that in the Republic, clones wanted to show their individuality by expressing themselves through things like their unique appearances and their nicknames, rather than sticking with keeping their armor shiny and referring to their numbers. In the Empire, none of that is a thing anymore; after the Academy, your identity is basically sterilized. You all have the same armor and a similar set of numbers to call each other by. Deviate, and you'll get a stern talk if you're lucky.
  • In "The Lost Commanders"/"Relics of the Old Republic", Gregor calls Kanan by the title general. Kanan gets angry and says he was never a general. Gregor (oblivious to Kanan's anger) "corrects himself" and calls him commander instead. Kanan tries to tell Gregor not to call him that either but gives up rather quickly. Being a Padawan during the war, he was probably addressed by the title of commander by the clone troopers.
  • Someone on Tumblr noticed that there was a lot more to the Grand Inquisitor's defeat to Kanan back in "Fire Across the Galaxy". The camera wasn't going slo-mo because Viewers Are Goldfish, it wasn't just Kanan noticing a fatal flaw in the lightsaber's design; we are viewing Kanan's perspective, because he found a shatterpoint. In Legends, Mace Windu and Depa Billaba, both predecessors of Kanan's line of apprenticeship, were masters of the shatterpoint technique, a technique where a user has deep focus with the Force and taps into it to find the weak point of an object, allowing said object to break with a single touch at a certain interval. Must be technique naturally carried in their line. Shatterpoints can also have a huge significance on events, such as a victory that would otherwise have to be conceived through some sort of miracle; which is exactly what happens in "Fire Across the Galaxy". Kanan cutting the Grand Inquisitor's lightsaber in half led to the pieces falling into Tarkin's Star Destroyer, which in turn led to Imperial forces being stalled long enough for the blockade runners to arrive, which became a huge enough victory that in stirred up whispers from Mustafar; sympathy for the Rebellion and doubt of the Empire's impregnability.
  • Some fans have complained that the lightsaber fights in Rebels aren't as good as the fights in The Clone Wars. While it's true that lightsaber battles aren't as intricate as the ones in the previous series, the one Jedi protagonist in this series, Kanan, was still a padawan when he lost his master and thus, never fully completed his training. And naturally, he won't be passing on any advanced lightsaber techniques off to Ezra. And with regards to the Inquisitors, the Rule of Two is still very much in place so they definitely won't be taught any advanced lightsaber or Dark Side techniques but instead, only get taught the bare minimum to be just good enough that they can take down most people, except for the Sith themselves. So in retrospect, it actually makes sense that the lightsaber battles in the show aren't as advanced or as flashy because most of the Force users in Rebels are barely above padawan level.
    • There's another reason: The prequel trilogy-era lightsaber combat is flashy because, before The Phantom Menace, the Jedi have believed the Sith to be extinct for a thousand years. During that time, lightsaber combat evolved as an art, developing a lot of flashy flourishes and Flynning that it hadn't previously possessed. In the time of the Empire, the earlier, more straightforward fighting styles are better suited to the situations any Force-users would be facing.
  • Anakin's holocron recording, in which he teaches a series of Ataru techniques focused on deflecting blaster bolts, is notable for a few reasons.
    • 1: Ataru is about as different from Djem So, Anakin's favored style, as possible.
    • 2: Ataru is specialized against single, lightsaber-wielding foes, and is vulnerable to both being outnumbered, and blasters. Anakin's modified techiques are explicitly meant to counter this weakness. What this shows us, is that Anakin has mastered lightsaber combat to the point where he not only understands multiple styles, but where he can teach, not only the original styles, but his own modifications of them. This gives him some reasoning for why he should be considered a Master, namely that he's teaching new techiques and modifying them, something generally considered to be the actions of a Master, not a Knight, rather than the petulant "I'm the chosen one" that seemed to be his only basis for such an action in the prequel trilogy. The use of Ataru in particular, and the emphasis on deflecting blasters, is also quite brilliant. Anakin's Padawan, Ahsoka Tano, originally was trained largely in Ataru, and as such, wouldn't have been well suited to the battlefield of the Clone Wars. Anakin's using his experience teaching Ahsoka in Form V techiques, to create a training course to ready new Jedi for the battlefield of the Clone Wars.
  • In the novelization for "Spark of Rebellion", Sabine mentions at one point when Ezra accidentally insults her that if he hadn't been a kid she might have hurt him. The Mandalorian warrior code in Legends holds that children are sacred to Mandalorians, showing that Sabine is a far different Mandalorian from the pacifists and terrorists seen in The Clone Wars, even if her family was the latter.
  • Fridge Sadness: Kallus is caught in two explosions in Season 1; "Spark of Rebellion" and "Vision of Hope". He gets up very quickly, and in the latter occasion, we can compare his recovery to others in the room, being one of the or the first to get back up. It seems like nothing, perhaps just what he learned to do in ISB training, but remember that in "The Honorable Ones", the incident on Onderon started with him getting caught in the blast of a bomb, rendering him paralyzed and helpless when the mercenary came around to execute everyone. This might be a sign that Kallus has PTSD.
  • At first, the Protectors accusing Death Watch of being traitors raised an eyebrow, considering they helped take back Mandalore from Maul by teaming up with the Republic, but then again, there are several reasons as to why they may have felt this way:
    • The Siege of Mandalore happened at the very end of the Clone Wars. The whole time until the Siege, Mandalore's been torn apart by Death Watch and the Supercommandos. News of the Jedi's "betrayal" and the rise of the Empire would've overshadowed news of the Death Watch having an Enemy Mine with the Republic.
    • In addition, the Empire is quite fond of pretending things never happened, so it's a possibility that the Imperials just branded Death Watch as criminals again (though Death Watch could've decided to stir up trouble again, as an act of rebellion against the Empire or something else).
    • The feud between the Protectors and Death Watch dates back to many years in the past, so it wouldn't be a case of Easily Forgiven by the Protectors. Twilight Company, a couple of years down the road after Rebels, mentions that Death Watch is mercenary group in the bounty hunter kind of way, seemingly not like a space patrol like the Protectors, so that shows Death Watch didn't just have a change of heart after the Siege either.
  • If we followed the Resol'nare, Sabine actually qualifies for most of these principles so far and is on the way to being considered a real Mandalorian according to Legends:
    • Wearing the armor: Pretty self-explanatory. Bonus points in that she actually forged it with her family.
    • Speaking Mando'a: My Rebel Sketchbook reveals that Sabine knows how to speak Mando'a, which she demonstrates on-screen in "Legacy of Mandalore".
    • Defending oneself and family: She defends her surrogate family, the Ghost crew, as well as the Rebellion, and if "The Protector of Concord Dawn" was any indication, she still has pride in her original family despite whatever choices they have made in the past.
    • The only principles she hasn't done known to us is contributing to her clan's welfare, rallying to the Mand'alor's call (which is sort of impossible; does one consider Maul and/or Vizsla as Mand'alor, and who is the present Mand'alor, if any?), and raising her children as Mandalorians (she doesn't have any yet).
    • In addition, she also follows other ideas not said in the Resol'nare, including proverbs and phrases such as:
      • "Family is more than bloodline." She sees the crew as her family, as well as Ketsu and a couple others such as possibly Rau, if info on Season 3 is any indication.
      • "Cin vhetin." (lit. "white snow"), as in, once someone takes up the armor, their past no longer matters.
      • We know that Sabine got a hold of her armor after she deserted from the Imperial Academy, and this means that she is trying to move past that and her mother's past as a Death Watch soldier, so that she can move forward as a soldier of the Rebellion, a story that is still going on right now as of the first half of Season 3.
      • "Nobody cares who your parent was; only the parent that you'll be." note  Sabine sees herself as her own person, not someone with pre-decided fate and destiny when her mother was Death Watch. All that matters is that her mother and family taught her the traditional Mandalorian way; they did their job. This is something the Protectors failed to see.
      • "Train your sons to be strong, but your daughters to be stronger." Technically applies more to Sabine's mom and family by not making Sabine a wuss. It's also revealed in "Legacy of Mandalore" that Sabine has a history of beating her brother when they're sparring.
      • "A warrior is more than their armor." Sabine's pretty skilled in other fields, she's not just a warrior. She's also an artist, a technician, etc.
  • During the holocron fusion in "The Holocrons of Fate", Ezra sees more than Maul does, and Maul relies on him to deepen the vision. Part of this might be because Ezra's asking a more specific question than Maul is (Ezra wants to find out how to destroy the Sith, while Maul seeks for "hope", whatever that means for someone like him), but part of it might simply be because Ezra can open both holocrons while Maul can only open one.
  • Some people thought it'd would've been even more heartwarming if Kallus had referred to Zeb by his nickname instead of his full name when he had to convince Sabine that his advice was trustworthy in "The Antilles Extraction", but if he had referred to him as "Zeb", then it would've come off as an attempt to be chummy and could have aggravated Sabine even more, especially considering she has trust issues and takes lying to her very seriously, and we know that calling him "the Lasat" would definitely not help the situation. Using his full name indicates to her that the relationship he has with Zeb has reached a level of mutual respect, and if Zeb did not say anything before, it was because he must have wanted to respect it by keeping it private, something Sabine surely understands and respects. If Kallus trusts Zeb, it's only because Zeb trusted him first, which in turn lets Sabine know she can trust Kallus.
  • Why did Thrawn stick around and let the rebels leave in "Hera's Heroes"? Hera told him earlier on that she would have destroyed her family heirloom rather than let him and the Empire take it. She then proves her point by destroying her Imperial-occupied house so that she and company could escape. Now Thrawn knows that Hera will sacrifice things at any cost to keep them from getting in the hands of the Empire. Hera Syndulla is serious indeed. (Thrawn even gets a look of mild surprise when he learns Hera would be willing to destroy the heirloom, and from that point is clearly planning to learn even more about what she's willing to give up in order to succeed.) Thrawn also plays the long game and isn't concerned about immediate victories, and one of his main strategies is understanding the enemy. Killing Hera and her crew would be an important victory but they would be replaced by someone new he would have to learn about and understand. By letting them go he gives them a meaningless "victory" and learns more about the people he's planning to eventually defeat.
  • In the Aftermath trilogy, Wedge forms a new starfighter squadron; Phantom Squadron. Not only is it a reference to the similarly named Wraith Squadron from Legends in the X-Wing Series (as well as possibly referencing the Phantom Squadron from the Legacy era roleplay, which was in-universe inspired by Wraith Squadron), but it makes sense that Wedge named it so in tribute to his friends, the Ghost crew, who also had at least two shuttles called the Phantom as well.
  • I thought it was a bit dumb that Rau didn't get his original helmet back and had to reuse one of his men's. But I thought about it and realized this: the symbol on Rau's first helmet helped enforce the idea that he was their leader (The Protector; not just any ordinary Protector), and the symbol was one of high prestige and honor. It was a privilege to lead his men. But he can't be a leader if he has no one to lead. Using a lesser ranked Protector helmet stained with their blood symbolizes that he has to start all over again (to regain his honor and rebuild the Protectors), and that he also now carries the burden of their deaths.
  • It's not hard to sympathize with Hera's concern about whether they can trust Kallus, because that's what they thought about supposed anti-Imperial Gall Trayvis too, and he turned out to be a mole.
  • Kalani's actions during the droid shutdown is the same as Rex's reaction to Order 66; both of them eventually realized that it was a ruse and found a way to disobey their respective commands. Fittingly, they would be the only ones of their respective armies to realize that they were ultimately pawns for the Empire.
  • In "The Last Battle", Kalani explaining that the Lasat we're not involved in the Clone War may have a reasonable explanation. During the war their was a group that wanted to stay neutral. The Council of Neutral Systems, a group of fifteen hundred systems led by Duchess Satine. Lasan could have been one of those systems.
  • Wedge says he can pilot anything, just as Poe would say in The Force Awakens. Is it a coincidence, was Poe channeling a hero of his, or did his honorary uncle Wedge rub off on him?
  • In "Ghosts of Geonosis", at first, when Hera first hears about Saw, she doesn't seem to know about his reputation, as she would've warned the others about his instability much sooner had she known earlier. When Saw boards the Ghost and meets the rest of the crew, Hera is unimpressed by him. Notice that Zeb looks a bit uncomfortable meeting Saw, certainly because he learned from Kallus about Saw's brutality. It's entirely possible that Zeb told Hera about this right before the scene where they meet Saw in the Ghost.
  • Thrawn is actually surprised and nonplussed that the Rebels thought to sabotage his effort to find their base by reprogramming the searching droid to self-destruct upon return to the Empire. Since it was Zeb's plan, and Thrawn hasn't had the chance to encounter Zeb or observe his strategies at work, he couldn't account for such an act.
  • Thrawn apparently not caring about Kallus' loyalty in "Warhead" is easily explained by the situation: it doesn't matter if Kallus/Fulcrum alerts the Rebels about the infiltrator droids or not. If he doesn't, the program continues on without issue. If he does, the Rebels face the Morton's Fork situation on how to deal with the droids: destroy one that finds them, the Empire will go to that system and close in on them, don't destroy it and it passes on their location, attempt to subvert its programming and it blows them all up and alerts the Empire to their location. Even the best case scenario for the Rebels, that they're alerted in time and either move to avoid the droids or after their base is identified, disrupts their operations and essentially forces them to always be on the run. And even Zeb's Take a Third Option ends up helping Thrawn, even if Thrawn least expected it. There's no particular reason for Thrawn to make a show about Kallus because, in the end, there's utterly nothing he can do to prevent Thrawn from getting something out of the situation.
    • Also, it's important to note Thrawn really didn't know the identity of Fulcrum up until "Through Imperial Eyes". In this episode, Thrawn feels Fulcrum wasn't an issue at this point and didn't have to worry about who to trust for a few reasons: 1) Thrawn is concerned about sensitive information being leaked, and there was nothing sensitive about the use of Infiltrator Droids. 2). Anyone could've warned the rebels, and he couldn't really care less who does, because the result would end with the rebels either compromised or dead, or having led him closer to finding them, showing how foolproof his use of the droids are.
  • In "Ghosts of Geonosis" Ezra acts unusually kind towards Klik-Klak after he's caught, sympathizing with him and reassuring him even though Klik-Klak was trying to kill them a moment ago. But since he made a connection with Klik-Klak earlier to find him and can feel Klik-Klak's fear and protective instincts, he's far more forgiving than usual.
  • During the episode where Hera returns to Ryloth and meets her father, she relapses into the "Rylothian" accent she otherwise does not speak in. It's actually quite common for people who otherwise do not retain their accent/dialect to revert to it when speaking to their (grand)parents and even more so during events of extreme emotion.
  • In "Breaking Ranks", observant viewers may realize that Tua's office is across from Kallus' office. In later episodes, Tarkin, Vader, and Thrawn are seen using Kallus' office. While it hasn't been stated onscreen or in official material yet, considering Tua is The Dragon to Pryce, it's probably Governor Pryce's office, used by whoever is the leading official at the time if Pryce is absent and/or her superior(s) is on-world.
  • In "Droids in Distress", why was Minister Tua sent to retrieve those T-7 ion disruptors? Because the Empire is going to create new disruptors out of them in the factories, as we find out in "Empire Day" and "An Inside Man".
    • This is actually mentioned in the episode, where Sabine says she learned while translating for Tua that the Empire wanted the disruptors so they could mass-produce them on Lothal.
  • In "Trials of the Darksaber", Kanan mentions that Sabine's hotheaded nature keeps her closed off from the Force. The implication being that while not everyone can be a Jedi, anyone with the proper mindset can sense the Force. Back in the Clone Wars episode "Ambush". Yoda told his clone troopers that because they are all living beings they were connected to the Force. So in a sense, Kanan was making the same observation as Yoda.
  • In "Legacy of Mandalore", despite asking Ursa an Armour-Piercing Question about whether she values Mandalorian customs more than her daughter's life, Kanan doesn't interfere in the duel between Sabine and Saxon. Why? Two reasons. One, the Jedi and the Mandalorians have an age-old enmity, so he won't exactly get or stay in Clan Wren's good graces if he intervenes. Two, he wants Ursa to think and come to a decision about what she values more, so that if it becomes necessary, and it does, she can save her own daughter's life.
  • In "Through Imperial Eyes", Kallus and Lyste are surprised that there are other sector officers (Titus, Slavin, and Brunson) being interrogated. It's clear that Thrawn and Yularen are suspicious not just of him being Fulcrum, but of every officer minus Pryce who has ever encountered the rebels and survived.
    • In addition, what about the other surviving Imperials in the cast? Obviously, Tarkin is not a rebel spy; Baron Valen Rudor is either dead or has no reason to give up his perfectly fine life as an Imperial noble, as well as never having encountered any of the Ghost crew members or the other rebels personally for a couple of years now; Commandant Relik and Captain Skerris barely interacted with Sabine or even any of the Atollon rebels prior to their debut and were already investigated by Pryce, Kallus, and the ISB in that same episode, in addition to probably being too busy on Montross to make a short trip; AP-5's Imperial freighter captain is likely in rebel custody, as he was present when Chopper and AP-5 came up with a new location for their rebel base. Of course, the other answer is that they were interrogated offscreen or were planned to be interrogated until Thrawn finally had enough evidence to conclude that Kallus is Fulcrum.
    • Thrawn's choice of who to suspect aside from Kallus is also based on the nature of their past failures; Lyste, because three ships disappeared on his watch, and it did involve an inside job. Slavin, because a disguised Ezra (whom Thrawn outed himself) went into General Syndulla's home on his watch. Titus, because he failed, for whatever reason, to heed advice to tighten Ezra's capture, costing the Empire an Interdictor, as well as failing to capture Ezra at Reklam Station and giving him the idea to cut the power. Brunson, because she was too slow to capture the rebels and let them get away with whatever they found on Geonosis. Konstantine, well, because Thrawn doesn't think too highly of him anyways when it comes to dealing with the rebels.
    • Pryce isn't a suspect or was already deduced to not be one earlier, before the arrival of Kallus and Lyste, because Thrawn has already known her for quite some time now and is aware that she could never be a rebel spy, and the interrogation would otherwise just be very short anyway. In addition, Pryce has worked closely with Emperor Palpatine and other Imperials from high command and is also fully aware of the Empire's plans for Lothal, so if they trust her and she's never budged for years, then she's instantly off the suspect list. It all reinforces why the idea of Pryce being a traitor is extremely ludicrous to boot.
  • For Thrawn to Feed the Mole, such a plan relies on keeping the other Imperials in the dark, as well as maintaining the deception that Lyste is the traitor. Doing so otherwise is a risk for three reasons:
    • If Thrawn pardons Lyste, the Imperials will get suspicious of each other again and from both of those things happening Kallus will know his plan didn't work.
    • If Thrawn fills in Pryce and the other Imperials on his plan as well as the truth, they're going to protest his methods. It's established from the beginning of Season 3 that Imperials like Konstantine don't understand his methods and are loath to trust them. Even on Thrawn's instruction, it would be hard for them to purposely ignore the truth and not give suspicious glances to Kallus that will tip him off.
    • If Thrawn tells the other Imperials working for him the truth as well as his plan, word would get out to Tarkin that Thrawn is knowingly letting a traitor loose. Since the traitor already did enough damage beforehand and Thrawn didn't tell him, Tarkin would have his head for this failure.
  • Ezra teaming up with Kallus is a lot similar to his interactions with other members of the Ghost crew. Ezra gets scolded for getting in trouble and he responds accordingly, but when it comes to getting the job done, they do it effectively and get good results. Perhaps it's a glimpse to a life Kallus may have one day as a member of the family, or something he will never have, at least not in this lifetime.
  • Fridge Sadness: The magazine comics reveal that Kallus was initially failing as an Imperial cadet and admitted that he only got better with the help of a more successful classmate, thus eventually allowing him to graduate as the top of his class. In the show itself, Kallus likes doing his job right (ex. in the novelization for "Call to Action", it is revealed he was an early bird to the meeting) and can be arrogant. Later on, starting with his Heel–Face Turn, he's given chances to leave the Empire but refuses all of them until it is too late. In addition, as Zeb allowed Kallus to know his name, Kallus didn't do the same, suggesting that he still didn't see himself as separate from the Empire after working together to survive. It would seem that Kallus feels that he is dependent on the Empire because it's all that he's had and worked in for a majority of his life, and whether or not he knows it, he's too attached to it to suddenly be willing to leave it all behind at a moment's notice.
  • Thrawn has good reason to believe that Kallus knowingly didn't report Ezra and that Lyste being the spy is too fishy. Thrawn bases this on how intelligent (or not) his officers are, how good they are at their job, and their history of encounters with the rebels. It even goes back to the responses Thrawn received from both of them in "An Inside Man" regarding a wall containing rebel graffiti. As a result, Thrawn knows Kallus is too knowledgeable of the rebels to be ignorant, let alone not recognize the artwork on the helmet. As for Lyste, Thrawn knows Lyste is too simple-minded to pull off such a betrayal, coupled with the fact that he doesn't understand the big picture like Kallus does. Additionally, Thrawn can rule out the possibility of Lyste engaging in Obfuscating Stupidity because he'd know what that looks like from actual stupidity.
  • In Son of Dathomir, Saxon is technically Kast's subordinate because she's Maul's right hand, while Saxon just leads the men. This hints that if Saxon apparently got promoted all the way up to being leader of Mandalore with no mention of Kast, then something must've happened to Kast in between the Siege of Mandalore and Rebels due to the switch in the power dynamic, thus being a hole in the Sabine's mom = a surviving Kast theory, because if the theory were true, Saxon would've been more explicit about his currently deteriorating ties to Sabine's mother/Kast and how she's fallen from grace since the Clone Wars during his confrontation with Sabine and Ezra in "Imperial Supercommandos", rather than how he has casual ties with Ursa like every other former colleague and/or Mandalorian official that isn't Kast or Almec, for example.
  • Could Ketsu help out Sabine alongside Rau and Clan Wren? Maybe, but considering Ketsu is likely a Mandalorian as well, she's probably considered a pariah like Sabine as well (though possibly not as bad, judging by lack of comments and issues). One exile being supported by a powerful family and a royal guard, okay, maybe people could find some leeway with that. Being supported by her fellow exile that is one of her best friends and they both ran away like troublemakers? Not so sure about that...
    • In addition, there's a possibility that Ketsu doesn't care that much about Mandalorian culture (judging by her garb being more like any other bounty hunter garb than Mandalorian armor, as well as a different fighting style that seems foreign), so she's not exactly the best supporter to ask for at the moment.
    • Hell, we don't actually know if Ketsu is actually Mandalorian or not. Just because she attended the Mandalore Imperial Academy doesn't mean she grew up in the culture.
  • Why does AP-5 seem to realize there's something up with Chopper faster than the other rebels? He's probably met some Imperial astromechs during his job when he was still with the Empire, likely noticing that Chopper is acting more like them than his usual self. But then again, there's also the fact that the other rebels just haven't noticed there's something wrong with Chopper since he, AP-5, and Wedge literally just got back.
  • It may seem like pure luck that AP-5 was able to pass through the scanner, seeing as how not any droid can pass through the scanner. This is attributed to the fact that AP-5 is a former Imperial droid, but since the Empire doesn't know he defected (it's not like they care about droids anyways), he's still registered in their systems, which means Imperial systems will still think he's on their side.
    • Plus, the Empire doesn't actually know what happened to the cargo ship he was stationed on in "The Forgotten Droid". And it's mentioned in that episode that AP-5 was scheduled to be replaced soon, so the Empire probably just thought he was destroyed, and thus didn't bother to wipe his codes.
  • The reason why Ezra doesn't use his lightsaber in "Double Agent Droid" is because either he likely left it in his room, as he had no reason to be carrying it around if he didn't know they weren't going to be in a physical fight (Zeb didn't have his bo-rifle either until the end) and/or Hera wouldn't be too happy with him cutting holes in her ship, as silly as it sounds. As for the Force...
  • Aftermath says that Wedge ended up being a Sixth Ranger to a rebel freighter ship as a navigator and gunner after be broke his legs during his career as an A-Wing pilot. "Double Agent Droid" shows that he's pretty much an honorary member of the Ghost crew, and "Warhead" showed that he became an A-Wing pilot in Phoenix Squadron, but he has yet to break his legs. Huh. Also, uh oh.
  • Look closely at the way Maul lunges as Obi-Wan in their duel. He tries the exact same attack which killed Qui-Gon. Obi-Wan clearly learned from his master's death, so it's no wonder that he was able to counterattack so easily.
    • It explains the saber duel in ANH. Obi-Wan uses the fighting style he used in A New Hope. Look at how quickly Maul went down. Consider what would have happened if Vader had used his former style.
  • In "Twin Suns", Obi-Wan is completely civil and amiable to Maul... right up until Maul figures out he's trying to protect someone, with an implied threat. At that moment, Kenobi ignites his saber, his face hardness into a grimace, and all attempts at dialogue go out the window. Apparently, threatening someone he cares about is the closest thing Old Ben has to a Berserk Button. Flash forward to Return of the Jedi; what did Vader say to Luke to make him go ballistic?
  • Of course Obi-Wan's rematch with Maul would be concluded so swiftly and cleanly; Obi-Wan has a subtle contempt for the "random" and "clumsy" contemporary fighting techniques; he prefers a more elegant approach, from a more civilized age.
    • It gets better when you realize exactly what happened. When he takes the moment to survey his opponent and figure a strategy, Obi-Wan switches to none other than Qui-Gon's stance. Darth Maul promptly launches himself in and attempts to do the exact same Combat Pragmatist slam of the his hilt to the face to stun Obi-Wan, who sees it coming and slices clean through the hilt, and Maul by consequence, all in a mere three strikes. With his skilled and samurai-like precision, Obi-Wan exploited Darth Maul's anger and pragmatism by intentionally creating a Call-Back to trick Maul into repeating the same actions, something Obi-Wan's probably been studying to prevent since the day Qui-Gon died due to witnessing it firsthand. Maul also never really evolved his combat style, while Obi-Wan had many years to reflect and develop, turning him into throwing the flashiness out for brutal yet elegant efficiency as a cold, hard counter for combatants like Maul.
  • If Zeb is the Child and Kallus is the Warrior as said by Chava, then Zeb has already saved Kallus. On a technical and literal scale, Zeb threw Kallus up to the surface on Bahryn, which allowed Kallus to choose to shoot the bonzami and help up Zeb (thus saving Zeb, which isn't what the prophecy specifically said), and Zeb finding the transponder and adjusting it to all frequencies allowed Kallus to be rescued by a passing traveller, subsequently letting Kallus become a Fulcrum. But on a metaphysical interpretation or however things like prophecies are supposed to be told, because Zeb told Kallus that there is more to the Black and White Morality the agent seemed to believe in, it opened up Kallus to a better view of the Galaxy, causing him to choose to go down a better path. Zeb saved Kallus from staying a villain.
  • Chava said to Zeb that the Prophecy of Three is applicable, in that he not only is one of those roles, but also all the roles at once. The Child is Zeb's idealism and morality, the Fool is Zeb's insecurities as a result of his Dark and Troubled Past, and the Warrior is Zeb acting out of anger and negativity in reaction to his insecurities/Dark and Troubled Past. This can also be applied to a number of other characters (probably just about everyone), including Kallus, the rest of the Ghost crew, Anakin, and so on.
    • In addition, if treated as being separate individuals/objects for the different roles, then it also is applicable; there will always be something that causes an effect on an object, knowingly or not.
  • In Season 3, the main Imperial cast makes more appearances on Lothal or in its orbit. Not only is this because Thrawn is readying weapons like the TIE Defenders there, but his colleague, Governor Pryce, has to attend to her duties on Lothal after having neglected them for the past year or two. Considering her absence led to Minister Tua being unable to competently deal with the Ghost crew and thus birthing the Lothal Insurgency, Pryce needs to keep Lothal in check if she wants to stay out of trouble with Tarkin. In addition, even without the Lothal rebellion problem, Pryce has to deal with bureaucracy that would typically be in Tua's hands (such as civilian problems that will still exist in spite of martial law) and the other ministers (as seen in Servants of the Empire) seem to be useless for doing Tua's work, so she has twice the workload to do. Being stationed on Lothal with Thrawn means that she can handle being both on the chase for the Phoenix rebel cell (whose successes spawned from her not doing her job back in Season 1, so now they're her responsibility) one day and then keeping an eye on Lothal the next day.
  • The Bendu tells Thrawn he sees defeat in his future. If anything, the Bendu is referring to the Empire's inevitable defeat, so in this case, fate is not on Thrawn's side.
    • Perhaps this is why the Bendu refuses to help the rebels. While it's in line with his True Neutral nature, the Empire's defeat is set in stone one way or another.
  • Fridge Sadness: While not many Imperial soldiers and officers particularly care for one another, Kallus formed a camaraderie with more than a few in his lifetime. While Kallus was able to defect from the Empire and survive, it means he will be up against colleagues, people he fought with and trained with, and in the next season, he will have to move past that.
  • Why was Gar Saxon assigned as the Emperor's Hand? Saxon used to be one of Maul's right-hand warriors, so he certainly at least had some idea of what was truly going on with the Sith and their plans from what he knows from Maul and his experience as one of his soldiers. Since Saxon is an Opportunistic Bastard, it probably took that prior knowledge and a little bit of convincing to Palpatine that he had genuinely changed loyalties and that his loyalty is undying so long as it is in the winning team combined, which in this case would say something, since Palpatine typically isn't one to be an audience.
  • In "Zero Hour", Thrawn clearly didn't use utilize TIE Defenders against Rebel Fighters, but they would've been especially useful against the Mandalorian Fang Fighters. If anything, Thrawn didn't use them because they are still in the prototype stage at this point.
  • Near the beginning of "Zero Hour", Kallus and Thrawn get into a fight which Kallus seems to lose a little too easily. However, as we saw back in "The Honorable Ones", Kallus lost his fight with Zeb surprisingly easily as well. The thing both situations have in common? Kallus is forced to fight in a confined area. If you look closely during the series, you'll notice Kallus does better in a fight when he has a lot more room to maneuver.
  • What ultimately did in Kallus at the end of his fight against Thrawn is that Thrawn's finishing move on him was hitting the same leg (and upper portions of it like the hip) that got injured in "The Honorable Ones". Considering this is Thrawn we're talking about, he probably read up on Kallus' report about how the agent crashed on Bahryn and broke his leg, but was found by a passing trader.
  • When it was revealed that Rukh, Thrawn's bodyguard, appears in the fourth season, the Grand Admiral's override code for the assassin droids gains new layers of meaning. First, Rukh's name being the code signifies his role as Thrawn's protector. Second, the fact that the code fails harks back to Rukh's Legends role — and possibly his role in this continuity as well — as Thrawn's eventual assassin.
  • Kallus' new rank as Captain in the Rebel Alliance is about as equivalent as he can be to his original rank as Agent. He outranked Aresko, who was a Commander/Commandant, but was about of equal rank to an unspecified Admiral rank (Konstantine and Titus). Since Kallus is nowhere near the prowess of characters like General Dodonna and Admiral Ackbar, the closest thing he can get is the rank of captain. Though it's certainly possible for him to quickly ascend the ranks and become a General, since Hera becomes a General within this year or the next, and Han and Lando became Generals as well despite only serving with the Rebellion for three years in Han's case (discounting the year he spent in carbonite) and one year in Lando's case.
  • Kanan actually applies to all of those descriptions Hera gives of the crew in the opening monologue of the Season 4 trailer. A boy who was lost and broken, and was also a war veteran and a survivor, but was able to lead others in spite of being a fallen knight.
    • You could apply this to the other members of the crew to at least technical extents. All of them were lost and broken to some extent, were survivors of a struggle that you could call a "war", had a fall from grace and/or a Darkest Hour, but were able to become prominent figures that lead others into battle.
  • In "Ghosts of Geonosis", it's revealed that Saw Gerrera's team, upon arriving at Geonosis, detected a power source that wasn't present when the Ghost crew first visited the planet in "The Honourable Ones". It's revealed that a surviving Geonosian, nicknamed Klik-Klak, has been maintaining a shield generator and battle droids as a security force. So why wasn't the shield generator's power source and Klik-Klak's lifesign detected in "The Honourable Ones"? Simple:
    • Regarding Klik-Klak's lifesign, Geonosis is riddled with tunnels, which go quite deep. It's possible for lifeforms far enough under the surface to be undetectable to ships scanning from orbit.
    • The power source is likely absent for two reasons: One, the information that led to the Ghost being sent to Geonosis in "The Honourable Ones" turned out to be a trap set by Agent Kallus. Klik-Klak probably has passive scanners to detect ships coming out of hyperspace. Upon detecting the arrival of an Imperial ship, he would have immediately shut everything down, due to rightly fearing the Empire because they massacred his people. The other possible reason is that, due to the Empire leaving the construction modules and debris field from the work on the Death Star in orbit until sometime between "The Honourable Ones" and "Ghosts of Geonosis", Klik-Klak didn't actually have anything actively running at the time, and only reactivated the shield and battle droids after the Empire cleaned up the orbital facilities, convincing him that they wouldn't be returning.
  • In "Zero Hour", it's revealed Atollon doesn't appear on Imperial charts, but it was recorded in "The Forgotten Droid" and "Warhead", so why didn't it appear on Thrawn's Imperial map when he triangulated the trajectories of the Fulcrum transmission and General Dodonna's fleet? Ezra and Chopper snuck into Thrawn's office in "Through Imperial Eyes", and deleted Atollon from the database. Quite possibly, Thrawn had complete access to the official Imperial star chart, so by deleting Atollon, the planet disappeared from all Imperial maps. For all Thrawn knew, that planet doesn't exist on Imperial maps, leading credence to the fact that he only heard of such a planet from non-Imperial maps.
  • Sabine's story actually has some parallels with Kanan's story.
    • After the people they were close with were hurt (For Kanan, the Jedi; For Sabine, "friends, family, people that I knew; my people"), they were betrayed by what remained of their loved ones (The clones [and also in a way, the Republic-now-Empire] and the Inquisitors; The Mandalorians and the Empire), causing lasting trust issues and Kanan/Sabine were left in the dark as to what exactly was going on with their loved ones that caused them to turn against them until many years later (The clones were brainwashed with chips in their head; Ursa had to prioritize the clan's safety and wasn't entirely happy making that choice).
    • Kanan had a hard time trusting Janus (and Kleeve) at first, so did Sabine with the Ghost crew.
    • Kanan and Sabine are very bitter and reluctant to reconcile with their pasts to the point that they're willing to give up before they finally reconcile it. These feelings also make them feel inadequate about taking up a leadership position, but they eventually becoming confident enough to become a leader.
    • Kanan was with Janus before meeting the Ghost crew, Sabine was with Ketsu before meeting the Ghost crew. Both Janus and Ketsu are undesirables and don't really seem to care about Kanan/Sabine's cultural heritage or past, dragging Kanan and Sabine into their field.
      • In addition, went push came to shove, Janus went back for Kanan went he got captured, whereas, Ketsu left Sabine for dead.
    • Both are considered wanted criminals by the Empire (Kanan is a Jedi, which are supposed to be extinct; Sabine is a teen genius that helped make superweapons).
    • The Big Bad of their first major arc was someone they had One Degree of Separation with in the past (the Grand Inquisitor used to be a Jedi Temple Guard, so chances are Kanan as Caleb had passed by him multiple times in the temple; Saxon was a former colleague of Ursa back in Death Watch).
    • Darth Maul has taken something from them (Kanan lost his sight; Sabine is suffering from the effects of Maul's leadership on Mandalore indirectly leading to an Evil Power Vacuum).
    • Both use Ezra's lightsaber to fight their Big Bad, then end the duel with the Big Bad at their neck by setting up their dual lightsabers in a scissor position. Both Big Bads wish to commit suicide to avoid a Fate Worse than Death after being humiliated by their loss and were willing to Face Death with Dignity (the Grand Inquisitor didn't want Vader getting at him for failing; Saxon wanted to die an honorable death to get it over with, though Saxon ends up dying unhonorably by attempting something unhonorable last second), but neither Kanan or Sabine were directly responsible for their deaths.
      • Big Bad's death was only the beginning; there are more of them (as in, more Inquisitors/more of Imperial-aligned Mandalorians) and it marks the hero and their cause as a very legitimate threat to the Empire, causing them to send in more stronger Imperial forces.
  • Both Kallus and Rex are captains, so it makes sense that they were arguing over who fellow Captain Hera said gets to command the Ghost, rather than one of them stay silent because the other outranks them.
  • Sabine seems to be the perfect candidate to be Mand'alor, so after all that build-up, why does she just give it to Bo-Katan, humbly saying that she was meant to choose the next leader instead of being the next leader herself? Being Mand'alor is a life-long commitment, and she's still young. As far as we know, Mandalorian culture doesn't put that much emphasis on A Child Shall Lead Them unlike Naboo or Alderaan, so Mandalorian youth aren't prepared to bear The Chains of Commanding (unless if they're the heirs of their clan). Sabine has also spent her teenage years constantly on the move, which she has become more accustomed to than staying in one area.
  • While there is an element of irony to Sabine naming her weapon 'The Duchess' after Satine, on another level, it's darkly appropriate as well. The Duchess targets traditional warrior Mandalorians by attacking them through their weapon, the largest physical marker of their cultural affiliation, and leaves untouched those who have abandoned their armor (And with it, their way of life). Satine tried to get rid of the warrior class of Mandalore, accepting only the peaceful New Mandalorians, and exiled dissidents against her rule to the moon.
  • So, why out of all the named Imperials Ezra knows does he choose Admiral Titus when asked to identify himself? Well, all the other officers Ezra knows wouldn't have worked: Grand Admiral Thrawn? He's a high-profile Imperial, so no one's gonna believe that. Every officer would know where he is located, and it's not on Jalindi. Lieutenant Lyste? Based on Lothal, so he's out (as well as probably imprisoned or stripped of rank). Agent Kallus? Already a known traitor. All the others he knows are dead. So, he's stuck with Brom Titus, who is not as high profile (as far as we know).
  • Kallus likely debriefed the information he knew when he was in Imperial service, which is probably how Ezra learned who Admiral Titus is.
  • In "In the Name of the Rebellion", Senator Mothma tells Ezra that Lothal has to wait its turn to be liberated. In the previous episode, Hera mentions that she had to persuade Mon Mothma to let the Ghost crew help the Mandalorians by telling her that freeing the influential Alrich Wren from prison would be an important step in forming a local rebel cell there. It makes sense she authorized the mission, since the Mandalorians are quite capable of warfare and could be a valuable asset as proven at the Battle of Atollon once Mandalore is freed (as Ursa states they won't join the main Alliance until then and that the Mandalorian fight against the Empire is personal anyway), unlike civilian worlds like Chandrila, Lothal, and so forth.
  • Regarding Kanan's death, it is less of a victory for the Empire than it seems; Apart from halting the TIE production, which Thrawn pointed out, a larger implication from the circumstances of Kanan's death is that Pryce just made a martyr out of him. Keep in mind, it's not just any rebel leader who made a Heroic Sacrifice, but rather a Jedi, and Thrawn is definitely takes issue with what a [Jedi's sacrifice will bring.
  • While Kanan has always been a Contrasting Sequel Main Character for Anakin Skywalker, compare the ending of their respective stories. While they both have premonitions of the future, Anakin furiously tries to fight fate and save Padme and their child, helping to destroy the Jedi Order and aid the rise of the Empire and ultimately contributing to his wife's death by choking her with the Force. By contrast Kanan calmly accepts his fate, and by doing so is able to not only save his family (including Hera, whom he protected by using the Force, and his unborn son) but start a chain reaction that helps to liberate Lothal and eventually lead to the downfall of the Empire.
  • Thrawn's talk about how the Jedi had so much power, but lacked the vision to fully utilize the Force, as well as his Might Makes Right philosophy, are among the core beliefs and opinions that the Sith follow. It's no wonder Palpatine and Vader greatly favor him; The Force may be a mystery to Thrawn, but he definitely thinks like a Sith.
  • It leaves little wonder what Palpatine did after learning Ahsoka is alive. He demotes Darth Vader right after failing to protect the Death Star.
  • Mart, in his debut episode, was really cocky about wanting to destroy a Star Destroyer. He indirectly does so when he executes Ezra's backup plan and summon the purrgils. Including possibly the Chimaera. Though technically, the entire fleet was wrecked but sent to somewhere else in the Galaxy.
  • Wolffe stayed with Mart & Vizago in order to avoid his PTSD causing any problems during the final battle.
  • Ezra leaving a meiloorun in Hera's room ("I know it's your favorite.") and telling Zeb that he can have the top bunk "...for now." may be Ezra subtly hinting that he knows that Hera is pregnant with Jacen — pregnant people have hunger pangs, and Zeb may have to share his room with Jacen in the future.
  • The Bendu's defeat in the season 3 finale actually has a lot of deep meaning behind it. Mostly, it reinforces what his early tantrum against Kanan showed: that he is both Not So Above It All and also Not So Different to the "petty" Jedi & Sith he talks down about. Just like the Jedi, he had allowed himself to grow lazy and arrogant, willfully ignoring the galaxy until the galaxy came back to bite him: he presumed that his powers in the Force would allow him to get his way, but because he had been isolated for so long, the denizens of the galaxy no longer recognize or fear him in the way they once did, resulting in them instead attacking him and forcibly reminding him that he's not a Physical God. It also serves as a rather sharp-tongued Actor Allusion; after all, the Doctor was often reminded that he was neither infallible nor entirely as smart as he thought himself to be...
  • It's no surprise Thrawn came earlier than Ezra expected in the Grand Finale; While Ezra was in the World Between Worlds running away from the Emperor's Sith Sorcery, remember that Thrawn was also on Coruscant for a meeting the Emperor, so once Ezra escaped, Emperor Palpatine sent Thrawn back to Lothal to retrieve Ezra for him.
  • Dume mentions that Ezra must "restore past, redeem future" when instructing him about the temple. We later learn that "restore past" meant rescuing Ahsoka Tano, but "redeem future" is unclear. At least until the finale when it's revealed that Ahsoka is searching out Ezra, and is probably the only Force-user left alive who could find him. In rescuing Ahsoka, Dume didn't just save her, he also made sure Ezra wouldn't be exiled forever and eventually die alone away from his family, thus "redeeming" what would have been a Downer Ending for his padawan.
  • Some moments involving Maul gain a new light after his cameo in Solo.
    • When Ezra meets Maul, Maul says "once I had power, now I have nothing". While this may seem somewhat hyperbolic, given that he only seemed to rule Mandalore and manage the Shadow Collective for a few days, it makes a lot more sense after Solo revealed him to be the leader of Crimson Dawn, one of the most powerful crime organizations in the galaxy.
    • Ezra finds a few Mandalorian artifacts in Maul's Dathomir base, including a vandalized portrait of Duchess Satine (which was previously seen hanging on the walls of her palace in The Clone Wars). Given that Maul probably wouldn't be able to show his face around Mandalore after being driven off the planet, it raises questions as to how he got the portrait. But given that Maul had extensive criminal connections in the underworld via being Crimson Dawn's leader, it's possible that he used these connections to get the portrait and other artifacts.
  • Kanan's death by fire could be seen as the force giving him a traditional Jedi funeral.
  • It's established in Clone Wars that Maul's anger is the only thing keeping him alive. Another reason he may have died so quickly is that he finally let go of his hatred, and thus didn't have the dark side power left to sustain his ruined body.

    Fridge Horror 
  • At the end of "Droids in Distress", half the shipment of T-7 ion disruptors has been destroyed. However, the other half is now in Vizago's possession. Now, instead of the Empire (which had to resort to secrecy in claiming the guns since the Imperial Senate banned them after the Lasat genocide), they are now in the hands of criminals, and we have no idea who Vizago's buyer is. Considering these guns can take out starships and have nasty effects on the living, it looks like the Hutts may be having some competition.
  • Just how does a T-7 disruptor kill a living being? If Zeb's experience with the weapon and the Senate banning them are anything to go by, it can't be pretty. Carrying over from the Legends continuity, disruptors cook people from the inside, incinerating their flesh and leaving charred skeletons behind. Or in some cases, just a pile of ash. That sounds awfully similar to Owen and Beru's death.
  • In ''Fighter Flight", we see the prisoners being housed in open compartments outside of the Imperial transports. While this seems counterintuitive at first, especially considering how easily Ezra is able to get the prisoners out, the fact that the prisoners are clearly visible and that the compartments don't seem to be armored makes you realized that anyone imprisoned in them is basically acting as a Human Shield. Alternatively, those transporters could also be used in urban settings, which makes the prisoners into examples to frighten others and add in a little taste of public humiliation.
  • In "Rise of the Old Masters", a throwaway line mentions "another successful planetary liberation through the Base-Delta-Zero initiative". That means everyone on that planet is dead and it's now a strategically useless, bombed-out, dead wasteland, possibly going so far as to make it a sea of molten slag depending on the source and how literally one is supposed to take those sources. At best, because the term "initiative" was never used to describe the operation before, we're looking at a proto-Tarkin Doctrine scenario, where the planet capitulated under the very real threat of becoming a bombed out wasteland. The key word there is "another", so this has happened more than once. According to the EU, it only takes one Star Destroyer to carry out a Base-Delta-Zero attack. As of "Rebel Resolve", there are six orbiting the planet...
  • Luminara Unduli:
    • What broke Luminara Unduli so much that she went to her execution so meekly? Between her own apprentice falling to the Dark Side, the destruction of the Jedi Order, and living through the rise of the Empire, it seems that after she was captured she just gave up. Not even getting into the likelihood that she was "interrogated".
    • Add in the possibility that she was alive for the first few Jedi lured in to 'save' her, and may have been overcome with grief at being used as bait.
    • It's now entirely possible that the explanation for this is that the Inquisitor who executed her was actually Barriss Offee.
    • "Death is a part of life." Calmly embracing death rather than struggling against it to no purpose should be seen as evidence that she remained a Jedi to the end rather than that they had broken her. If she judged that struggling to survive would simply inflict pain and suffering while still being ultimately futile, it is better to simply become one with the Force as a true Master does when their time comes. Perhaps her voice now speaks through the Force to her misguided Padawan, a Light to guide her back from the Darkness.
  • In 'Empire Day' after Sabine has accessed Tseebo's imperial intelligence, she reads off what she's looking at. Among new TIE plans, she says 'the new T8 Disruptor prototype'. It's mostly just a throwaway line, but the Empire is obviously still trying to make more disruptors, and if the EU is canon is this situation, we know what those could do.
  • In "Idiot's Array", the Ghost's masking systems falter at a very bad time, revealing to the Imperial blockade around Lothal that the rebel ship that's evaded them for so long has such a masking system. This may not bode well for our heroes' cover from here on out...
  • The fact that Senator Trayvis is an Imperial Agent and part of an ISB False Flag Operation raises a whole host of interesting questions. Like how many rebels has this killed? How many Rebel cells are secretly controlled by the Empire's State Sec? Who can they really trust? Paranoia Fuel at its finest.
  • In "Vision of Hope", Ezra has a vision and passes out, only to wake up and find out that he deflected every shot into the target while he was in a trance. The Force took control of his body while his mind was elsewhere and did something extraordinary he doesn't remember? It's a low-key, light side version of what happened on Fort Anaxes.
  • It is odd that Kallus was so unnerved by Aresko and Grint's executions, until you remember how the rebels slipped from his fingers as well. Then you realize his head is also on a quite literal chopping block.
  • In "Rebel Resolve", Mustafar is described as a place "where Jedi go to die". If one remembers "Children of the Force" in The Clone Wars, Darth Sidious was performing potentially-lethal experiments on Force-sensitive babies to convert them into spies, and he mentioned that he had more than one facility for these experiments. Sidious may be continuing these experiments and he's now willing to use people of all ages as test subjects. These experiments could also be how other Inquisitors are created if they don't kill the Jedi (so if it doesn't kill Jedi literally, it kills them metaphorically). Mustafar also makes for a pretty genius Continuity Nod when you learn it's a place "where Jedi go to die". Remember who, from a certain point of view, died on Mustafar? He shows up at the end. Darth Vader. And now, with the release of Rogue One, this line takes on even more meaning. Guess who has a castle on Mustafar?
  • The Kyber Crystals are revealed by show writers to be focus components in the Death Star's superlaser. Kyber crystals are also focus components in lightsabers. Seeing that very little out there can withstand the cut of a lightsaber, you can begin to see just exactly how a Superlaser can core out a planet.
  • And this is not the first time that we've seen what a giant Kyber Crystal could do. In the Utapau story reel of Star Wars: The Clone Wars, a Kyber Crystal the size of a truck can intensify and unleash a great energy beam that could vaporize anything if it was fired upon by blasters. When Obi-Wan had a battalion of tanks auto-fire on the crystal, the crystal overloads with energy and creates an explosion that destroys an entire fleet. And if the old Jedi legends from Yoda are to be believed, giant Kyber Crystals were made into super weapons during the war between Jedi and Sith.
  • Tseebo has the same type of cybernetic headband that Lobot has. At the beginning of Star Wars: Lando, Lobot is shown to be more talkative than he is in The Empire Strikes Back and is later revealed to be mentally fighting back against the headband's influence to rewrite his personality. At the end of the comic series, Lobot surrenders to the headband to save his friends, turning him into the mute, emotionless man we saw in the film. Tseebo's already very loopy from the information overload, and unless the rebel movement was able to disconnect the headband, it's only a matter of time until the same thing happens to him as well.
  • Given how the stormtroopers under Darth Vader's direct command are most likely from the famed 501st Legion, which is known to include some surviving clone troopers from the Republic days, Rex and his squad of now-renegade clones might wind up be fighting their own brothers.
  • It has been stated that The Empire has a five-year plan for Lothal. Guess what else happens in five years? The completion of the first Death Star.
  • What happened to the Interdictor crew in Stealth Strike once the gravity well projector got so over-set that it was causing the Interdictor's structure to buckle? The ones that got shot or carved up by a lightsaber may have been the lucky ones.
  • "Stealth Strike" marks the second time Rex has tried to sacrifice himself to cover the escape of the rebels, both times his reasons seemed dubious. The man clearly has some death seeker tendencies.
  • Kallus was able to figure out pretty quickly that Ezra was Force-sensitive. If the Ghost crew hadn't come back for him back on the Star Destroyer, Ezra could very well have been turned in to the Inquisitor... or worse.
  • Ezra at his worst is passionate, angry, devoted to his family, vengeful, and a survivor. In other words, Not So Different from Darth Maul.
  • The babies that Ahsoka and the Spectres save in "The Future of the Force" are likely to grow up to become Luke Skywalker's doomed Jedi students. Sure, there are bound to be plenty of Force-sensitives who haven't chosen a path, but still... Also, what exactly was the Empire going to do with those babies? Word of God is that it would be too horrific to show on Disney XD. Harkening back to the The Clone Wars episode where Anakin and Ahsoka rescue babies from the Sith's clutches, which wasn't even shown on Cartoon Network.
  • When you consider how the Empire could pull off the sterilization of Geonosis without repercussion. While the act itself could be performed in secret, it's hard to not notice the loss of an entire people - even the Lasat are remembered. However, considering that Geonosians were responsible for manufacturing battle droids during the Clone Wars, it's easy to imagine most people, especially those who were part of the Republic, not really caring about them, or even happy at their extermination.
  • Considering that the Empire wiped out Geonosis to keep the Death Star a secret, that makes you wonder what will happen to the populace of Lothal once their role in the Death Star's construction is complete.
  • In the first two seasons, Ezra's eyes were light blue. However, in the trailer for Season 3, his eyes are quite clearly purple, as he is corrupted by the influence of the Sith holocron and red creeps into his eyes.
  • What happens to all the people the crew has run into and had some sort of trouble with the Empire, from Tseebo, to the Kells, the babies, that one Ithorian they accidentally hitched a speeder ride with? This troper seems to remember at least one work in Legends where people saved by the heroes pre-A New Hope were sent to Alderaan for sanctuary, and there's at least one instance I can remember from one of the Rebels novelizations where an Imperial officer sent his son there to hide from the Empire, so Alderaan isn't completely out of the question... And everyone else that just happens to have bad luck like that Ithorian driver might be in Imperial custody for treason.
  • In Return of the Jedi, Yoda tells Luke that he is the last of the Jedi. Originally, this didn't bother fans as Kanan and, by extension, Ezra were not officially Jedi. But, as of "Shroud of Darkness", Kanan is a full-fledged Jedi knight which leaves fans wondering about his fate. And, as it turns out, for good reason.
  • Ezra angrily telling Kanan that he doesn't need him, already a Wham Line on the surface, is even more painful if you look into it. As far as Ezra's concerned, Kanan essentially abandoned him after Malachor, and Ezra hates being abandoned in any way, least of all voluntarily. He's not just asserting his independence from Kanan, he's bitterly calling him out for leaving him alone.
  • Since the Galaxy is pretty big and of course can't have known information on every single thing and individual available to us, one way of interpreting Legends and the NEU's different choices and forks in the road is that in Legends, perhaps, no one saved or found our heroes. No one found Caleb Dume or Kanan Jarrus. No one found Hera Syndulla. No one found Sabine Wren. No one found Garazeb Orrelios. No one found Ezra Bridger. No one found Chopper. They could have died before they became heroes, or perhaps they found another, better life in Legends, and thus, others stepped in to be the heroes and villains of those stories.
  • If Thrawn already suspects Kallus is helping the Rebels in "An Inside Man", it wouldn't be a stretch to say he could've easily figured out Leia Organa helped the rebels in "A Princess on Lothal".
  • It seems kind of odd that Thrawn just coincidentally decided to personally inspect the factory line at Lothal on exactly the day Ezra and Kanan infiltrated it. Sure, he was visiting in response to the unusually large malfunction rate from the factory, but there may be more to it. However if he was already aware that Kallus was the mole, it's likely because he was tracking Kallus's transmissions and deduced that the rebels would be infiltrating the factory soon. Given that he also knows the Ghost comes from the Lothal Cell, it was easy to put two and two together and he was probably expecting the Ghost Crew right from the getgo. He probably intentionally killed Sumar just to rile up the Ghost crew.
  • In "An Inside Man", a Bardottan statue (a species of Force-sensitive's from The Clone Wars) is seen sitting in Thrawn's office. Knowing Thrawn's habit of collecting cultural artifacts from those he conquers, doesn't bode well for the Bardottan's.
  • The line regarding Mustafar in the Season 1 finale takes on a whole new meaning when you take a certain reveal from Rogue One: Mustafar is the place Jedi go to die, because it is Darth Vader's base of operations. Kanan was on his way to a personal interrogation from Vader himself.
  • Since Saw is slated to return later and Kallus has a 50/50 chance of joining up with the rest of the Rebellion, it might not go over so well with either of them should they ever meet... especially should the Mercenary still be with the Partisans and decides to accompany Saw that next time.
  • Ahsoka's fate on Malachor since we last see her retreat back into the temple, carries a lot of darker implications; If you think about it, a lot has happened throughout Ahsoka's life; from being framed for treason to being disillusioned by the Jedi, and Anakin was all she had through all the pain and suffering. Now, she sees her dear friend, fallen to the dark side, with barely any trace of his old self left. This very moment is one that likely brought her way past the Despair Event Horizon, so it's not hard to imagine that Ahsoka could have committed suicide after falling back into the temple. Thankfully, as it turns out, she gets out okay thanks to Ezra.
  • TIE Defenders aren't the only weapons being manufactured on Lothal. Sabine mentioned way back in "Empire Day" that new ion disruptors, the T-8s, being planned to be built. Plus, whatever happened to Vizago's half shipment of T-7s, anyway? Let's hope that the rebels destroy the factories before it can bear fruit and that Vizago didn't sell them to anyone with ill-bearing.
  • Whether or not it's horrific is YMMV, but Ursa was present when Maul earned the Darksaber by You Kill It, You Bought It. She might only not be shocked to see that Sabine is now the new owner of the Darksaber, but the possibility that Sabine killed the previous Death Watch leader.
    • This actually does get noted on in-universe. Ursa tells Sabine that she doesn't have a legit claim to the Darksaber if she didn't fight Maul for it, but it looks like they're gonna have to make use of what they have.
  • A pretty obvious one, but if the rebels had refused to rescue Tua in "The Siege of Lothal", she would've been executed anyway, because the penalty for treason by an officer is death, as stated by Kallus in "Through Imperial Eyes". The question is how the Empire would've covered it up with the public. An Unperson would've instigated more rebellion from the populace if a political leader tried to rebel or was fearful for her life (though, the Empire could've just been up forward with that, and some people would either see her as a martyr or a Broken Pedestal). It would probably be something like her "being offworld" or being killed by rebels on her way home or something.
  • The Bendu claims that perhaps it is the will of the Force that the Jedi and all their kind perish. One would think that the Bendu is just angry with Kanan for calling him a coward, but look at the Prequel and Sequel Trilogies — the old Jedi Order is wiped out by the Sith, and the Dark Side through Kylo Ren and Snoke once again destroys the Jedi Order, and forces Luke to flee the known galaxy. Perhaps this is what Snoke convinced Kylo Ren of, and what the Force may actually want, for whatever reason: the final destruction of the Jedi is the last step to "bringing balance", so the Force can start anew without the burdens of the influence of the Jedi and Sith on the Light and Dark Sides of the Force.
  • Sure, Thrawn had no idea what the Bendu was capable of, but after witnessing the creature's power with his own eyes, and not even being impressed, he's still alive. Think about that: Thrawn knows about the power of the Force. Given how he's able to make new plans based on what he knows, it means that even mighty supernatural entities might not even be enough to save the Rebels next time. And given how the Bendu killed Rebels and Imperials alike...
  • Remember the T-7 Ion Disruptors from waaaaaay back in Season 1? Remember how their horrifyingness came from the fact that they were so bad that the Empire banned them, and that in the Legends continuity they killed by superheating the target until they were just charred skeleton or ash? Sabine's weapon, the Duchess, does exactly that, except on a massive scale. Furthermore, the on-screen effect is a neutered version due to Tiber Saxon not knowing how it works. No wonder Sabine feels such shame over the thing; her creation dwarfs some of the most atrocious weapons the Empire itself has created up to this point, and she designed it specifically to use against her own people. Added to the fact that someone who knows about it's inner workings can tweak the effect to affect any material, and you have a weapon far more effective at subjugating populations than the Death Star could ever hope to be. It's a good thing they ended up destroying all records of the thing.
  • The liberation of Lothal should have had dire consequences, but as Sabine says, the Empire never attacked. While at first it seems weird, you realize that, with the TIE Defender project dead in the water, their main focus now is the Death Star. As such, if not for the Rebel victories at Scarif and Yavin, Lothal would have likely been turned into space dust.
  • Jacen Syndulla, the son of Kanan and Hera, is almost certainly Force sensitive, and obviously has connections to the rebellion. It’s plausible that he might’ve gone to train to be a Jedi under Luke Skywalker. Meaning that he was either killed by Ben Solo, or became a Knight of Ren himself. And that’s not even considering the fate of his namesake...
  • You better hope Ezra did not end up in the Unknown Regions, because that's where Snoke is from, and if Ezra is unlucky enough to end up there, he's done for to ensure there are no more Jedi.
  • Thrawn expands the Cryptic Background Reference of Thrawn's victory at Batonn where more civilians than rebels were killed, before he appeared on the show. Among other things it reveals two things: Batonn is geographically close to Lothal and many civilians joined the insurgents despite the leader, Nightswan, not wanting them to. Now considering, the Batonn insurgency happens shortly before season 3, one realizes that many of those civilians decided to join because of Ezra's broadcast.
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