YMMV / Star Wars

Works in this series with their own YMMV pages:


The franchise as a whole

  • Alternate Character Interpretation: Quite a bit of this in fandom. Anakin Skywalker is a Base Breaker (as stated below) - is he a self-involved brat who always whines about how hard his life is or a hapless Pawn of Prophecy, or a psychotic Stalker with a Crush who used the Force to Mind Rape the woman he was obsessed with, or a poor misunderstood Jerkass Woobie who would have been fine if those cold and unfeeling Jedi had just tried harder to understand him? Well, it depends which fans you ask.
    • His mentor, Obi-Wan Kenobi also gets his fair share and it's arguable that some inconsistencies are the results of Retcons in the prequels from things already established (or implied) in the Original Trilogy—and then there are things thrown in from the EU (such as the Jedi Apprentice novels). For instance, some cite his Chessmaster tendencies in the original trilogy and see him as self-righteous and authoritarian in the prequels, but the novelisation of Revenge of the Sith characterises him as so self-effacing, that he genuinely doesn't realise his true value and abilities as a Jedi (his reaction when the Jedi Council announce that they are sending their "most cunning and most tenacious Master" to deal with General Grievous is both touching and amusing. He asks who they intend to send and then it dawns on him that everyone else is looking at him).
      • It could also be inferred that Obi-Wan himself is something of an Unreliable Narrator who tends to emphasise his own failures and relative culpability (which would fit in the self-effacing characterisation mentioned above). For instance, when Obi-Wan tells Luke that Anakin's fall was partially his fault because "I thought I could instruct him as well as Yoda. I was wrong." in Return of the Jedi it somewhat implies that Obi-Wan must have arrogantly demanded to train someone that Yoda would have been willing to train and done a better job with. Come The Phantom Menace this is shown clearly not to be the case. Obi-Wan is perhaps a little arrogant in the way he demands to train the boy, but it seems clear that a) Yoda was not willing to do the job and b) the demand is driven by his promise to a dying man rather that any belief in his own abilities as a teacher. And there doesn't seem to be any cases where Obi Wan tries to represent his role in events to be bigger or better than is actually seen or to place blame for his problems on others. Maybe he really is that humble and/or shy of taking praise or credit?
    • Some like to think the Jedi are more evil/susceptible to the Dark Side than they admit due to certain actions and behaviors. Obi-Wan and Yoda in particular get hit with Ron the Death Eater interpretations in regard to their training of Luke and hiding the truth about Vader to him.
    • The Jedi Council are portrayed as maliciously indifferent in some fanworks and EU materials, caring only for their own agenda while doing whatever they have to to achieve it. In the prequels, they state that the 9 year old Anakin is too old to begin the training, implying they normally take children when they are too young to understand what they are actually doing. They also appear to be blind to their own hypocrisy note  and deal with emotion in a way that suggests the current generation of Jedi Masters were all poorly trained in handling them. The frequent and violent outbursts by young adult Jedi that lead to their deaths or expulsion from the Order often gets met with tutting and proclamations that "(s)he simply lacked the discipline" and that other Jedi should repress themselves even more. Basically, they come off as Not So Different from the Sith in any way other than how they handle emotion, which is just as bad but in a different way from their enemies. The prophesy that a child would bring "balance" to the force by destroying the Sith once and for all also reeks of Protagonist-Centered Morality, since it would only be further unbalancing the Force towards the Light Side.
    • There's been some speculation that Jar Jar Binks is actually force-sensitive. The main citation (as per The Fool) is that with some of the crap he lives through and pulls off, there is no way all of that is purely incidental.
    • One theory that's been gaining popularity takes it even further: Not only is Jar Jar utilizing Obfuscating Stupidity (his bumbling antics being a form of Drunken Fist,) but he's actually a Sith lord, co-conspirator with Palpatine, the Evil Counterpart to Yoda (who was also introduced as an annoying alien who was a lot wiser and more important than he let on) and possibly even the Bigger Bad of both trilogies. The fact that the voice actor for Jar Jar seemed to nebulously confirm this theory on multiple occasions only threw more fuel on the fire.
  • Angst Dissonance: It's very likely that Anakin himself in the prequels is deliberately written to be Wangsty, due to the fact that his anger leads to his path down to the Dark Side.
  • Archive Panic: The Star Wars franchise is one of the biggest media franchises around—it consists of six movies (with three more on the way), numerous spin off films and animated cartoon series, a monstrous amount of comic books, comic strips, books and novels (Wikipedia lists at least 303 books total), over 120 video game tie ins and other misc. material (I.e. The radio and audio dramas, and enough toys and merchandise to fill the Executor). And new content is still being made to this day, and after 37 years, it is showing no signs of stopping.
  • Badass Decay:
    • Padme Amidala, when she becomes pregnant with twins in Revenge of the Sith. Justified in that she's eight to nine months pregnant.
    • Some people also say this about Darth Vader and Anakin Skywalker in the prequels, though this would qualify in-universe as taking a level in badass by the time the Rebellion comes around.
    • General Grievous. Badass in the now-non-canon Star Wars: Clone Wars where he debuted versus his coughing coward appearance in Revenge of the Sith. Star Wars: The Clone Wars does a better job of showing Grievous' fighting abilities, keeping him in line with the movie's pragmatic side while portraying him as a formidable, but not overty badass fighter.
  • Base Breaker:
    • Anakin's fanbase vs. hatedom is evenly split between those who liked or hated the prequels. Both sides will praise his portrayal in Star Wars: The Clone Wars through.
    • Within the fans whom solely liked the originals, the Ewoks are debated as whether are the start of Lucas making mistakes or aren't that annoying but should be viewed more positively in light of Jar Jar's antics.
    • Within the prequel fanbase the criticism towards Jar Jar is either justified on it's own or over-inflated by those whom hated the prequels against a character that wasn't that annoying or stereotypical in hindsight. Depending on whether it proves to be true, the theory about what Jar Jar might have been all along (see Alternate Character Interpretation above) threatens to blow up the breaks on this base all over again.
  • Better on DVD: If you get the Complete Saga collection, you'll get all six movies so that you don't have to buy them separately. This makes it slightly easier for a viewing experience, as both trilogies were originally sold separately. It counts also even for the regular editions (including as a DVD release), as all three films of both trilogies are collected in the set instead of separately.
  • Broken Base:
    • There is a schism between fans who enjoy the prequels but find the originals to be outdated, the fans who insist that the original trilogy is the best and that the prequels can piss off on account for their lower quality writing and the fans who believe that the entire series is good. There are also fans who enjoy the Expanded Universe and those who don't care for it. More generally, there is a related but not identical schism between pro-Lucas and anti-Lucas fans.
    • Two of the home video releases, the 2006 "Limited Edition" DVD release and the 2011 Blu-ray release. Most other releases were either generally liked or hated.
      • For the 2006 "Limited Edition" with the original theatrical versions, some fans were gleeful/grateful that Lucas finally let them see Han shoot first, see Sebastian Shaw's ghost instead of Hayden Christensen's, hear Jason Wingreen as Boba Fett, watch Jabba's performers sing "Lapti Nek", etc. Other fans were extremely critical about the poor quality of the originalsnote  and believed that Lucas was intentionally creating an inferior product to suit his own purposes.
      • For the Blu-ray versions, on one hand, you have the picture quality, the boatload of extras and the opportunity to watch all six movies in brilliant hi-def. On the other hand, you have the various edits (and Lucas' refusal to revert old unpopular edits such as Greedo shooting first), horribly lame cover art that shows how much Lucas loves Jake Lloyd, and the picture quality.
    • Anakin Skywalker in the prequels either had a well-developed fall or was too Wangsty. As far as an alien race goes, the Ewoks are tolerated or hated depending on the fan.
    • Is Hayden Christensen is a bad actor or a good actor given bad lines and direction?
    • Fans are very divided on the untitled Anthology movie about young Han Solo movie. Part of the fandom is excited about what his backstory will be in the new continuity, another part of the fandom thinks it's completely unnecessary and cheapens the character especially after his death in The Force Awakens, and another group lost interest when the shortlist of potential actors for young Han Solo appeared on the Internet, believing it to be entirely WTF Casting Agency.
    • The choice of Colin Trevorrow to direct the ninth film and finale to the sequel trilogy. After the financially successful but critically mixed reception towards his work on Jurassic World, the fanbase is divided between those who loved that film and think he will do a great job, and those who hated it and don't think he's capable of doing it justice. Others are fine with the choice of him as director but dislike the possibility of him being involved in the writing process, citing it as the weakest aspect of his previous films.
  • Canon Fodder: Despite the Expanded Universe, or maybe because of it.
  • Contested Sequel:
    • Due to the vitrolic nature of the Broken Base, every movie after The Empire Strikes Back is seen as this. Ironically, Empire was widely seen as this at the time of release due to being Darker and Edgier and having No Ending, though it was considered the best of the Original Trilogy once Return Of The Jedi was made.
    • The Prequel Trilogy as a whole is subject to this.
  • Complete Monster: See Emperor Palpatine and the others here.
  • Critical Backlash:
    • The prequel trilogy, especially The Phantom Menace, gets this in spades due to the often vitriolic nature of the people's dislike for them, which can cause people new to the franchise to wonder what all the fuss was about. Revenge of the Sith gets it much less so than the other two, although it is still gets enough flack to warrant the same status as the other two.
    • Ironically enough, Jedi, while still generally seen as the worst of the original trilogy, is getting more and more praise as time passes and it's not uncommon to hear people claim it as their favorite of the original trilogy after the prequels came out. Revenge of the Sith has also increased its reputation, as the events of that film adds a greater dramatic weight to it.
    • As noted in the Misblamed section, some fans feel that Jake Lloyd and Hayden Christensen get too much hatred for their terrible performances, pointing out how other actors gave similarly bad performances yet didn't get as much fan ire. Instead, they point to the bad screenplay and George Lucas's direction. The bullying that Lloyd received for his portrayal and Lucas admitting that he can't write effective dialogue only increased this backlash.
  • Critical Dissonance:
    • The prequels had better reception than most internet forums and comments sections would have one believe, considering the first two got a So Okay, It's Average reaction with 59% and 67% scores on Rotten Tomatoes and a rather positive 79% for Episode III, only less than Return of the Jedi by 1%. note  Going by some fan reactions and the audience polls ranging in the 60% range, one would get the impression they are some of the worst films to hit the planet.
    • Similarly, while Return of the Jedi is considered the weakest of the original films, it still has a very favorable reception, considering its Rotten Tomatoes audience score is at a whopping 95%, far better than the 80% of critics.
  • Death of the Author: Star Wars gets subjected to this a lot from certain parts of the fandom, particularly pertaining to the changes made in the various re-releases and various aspects of the prequels. It's easily one of the biggest Base Breakers of the entire franchise and a significant turn-off to non-hardcore fans.
  • Enhanced on DVD: The Blu-Ray release of Star Wars removes small mistakes in the original trilogy that were missed (such as the lightsabers in the Darth Vader and Luke fight in Return Of The Jedi) and includes re-rendered CGI for many scenes of the prequels and replaces the Yoda puppet from The Phantom Menace with the CGI one.
  • Ensemble Darkhorse: Now has its own page.
  • Epileptic Trees:
    • There's a somewhat popular one that suggests that R2-D2 was actually a Republic and later Rebel spy throughout the entire series.
    • Another popular theory posits that Boba Fett killed Beru and Owen Lars, supported by his presence on Tatooine in the Special Edition, and the fact that Darth Vader specifically tells him not to disintegrate anyone, when the only characters that are shown as having been disintegrated are the Lars family.
    • See the Alternate Character Interpretation of Jar Jar Binks for one that could alter the complexion of the entire post-original trilogy franchise if proven to be true.
  • Even Better Sequel: The Empire Strikes Back is viewed as one to the original film (A New Hope).
  • Evil Is Cool: Darth Vader kicked this trope into high gear and set the standard for future fictional villains. Most of the series' other villains are well-loved too, Palpatine and Darth Maul in particular.
  • Evil Is Sexy:
  • Fandom Berserk Button:
    • Bringing up just about anything involving the prequel trilogy has been known to tick off very scornful fans of the series. And on a minor note; do not call Darth Vader "Dark" Vader unless you really want to get on a fan's nerves.
    • Mentioning David Brin and his distaste of the series is another way to get fans angry due to what many people view as a lackluster argument, issues of anti-democratic ideas aside.
  • Fan Hater: Towards its own fandom nonetheless! Wars over elements of the franchise, especially the prequels, can get ugly, in some cases leading to rather truly horrible things such as fans attacking each other and name calling (It's not hard to find forums or comments where people tell fans of the prequels to watch the Plinkett Reviews because they just can't live with the idea that people like them.).
  • Fandom Heresy:
    • Criticizing Yoda. In some scornful circles, admitting you liked the prequels (or worse, the Updated Rereleases of the originals) can be this, too. Among the absolute most "purist" fans, even Return of the Jedi isn't always safe.
    • If you say you like Hayden Christensen (or at least his performance), you'd better be ready to reap the shitstorm.
  • Fandom Rivalry:
    • Famously so with Star Trek, no doubt caused by the similarity in names and contrasting styles. Now that J. J. Abrams has been given the reigns for both franchises, tensions have really heated up.
    • Thanks to the Mr. Plinkett reviews, RedLetterMedia is a sworn enemy of fans who like the prequels, leaking over to fans hating each other for liking the prequels.
  • Fanfic Fuel: Long before the Prequel Trilogy was released, there were fanfics about the rise of the Empire and Anakin Skywalker's turn to the Dark Side.
  • Fanon Discontinuity:
    • There is a small, but vocal, segment of fans that consider the prequels and edits to the original trilogy non-canon. There is also a substantial segment of the fan base that would like to pretend that all of Lucas's entries in the series after Return of the Jedi never existed.
    • Also, The Star Wars Holiday Special is one of those things that the fans, nonfans and George Lucas refuse to acknowledge the existence of. The decanonization of it was seen as one of the few benefits of dropping the old EU.
    • Some fans already considered the EU non-canon, even though that conflicted with Lucasfilm's former canon policy. Following the dropping of the EU in 2014, some longtime fans of the EU have stated they still consider it canon. Broken Base, much?
  • First Installment Wins: All the films were financial successes and while elements from the series, particularly the first four (A New Hope through The Phantom Menace) are known among the general public, A New Hope is by far the most parodied and referenced. The Empire Strikes Back, however, is viewed as an Even Better Sequel as hindsight and the other films have their fans as well, making this a small point of contention among fans. As a whole, the original trilogy was much better received than the prequels.
  • Franchise Original Sin: Nearly all the flaws of the prequel trilogy (corny dialogue and acting, cutesy moments, scrappys), notably excepting cheesy romantic scenes and Conspicuous CG, were present, albeit in reduced quantities, in the original trilogy as well. Rumor has it that the OT's love story would've been cheesy, had Harrison Ford and Carrie Fisher not come up with far superior lines on their own.
  • Generational Saga: The Star Wars movie saga is the story of the rise of a man from absolute poverty to absolute power and his downfall, intersected with the rise of his son from that of a simple farmer to galactic hero.
  • Genre Turning Point: Star Wars had a bigger change in how the industry made movies than any other film since The Jazz Singer. It marked the start of blockbuster films and spinning merchandise and setting the standard for money-spinning franchises and sequels. It also contributed greatly to the end of the New Hollywood and the decline of the adult movie audience in the eyes of critics, fellow film-makers and, recently, George Lucas himself:
    George Lucas: "When Star Wars came out, everyone said it's a silly movie, just a bunch of space battles and stuff...There's more to it than that but everyone said it's just a bunch of spaceships...that part of the science fantasy got terribly abused... The other part is the technology, especially when it came down later to digital technology, where you can really do anything. Which people just abused, which they did with colour, they did with sound. Whenever someone brings a new tool, everyone just abuses it and you forget the fact there's actually a story. The other thing that got abused... the studios said "Wow we can make a lot of money, this is a license to kill" and the only way you can do that is not taken chances. Do something that's proven. You have to remember that Star Wars came from nowhere, American Graffiti came from nowhere. There was nothing like it. Now if you do anything that's not a sequel or a TV series or look like one, they won't do it. That's the downside of Star Wars and it really shows the enormous lack of imagination and creativity on the part of the industry."
  • Heartwarming in Hindsight: Luke and C-3PO's bond throughout the original trilogy becomes more heartwarming when we see in The Phantom Menace that Threepio was originally built by Anakin, effectively making Luke and Threepio brothers.
  • Hilarious in Hindsight:
    • A planet with two suns was discovered by NASA years after the release of A New Hope.
    • "That's no moon... oh wait, it actually is. Never mind."
    • In anticipation of the release of Return of the Jedi, MAD once ran an article called "The Star Wars Log", framed as the official outline of the rest of the saga (which had been announced as a nine-film series at the time). The article was supposed to poke fun at the convoluted direction of the series up to that point, but a few of its predictions actually turned out to be eerily accurate. For example:
      • They predicted that Episode II would be titled "Send in the Clones", and that it would involve the revelation that Darth Vader and Obi-Wan were cloned from the same donor (Chewbacca's grandfather). Episode II was actually called "Attack of the Clones", and the revelation was about Boba Fett and the Stormtroopers being cloned from the same donor.
      • They predicted that the detail about Chewie's grandfather would set up a conflict between the Wookiees and the Empire in Episode III. As it turned out, a battle involving the Wookiees and the Empire actually was a big plot point in Episode III, and Chewie himself would have been a veteran of that battle.
      • They predicted that the later films would involve a "Great Droid War" of some kind. Though it wasn't actually called that, the later prequels did have the heroes at war with an evil army of droids.
      • They predicted that the series would end with the revelation that Luke's father wasn't Darth Vader... but that Luke was fathered by "the Force itself". In the real movies, Vader did turn out to be Luke's father after all, but Vader was revealed to have been conceived by the Force.
    • This parody in an Italian Mickey Mouse comic made in 1997 is this, now that Disney owns Star Wars.
    • The 2006 Drawn Together episode "Terms of Endearment" does a Chair Reveal scene taken directly from General Veers glimpsing Vader's helmet being lowered onto his scarred head in The Empire Strikes Back. Except that in the Drawn Together version the villain is revealed to be... Mickey Mouse!
    • Doubles with Harsher in Hindsight: In light of the new prevailing theory about Jar Jar Binks secretly being a Hypercompetent Sith Lord using Obfuscating Stupidity the entire time, as well as Ahmed Best's recent social media and podcast material that seem to be all about subtly confirming that he knew what the original plans were for his character all along, his appearances resuming the voice of Jar Jar Binks in Robot Chicken may be both of these. Hilarious because one particular segment he did on Robot Chicken was a deliberate allusion to the truth Hidden in Plain Sight. Harsher because the fan backlash that ostensibly got George Lucas to back out on this plan didn't actually save the fanbase from a horrible character, but instead destroyed Ahmed's hopes of superstardom by crashing what was meant to be a revolutionary breakthrough that he'd put his voice to.
  • Ho Yay:
    • Very little outside the Expanded Universe, but Luke and Han have a few longing stares in Episodes IV and V.
    • Qui-Gon/Obi-Wan and Obi-Wan/Anakin are both popular. Say what you will: George has figured out how to take Ho Yay out of the level of Fanservice for the ladies and some men and actually have it be meaningful, such as Obi-Wan's "I loved you," which was a response to Anakin's bitter "!" for being left by him to burn near a river of lava. Both of them feeling betrayed by the other.
    • There's quite a bit between C-3PO and R2-D2 as well, with the theory of the two being closet homosexuals being very popular for a long time.
  • Idiot Plot: Ties in with They Just Didn't Care - a frequent complaint about the prequel trilogy is that the plots only work because the heroes are too stupid to see that the real villain is right in front of them.
  • I Liked It Better When It Sucked: An argument that fans of the original cuts of the film make in regards to the Special Editions is that the movies had more soul to it without the touch-ups and added scenes. This is still a point of debate, as aside from some of the more controversial changes (such as Greedo shooting at Han), there are a still a handful of Special Effect Failures present in the original cuts that detract from the experience of the movies that said Special Editions fix.
  • Ink-Stain Adaptation: The prequels' handling of certain characters was extremely divisive to say the least, so much so that many fans claimed the characters were ruined by the prequels.
    • In the mind of these detractors, the character most thoroughly ink-stained by this is, of course, Anakin Skywalker/Darth Vader. Prior to the prequels, Vader was known as one of the most iconic villains ever, a fearsome, black-armoured Fallen Hero who was as dangerous to incompetent subordinates as to his foes. The decision of the prequels to portray him as a scared little boy, then an awkward teenager, then a generally unsympathetic, narcissistic, short-sighted, and occasionally megalomaniacal Anti-Hero forever sullied the image of the Dark Lord for many prequel detractors. On the other side of the spectrum Prequel fans argue that Anakin was supposed to be like this in an attempt by Lucas to deconstruct certain tropes and notions viewers had about Vader and that he could still be the fearsome character he was viewed as prior to the prequels.
    • Boba Fett wound up with some ink-stains as well. While he was the original trilogy's Memetic Badass and the early Expanded Universe turned him into an Ascended Extra, Episode II retconned his EU backstory and changed him into a clone-child of another bounty hunter. To be fair, Fett has been the subject of a lot of inter-author warfare and his depictions vary so much from author to author, it's difficult to figure out who the "real" character even is anymore...
    • Some fans did not take kindly to the zen-like mentor Yoda getting a lightsaber and fighting like a pinball throughout the prequels.
  • Internet Backdraft: Depending on what forums you go to, mentioning the prequels or RedLetterMedia reviews could start a war.
  • It Was His Sled:
    • In case you didn't know, Vader is Luke's father.
    • And Senator Palpatine is Darth Sidious.
    • Princess Leia is Luke's sister.
    • Really, a large amount of the plot is known among the general public for the entire series. The fact that Star Wars is commonly subject to Whole Plot Reference in many works doesn't help matters at all.
  • Iron Woobie: Obi Wan Kenobi endures an excruciating amount of personal loss and suffering without complaining about it or visibly cracking under the pressure.
  • It's Popular, Now It Sucks: Some nerds in other fandoms resent Star Wars because it's the most prevalent stereotype of what nerds enjoy (at least in America).
  • Love It or Hate It: The prequels are either flawed but serviceable films or a blight on the series. How intensely one thinks of it varies of course on the person and is one of the biggest dividing points among fans for a reason.
  • Love to Hate: Most of the major villains are subject to this, but Darth Vader, Palpatine, Darth Maul, Boba Fett, General Grievous and Kylo Ren are probably the biggest examples.
  • Jerkass Woobie:
    • Anakin Skywalker/Darth Vader is the biggest example considering his upbringing as a slave, although his cold attitude prevents him from being completely huggable.
    • Boba Fett as well. He may be a ruthless bounty hunter, but he did watch his father get decapitated as a kid after all.
  • Magnificent Bastard: Palpatine in the Prequel Trilogy. In the original trilogy he's more of a Smug Snake, but manages a good effort. He takes on 4 Jedi Masters (one of them Mace Windu) and kills three of them in seconds. He either allows Windu to defeat him just so he can present himself as a helpless victim to Anakin, or despite being defeated manages to instantly turn the situation around to get Anakin to perform a Face-Heel Turn. He's also not above using himself as bait in traps, exposing himself to considerable danger in the process. His kidnapping at the start of Revenge of the Sith was orchestrated to get Anakin into a position where he could kill off Dooku and potentially also get Obi-Wan killed in the line of duty and deprive Anakin of his restraining influence. Still, in Return of the Jedi he used his presence aboard the unfinished second Death Star to make a sortie against the battle station all the more irresistible to the rebels, allowing him to ensnare them in a trap that would wipe out their ships and leaders, eliminating their ability to oppose his rein in any organized way once and for all.
  • Memetic Badass:
    • Han Solo, with his charming personality and awesome ship, is viewed very highly by fans.
    • R2-D2 saves the day enough that some people wonder why he doesn't get more credit.
    • The Fetts, Boba in particular considering he stands up to Vader and looks very cool, but suffered an anti-climatic death scene.
    • Mace Windu demands to know why he and his purple lightsaber are fourth on this list!
    • Kyle Katarn from the Expanded Universe is treated as the SW universe's answer to Chuck Norris thanks to a similar appearance.
    • Yoda, ever since his duel with Count Dooku in Attack of the Clones. Ever since that movie, anytime a Pint Sized Power House character is fighting, you can guarantee that they will fight exactly as Yoda does.
  • Memetic Loser: The Stormtroopers are so memetically bad (to the point of exaggeration) at hitting targets that they're the Trope Namer for Imperial Stormtrooper Marksmanship Academy.
    • There's also Greedo, who's a Memetic Loser both in and out of universe. The poor guy is the Butt Monkey of the galaxy and can't kill Han Solo when he's sitting barely a foot away from him.
    • The Battle Droids, in and out of universe for being even worse marksmen than Stormtroopers.
  • Memetic Molester:
  • Memetic Mutation: As mentioned above, everything. The original trilogy alone has easily the highest degree of quotes per movie ever; for example, doing a Google search for virtually any line from Episode IV will result in an auto-fill. The prequels slightly less so. Just as general concepts, "The Dark Side" and "The Force" have entered mainstream culture.
    Admiral Ackbar: "It's a trap!"
    Darth Vader: "DO NOT WANT!"
    Darth Vader: "I find your lack of X disturbing."
    • The whole "Disney buying Lucasfilm" thing led to a slew of jokes about Princess Leia becoming a Disney Princess.
    • A few memes have taken hold in the comment sections of the official Star Wars Facebook page. In particular: when the moderators post trivia questions on Tuesdays, it's become tradition to answer "Jake from State Farm" when they ask for a character's name. After NBC anchor Brian Williams was suspended in February 2015 for falsely claiming to have survived an RPG attack while riding in a military helicopter in Iraq, many fans have taken to answering "Brian Williams" when the question is about a character who participated in a major battle.
  • Misblamed: Hayden Christiansen often comes up as a main culprit for the prequels' quality or lack thereof, with the role arguably becoming a Star-Derailing Role, despite that he's done work outside the series where he received praise for and was hardly the only actor affected by George Lucas's touch; Natalie Portman, who would become a major star and an Oscar winner a few years later, said she had trouble getting quality work due to a perception from the prequels that she couldn't act. Natalie Portman! Couple that with the fact Lucas had always come under fire from his cast as a writer/director (Harrison Ford once told him, "You can type this shit but you sure as hell can't say it!"), and it sometimes feels like Christiansen got a raw deal considering the other major actors came out of the prequels just fine.
  • Moral Event Horizon:
    • Palpatine crosses this when he tells his troops to execute Order 66. Subverted by Anakin/Darth Vader, who redeems himself after years of evil actions, but initially played straight either when he slaughtered Tusken Raiders (women and children included) in Attack of the Clones, or when he massacred Jedi children in Revenge of the Sith.
    • In addition, Palpatine had orchestrated a major intergalactic civil war that has caused the deaths of countless billions on hundreds of planets solely to cement his political power and weaken or destroy all rivals to that power. And he'd been planning it for years prior, to say nothing of all the other evil stuff he ordered in The Phantom Menace, and everything we're told he'd done in the Expanded Universe up to this point. Moral Event Horizon? That hardly counts as Tuesday. He'd done waaayyyy more evil stuff than that throughout the series.
  • Narm: A common complaint levied against quite a bit of the dialogue, especially in the prequels. Lucas admitted his weakness as a writer of dialogue, but is also a fan of melodrama (at one point, Hayden Christensen tried to deliver a line in a calm, realistic manner, but Lucas ordered him to redo it in an over-the-top fashion). It was also the first franchise on this wiki to have its own Narm page.
  • Narm Charm:
    • Many scenes come across as being cheesy, but they don't detract from how awesome the films are that much. Many of the examples listed on that page qualify for this trope as well.
    • A lot of fans agree this is the reason why they might give the prequels a chance.
  • Nightmare Fuel: Star Wars has its own page of horrors.
  • Nostalgia Filter:
    • The arguments of a lot of Original Trilogy purists reek of this - never mind that the Original Trilogy had several flaws that weren't fixed until the Special Editions (which many of said purists ignore), and that a few of these flaws were actually avoided in the Prequel Trilogy.
    • Conversely, this can occur with fans of the prequels who downplay their flaws in defense against their detractors, regardless of whether they are valid or not.
  • Opinion Myopia: Occurs quite a bit among fans, especially the more zealous haters of the prequels who often insist the fans who like them are stupid and need to watch the RedLetterMedia reviews.
  • The Problem with Licensed Games: Back and forth. Usually original EU games turn out fairly well (helped that they're games designed to stand alone products and not cash ins to the movies), with some even being considered classics but for the most part direct adaptations of the movies suffer. The Super Star Wars trilogy were not only the most notable aversion, but they're were also freakin' hard. The Rogue Squadron and X-Wing series, Knights of the Old Republic and the Dark Forces Saga are considered among the best Star Wars games. Lego Star Wars are widely popular, and considered one of the best Lego games.
  • Protection from Editors: Widely believed to be at least partly responsible for the stumbles in the Prequel Trilogy. When making the Original Trilogy Lucas consulted other film-makers he was on good terms with (including Steven Spielberg, Brian De Palma (who famously re-wrote the original film's opening crawl to what we finally saw), Francis Ford Coppola, and of course, Lawrence Kasdan) and awkward dialogue was frequently replaced with ad-libbed lines. By the time of the Prequels, most of Lucas' film-industry friends weren't available, and everyone else was far more hesitant to criticize or question the man who invented Star Wars.
  • Rewatch Bonus: The fact that the reveal that Vader is Luke's father causes this is why the twist works so well.
  • Rooting for the Empire: Combine the sky-high Evil Is Cool factor of Darth Vader and Palpatine, a varied set of particularly stylish and intimidating uniforms for the stormtroopers and other military personnel, a fleet composed of almost nothing BUT Cool Starships, a comparatively milquetoast opposition and the fact that they replaced a corrupt, obstructive bureaucracy, and you have a recipe for one of the most sinister-yet-endearing villainous forces ever created. There is a reason why the 501st Legion, the largest Star Wars cosplaying organization on the planet, themed itself after the bad guys...
  • Sacred Cow: The original trilogy. Just trying to tell someone you don't like it or even suggesting it might have some shortcomings tends to create a lot of backdraft with David Brin being a notable recipient of this.
  • Scapegoat Creator: It's unlikely any creator of a popular franchise is as vocally disliked by his fans as George Lucas, despite the fact that the series is entirely his creation and vision and would simply not exist were it not for him. Some of the criticism directed against him (the extreme tinkering of his films on home video) is fair, but some fans take this to the extent of dismissing Lucas entirely, by making points about how the film is best when he is least involved, by citing The Empire Strikes Back, despite the fact that Lucas was solely responsible for the main plot twist of that film.
  • The Scrappy: In order of appearance (and hatred), C-3PO and the Ewoks in the original trilogy, Jar Jar, and Anakin in the prequels.
  • Shocking Swerve: Rare successful examples: Vader's being Luke's father and Leia's being his sister. Neither is hinted at in any way (especially the second), but they're regarded as great twists all the same.
  • So Cool It's Awesome: The original trilogy, particularly A New Hope and The Empire Strikes Back, recieved critical acclaim and is beloved by many fans of sci-fi and film to the point of being considered must-see films in many people's eyes due to its enormous impact on culture. While the prequels are more divisive, they have their fans and both trilogies have contributed to forming a very large and passionate fanbase that is still going strong nearly forty years later.
    • A perfect example of how beloved the series is can be illustrated with the pre-release success of The Force Awakens; despite the prequels being widely criticized among fans of the series (and those who weren't to begin with), the trailers for Episode VII were so well-received, the final trailer was the fastest film trailer to hit 100 million views on YouTube and made $6 million in ticket sales on the first day they were available... over two months before the film's release. As for the movie itself, it was released to critical acclaim on par with the original trilogy's best, qualifying it for this trope too.
  • Stoic Woobie: Princess Leia, considering she loses her planet and is forced to watch Han be frozen in carbonite, but doesn't dwell much on either of them.
  • Tastes Like Diabetes: A common accusation from some fans is the willingness to stoop down and appeal to kids, particularly with elements like the dialogue and goofy characters like ewoks and battle droids. The insane amount of merchandise and endeavors the series gets involved in, much of which is kid-oriented and quite bizarre, also is a target of hate. Revenge of the Sith and moreso The Force Awakens defy this trope by having a more "adult" tone and much less "whimsical" humor than previous movies, but the kiddie Misaimed Marketing is still there.
    • Of course, to a lot of people, Star Wars was always child friendly. Only 2 out of 7 films have a PG-13 rating while nearly every other film was PG rated (although it should be noted that the PG-13 rating did not exist until the summer of 1984, a year after Return of the Jedi was released). Appealing to kids was a major part for its early successes. But even then, kids don't want to be pandered too all the time.
  • They Changed It, Now It Sucks: The revisions made to the original trilogy over various re-releases were not well received by all fans. Those who grew up with the original trilogy were considerably outraged about the changes that affected the story and the music. And don't even mention the issue of Greedo shooting first.
  • They Just Didn't Care: A frequent criticism of George Lucas and the prequels is that he just didn't seem all that interested in the story he was trying to tell.
  • They Wasted a Perfectly Good Character:
    • Darth Maul, one of the most badass characters in The Verse, after killing Qui-Gon (previously established as quite the badass himself)), lets Obi-Wan slooooooooooowly flip up onto the ledge behind Maul, and Maul just stands there and lets Obi-Wan kill him. They had two more movies or more to keep him around as a villain, and a full-scale war in which to give him a decent death. Nope, we get stuck with Dooku, a talkative old guy, and Grievous, a Dirty Coward Evil Cripple in a crappy mech-suit as villains for the next two movies.
    • Hey, at least Dooku was played by Christopher Lee, which is always awesome. Grievous, on the other hand...
    • Averted; He is back and kicking ass in Star Wars: The Clone Wars for this exact reason.
    • Both Fetts are seen as awesome characters by a good number of the fans, who also think they deserved better more screen time and a better death in Boba's case. As compensation, Boba's death was overridden to allow him survive in the Expanded Universe and confirmed to remain canon after its dropping. Lucas even stated he would've allowed him to live had he known how much fans like him.
  • They Wasted a Perfectly Good Plot: Both fans and critics of the prequel films generally agree that whether they liked the plot of the films or not, the execution of said plot was generally poor and the films had a great deal of padding and waste. In particular, the fact that the Clone Wars are never really depicted on the big screen (Episode II covers the beginning of the conflict, Episode III covers the end) is considered a missed moment of awesome, particularly since the Expanded Universe and TV shows handled it so well. One could argue that Episode I is the most plot-irrelevant movie of the three and the prequels could have easily begun with Anakin already training as a Jedi and Obi-Wan already his master, and more of the conflict could have been seen and Anakin's fall to the Dark Side could have been covered in greater depth and detail.
  • Too Cool to Live: Too many to count. Obi-Wan Kenobi, Qui-Gon Jinn, Mace Windu, Jango Fett, Count Dooku, General Grievous, Darth Maul, Han Solo. Awesomely subverted by Boba Fett and Darth Maul who were simply too cool to die and were retconned as having survived their deaths — Boba managed to fight his way out of the Sarlacc; Darth Maul somehow made his way to the planet Lotho Minor and eked out an existence there until his brother found him.
  • Uncertain Audience: This has been an issue with Star Wars since the beginning and it has coloured everything from tone and content, and the actual reception of the films:
    • The original Star Wars was unambiguously a light-hearted adventure story for all audiences and it occupied the same pedestal of The Wizard of Oz and the 1940 The Thief of Bagdad as popular children's fantasy that adults could see with them. The dark tone of The Empire Strikes Back was the exception (and it was rejected by part of the audience of the first film) before returning full circle with Return of the Jedi (far better recieved upon release than later). When The Phantom Menace came out and returned to the tone of the first film, the audiences who had grown up with Star Wars and regarded The Empire Strikes Back as the best generally rejected the film and the prequels.
    • The other debate is also "new fans" and "old fans". It is partly to keep the franchise fresh for newer audiences that Lucas keeps updating his special editions with newer special effects and changes. Likewise, the demand by fans for a more integrated continuity, also leads Lucas to more carefully interweave the prequels with the sequels and correct elements across the Saga, and yet fans of the original Star Wars reject these changes. The prequels which chronicled the rise of Darth Vader was similarly divided. On one hand there was greater World Building at the expense of action, which catered to the demands and attention of fans rather than general audiences, on the other hand it was too bogged down with ensuring Anakin marches across The Stations of the Canon, that it didn't entirely stand on its own merits.
    • With The Force Awakens, we have the same issue. Critical reception has been excellent but generally notes that it caters to the nostalgia for the original series and repeats elements from the plot and setting, rather than tell a new story. In keeping with this, the movie is more "adult" than previous Star Wars movies, with more intense violence, less whimsical humor and a lessened Kid-Appeal Character presence, but is still marketed to kids just as much.
  • Unintentionally Unsympathetic: Many of the behaviors of the Jedi (Obi-Wan being an exception) and the Republic in the prequels invited a great deal of deconstruction by fans. Through it could have been intended by Lucas.
    • The prequel-era Jedi Order, due to the fact they exclusively recruited very young children, compared to Luke and many pre-prequel EU works depicting Jedi beginning training as teens or adults. This led to many fans viewing the prequel-era Jedi as brainwashed child soldiers and they could be fairly snooty as well with Mace Windu's distrust of Anakin in Episode III and Qui-Gon insisting to Shimi he didn't come to free slaves being notable examples.
    • The Old Republic, viewed nostalgically in the original trilogy, was depicted in the prequels as a crumbling body run by Corrupt Politicians and Obstructive Bureaucrats and this subverted the Good Republic, Evil Empire trope by making it look like it was well on its way to either breaking up or becoming an empire regardless of Sith scheming. This led to implications of the Democracy Is Bad trope, which unlike the situation with the Jedi was only made worse in the Expanded Universe as the New Republic was already showing the same problems as the Old more or less as soon as it was established. This is one of the reasons why critics of the more fundamental aspects of Star Wars, like David Brin, claim that Star Wars is explicitly and intentionally anti-democratic.
    • One of the more common complaints about the Prequels is that they hinge on Anakin being a tragic hero who elicits sympathy from the audience, yet his villainous attributes take up the bulk of his screen time while his more heroic traits are either downplayed or resigned to expository dialogue.
  • Villain Sue: For some detractors of the prequels, Palpatine is viewed as this, considering the vast amounts of Idiot Plot involved and how the Jedi claim to be clouded in finding the Big Bad from the Dark Side when Palpatine displays suspicious behavior. His actions to Anakin in Episode 3 are particularly cited due to him being very open to Anakin about his dark nature.
  • Vindicated by History:
    • C-3PO, widely reviled as a scrappy around the time of Empire, is much more fondly regarded by fans after the Ewoks, Jar Jar and Anakin proved to be far more polarizing characters.
    • The Empire Strikes Back was divisive in its day, now it's considered the best of the films. Return of the Jedi, while remaining the general least popular entry of the original trilogy, has also found more and more supporters as time has gone by.
    • While the Prequel Trilogy is still regarded as inferior to the original films, stances on them have gradually softened over time, with many pointing out that while flawed, they do still have many positive attributes and do contain several good ideas that admittedly needed to be roughed out a little more. It hasn't hurt that both canon and non-canon EU titles as well as fanworks have been able to make good use of elements and characters from the Prequels.
  • Wangst: Anakin does this in Episode II and III. A notable example being his complaining about having to wait to take the Jedi trials — ironically proving why Obi-Wan wants him to wait.
  • What Do You Mean, It's for Kids?: According to Word Of God. Lucas first claimed that Star Wars was for kids to defend the blunders in The Phantom Menace and seems to be leaning more towards this as time goes onnote , probably as a way to claim that he knows what he's doing and that his various blunders are justified. He also used a similar defense for Red Tails.
  • What Do You Mean, It's Not Political?:
    • Some viewers have noted that the Prequel Trilogy has a lot of things that could be construed as attacks against George W. Bush and conservatism in general, especially when using Palpatine to pass similar decrees. Lucas insists that Palpatine was actually be based on Richard Nixon and later Adolf Hitler.
    • The fall of the Old Republic/birth of the Empire also directly mirrors the fall of the Roman Republic and its transition into the Roman Empire. Those who think George Lucas was taking potshots at the American political climate at the time should have been a lot more concerned about how the parallels mapped...
    • William Kristol has come out saying the Galactic Empire is an ideal Neoconservative government. Make of this what you will.
  • WTH, Casting Agency?: Some fans don't have the highest opinion of the decision to cast Samuel L. Jackson as Mace Windu, feeling that the character was a waste of a good actor. Jackson is arguably the most talented actor in the prequel trilogy, yet Windu—a bald, stoic, Only Sane Man space monk—has probably the tiniest emotional range of any character in the main cast. Hell, his death scene is the only scene where Jackson actually gets a chance to show real emotion on screen.
  • Win the Crowd: A New Hope was initially seen as a bizarre avant-garde action movie when the initial trailers came out, but people went to see the movie anyway, figuring it would at least be So Bad, It's Good. The film managed to win the audience over with the opening crawl, seconds after the movie started, and kept audiences hooked with the initial blockade runner chase. John William's score probably had something to do with it.
    • After the polarizing prequels, the series had to do this upon Disney's revival; the reaction to the trailers for JJ Abrams The Force Awakens was so overwhelming positive that the final trailer was the fastest to hit 100 million views on YouTube and the film generated over $6 million worth of pre-sold tickets the very first day they went on sale... two months before its release.
  • The Woobie: Has its own page.