Follow TV Tropes

Following

YMMV / Pokémon Ruby and Sapphire

Go To


Back to main Pokémon YMMV page


    open/close all folders 

    Gen III: Ruby, Sapphire, and Emerald 
  • Adorkable:
    • May tends to become flustered at times when she's the rival, usually after she's said something embarrassing.
    • Wally is very shy, polite, and awkward.
    • Flannery's attempts to sound tough and seem intimidating land her as this. The remakes make it even more apparent, with the updated graphics giving her the chance to look as adorably goofy as she sounds.
    • Steven. He has a list of favorite rocks for Christ's sake.
  • And You Thought It Would Fail: The third generation of games came out after the initial Pokémon craze had died down and the franchise suffered its first slump, with many believing the series would soon be discontinued. Some of the more vocal detractors claimed that Ruby and Sapphire was just a desperate attempt by Nintendo and Game Freak to wring as much money as they could from a dying franchise. Junichi Masuda, the games' director, saw the decline in Pokémon's popularity and feared the games would fail so much that he actually had nightmares about it. Thankfully, the games went on to become the Game Boy Advance's highest-selling titles, although they did sell less than the previous two generations.
  • Anti-Climax Boss:
    • One of the more noted weaknesses of this set of games is that both the rival (Brendan/May, who doesn't fully evolve his/her starter and is the only one who can't be battled infinitely) and the Aqua/Magma Leaders (who only use a mere three Pokémon, all of them being ones that every one of their grunts use) are really pathetic compared to the rivals and Leaders in the rest of the series. Averted in the remakes, where the rival does fully evolve his/her starter and the final rival battle is fought after the credits roll, has a team on par with the Elite Four, and has access to Mega Evolution.
    • Wallace as the Champion in Emerald is thought of as being this due to falling to Poor, Predictable Rock unlike Steven, who uses a diverse set of Pokémon types. It doesn't help that he still specializes in the same type as another Gym Leader in the region, and even then, you get a lot of practice fighting Water-types thanks to Team Aqua and the Surf-heavy late-game routes. Steven does appear as a much harder Bonus Boss later, though.
    • Liza and Tate in Ruby and Sapphire have to be one of the easiest Gym Leaders to date. They have two mediocre Pokémon that can easily be defeated with Surf, a move you have to know to even get there. They can do some damage if you let Solrock get a Solar Beam powered by Sunny Day in and it hits your Water-type, though. They become more of a proper challenge in Emerald, packing Xatu and Claydol alongside their original Solrock and Lunatone, but oddly go right back to this in the remakes.
    • The entire Hoenn Elite Four can be this as well. Sidney's the only one who even tries to cover his weaknesses to Fighting and Bug (The latter of which you most likely aren't using at that point in the game). Phoebe and Glacia suffer hard from Agatha Syndrome in which their Pokémon all come from one or two evolutionary families - meaning they all can be hard-countered by one type that can outspeed them. Even if Drake has two Pokémon that know Flamethrower, his Shelgon knows Rock Tomb, and the AI will use them if you have an ice type, all but one of his Pokémon have a double weakness to Ice.
  • Awesome Music: See the series page for the trope.
  • Best Boss Ever:
    • Norman. His gym type is Normal, and his signature Pokémon is Slaking. Slaking's gimmick is that it has some very very high stats (Higher than most pseudolegendaries!) and can thus can take and give a lot of abuse before going down. At the expense of only being able to act every other turn. Thus, players were forced to take the cooldown into account along with the move Facade which discouraged you from simply trying to slow it down with a status ailment.
    • Steven himself. In contrast to the rest of the Elite Four, he really tries to cover his weaknesses. Just because Rock and Steel (his two types of choice) share some common weaknesses in Ground and Fighting doesn't mean you can just spam a few powerful moves and call it a day. What's more, he will alternate between hitting you with moves to slow you down like Confuse Ray or Reflect/Light Screen and hard hitting moves like Earthquake.
  • Breather Boss:
    • Brawly in Sapphire and Emerald is easy to deal with if you catch a Sableye in Granite Cave, since it is immune to most of his team's attacks. Sableye also has Night Shade, a Fixed Damage Attack that completely ignores the Defense boost of his Signature Move (Bulk Up) and Meditite's Reflect.
    • Tate and Liza are fairly easy in Ruby and Sapphire. They only have two fairly weak Pokémon between them that are easily taken down by Surf, which is required to reach their Gym in the first place.
    • Wallace as a Gym Leader in Ruby and Sapphire and his replacement in Emerald, Juan. Their Pokémon are very unimpressive (they both lead with a Luvdisc and the rest of their team bar Milotic/Kingdra are pretty mediocre Mons) and all their Pokémon use Water Pulse (which is a TM move), a move whose power is fairly low at this point.
    • Wattson can be this if you bring a Ground-type, due to two of his Pokémon (specifically, his Magnemite and Magneton) having a quadruple weakness to Ground.
  • Broken Base: The games were and still are divisive (as expected of any Pokémon region, to be fair). The copious arguments about whether the Hoenn games are good, or even the best ever or worst ever, usually feature the following points:
    • Pros: The gorgeous diversity of the region. It's packed with so many different kinds of places to explore, such as a shipwreck, meteor falls, volcanoes, etc. The storyline is also widely praised, as well as the introduction of Battle Frontier.
    • Cons: The most common complaints are easy to sum up: Surf and trumpets.note 
  • Casual/Competitive Conflict: Smogon launched about a year after Ruby and Sapphire's release, though the conflict didn't really take off until Diamond and Pearl when TPCi started doing the official VGC Tournaments.
  • Critical Dissonance: The original Ruby and Sapphire received very positive reviews just upon release. The fandom was much more polarized for many reasons, and still is to a great extent.
  • Demonic Spiders:
    • Although not hard to run away from, Whismur can do a lot of damage with Uproar. If you're not careful, it can result in a couple Pokémon fainting.
    • Trapinch usually have Arena Trap, which means you can't switch out or run unless your active Pokémon's a Flying-type or has Levitate. (And even then, Flying-types have its Rock-type attacks to fear.) It also has a colossal attack stat at a base of 100, which is also the very same amount as its final evolution — suffice to say, not many unevolved/not fully evolved Pokémon will be able to tank many hits from that monster, and anything weak to Ground-type moves will almost certainly go down in one hit. The Pokémon you open with is the Pokémon that lives or faints. If you're just trying to pass through the desert, and you weren't really thinking about your lead Pokémon, and you come across a Trapinch...
  • Disappointing Last Level: The last quarter of the game infamously requires an immense amount of Surfing, and it doesn't help that there are virtually no distinguishing features or landmarks to help you navigate. Hope you like Tentacool and Wingull. Fortunately, the water routes are easier to traverse in the remakes. Made even worse by the 8th Gym Leader, a Water-type specialist. Even worse in Emerald as the 8th Gym Leader is promoted to Champion while still being a Water-type specialist, and a less interesting other Water-type specialist is placed at his old position while Team Aqua gets most of the villain spotlight there as well. If you picked the Grass-type starter or you picked up a Lotad or Shroomish early on and Electrike for the water routes, you were probably playing on autopilot by the end.
  • Draco in Leather Pants: Sure, Archie and Maxie were some of the least openly-evil villain bosses to begin with, but some fans go even further and remove any traces of responsibility for their crimes from them. And then there's their underlings, who get this treatment as well despite being Psycho Supporters or Jerkasses.
  • Ensemble Dark Horse:
    • Gardevoir, having an endearing humanoid design and protective personality.
    • Flygon has a pretty big underground cult following for being one of the coolest Pokémon designs of the third generation and for its unique typing. Even after Garchomp was released with the same typing and better stats overall, many players prefer the good old insect/dragon hybrid because it's just way too damn cool.
    • Milotic, the Distaff Counterpart to Gyarados, was also another favorite Pokémon from the Gen. It was also one of the most notoriously hard Pokémon to get.
    • Like most Champions, Steven Stone — helped by being a Memetic Badass and Silver Haired Pretty Boy.
    • Absol got a lot of love for its cool design, though its very Awesome, but Impractical nature (it was a Glass Cannon with a massive movepool that couldn't use most of it because of its horrible Special Attack, while its similarly bad Speed ensured that it would get killed before it could do much of anything) made it a competitive pariah until X and Y, when it Took a Level in Badass with a Mega Evolution that could actually abuse its Special movepool while buffing its Speed significantly.
    • Salamence also got a bit of love for being a badass Dragon-type that could match Dragonite more or less hit-for-hit.
    • Metagross, a robotic psychic spider with impressive stats, even with Gen VI's nerf to Steel-types giving it two extra weaknesses and ended up being a Bragging Rights Reward in its debut generation (just like Tyranitar in Gen II).
    • The "Ranger" class of trainers, who became popular enough to get a spinoff to themselves.
    • The Battle Frontier in Emerald has their own versions of Gym Leaders, known as the Frontier Brains. While many Frontier Brains in the series aren't remembered by players who never got into the post-game, all of the Hoenn Frontier Brains are somewhat remembered (thanks to the ninth season of the anime featuring all seven of the Brains) and some of them are appreciated by hardcore/anime fans:
      • Pike Queen Lucy, of the Battle Pike, is remembered for not only having one of the most...uh...unique character designs, but was one of the most favorable anime characters to ship with Brock, as she was one of the few who actually fell for Brock in the anime. She got a very small cameo (as an NPC you can talk to in the Battle Maison) in the remakes; and after an entire decade and a half, she finally managed to return in Pokémon Masters as the first (and so far, only) female Frontier Brain that can be recruited.
      • Pyramid King Brandon, of the Battle Pyramid, is a fan-favorite anime character due to his personality and the fact that he finds (and owns) ancient Legendary Pokémon, and is a friend to them. Like Lucy, Brandon made somewhat of a cameo in the remakes, but as the main star of an "ancient discovery" show (that only can be accessed with the Volcanion event).
      • Tower Maiden Anabel, of the Battle Tower, may be hated by some for her jerk-like actions to the player, but she was another anime character that was appreciated by anime fans. On top of that, she returns in Pokémon Sun and Moon and it's revealed that Emerald's version of Anabel is the one who appears in Sun and Moon.
  • Evil Is Sexy: Archie, Maxie, and their Dragons.
  • Fandom Rivalry: With Yu-Gi-Oh!. In between the second and third generations of Pokemon, Yu-Gi-Oh's anime and card game grew extremely popular and began to eat away at the former's fanbase. Many video game analysts believe that the reason Ruby and Sapphire had lower sales than its predecessors was due to older fans having drifted towards Yu-Gi-Oh.
  • Fan-Preferred Couple: Skitty and Wailord.
  • Fashion-Victim Villain: The Team Magma Grunts with their horned hoods.
  • Foe Yay:
    • Shelly seems to flirt with you no matter what your gender is.
    • Maxie with Archie, as well as the player in Emerald.
    • Seviper and Zangoose can breed, despite being enemies.
  • Franchise Original Sin: Shares a page with the rest of the franchise.
  • Goddamned Bats:
    • All of the enemies in the desert in Route 111 can be this, especially when combined with the perpetual sandstorm in that area and the fact that all of them have accuracy-reducing moves.
      • Sandshrew have high Defense and an evasion boost in the sandstorm, they can increase both advantages, and they can poison your Pokémon. If you aren't fielding a Pokémon immune to the sandstorm damage, they can go from this trope to outright Demonic Spiders after a Sand Attack or two.
      • Baltoy frequently Selfdestruct as the first move in combat, and if that fails, they may attempt to confuse your Pokémon.
      • Cacnea have the same evasion boost as Sandshrew in a sandstorm (as well as Sand Attack) and can pile Leech Seed on that.
      • Trapinch are the least offensive, but they can become this with their Arena Trap Ability if you're trying to flee the area and limp back to a place to heal.
    • And of course, Zubat/Golbat and Tentacool/Tentacruel return to fulfill their role for caves and for surfing. Wingull and Pelipper make their debut as the worst of both worlds — speedy confusion-spammers on the sea — in a game that involves a lot of surfing.
  • Good Bad Bugs:
  • Growing the Beard:
    • One feature that Ruby and Sapphire introduced that all the other main games following it has to the point of being indispensable is the menu-sprite-based box system. In previous games, the box system was very clunky: when your box was full, you couldn't catch any new Pokémon until you physically changed the box yourself. Ruby and Sapphire completely overhauled the way boxed Pokémon were represented. You can now see all the Pokémon in a given box, arrange them however you want to, and even change the wallpaper to however you want it to look. At least three different Pokémon "games" (more like applications) are based solely on storing Pokémon in this manner (Pokémon Box: Ruby and Sapphire, My Pokémon Ranch, and Pokémon Bank).
    • The introduction of Abilities (and, to a lesser extent, Natures) added a new layer of depth to battling and let many Pokémon differentiate themselves from those that previously overshadowed them and/or take a level in badass.
    • The Battle Tower of Ruby and Sapphire and especially the upgraded Battle Frontier of Emerald really solidified what players would come to expect from Post-End Game Content, after the first generation only featured Mewtwo and the second generation had Red. An actual area where you could battle and justify grinding and building the perfect team really appealed to those fans who didn't have the option of battling against friends, which always seemed to be what the game intended for you to do after beating the story.
  • Hilarious in Hindsight: Check the main page.
  • It's the Same, So It Sucks:
    • Nothing has changed for Dark and Steel-types in this generation; Dark-type moves are assigned to Special Attack, yet the ones introduced in this generation are mostly physically-inclined, while any Steel-types that don't have claws, tail, or wings are unable to utilize their Steel STAB aside from the possible Hidden Power. It wasn't until the next generation that those two types finally showed their true strength, with the Physical/Special split and more reliable STAB moves for them.
    • A lot of initial complaints about the game were that they cut out so much of the Pokedex only to replace them with inferior counterparts, and that the type specialties of the Gym Leader and Elite Four followed too closely to the original games, making the reaction simultaneously this and They Changed It, Now It Sucks! (see below). This has lessened over the years as the Hoenn Pokemon became popular in their own right, and people would go on to complain about Pokémon Black and White and especially Pokémon Sword and Shield doing a similar soft reboot with the Pokemon roster.
  • Junk Rare:
    • Skitty has a low encounter rate and horrible stats, even when evolved into Delcatty.
    • Chimecho is found only in the highest part of Mt. Pyre with a measly 2% encounter rate. It's close to completely useless in battle.
    • Nosepass. You just have to get lucky in finding one by smashing rocks in Granite Cave, and then discover that its Attack is rather poor, more than likely making you think, "THIS is the Pokémon I had difficulty with in Rustboro?"
  • Memetic Badass: Steven Stone, as the Final Boss, naturally fell into this; when Emerald came out and he was replaced by Wallace, Steven was generally found to be the more difficult of the two — thanks mainly to having a more diverse team — and thus this reputation was reinforced.
  • Memetic Molester:
    • "Hohoho! I like kid TRAINERS! Let's have a good one!" note 
    • The Trick Master. Each time you enter the Trick House (assuming a new challenge is available); you're told that you're being watched, and have to find his hiding place. The large number of trainers apparently lost and trapped within the puzzles doesn't help.
    • Steven Stone gets labelled as this (alongside his other Memetic reputation above) — to some degree — due to his numerous interactions with the young protagonist.
  • Memetic Mutation:
  • Mis-blamed: The one thing fans seem to remember to blame Game Freak for rather than Nintendo in the Pokémon games is the inability to transfer Pokémon from the first two generations' games to Ruby and Sapphire onward. However, this is — coincidentally enough — the one complaint that the company had no control over — the Game Boy Advance wouldn't allow interaction with the Game Boy and Game Boy Color games at all, even if they wanted to make it possible.
  • Moe: Wally causes this reaction for his rather cute design, being an Ill Boy, and acting pretty shy when you first meet him. His design in the remakes makes him even more adorable.
  • Older Than They Think: Species aside, Milotic is the first Shout-Out to The Ugly Duckling, long before Ducklett/Swanna.
  • Popularity Polynomial: These games were received just fine at first, but they fell out of favor rapidly, and Hoenn in general became ignored for many years. When the long-requested remakes were finally made, however, Hoenn, its human characters, and its Pokémon got a massive resurgence in popularity, probably even more popular than before.
  • Replacement Scrappy: Wallace as the Champion in Emerald gets this reaction due to Steven's greater popularity, because Wallace is an Anti-Climax Boss, and because he's the Water-type Champion in the Generation infamous for the amount of Water the later parts of the game contain — and comes after both an evil team based around themnote  and a Water-type Gym Leader.
  • Rooting for the Empire: The region is so infamous for its water that many fans have made jokes about Team Magma maybe having a point about expanding the land mass. At the least, they believe Magma has a more understandable motive than Aqua because human society would benefit more from increased land mass over increased water mass.
  • Sacred Cow: Pokémon Emerald is this for some fans, to the point that one of the biggest criticisms of Omega Ruby and Alpha Sapphire is that they follow the original pair, and thus diverge from there instead of building on Emerald. The exception is that most fans prefer Steven as the Champion over Wallace, for the reasons outlined in Replacement Scrappy above.
  • The Scrappy: Shares a page with the rest of the franchise.
  • Scrappy Mechanic:
    • The fishing mechanic as a whole was much more needlessly complicated than in the other generations:
      • Previously and after, you would cast your line and wait a few seconds and either get a bite or don't. In this generation, there's a needlessly long series of button pushes that literally amounts to "Oh a bite! Oh a bite! Oh a bite! Oh a bite! Oh a bite! Oh a bite! Oh a bite! Oh a bite!" which is made even worse by the Random Number God who chooses a number between 1 and 8 to decide how many seconds you needed to wait between a bite, potentially catching you off guard if you do so much as take your eyes off the screen for even one second. In short, fishing demanded absolute focus, thick patience, great luck, and plenty of time — kinda like how fishing works in real life, shockingly enough — but exactly none of that, especially of that manner and magnitude, would work well in a Pokémon game.
      • The Old Rod makes you go through this timing check only once per attempt. The Good Rod increases this to a max of three checks, and the Super Rod takes it all the way to a max of six checks. Have fun fishing with the Super Rod for that 15% chance of a Horsea!
      • There are several routes where using the Super Rod reduces the types of Pokémon you can catch compared to the Good Rod.
    • Berry farming could be aggravating, since it lacked any means of finding where you planted your berries. Certain Berries (mostly the rare ones) also required that you must water the Berry plant during each stage of growth (not multiple watering during one specific growth stage); otherwise, your Berry yield when you harvest the plant will be exactly what you started with: one Berry. Even then, you have to wait up to three days just to pick up to a measly three berries. There's a reason why later generations greatly upped the maximum berry yield.
    • The Bicycle concept in itself. Switching Bikes requires the player to travel to Rydel's Cycles in Mauville City each time the player wishes to switch, as he/she is only allowed to take one kind of Bike (Mach Bike or Acro Bike) out at a time. Several puzzles also require a specific kind of Bike — the Mach Bike is used to navigate across muddy slopes and cracked tiles, while the Acro Bike is needed to traverse distinctive white rails and rocky platforms. Hoenn's Safari Zone is probably one of the best examples — one area requires the Mach Bike, while another requires the Acro Bike, meaning that the player can only visit one of them during a Safari Zone session. For Pokémon Diamond and Pearl, they essentially combined the two bikes into one by having two speed settings. The problem was solved in the remakes by making it possible to own both bikes at once. However, you need to talk to certain NPCs first before Rydel allows you to keep both bikes. One of them is in a post game-exclusive area.
    • The introduction of the Regional/National Pokédex split. While Gold, Silver and Crystal had a mix of older Pokémon in with newer ones, Ruby and Sapphire was extremely adamant that the player should stick to new Pokémon almost exclusively. Most older Pokémon simply couldn't be found anywhere (Colosseum and Fire Red and Leaf Green wouldn't be released for another year or so), and trading between these games included a lot of arbitrary restrictions. By the time you could start trading over, the main game was over, so there was little point in even doing so beyond 100% completion and taking your favorites through some basic post-game content. The National Dex stuck around for subsequent generations, though the restrictions have lessened over time.
    • Out of Emerald's Battle Frontier facilities, the Battle Palace is by far the most hated of the lot. You can't control your Pokemon, and instead they attack randomly based on their Nature. This makes it a pure Luck-Based Mission where if you want to improve your odds, you may have to use a Pokemon with a sub-optimal Nature that contradicts its stats.
    • Trying to get the Eon Ticket legitimately in Emerald. It's possible to do so without hacks, but it's an incredibly cumbersome process: because Emerald doesn't natively support the e-Reader peripheral, you need to scan the Eon Ticket's e-Reader card into a copy of Ruby or Sapphire, then mix records with your copy of Emerald to transfer the item into the latter. Oh, and it turns out that the Eon Ticket can only be transferred from an RS cartridge five times or less, and this data is saved independently of your save file, so if you've bought a used copy of Ruby & Sapphire just to get an Eon Ticket into Emerald, you have to hope to Arceus that nobody's transferred five Eon Tickets from it already.
  • Special Effects Failure: The Pokémon animations in Emerald are considered lackluster even for its time period, with the animations being mostly limited to resizing the sprites, alongside rotating/flipping and glowing effects. It says something that Crystal's sprite animations were much more dynamic.
  • That One Attack: Flannery's Torkoal knows Attract, which will cause the target to not do anything 50% of the time if they are of the opposite gender. Since Torkoal is naturally bulky, it'll almost always be able to get one off and proceed to elongate the battle while you try to hit it unless you brought a female or genderless Rock-/Ground-/Water-type. Good luck if you wanted to use Mudkip, since they have a gender ratio of 7 males to 1 female!
  • That One Boss:
    • Norman. This guy is only the fifth gym leader, yet he has two Slaking, which have the highest attack stat of any non-legendary Pokémon up to then and a ton of HP. Even though they can only attack every other turn, they are still capable of KOing a Pokémon in one hit depending on their defense. He also has a Vigoroth, which is less powerful but pretty fast, able to attack before most other Pokémon you probably own, and isn't crippled by Truant. Finally, all three Pokémon come equipped with Facade, an attack that doubles in power if the user is poisoned, burned, or paralyzed. Norman in Emerald isn't too shabby either. He may have replaced one of his Slaking with Spinda and Linoone, but those two can certainly be annoying in their own way; Spinda has Psybeam to cause trouble for your precious Fighting-types, while Linoone becomes a frightening Glass Cannon if left unchecked with Belly Drum and its high speed. Fortunately, the fight is easier in the remakes, as you can use status ailments effectively without getting completely clobbered for it. However, their Retaliate can still potentially take down a Pokémon in the event that one of them goes down, assuming that you can survive their attacks otherwise. Let's just say that dad meant it when he said he won't hold back even when he's up against his own child.
    • Winona uses Flying-types, and her last Pokémon is an Altaria which knows the deadly combo of Earthquake and Dragon Dance, which she can't learn at the level you fight her, setting her up perfectly to sweep your entire team with powered-up Earthquake and STAB Aerial Ace techniques, the latter of which never misses. What's more baffling is the fact that Altaria even knows Earthquake, since it can only learn it via a TM, but in-game, the TM for that move isn't obtainable until much later. Because of this, if the player isn't aware of this, they'll be in for a rude awakening if they plan on using an Electric or Rock Pokémon to sweep through her gym, since Electric and Rock Pokémon can normally take out Flying Pokémon with ease, but they are both weak against Ground type moves. Plus, Altaria is part Dragon-type, neutralizing its weakness to Electric-type moves. She's also the first leader to use Full Restores, which restore health and cure ailments. Fortunately, it's easier in the remakes where you get access to Latias and Latios respectively, which can potentially exploit Altaria's Dragon weakness and is immune to Earthquake due to their abilites. Alternatively, get the Dazzling Gleam TM from the Fairy Tale Girl on Route 123.
    • Tate and Liza in Emerald. It's fought in a Double Battle, a brand-new mechanic not seen much prior to this fight, which requires much more strategy than Single Battles. In Ruby and Sapphire, their team only consisted of two Pokémon (meaning you could, in theory, defeat them in one hit). These two Pokemon, incidentally, have a much stronger physical defense than most of the Psychic types you are used to fighting. This time around, however... You first need to fight through a Xatu (which can either use Confuse Ray on your fighters or Calm Mind to jack up its stats, aside from flat-out attacking with Psychic) and a Claydol, which spams Earthquake and AncientPower. The best part? Earthquake hits everything on the field, but thanks to their team choices, you're the only one who will get hit by it. Then there's Solrock and Lunatone you have to deal with. Solrock will use Sunny Day to power up its Flamethrower, reduce the effectiveness of Water-type attacks against them and instantly use SolarBeam, as well as attacking with Psychic, while Lunatone will put up Light Screen (Claydol knows it, too) to raise the opposing team's already high Special Defense, put you to sleep with Hypnosis, and do the same Calm Mind/Psychic combo as Xatu. The team is also prone to using moves (such as the aforementioned Claydol's Earthquake) that hit both of your Pokémon at once, raising the stakes that much higher.
    • Juan from Emerald is really annoying to defeat primarily due to his Kingdra, similar to Clair from Pokémon Gold and Silver. Except his Kingdra is much harder to defeat. This is because not only is Kingdra hard on its own, since the only moves that are super effective against it are just other Dragon moves, but it knows Ice Beam, which will deal 4x damage to almost every Dragon type in the game, so having a Dragon Pokémon on your team is very risky. Other things that make it hard to defeat include it knowing Rest, while it's holding a Chesto Berry so that it can recover its health without Juan using a Full Restore right away. Similar to Clair's Kingdra knowing Smokescreen, it knows Double Team so that you will almost never be able to strike it if you allow it to use it, which is even worse than Clair because Smokescreen only affects a single Pokémon at a time while Double Team makes it hard for everyone to strike. One of the few saving graces is that it doesn't know Dragon Breath, a move that has a 30% chance of paralyzing the opponent and making them move last, being replaced with Water Pulse, a move that has a 30% chance of causing confusion which wears off after a few turns, and Rest replaces Hyper Beam from Clair's Kingdra. Basically, Juan's Kingdra is harder to defeat because its move combination makes it both offensive and tactical. On a smaller note, his Whiscash will be a pain to defeat due to being immune to Electric moves and being only weak to Grass moves, especially if he switches in-game so that electric moves won't do a thing.
  • That One Level:
    • Hoenn's Victory Road is generally regarded as the most tedious in the entire series due to the absurd 5 HM requirements necessary to get through the place quickly — (Waterfall and Flash are not required, but make it more convenient) — forcing players to replace one or two of their Pokémon with ones that know HM moves, thereby limiting their options against the local trainers. It is also the most challenging Victory Road to grind levels in, due to the majority of the Pokémon inside being either basic-stage — (frequently using Roar/Whirlwind to thereby deny you any experience points) — or just mostly Confuse Ray-happy Golbat.
    • Though a tad bit easier in the remakes due to the Nintendo 3DS engine allowing diagonal movement, Wallace's Sootopolis Gym is full of ice tiles that must be walked upon in a specific path in order to get to the Gym Leader.
    • Dungeons containing puzzles involving steering the difficult-to-control Mach Bike. Rare, but frustrating.
  • That One Sidequest: Finding Feebas and evolving it into Milotic. You can read the full summary here, but in short, it involves hours and hours of systematic searching, endless fishing, finding/breeding a Feebas with the right nature once you've found a Feebas tile, and lots of Berry farming and Pokéblock making. At least it's easier than in Generation IV where the Feebas tiles get scrambled every day rather than by something reasonably under your control. Averted in the remakes, where Feebas can be found on any tiles (but has a lower encounter rate to compensate).
  • They Changed It, Now It Sucks!: When originally released, there was no hint of a Generation I remake, meaning that around 184 Pokémon were completely absent from the games. The only hint that they would return was their isolated data, which usually indicates event Pokémon (a very beloved game mechanic). That, combined with a number of expies for the missing Pokémon, the National Pokédex not being available from the start as it was in Generation II, replacements for Team Rocket, no way to return to Kanto or Johto, minimal time-based events, and an overall similar structure to Generation I, led many fans to think the release of Ruby/Sapphire was a franchise reboot, and said fans were not happy.
  • They Wasted a Perfectly Good Character: More like a character type, but Surskit had a unique and useful Bug/Water-typenote  held back by the low stats that came with it being a first stage evolution. Then its evolution Masquerain lost that typing in lieu of the weak and uninspired Bug/Flying-type. It took until Pokémon Sun and Moon, over 13 years later, to get fully evolved Bug/Water-types that could utilize the type's potential.
  • Tier-Induced Scrappy: Any Fire-type in the Hoenn dex not named Blaziken. The ones native to Mt. Chimney are very slow and have mediocre stat spreads; the Slugma and Numel lines in particular have their defensive stats hampered by their crippling weakness to Water-type attacks (and this is Hoenn/Too Much Water, making that weakness even more of an issue than normal). The Vulpix line is the least terrible of them, but their late-joining time and the limited availability of evolution stones can make things more difficult if you want to fit them in your team.
  • Tough Act to Follow:
    • These games also introduced Steven Stone, one of the most popular champions in the series among fans, so much so, that he is considered a Tough Act to Follow among the subsequent champions (although many would argue that Cynthia in the following generation subverted the trope.) While Blue and Lance did have a diverse team, and tried to stop the villainous team respectively, it was Steven who really set up this standard.
    • Hoenn contests are quite popular in the fandom, to the point of other sidequests in future games being frequently compared to it.
  • Unconventional Learning Experience: Obtaining the Regis requires the player to learn some Braille.
  • Unfortunate Character Design:
    • Castform's very unfortunate "cloud" looks like testicles (or alternatively, breasts).
    • Lileep's and Cradily's pink tentacles can easily be mistaken for something else.
    • Combusken's overall shape is uncomfortably phallic.
  • Viewer Species Confusion: A lot of fans consider Poochyena and Mightyena to be dog or canine-based Pokemon and are frequently thought of as wolves, when in fact, they're possibly based on hyenas, hence why they got half of their name from the word 'hyena', are known as the "Bite Pokemon", and have appearances inspired by brown hyenas.
  • Vindicated by History: At the time of their release, Ruby and Sapphire were polarizing for making significant changes to the game mechanics and for only a handful of earlier Pokémon being available without trading with then-unreleased titles. Most fans these days appreciate the games and Game Freak for understandably changing the often slapdash code of the previous generations into something more manageable, while introducing new mechanics that improved battles, and only wished that the other design flaws could be fixed by a remake. Thankfully, many fans rejoiced when the news came that remakes were made, Pokémon Omega Ruby and Alpha Sapphire.
Advertisement:

    Gen VI: Omega Ruby and Alpha Sapphire 
  • 8.8: IGN's infamous review of Omega Ruby and Alpha Sapphire was glowing with praise almost through the whole piece, with criticism only reserved for factors like too many required HMs and "too much water," yet the game received a score of 7.8 / 10. This is ironic as "too much water" was one of the most prominent criticisms of the original game long before the review came out.
  • Accidental Innuendo:
    • One of May's idle animations has her bending down, placing her hands on her knees, and stretching her back and leg muscles so they don't get stiff from standing in one spot, which makes it looks like she's twerking.
    • When examining the portals in some Mirage Spots, the game asks you if you want to "put your hand deep in the hole."
    • This excerpt from Courtney's speech before you fight her in the Magma Hideout:
      "...But... ...Now... ...I just... ...want to... ...With you... ...I want to... ...engage... ...You... ...I want to... ...analyze. Ahahaha. ♪"
  • Adorkable:
    • Brendan trades in his Tsundere tendencies from the original games for this instead. He's much friendlier toward the player, and stammers talking to her at times.
    • Maxie's dorkier qualities manage to sneak through in the very rare times he loses his composure. The best examples being his losing animation and how he awkwardly doesn't know how to respond to Courtney's Inelegant Blubbering at the end of the Delta Episode.
    • Courtney shows shades of this, especially when she gets flustered.
  • Alas, Poor Scrappy: The Game Corner has long been controversial among fans for being a Luck-Based Mission and a blatant Money Sink. However, even some people who didn't like the Game Corner are sad that it was closed down, while the message that comes with this only makes it worse.
    "Thank you for all your support over the years. Good Game."
  • Anti-Climax Boss:
    • Archie and Maxie still get hit by this despite being given Mega Evolutions, as Sharpedo and Camerupt are still easy to one-shot when Mega Evolved.
    • Wallace becomes a cakewalk if you use either Primal Reversion. Primal Groudon's Water immunity and teaching it Solarbeam (located easily in the Safari Zone) lets it steamroll through through his entire Gym, while Primal Kyogre can abuse 100% accurate Thunders to one-shot everything except Whiscash (which can't take a Origin Pulse).
    • Zinnia. In the second battle with her, she has her own unique battle theme and five powerful Dragon-types... which are all rendered moot due to the significantly higher-leveled Mega Rayquaza you obtained just before battling her. Dragon Ascent will oneshot her Goodra, Altaria, and Noivern while Dragon Pulse will take care of Tyrantrum and Mega Salamence. Even if you decide not to use Rayquaza, her team isn't anything special and will faint to Ice-type attacks just as fast. More so when you use any Fairy-type against her.
    • After the fight with Zinnia you go into space to confront Deoxys. Unless you are trying to capture it right there, which may take some time due to the low capture rate, the same uber-powerful Mega Rayquaza will just knock it out with just about any move in its arsenal. That is, if Deoxys doesn't one-shot you first.
    • After beating the Elite Four and returning for a rematch, they get much higher leveled teams, better Pokémon, and Mega Evolutions, making them a significantly higher threat...except for Steven, who's worse. Though his team has the second highest levels in the game (behind Wally's final team), likely to be 5-10 levels higher than the player even if they've been using the Game-Breaker Exp Share, it suffers heavily from Poor, Predictable Rock. Four of his team have the same common weakness: Water. None of them, with the exception of Aerodactyl, have any Electric or Grass moves, and on top of all that they're fairly slow, making it a cinch to sweep them with a Water Pokémon. On top of that, his strong fossil Pokémon are replaced by an Aerodactyl (which is still rather good) and a Carbink with an offensive moveset!
  • Author's Saving Throw:
    • As noted on their character sheets, Archie and Maxie's plans in the original games had some holes in them. Archie wants to increase global sea levels by summoning torrential rains to flood the world, and thinks this is a good thing; Maxie wants to make Mt. Chimney erupt in order to expand the landmass, despite the volcano being in the middle of the continent (Team Aqua's plans for the volcano in Sapphire make even less sense, and don't even fit with their overall plan for Kyogre). Also, don't even get into how they plan to use a meteorite to somehow force an eruption/render it dormant. The remakes retcon that Team Aqua is an Animal Wrongs Group who want to raise sea levels to return the world to nature, so they don't care about the destruction of land-based human cities, and the Mt. Chimney plan for both is retconned to them trying to harness the volcano's power to transform the meteorite into an artificial Mega Stone.
    • Previous remakes had some issues when it came to certain evolution and trading methods. FireRed and LeafGreen had it so that you were unable to obtain Pokémon that evolve via friendshipnote  or through trading with a held itemnote  until after obtaining the National Dex, in addition to preventing gamers from being able to trade with the original Ruby, Sapphire, and Emerald until completing a sidequest that's very late in the postgame. The games also lacked a day/night cycle, which meant no Umbreon or Espeon either. Adding to that is how HeartGold and SoulSilver, while fixing the issues FRLG had, had no access to location-based evolutions, which meant no Glaceon, Leafeon, Probopass or Magnezone. OmegaRuby and AlphaSapphire allows all different evolution methods right from the start. note 
    • While not the first game to do this, Ruby and Sapphire were the games that established the tradition of giving the starters secondary types, and more importantly, a moveset that allowed them to utilise their secondary type. Poor Treecko, however, remained pure Grass all throughout its evolution family. The Gen 6 remakes fix this by giving Sceptile a secondary type during its Mega Evolution... Dragon type. Sure enough, Sceptile gets to learn Dual Chop and has access to Dragon Claw via TM.
    • The National Dex is unlocked prior to Victory Road. This allows the trainers in Victory Road to use Pokémon that they didn't have access to in the originals, and also allows the Elite Four to be a little less of an anti climax. Similarly the rematch of the Elite Four is also well received since they all cover their weaknesses and use a much more diverse set of Pokémon.
  • Base-Breaking Character: Shares a page with the rest of the franchise.
  • Big-Lipped Alligator Moment:
    • Like in X and Y, an event pops up if you have the Mythical Pokémon Diancie. It's similar to that event: two people want your Diancie for their master, then their master comes and lets you keep your Diancie. This is how you get Diancie's Mega Stone. It can feel even odder if you activate the event early enough; your character doesn't know anything about Mega Evolution, or possibly that it even exists!
    • On top of the Sky Pillar with Zinnia, she knocks you out. For no reason (except for allowing the next cutscene to be set at a specific time of day). She doesn't get anything out of it, and after she apologizes it isn't brought up again (barring the fans, who placed her instantly into Memetic Molester for it).
    • The Legendary Pokémon themselves. Though, downplayed, because of the implied explanation as to why all these dark portals are spawning all over Hoenn is that it is Hoopa's doing, potentially in its new Unbound Forme. Though, they serve no story purpose, and only a handful of the dozens of them are hinted at by an NPC, like Flannery and Heatran, or Regigigas with a girl who gives a vague hint at Pacifidlog Town.
    • Looker's appearance in the game is this. He randomly washes up on the beach at the Battle Resort with amnesia, and after being brought into a cabin gives the player a Mega Stone. Sounds like a set up for a sizable sidequest of some sort, right? Nope, nothing more ever comes of this incident. The sudden appearance and amnesia may be explained by certain post-game reveals in Pokémon Sun and Moon... but it's still incredibly strange within ORAS themselves.
  • Broken Base:
    • The Delta Episode. There are those who think it's a fantastic addition to the game, with an engaging story, and are happy that it focuses on a tragic and interesting character like Zinnia. Then there are those who think it's incredibly tedious - (not to mention the constant back and forth travels between locations, just for someone to tell you something they could have easily told you over the phone) - and that it should have focused on a character that is less irritating and creepy. And some fans like the story, but still hate all the backtracking involved.
    • A common debate is whether these games or X and Y are the superior Gen VI games. Supporters of X and Y tend to enjoy the hugely expanded Pokédex and the return of Gen I favorites, Trainer customization, the Friend Safari and the Kalos region itself. Supporters of ORAS cite the wider variety of features, more balanced difficulty, greater level of polish, more extensive postgame, wider variety of obtainable starters and legendaries, and the Delta Episode. Of note is the fact that both sets of games attempt to pander to nostalgic fans, albeit in different ways, and also have deeper and more involved plots than previous Pokémon games.
    • Similarly, fans are divided on whether Emerald or ORAS are the definitive Hoenn games, thanks to the latter games not reflecting most of the changes from RS in the former outside of a few Mythology Gags. The merged storyline, ability to get all three mascot Legendaries, higher difficulty, rematchable Gym Leaders, and, of course, the Battle Frontier are cited in Emerald's favor, while the separate but expanded storylines, later-generation improvements, expanded Dex, improved Pokénav, Secret Bases and Contests, enormous selection of postgame starters and Legendaries and Soaring are seen as the better trade-off for ORAS fans.
    • Overall, fans are divided on whether ORAS are among the best games in the series for their sheer amount of features and content and for expanding on the originals while retaining some of the better-received features from X and Y, or still fall short due to retaining some flaws from Ruby and Sapphire and not having the beloved Battle Frontier from Emerald, resulting in a decent but not amazing postgame unlike those of HGSS and B2W2.
  • Casual/Competitive Conflict:
    • As with all the more recent games, this is full swing among a chunk of the player base, but this time it gets referenced in-game, but from the competitive perspective. A man in the Battle Resort outright tells the player that in order to be the best Trainer, they may not always be able to use Pokémon they like - the exact opposite of what NPCs in the games usually say. The man's daughter even has a Garchomp, a Pokémon that has excelled in competitive battling since its introduction; she even explicitly says she borrowed it from him so she could do better.
    • Made even further notable after you win 50 straight matches in any given Super Battle in the Battle Maison. Wally will appear in the Battle Maison and challenge the player, starting with a more powerful version of his team from Victory Road, but battle him again and he'll be rocking a team that looks like it was ripped straight from a Smogon OU match! He even thinks to himself between matches what changes he needs to make to his team to make it stronger.
  • Common Knowledge: The belief that Devon and Mauville were killing Pokémon to create Infinity Energy. It's actually said ingame to come from "deep sea minerals" which are implied to be Pokémon that were long dead and fossilized. If anything, the use of Infinity Energy is more of an allegory for fossil fuels.
  • Creepy Awesome:
    • Deoxys. Its entrance is mostly the former (with a touch of the latter), while the battle itself that ensues is moreso the latter.
    • Courtney. She talks like a robot and fans love her for her pure unhinged-ness.
  • Ensemble Dark Horse: Every single one of the updated admins.
    • Courtney amongst a lot of the player-base, for her robotic yet Creepy Awesome mannerisms and her characterization as a Yandere.
    • Tabitha, on the other hand, is now regarded as more of a Laughably Evil villain. Redesign aside, he subsequently becomes more of a semi-Anti-Villain, during the Delta Episode postgame. His fans also like to characterize him as a Butt-Monkey.
    • Shelly, for being a flirtatious Ms. Fanservice Dark Action Girl, getting love from boy and girl players alike.
    • Matt, for exuding insane amounts of Ho Yay with several male characters, as well as providing a bunch of hilarious lines.
    • Gabby & Ty are also popular as you can see in forums and Youtube videos. Many players of the game loved battling the duo countless times. Fans have also claimed that they enjoy battling the two to level up their Pokemon and complete their Pokedex.
  • Even Better Sequel: To X and Y note . X and Y, while lauded, suffered from a few issues such as an inconsistent framerate, overly easy difficulty, poor pacing, an over-reliance on old Pokémon, and a barren postgame. ORAS's graphics and framerate have a bit more polish, the difficulty is a bit more balanced, the plot is more coherent and better-paced (allowing the characters to be more fleshed out), Gen III Pokémon are front and center just like in the originals, and there are many new postgame features including the Delta Episode and more past starters and legendaries. All of these double as improvements over the original Ruby and Sapphire, and many fans cite ORAS as the ideal versions of the Hoenn games, resulting in a notable Broken Base over how well they hold up compared to Emerald (long considered one of the best games in the franchise).
  • Fan-Preferred Couple:
    • Really, you'll be hard-pressed trying to find someone who doesn't ship Archie/Maxie.
    • By extension, Matt/Tabitha and Shelly/Courtney, collectively known as Maqua.
    • Brendan/May was a pretty big one in the original games, and its popularity seems to have been acknowledged in the remakes, where it's practically canon.
    • Brendan/Courtney shows up fairly often in fan artwork. This may be influenced by Pokémon Adventures, where it's outright canon from her side. Not to mention Courtney's Yandere tinted interactions with the player character in the remakes.
    • Wally/May was a minor ship back in Ruby and Sapphire, come the remakes and it started picking up steam, likely due to Wally's increased popularity as a character.
  • Foe Yay:
    • Matt has a good bit of it with Tabitha in the demo.
    • Shelly and the player character. Same with Matt regardless of gender.
    • "Once Courtney sets her interest on someone or something, she never gives up in pursuing it". And one of her 'interests' is you.
  • Fountain of Memes:
    • Mega Swampert's super buff appearance has been subject to all kinds of memes, such as parodies of online "get buff quick" ads. It also gets paired up with Ike and Knuckles.
      I herd u leik murder!
    • Mega Slowbro almost immediately spawned tons of jokes concerning its appearance. Some of the more popular ones compare it to a spinning top (or a Beyblade) or poking fun at how it shouldn't be able to keep itself upright.
  • Game-Breaker:
    • The Exp. Share allows every pokemon in your team to gain the experience whenever you win a battle, significantly cutting down on grinding.
    • Once you make it to the eastern half of Route 118, you and Steven are enlisted by Latias or Latios (depending on which version you are playing) on a plot-mandatory sidequest to Southern Island to defend their sibling from either Team Magma or Team Aqua. After a Multi Battle that you shouldn’t have any trouble winning at the point you’re currently at in the game, Latios or Latias will join your party, already equipped with their Mega Stone. You also get the Mega Bracelet from Steven after clearing the sidequest, enabling you to use Mega Evolution. With Mega Evolution already being a game-breaker in-game, you now have access to a Pokémon whose stats completely outclass next to every other Pokémon in the game in its base form, AND can Mega Evolve to power up further. The icing on the cake is that if you obtained the Eon Ticket from Streetpass, you can actually revisit Southern Island to catch the Eon sibling that you didn’t get from the sidequest. And with the ultra-diverse movepools that both Latias and Latios have, say goodbye to any and all challenge in the main story!
    • Mega Rayquaza has become infamous as one of the most broken Pokémon in the series. It not only has a ridiculously powerful new signature move in Dragon Ascent, but it can Mega Evolve without a Mega Stone — it only needs to know that signature move. This lets it use another held item such as Life Orb, effectively making it an unencumbered 800 BST Pokémon. Furthermore, its ability Delta Stream cancels out its Flying-type weaknesses, halving its Ice weakness and removing the Rock weakness. Topping that is Dragon Dance/Swords Dance to skyrocket its already high Attack and Speed. Mega Rayquaza is so strong that it broke Smogon's tier system, because even in the "Uber" tiernote , it could deal a One-Hit KO to most of the Olympus Mons with one turn of set-up or 2-hit KO anything else that survives its wrath with no significant retaliation. This forced the website not only to make a new metagame called "Anything Goes" with all restrictions and clauses they've previously enforced removed (with the exception of the Endless Battle Clause, which is solely because things like Funbro are intended to piss people off), but to make Ubers into a full-blown tier. All because of Mega Rayquaza.
    • Mega Salamence. It has nice offensive boosts (including a Special Attack boost that now makes running mixed or Special sets entirely feasible), a 20-point Speed boost (putting it among the most well- known fast Pokemon such as Alakazam and Sceptile), a godly ability (Aerilate, which gives a 1.3 boost (1.2 as of Sun and Moon) to its Normal-converted-Flying type attacks, on top of STAB), and a 50-point Defense boost. At 130 Defense, this makes it better than most dedicated walls. Coupled with its existing tools, Mega Salamence can easily wipe out teams while shrugging off everything but Ice-type attacks. Smogon banned it from their OU tier in less than a month, and later from their Doubles format, a metagame with far fewer bans than OUnote . It has already thereafter made a name for itself as one of the single biggest terrors in Ubers, considered on par with horrors like Xerneas and Arceus.
    • The new DexNav app on the Touch screen. It lets you see what Pokémon are in the area, which ones you've already caught etc. It operates by Pokémon appearing on the overworld, like shaking grass in previous games. But that's not all it does. Every time you encounter a Pokémon, that relevant Pokémon's DexNav entry gains a level. As it gains levels you'll gain an increased chance to run into a member of that species that has egg moves or up to three perfect IVs or even Hidden Abilities. Imagine a Taillow with Brave Bird or a Poochyena with Play Rough before you even reach the first gym.
    • One notable Pokémon for the DexNav is Pelipper. A common occurrence while surfing, you can find them holding Lucky Eggs. You know, that item that gives a Pokémon an experience boost like a traded Pokémon, that was barely available in the first four Gens because it was rarely found on the rare Chansey, while even recent Gens have only given you one? Just get a Pokémon with Covet or Thief (the latter of which you can get as a TM from an Aqua/Magma grunt early in the game), and in a bit of time, you'll be able to equip your entire team with Lucky Eggs!
    • After the player deals with the Primal Legendary, all non-Hoenn Pokémon in the game become available, including the numerous Legendaries the games boast. It's possible to fight the Elite Four with a team of level 50 legendaries (the same level as the weakest Elite Four member) without doing any trading.
    • Mega Evolutions in contests. They get extra points using maximum appeal over every other weakling that can't go Mega (unless it's Lisia). This is perhaps the only true area in the game where every Mega Evolution is really a real Game Breaker no matter who it is.
    • Secret Bases have been given more functionality in which you can now actually sleep in beds to fully heal your Pokemon. This can potentially reduce the difficulty of the longer more challenging routes.
    • The Makuhita/Hariyama line is really too damn good for the player to help complete Hoenn's story; especially if the player gets it at the earliest point possible with the in-game trade to get it before the first badge, which in turn, gives the player an already powerful attack and health stat Pokémon better experience gain. To explain, apart from Elite Four Drake's dragons, the sumo Pokémon can do the following:
      • Makes the 1st Rock gym an easy breeze. Serves as a good alternative in the 2nd Fighting gym. Destroys the 3rd gym's best Pokémon due to Magneton's secondary steel-type (plus having a Magnemite). A solid fighter against the 4th gym if Thick Fat is involved. Makes the 5th Normal gym an easy breeze, and can easily tank Slaking's powerful Retaliate due to Hariyama's high health stat. Serves as a possible alternative in the 6th Flying gym to take on Swellow or Skarmory due to their normal and steel secondary-types. Serves as a possible alternative in the 7th Psychic gym since both Lunatone and Solrock have a secondary rock-type. At worst, the AI will be smart enough to both use Psychic on Hariyama. Serves as a good alternative in the 8th Water gym.
      • Makes the Dark-type Elite Four trainer an easy breeze. Makes the Ghost-type Elite Four trainer an easy breeze, because Hariyama is capable of learning dark-type moves, such as Knock Off. Makes the Ice-type Elite Four trainer an easy breeze. Makes for a good alternative against the Hoenn Champion due to Steven Stone using Pokémon that have some Rock and Steel-typings apart from Claydol. But even for Claydol, you'll probably still be running Knock Off to use against it.
  • Goddamned Bats: The Geodude family are even more annoying now, since the Sturdy ability now lets them survive attacks that are powerful enough to knock it out in one hit. So unless you have multi hit moves, they will land a hit on you before going down, or even worse, use Selfdestruct or Explosion before you can knock it out.
  • Goddamned Boss: Deoxys. Before you encounter it, you have to sit through about ten minutes worth of cutscenes, capturing Rayquaza, a final trainer battle, and more cutscenes, all with no chance to save before the Deoxys encounter. Once you finally reach it, it buffs its normally paper-thin defenses to incredible heights using Cosmic Power and then continually heals itself using Recover. On top of that, it has the minimum catch rate. Fortunately, you can choose to knock it out or run away and come back later to catch it at a more convenient time.
    • Deoxys is also a problem on the reverse side, because Mega Rayquaza, as noted above in Game-Breaker, can likely OHKO it no problem. The problem is trying to catch it then and there if you don't know you can catch it later or want to catch it with the epic atmosphere. You have to keep going through all of those cutscenes and battles over and over again if you take out Deoxys or, more likely, it takes itself out with Struggle after thawing out of Freeze no less than six times in the battle and still not catching even when frozen.
  • Harsher in Hindsight:
    • In both the original games and the remakes, Phoebe's trainer message on her Trainer's Eye profile is "I wonder how my grandma is doing at Mt. Pyre". Unless you lose against the Elite Four, you're not going to see this until afterwards. You can run into her again at Mt. Pyre once you've beaten them - she'll be chatting with a ghost and might mention that you've left a good impression on her grandmother...and the man who guards the orbs with his wife is alone.
    • In the remakes, Zinnia insists on not using the Link Cable to transport the massive meteor to another Universe (the one from the original games), because the people of that Hoenn might not be able to deal with it. She then smashes the device and forces you to come up with another solution. Come Pokémon Sun and Moon, where it is strongly implied that the original universe's Hoenn, or at least its Battle Frontier, was attacked by the Ultra Beasts. Note (contains spoilers) 
  • Hilarious in Hindsight: Check the main page.
  • It's the Same, Now It Sucks!:
    • In the post-game, the Battle Maison re-appears, in a new location known as the Battle Resort. While there are vague hints in game of the Battle Frontier being under construction, and the Multi Battle characters being replaced along with the ability to partner with people on your friend list and Wally appearing as a secret opponent, the Battle Maison uses the exact same battle artwork and 3D models as the X and Y one (though the dialogue is different); as if it's simply been copied and pasted. Even the Pokémon in the normal battles are the exact same! To a lot of fans, including the Maison as opposed to the Frontier, or even the Battle Tower, is a very lazy move, especially when it looks so blatantly lifted from X and Y. This has caused some debate on whether the absence of the Battle Frontier is enough to bring the games down despite all the other features and improvements.
    • With Pokémon-Amie and Super Training in which they did not even attempt to change a single thing. This would have been a good opportunity to add more Pokémon-Amie mini-games or at least try and fix the face-recognition issue that many players had, or even remove the constant pop-ups on PSS that suggest you trade or battle with someone.
    • On a meta-level, some fans who played the original were expecting a more-direct Time Skip sequel that sets long after the original Ruby and Sapphire (akin to Pokémon Black 2 and White 2), only to find out Omega Ruby and Alpha Sapphire were remakes with similar storylines they knew before, and even with some changes couldn't put off their frustration. Whenever Delta Episode could put off this flame is up for question.
  • It Was His Sled: Thanks in part to the nature of a previously nigh-unobtainable Pokémon becoming catchable no matter the real life time period, most people know that Deoxys is the Final Boss of the Delta Episode.
  • Launcher of a Thousand Ships: Archie. His main ships are with you, Matt, Maxie, and Shelly.
  • Les Yay:
    • If you play as May, Lisia will practically crush hard over you when she scouts you for the Contests.
    • Shelly also gets lines that potentially could be taken as this with May, and Courtney still acts like a Yandere.
    • There's also two girls locked in room 2 on Sea Mauville doing...something. The first girl is bewildered at how you got in despite the fact that she locked the door, and gives you the Room 6 Key to go away. She defends herself by claiming that she's busy "teaching the girl the difficulties of being a trainer!", while the other girl just blushes. The "Teammates" class trainers are often this, really. One of the earlier ones outright calls her partner cute.
      Girl 1: I was teaching this girl how hard it is to be a trainer!
      Girl 2: *Blush*
  • Memetic Badass:
    • Mega Swampert may have skipped leg day, but he is already everybody's "bruh".
    • Mega Rayquaza. So badass that Smogon banned it from its unofficial Ubers ruleset. It's the Olympus Mon that even the other Olympus Mons don't want to fight.
      Rayquaza: I came. I fucked Ubers up. I left.
  • Memetic Molester:
    • Zinnia, who knocks the player character out on top of Sky Pillar — an action that fans quickly made NSFW assumptions about. Her sudden wide-eyed Slasher Smile in the overworld and during battle only reinforces this repuation.
    • Courtney, who seems incredibly fascinated with "analyzing" the player, has gathered this reputation.
    • The Bug Maniac trainer class for looking rather shady with their Scary Shiny Glasses and creepy Slasher Smile. It doesn't help that they are excitedly sweating and holding a large bug catching net.
  • Memetic Mutation:
    • The general reaction to the announced remakes? "HOENN CONFIRMED!!1!" (Plus many mentions of the trumpets.)
    • Mega Swampert: "Do you even lift, bro?" It was a wimp before anchor arms. Now it's a jerk and everybody loves it.
    • Wallace's Stripperific redesign has become a common topic to make jokes about.
    • Team Magma and Aqua's redesigns make them look like Nerds and Dumb Jocks, respectively. This has led many people to make fun of their stereotypes, such as having Team Magma solve problematic equations, and to have Team Aqua solve their problems by doing manly (and sometimes stupid) things.
    • IGN's review of Alpha Sapphire: "Too much water!"Explaination  This has hilariously led them to be compared to Team Magma and their own anti-water campaign.
      • Another common joke is that Groudon is the one who wrote the review, pissing Kyogre off.
      • From the same review, "7.8/10" has already become subject to jokes and mockery.
      • Saying "7.8/10. Too much X" where X is something that gets focus in a work is also popular.
      • Pokémon Sun and Moon even put this meme into the Poke Finder's comments section.
    • Being such an absurd Game-Breaker, Mega Rayquaza (see above) got the nickname "BALANCE DRAGON" and led to jokes about how bringing it down to standard tiers would instantly balance the Metagame.
    • Expect to see a lot of memes involving Flygon getting abused due to not having a Mega Evolution (e.g. Garchomp licking its tears, etc) or the way the Garchompite is obtained through Aarune.
    • Mega Sceptile's tail is a Christmas tree.
  • Misblamed: Many fans are complaining about Gym Leaders supposedly being made easier since Emerald, not realising that it was actually Emerald that made the Gym Leaders harder compared to the original Ruby and Sapphire, which the remakes follow.
  • Moral Event Horizon: As primarily exemplified through the notice board near the entrance, Sea Mauville's management were so hellbent on getting their hands on the Infinity Energy-filled deep-sea minerals that had made Devon such a rich company, they worked their employees to exhaustion and insanity, not caring for the wellbeing of their employees in the slightest, let alone their lives. They also didn't balk at tearing through Pokémon habitats to get at their goal, which is what ultimately got the project pulled—Wattson had the patience of a saint through the whole ordeal, until that happened, and his better angels firmly convinced him to call the whole thing off as a result.
  • Older Than They Think:
    • The concept of being able to fly in the skies freely was first introduced in Pokémon Ranger: Guardian Signs. You could even summon either Latios or Latias to instantly go to the skies there.
    • The world being threatened by an oncoming meteor and needing Rayquaza to shatter it was a major story point in the first Pokémon Mystery Dungeon game.
    • The Johto starters, Lugia and Ho-Oh are all made available along with other starters and legendaries during the late game/postgame, but they were previously obtainable in Emerald under very specific and difficult circumstances.
    • Groudon and Kyogre aren't the first Primal Pokemon of the franchise. That honor goes to Primal Dialga.
  • Paranoia Fuel: Somehow, the newscasters featured in BuzzNav know almost everything about you. Though it's played a little softer when you realize that updating your BuzzNav is actually your character is sending his/her info to the station deliberately. After all, that's what you as the player are actually doing.
  • Player Punch: The characterization of Wally in the post-game. Took a Level in Badass aside, he slowly becomes a serious battler with the most competitive mons with the best abilities, moves and items, while battling you without (or with less) heart of that than when you fought prior to the Elite Four (which can be seen from the absence of Altaria and Delcatty), not to mention his speech pattern (at least in the Japanese version) becomes less friendly. Also, there are words in the Battle Resort that imply he hatched eggs in bulk, probably for the aforementioned team...Some old players may found his change in the remakes unsettling, or a direct punch in the face when they realize that Wally is basically retracing the same path as the player may have in becoming a competitive Pokémon battler...
  • Rescued from the Scrappy Heap:
    • The rival, May/Brendan, was widely regarded as one of the worst in the series, battle-wise, in the original games, since their starter never reaches its final form. In these games, not only do they have a more fleshed-out characterisation, but that complaint has been addressed: in Lilycove the Rival will use their fully evolved starter, and the rest of their team gets a big improvement too. They also become the Post-Final Boss the first time you beat the game... and they use a Mega Evolution!
    • Team Magma and Team Aqua. Many complained that their original motives were fairly stupid. Now their motives are more fleshed-out, Team Magma are pro-human Visionary Villains while Team Aqua is an Animal Wrongs Group. Aqua in particular actually has their buffoonery played up and made kind of endearing, though the lower-rank Magma guys get moments too.
    • The Admins of both teams, who had next to no characterisation originally, bland designs and were pretty much Elite Mooks at best. Now... well, just look at the Ensemble Dark Horse entries above.
    • Also, in the story quest, Voltorb/Electrode, which is now obtainable as soon as you get to Route 110. That, and coupled with the buffs it received throughout the generations makes it better than it was in the originals stats-wise.
    • Beedrill was often seen as a Crutch Character and only evolved from Weedle and Kakuna to get through the early stages of the game, suffering from low stats all around because a lot of the designated early available Pokémon are made weaker as a trade-off to being easy to catch. That all changed when it got its Mega Evolution, which beefed up its Attack and Speed stats to monstrous levels and gave it a fighting chance. The only real drawbacks are that its Special Attack is now a complete joke (not that Beedrill had much use for it anyway) and its unchanged HP, Defense and Special Defense leave it a Glass Cannon.
    • While the cultural reference to Japanese Mythology is appreciated, Scorched Slab is often derided in the originals for being a small cave containing nothing but the one-time use Sunny Day TM. The remakes turned it into a full-fledged dungeon containing valuables such as Charizardite Y and Heatran.
    • Ever since its debut in Pokémon Black and White, Serperior was mocked for being one of the weakest starter Pokémon in the series, even for in-game purposes. With ORAS, its Hidden Ability of Contrary was finally released as an event, causing it to become one of the strongest starters in the series in competitive play.
  • The Scrappy: Shares a page with the rest of the franchise.
  • Scrappy Mechanic:
    • While the ability to catch every non-event Legendary Pokémon not in X and Y is very convenient, there are some catches. First, some of the Legendary Pokémon can only be encountered if you have a set of Legendary Pokémon related to them (or some arbitrary attribute like maxed out EVs). Second, some of the Legendary Pokémon are version exclusive. Finally, some Legendary Pokémon can only be found if you have both version exclusives.note  If you're aren't able to gain the others via trade, which will likely require you to give up one of your version exclusives, or have previous gen games to help you with your transfer, your only option is to have both versions of the game.
    • Arceus' Plates (except for the Iron Plate, which is held by the Beldum that Steven leaves you in the postgame) and the Orbs for the Spacetime Trio are hidden items underwater, and you can't use the Dowsing Machine to locate them. Have fun trying to get them all without a guide. The Scanner is similarly hidden in the basement of Sea Mauville, and you need this to catch Lugia or Ho-Oh and subsequently the Legendary Beasts.
    • Collecting volcanic ash in the original Ruby & Sapphire was relatively easy because every tile of coated grass that you went through was one unit of ash collected; you just needed lots of max repels to get tons of ash without ever being attacked. In Omega Ruby & Alpha Sapphire, collecting volcanic ash is now changed to going through piles which give you between 5-15 grams. Combine this with the fact that there's only 7 piles means that you only collect between 35-105 grams per trip which is far less than what you could collect in the previous version (270 units per trip), requiring you to make many more trips than needed through Route 113.
    • The Search function of the DexNav when used indoors, in caves, or on the water. Instead of staying in one spot, the Pokémon that shows up will randomly hop around the area, making initiating a battle with them a pain because you can't just run up to their spot (you have to do the sneaking action, which makes you go slower). Nearby NPCs can also cause the Pokémon to flee since they're not sneaking, which can make encountering Pokémon in certain areas even more difficult if a Swimmer is nearby the spot the Pokémon decided to spawn. This is made worse when chaining encounters, as the Pokémon start to move much more quickly. Once you procure a chain of five and beyond, the Pokémon emerge for a single second each time and abscond after a mere 4-7 appearances. Since you need to sneak in order to battle them and they have a tendency to jump long distances, potentially not completely emerging for most attempts after the initial appearance, there is a very high chance that Failure Is the Only Option.
    • Obtaining the Destiny Knot. The Destiny Knot is practically essential for breeding Pokemon with good IVs, but the only way you can get it is by either re-matching the couple in Sea Mauville (who only have a 10% chance of giving it to you) or by winning a Master Rank contest (where you have a 1/21 chance of getting it).
  • Sequel Difficulty Drop: The inclusion of the many Anti-Frustration Features, general mechanic changes like the physical/special split introduced in Diamond and Pearl, Mega Evolution, and the new EXP Share make these games much easier than the originals. In addition, Word of God states that the Battle Frontier was cut due to assumptions that it would be too challenging for most players.
  • Sidetracked By The Golden Saucer:
    • The DexNav, a feature that shows what kind of Pokémon can be found in rustling grass and other areas. Since the Pokémon that can potentially be caught may have egg moves, rare items, great stats, or even Hidden Abilities, and the fact that finding more of the same Pokémon will level up the DexNav and increase the likelihood of getting better Pokémon, it can get extremely addictive.
    • Contests return, and they can be just as addictive as before.
    • Hunting down other player's Secret Bases and decorating your own can be very engrossing, especially if you're connected to the internet and can get a healthy stream of Bases from other online players.
  • Strawman Has a Point: During the Delta Episode, Zinnia destroys Cozmo's link cable meant to get rid of the incoming meteor on the basis that a different dimension (implied to be the original Ruby and Sapphire) would be destroyed instead. Cozmo angrily retorts that Zinnia has no proof, which is entirely correct since she refuses to (or legitimately can't) provide evidence that she's right about the existence of sentient life in the other dimension, let alone that the meteor is guaranteed to cause it any damage. Sun and Moon prove her entirely right, which makes it more confusing why she couldn't produce any evidence if she knew the truth about alternate realities.
  • Suspiciously Similar Song:
  • Tainted by the Preview: The remakes were getting a lot of flak for the rather abysmal marketing, which focused almost entirely on Mega Evolution and updated character designs, instead of other mechanics, character and story changes, and other improvements. Soaring wasn't revealed until shortly before the games were released, and Dex Nav was only revealed through some gamer reviews a week before the game's release. Fan opinion has mostly cooled down on the game, but the previews made the games look like Ruby and Sapphire, just with Megas.
  • Take That, Scrappy!: The Safari Zone has long been hated by many for being an unfair Luck-Based Mission, especially since some Pokémon can only be found in the Safari Zone. The remakes reveal that the owner tried to raise the price of admission, and promptly went bankrupt when people stopped coming to the Safari Zone.
  • Tastes Like Diabetes: May for some fans due to getting a hair ribbon, even cuter poses, her chibi model interactions as a rival and getting a Magical Girl-esque contest dress.
  • Tier-Induced Scrappy:
    • Several Megas introduced in these pair of games did not get it as good as the others:
      • Mega Steelix is essentially Mega Aggron, except that its ability is almost completely useless and has an undesirable weakness to Water. While it's slightly bulkier, Mega Aggron has Filter to cushion super effective blows.
      • Mega Latios is so similar to normal Latios (same Speed stat, same ability, the damage output is nearly identical if normal is holding a Life Orb) that it's difficult to justify using the Mega slot on it and considered largely inferior because of it. If you're in a battle where Soul Dew is allowed, there's literally no reason to even consider the Mega since Soul Dew is a direct upgrade that makes Latios hit harder than Deoxys-A and has no opportunity cost.
      • Mega Audino has trouble functioning in Singles matches; it's a Stone Wall that has difficulty keeping itself alive due to having to rely on the inefficient Wish + Protect combination for healing, being extremely passive, not having an ability, and getting a huge amount of competition from Clefable (who has 2 of the best abilities in the game, better defensive typing, can actually threaten the opposing team, and is not a Mega). In Doubles its role as a Cleric is borderline useless due to the more offensive nature of the format being more punishing to more passive Mons, while as a supporter the bulkier, non-Mega Cresselia already exists and can do literally everything you might want to use Mega Audino for (setting up Trick Room, buffing allies with Helping Hand, using Thunder Wave to spread Paralysis).
    • On the opposite end of the spectrum from the above is Mega Rayquaza, who is considered to be even more disgustingly overpowered than Gen I Mewtwo. Unlike every other Mega Evolution, Rayquaza doesn't need to sacrifice its item slot to Mega Evolve, meaning it can boost its speed or offensive prowess (which is very high) with Choice items or a Life Orb. With Delta Stream removing a Flying-type's weaknesses, its initially crippling double weakness to Ice-type attacks is weakened as well, making it tough to take down if one lacks a strong Fairy-type. The closest thing to a nerf it's gotten so far is an inability to Mega Evolve and use a Z-Move. It's telling how strong it is when Smogon made a tier with almost no rules just to contain this thing.
    • Primal Groudon is another high-level Pokémon that earns players' ire. Thanks to its strength, versatility, and Desolate Land completely destroying Water-type moves and making Ground its only weakness, everyone and their grandmother uses it when they can. Unfortunately for Smogon, while it's almost completely broken in Ubers, it's not quite broken enough to be Kicked Upstairs like Mega Rayquaza, having little reliable recovery and slow speed, so it sticks around.
  • That One Boss: While Omega Ruby and Alpha Sapphire are much easier than the originals, Primal Groudon and Primal Kyogre, on the other hand, are quite easily the nastiest legendary mascots you ever have to fight in the main series of video games. Their old abilities Drought and Drizzle have been replaced with Desolate Land and Primordial Sea, which are basically the former abilities on steroids. This is especially the case with Primal Groudon, as its ability makes it completely immune to any and all Water-type moves, and Primal Kyogre is no slacker either as Primordial Sea makes its already powerful Origin Pulse absolutely terrifying, and will tear off huge chunks of health from even Pokémon that resist it. And if you thought that catching them would be a piece of cake like with Reshiram and Zekrom as well as Xerneas and Yveltal in Black/White and X/Y? Nope, because unlike those four, they have the typical ludicrously low Legendary catch rate of 3, which makes them nigh-uncatchable even at one health while afflicted with a status condition while you're using the best Poké Ball for the job. And even lowering their health is a chore in and of itself, as Primal Kyogre packs Aqua Ring to gradually restore its health while Primal Groudon has Rest to not only instantly restore its health completely, but also remove any status conditions as well. Many 3DS's have likely been smashed by furious players that succumb to the wrath of these ancient abominations.
  • That One Level: The fourth Trick House chamber contains no trainers, just a gauntlet of Strength puzzles. Many of them involve moving outside the site of the puzzles to move around obstacles, but the crux is one puzzle involving three blocks. If you move a bit too fast downwards between two of the blocks, you may wind up pushing the wrong block, making you unable to pass through and have to reset the entire room.
  • That One Sidequest:
    • To get Lucarionite, you have to beat every Master Rank Contest, and then beat Lisia in a contest. You can easily do this with a single Pokémon by feeding it Rainbow blocks to max out all its conditions, but learning the AI trainers strategies and patterns is something that takes doing a ton of contests and can sometimes be a crapshoot. Lisia herself can Mega-Evolve her Altaria to score more points if she gets the crowd to maximum excitement, and generally better setups than the other trainers, so even if you're a whiz at contests she can be tricky to outdo.
    • Getting the Garchompite requires you to capture 1000 Secret Base flags. You can only capture a base's flag once a day, so unless you have Secret Base Pals, getting all of those flags will take a long time.
    • To be able to rematch Wally with his improved team, you have to complete a 50-win streak at any Super Battle at the Battle Maison. This in and of itself requires a 20-win streak in normal battles, which is already very time-consuming (if very easy due to the computer's propensity to use unevolved Mons), while the Super Battles are legitimately difficult due to the AI being smarter than the story trainers and using some strategies you'd expect from a Real Life tournament player.
    • Battling Fare Prince Trencherman requires you to defeat all 8 trainers of the Mauville Ramen Bowl battle in the food court in 8 turns. That'a right, you have to beat each of them in one turn. This wouldn't be so bad if it weren't for several of them intentionally trying to waste your turns with luck based strategies. The first opponent hits you with a Choice Scarfed Teeter Dance, confusing your entire field. The second uses three Simple (doubles stat boosts) Woobats with Double Team and holding Brightpowder. Miss once, and you've probably failed the run. And a third uses three Prankser Whimsicotts with Stun Spore, ensuring they Paralyze your Pokémon before you can do anything (and unless you have priority moves of your own, this tactic works regardless of how overleveled you are) essentially giving each of your Pokémon a 25% chance of failing to move and thus, costing your run. And then the second last opponent uses three Imposter Ditto, copying your party stats and all. Can you defeat your own Pokémon in one turn?
  • They Changed It, Now It Sucks!: Minor example: The Elite Four remix in this game lacks the iconic clapping section, to the consternation of many fans. It didn't help that the anime already did a well-received remix that added in more claps to the beginning.
  • They Wasted a Perfectly Good Plot:
    • Unlike the HeartGold and SoulSilver remakes that implemented the chase after Suicune from Crystal, ORAS did not incorporate any of the unique plot developments from Emerald. Meaning that the player never gets to face off against both Team Aqua and Team Magma, or get to challenge Hoenn's Battle Frontier.
      • In addition, the change in Emerald to have Team Magma's main headquarters within Mount Chimney to reach Groudon at the core of the volcano made a lot more sense from a world-building perspective than the original Ruby and Sapphire games where both Groudon and Kyogre are awoken in the underwater Seafloor Cavern, which sounds like something that would only make sense for Kyogre. The game remakes instead keep to the original games where both of the legendary Pokémon are woken up by their respective evil team in the Seafloor Cavern.
  • Tough Act to Follow: Much like the originals, expectations for Omega Ruby and Alpha Sapphire were very high due to the bar set by the previous remakes, Pokémon HeartGold and Pokémon SoulSilver — widely considered the most beloved games in the series. The final product was well-received overall, but failed to meet the standard left by HGSS and left many fans disappointed. Not helping matters is that HGSS incorporated many of the expanded elements from Crystal, whereas ORAS didn't do the same with Emerald.
  • Underused Game Mechanic: Horde Trainer Battles. Despite trailers hyping them a fair amount, there are only two of these in the entire game (once during the Team Magma/Aqua Hideout, and once during the Delta Episode), and neither are repeatable. They're also both extremely easy due to Conservation of Ninjutsu. (Sure you fight 5 Pokemon at once, but they're all around 20 levels lower than everything else at that point)
  • Unfortunate Character Design:
  • Unintentionally Unsympathetic:
    • Zinnia is presented in a more sympathetic light than Archie/Maxie, but her plan to get Rayquaza to stop a giant meteor that threatened the planet involved becoming a grunt in Team Magma/Aqua to assist awakening Groudon/Kyogre and hoping that the impeding cataclysm would result in Rayquaza’s direct intervention a la 3000 years ago. Had she succeeded, this would have likely resulted in Hoenn being destroyed before Rayquaza arrived. She then needlessly antagonize everyone else, acting all smug with her Holier Than Thou attitude while ruining the plan to teleport the meteor to another dimension arguing it would endanger its inhabitants despite offering no evidence it was inhabited and there being no other option save her plan, which would have failed if not for the lucky break of the player character having a MacGuffin on them. She caused at least as much harm as Archie/Maxie, yet doesn't even get their Heel Realization or comeuppance and gets Easily Forgiven by the others.
    • In a similar situation, in the same post-game episode, is Courtney (OmegaRuby) or Matt (AlphaSapphire), who attempt to destroy the world and everyone in it just because Maxie or Archie was depressed after having been beaten. Yet the game seems to expect us not only to sympathize with her/him and her/his flimsy motivations, but Maxie or Archie ends up having to apologize to her/him for their own depression "making them" do it, and just like Zinnia, he/she is promptly Easily Forgiven and receives no punishment for the attempted genocide.
  • Viewer Gender Confusion: Chaz's Machoke, Macherie, is a female. This isn't obvious at first glance, leading others to easily confuse it for being male.
  • Vindicated by History: Omega Ruby and Alpha Sapphire were lambasted by a sector of fans upon release for being underwhelming remakes compared to HeartGold and SoulSilver, mostly due to their lack of meaningful content expansion. However, in the wake of the mixed reception of Generations VII and VIII, many fans came around to ORAS for many of the strengths it had that weren't used or built upon in future games, as well as its very high level of polish compared to other 3D main series games. In addition to the various beloved features that were retained from X and Y, fans came to appreciate some of the ORAS additions like soaring and DexNav, and were able to more greatly appreciate how the games diverged from Ruby and Sapphire in their own way to modernize many locations and add to the series' lore. ORAS came to be regarded as very good games overall, and some fansnote  who are usually very critical of the 3D games even claim ORAS to be on the level of their preferred games.
  • What an Idiot!: The Draconids knew a thousand years ahead of time that another meteor was going to come strike the planet, but didn't bother to tell anybody outside of their clan. This especially applies to Zinnia, who knew that the player, Steven, and Mossdeep's staff all had their own plan.


Top

How well does it match the trope?

Example of:

/

Media sources:

/

Report