YMMV / Shadows of the Empire

  • Awesome Music: The soundtrack.
  • Best Level Ever: The Battle of Hoth had already gotten a decent rendition in Super Empire Strikes Back, but this game just took it to the next level. The last mission, the Skyhook Battle is a close runner-up for this title. Hoth was such a well-received level that they spawned a whole other series.
  • Breather Boss: While most of the bosses in the game are pretty brutal, the Loader Droid is a walk in the park by comparison. Its attacks are much less damaging than those most of the other bosses, assuming it ever gets the opportunity to actually attack you in the first place, as circling around it makes it all but impossible for it to hit you. Any difficulty in the battle tends to come more from the clunky aiming controls than the droid itself.
  • Breather Level: On Jedi difficulty, the Asteroid Field level is much easier than the downright brutal Battle of Hoth and Echo Base levels you just completed, and serves as a nice change of pace before you're thrown into Ord Mantell and Gall.
  • Heartwarming in Hindsight: When Guri is defeated by Luke, he spares her and asks her to come with them in order to reprogram her. She rejected the offer, responding that she'll die if they will try. Later, Guri decided to, and her effort was successful. Well done, Luke!
  • Hilarious in Hindsight:
    • A working title forThe Force Awakens was Shadow of the Empire, but it was changed to avoid confusion with the preceding works.
    • Nintendo's Star Fox series, which takes much inspiration from Star Wars, received its fourth installment, Star Fox Assault in 2005, 9 years after Shadows of the Empire. Similar to Shadows, the game features both flight and on-foot gameplay. Also like Shadows, the latter was criticized for having sloppy control and generally considered to be a Scrappy Mechanic in contrast to the more traditional Arwing gameplay.
  • Nightmare Fuel:
    • The sewers. It's entirely possible to be instantly killed by dianogas in an early stretch before fighting them on a regular basis. The level is hell for people with a fear of underwater creatures.
      • And the music. The dark, dank sewers were scary enough without it.
    • The Gall Spaceport music, especially the Scare Chords. Fittingly enough, it's also Boba Fett's official theme in the overall franchise.
  • No Problem with Licensed Games: While the game tie-in is really showing its age now, it's a perfectly playable and fun third person shooter with some cool vehicle segments, creative level ideas and a great soundtrack.
  • Polished Port: Arguably, the PC port of the game is a significant improvement over the N64 original, what with much more responsive controls and fully voiced, rendered cutscenes that hold up well enough till this day… that is if you're using a system this game was made for, as newer ones sure cause a few problems.
  • Schizophrenic Difficulty: The walking stages of the game are much harder and take way longer to get through than those that have you drive a vehicle (save, maybe, for the swoop race which, while tough, is still relatively short so you don't have to worry too much about losing your progress in case you run out of lives). The third level, taking place in the Asteroid Field, for instance, is ridiculously easy in particular and can be beat within less than two minutes.
  • Seinfeld Is Unfunny: The video game was one of the first games released for the Nintendo 64 and one of the first third person shooter games released in 3D. It was praised as a landmark game with impressive environments for its time and for its faithfulness to the movies, right down to having music taken directly from the films in addition to its own new sound cues. Being set between the Empire Strikes Back and Return of the Jedi was a huge selling point as well—up till then, there had been no Star Wars tie-ins prior to it that really bridged the gap between the two films, and it along with the other multimedia tie-ins considerably opened up the possibilities of the old Star Wars Expanded Universe. In hindsight, however, the game has not aged well from a technical standpoint; the environments are very barren and rough looking, the combat is extremely rudimentary, and Dash Rendar controls in a very floaty, awkward way. The starfighter segments, while good for their time, simply don't stack up in contrast to the games that took inspiration from it while substantially improving the flight and gameplay mechanics, such as Factor 5's Rogue Squadron series. The rudimentary story probably won't win over newer gamers either, since you really need to read the accompanying novelization and comics to get the full story of whats going on in the game, and its novelty as a Star Wars interquel is completely lost on newer fans who are used to seeing that kind of thing regularly in Star Wars works that came after it, such as Star Wars Bounty Hunter, The Force Unleashed and Rogue One.
  • Squick: Guri is fully equipped as a human replica droid. And Xizor has actually used said equipment. However, this may be Fetish Fuel instead, depending on your point of view.
  • That One Boss: Rather fittingly, Boba Fett. He has his trademark jetpack, the same kind of homing Seeker missiles you've been using since Hoth, and a close-range flamethrower that will kill you quicker than you can blink, even if you're at full health. Thankfully, the arena has some health pick ups on the outside, and he becomes much more sluggish once he enters Slave I for the second phase, though one bad move and you might end up having to repeat a definite Marathon Level.
    • Although neither he nor Slave I will follow you outside the launchpad, where you can find extra powerups. When dealing with Slave I in particular, you can just hop between the gaps on your jetpack, fire a few shots at Slave I, then dip back down before it can fire on you. Lather, Rinse, Repeat.
    • The Giant Dianoga from Sewers of Imperial City. Not only do you have to put up with Under the Sea physics, but you also have to focus on avoiding both its tentacles and getting sucked into its Sarlacc-like mouth (which will result in a One-Hit Kill, obviously). Additionally, you can only damage it via Attack Its Weak Point — namely, its always-moving eye.
    • The Gladiator from Xizor's Palace has three "forms": the full figure, its torso (with a rocket booster to propel itself around), and its head. When its second form appears, a labyrinth forms that also has some enemies inside. When the head is left, your jetpack malfunctions. And it always spams the laser (with a really big area span) no matter where you are.
  • That One Level:
    • Ord Mantell junkyard. You have to jump from train car to train car, and from train to train- all with physics that will send you helplessly falling to instant death if you attempt a jump at the wrong time. You will fall a lot before you get familiar enough with the mechanics to beat the level; and at the end of it is IG-88.
    • The widely reviled Swoop Bike chase level; a level that forces you to drive at breakneck speeds through cluttered streets and levels, with countless opportunities to get stuck, slow down, and crash and burn. The only thing that salvages the level is the enemies actually slow down so you can attack them, and even then, the game doesn't tell you how to attack them (you have to use a specific button to ram the swoop gang bikes at their sides).
    • Sewers of Imperial City. For some players, it's because of the dianogas scattered throughout the level if only because you hear its roar before you see it.
    • On Jedi difficulty, lets just say every damn level becomes this. Because Dash can only take two or three hits from most enemies, you absolutely have to stay on your toes through the game and be prepared for every attack that'll come your way, because even one slip up will spell death for you.

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