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Here is a list of Drink Orders commonly associated with certain nationalities and cultures, in Real Life and fiction.

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    Britain and Ireland 
  • Tea. "England's national drink," but really popular across the Isles (famously, Ireland actually drinks more tea per head than the UK).
    • Very class-indicator laden. Big, steaming mugs of really strong "Builder's" tea with lots of sugar (probably poured from a grimy metal or old "Brown Betty" teapot) = blue-collar working class; Mug of well-known brand tea, possibly made American style (teabag on a string), some sugar = white-collar or middle class; china cup (held with pinky in; pinky out is a dead giveaway for faux class) of unsweetened Earl Grey poured from a silver pot = upper class.
    • Immigrant groups are often seen consuming their ancestral brews, particularly Asians drinking masala chai with sugar and evaporated milk.
    • Certain tea blends exist to interact with British patterns—for instance, English and Irish breakfast blends are strong, intended to accompany the heavy, fatty, salty Great British/Irish Fry-Up loaded with bacon, eggs, sausages, fried bread, etc, so drinking one with the other suggests a robust ("manly") appetite; the more delicate ones like Earl Grey and Darjeeling contrariwise are served at afternoon tea with similarly delicate foods like cucumber sandwiches or (at the very heaviest) scones with clotted cream and jam, and suggest a delicate ("womanly") sophistication.
  • For stronger drinks, a working-class Brit will have ale, England being an ale culture and still holding tightly to the stuff. The traditional way to order it is to say, "[I'll have] a pint, landlord." (Or, if we're establishing him as a regular at this particular pub, it'll be "The usual, Jim — and one for yourself"). It'll still be a pint of bitter, though. He'll never order a particular brand; sometimes this is lampshaded by a request for "a pint of the non-specific".
    • An Irishman or Irishwoman may make the same order, but rather than a pint of bitter, it's typically a pint of stout—almost certainly Guinness.
    • Very good pubs may boast of many different ales on tap, but the regulars nearly always stick to a favourite ("the usual" or a fictitious name).
    • Don't order a cocktail or liqueur in a pub unless you want to be seen as pretentious or a "poof", except as dedicated, more sophisticated clubs or a yuppie bar.
    • Don't drink your beer by half pints if you don't want to be seen as a "poof" (unless you've made it known you're only there for one, are pressed for time, and can't stay for a whole pint).
    • The "a pint of the non-specific" trope was probably established due to the fact that brand names can't be mentioned on The BBC. EastEnders famously has a variety of fake brands behind the bar at the Vic; other BBC series do show real brands but rarely if ever mention them in dialogue. The phrase itself is a Running Gag from Alistair McGowan's sketches parodying Eastenders.
    • "A broon ale" is a common order for the working class Brit when Oop North.
  • An upper-class Brit in a lower-class pub will almost invariably ask for a wine list, to which the barman will inevitably reply, "Red or White?" Only after repeating this line in response to a series of increasing "elementary" wines will the barman suggest mixing the red and white to produce... not "blush", but "pink". "Blush" is almost as vulgar as "pink". Well on the way to being a Discredited Trope now that you can find two dozen varieties of Australian or South American wine in any supermarket; if it shows up these days it's probably a parody. That said, a working-class pub really isn't the place to be ordering wine unless you want to be seen as pretentious or a "poof" (or are a woman); someone who really disdains beer but finds themselves in such an establishment should ask for scotch or brandy (possibly with soda, if the concept of drinking spirits neat is also too much).
  • In general, a professional or upper-class Brit (if not in the mood for spirits) will have wine. Even if impoverished—then he'll get cheaper wine. Beer is for farmers, proles, and Irishmen. The wine should be French. This has been true since the Middle Ages: the medieval English went positively gaga over a dark rosé called ''clairet'' from Bordeaux, and even after their tastes had shifted to red wine they kept calling their beloved Bordeaux "claret"—and do pronounce the "t" at the end, the word isn't French any longer. Wars with France in the old days led to occasional upper-class grumbling about the availability of French wine, but it did introduce the British to a few of their non-French favourites, particularly sherry; and the old alliance with Portugal gave the English—and later the early Americans—a taste for Madeira and Port.
    • Port in particular proved extremely popular, to the extent that in time English families ended up moving to Portugal and taking control of a large part of the Port industry; to this day many of the most successful brands of Port have British names, for example Cockburn's, Taylor's, Graham's and Sandeman. As with tea, a whole series of rituals have cropped up surrounding the drinking of Port; for instance, the decanter should always be handed around the table from right to left, and should be passed continuously until it is empty (which shouldn't take that long). It is also considered extremely bad form to ask for the decanter directly if another person at the table is "hogging" it; instead, the tradition goes, one should always ask the offending party: "Do you know the Bishop of Norwich?". If the person doesn't take the hint (usually because they haven't heard of the custom) and says "no," you further nudge them by saying, "He's a terribly good chap, but he always forgets to pass the port." The reasons for any of these traditions have been lost to time and in some cases remain the subject of heated debate.
    • If they are in the mood for spirits, an upper crust or professional Briton (as distinguished from the "sophisticates" mentioned below) will generally gravitate toward the brown spirits in the winter and gin-based drinks in the summer. As regards the brown stuff, whisky is the favoured tipple of anyone with a claim on Scottish ancestry and Irish whiskey preferred by people claiming connections to Ireland; those without either may choose between scotch, Irish whiskey, or brandy, although rum may appear among those with a connection to the Navy, and North American whisk(e)ys (particularly American bourbon and Canadian rye) are also somewhat acceptable (especially if the family has a connection to the US or Canada). The brown stuff also tends to be drunk alone or with minimal dilution, while the summer gin tends to be mixed into longer drinks (in part because all but the most hardened alcoholics find most ginnote  rather hard to stomach plain,note  in part because the summertime lends itself to leisurely sipping on a long drink quite well), with gin and tonic and fruit cups (particularly Pimm's) being traditional.
  • A sophisticated Brit (read: James Bond) will order a vodka martini — shaken, not stirred, and the drier note  the better. As far as normal (gin) martinis go, Winston Churchill found it necessary only to gaze at the vermouth bottle from across the room while drinking straight gin and Noël Coward stated his gin should be "waved in the direction of Italy". A truly sophisticated Brit will order the martini stirred, not shaken, and, if asked, will explain that shaking bruises the gin.note  If it's summer, the sophisticate may prefer Gin & Tonic or a jug of Pimm's to go 'round.
    • Alternatively, he'll order a cocktail containing three measures of Gordon's, one of vodka (made from grain, not potatoes), half a measure of Kina Lillet, then instruct the bartender to shake it very well until it's ice-cold, then add a large thin slice of lemon peel.note . This is in keeping with the source material, where the patron explains his reasoning behind such strong and persnickety orders and is played very straight. However, he does consistently get a chuckle out of everyone else ordering one as well, which may also apply. In the original books Bond was meticulous about the use of Gordon's Gin. However, liquors have changed over the years; vodka is weaker (break out the Stoli 100) and evidently Tanqueray is closer to what Gordon's was in Ian Fleming's day, so keep those in mind. Also, Kina Lillet has been out of production for quite some time now and unobtainable except in ludicrously expensive cocktail bars that keep a supply; the accepted modern substitute (at least since Daniel Craig's Bond popularized the drink) has either been Lillet Blanc (a close relative but not as bitter as Kina Lillet) and a dash of bitters, or Cocchi Americano which is made with cinchona bark and is much closer in flavour to the original.
    • Complicated NAMED cocktails are also a way to show off between globe-trotting millionaire playboys such as The Persuaders!, as for example a Creole Scream (4 cl White Rum, 2 cl Dry Vermouth, 1 Dash Angustora Bitters, 1 cl Grenadine Syrup, 1-2 Green Olive). Some arguing on a minor detail such as one or two olives is to be expected.
  • An 18th-century Englishman down on his luck will have gin. Beer-swilling Middle Englishmen look upon him with disdain - gin was an extremely cheap and plentiful liquor, effectively the malt liquor/rock cocaine of its time and place.
  • Because it's unseemly for a lady to be seen to drink too much, a Proper Lady will, if she wants to drink heavily, discreetly drink gin and tonic and be careful not to reveal how many she's had. (The Queen Mum was famous for this.)
  • A Yuppie will have, "Macallan gran reserva, with a drop", or some ridiculously specific wine (Chateau Neuf, south field, 1978). That, or a bottle of Sol or Corona with a wedge of lime in the neck.
  • A non-Yuppie, meanwhile, will just order a Macallan, because it's damn good whisky. Ahem. The Macallan.
  • A Brit who wants to be a yuppie or sophisticate, but isn't (such as Del Boy) will order some totally preposterous cocktail, probably with an umbrella in it.
  • A character in a crime drama will always ask for "Scotch." The character will rarely specify the type, possibly because the writers don't realize that every Scotch is slightly different. If the character does ask for a specific brand, it will always be Glenfiddich or The Macallan. It's vanishingly rare that anyone asks for a brand of blended Scotch by name.
  • A Scotsman or an Irishman will drink their nation's native whisk(e)y.
    • In Hollywood, in contrast to the hundreds of varieties of Scotch whisky, Irish whiskey (yes, they're spelled differently, and the difference is, in fact, Serious Business) appears in just two brands: Jameson and Bushmills. They are largely equivalent, except that Jameson is Catholic and Bushmills is Protestant - thus picking the right one is non-trivial when dealing with particularly militant Irishmen - but this distinction is mostly an American fabrication, based on the fact that the Bushmills distillery happens to be located in Northern Ireland- the Jameson family were Protestant (as were the Guinness family, and most families who actually had enough money to start major breweries and distilleries)note 
    • A Scotsman will never order "scotch," but rather "whisky." Nonetheless, they expect to be served scotch because to them, scotch is the default variety of whisky (which is Truth in Television in Britain).
    • The most popular whiskey within Ireland itself is reputedly Powers Gold Label, which is usually hard to come by at any bar in the states, outside of certain Irish enclaves like Boston or New York (and sometimes even there).
    • The most popular scotch in Scotland is Famous Grouse, but it is not difficult to obtain in the United States.
  • In the UK, thanks in large part to the massively profitable global broadcasting deals negotiated by the English Premier League (the top division of English Football), and to the global merchandising potential of various clubs making it both financially viable and fashionable for the super-rich to own a football club, the entire league has money to burn. As a result, Premiership footballers earn an average of £50,000 per week, and often wildly in excess of that, with the very richest being paid over £300,000 per week - and that's before performance or appearance related bonuses, much less sponsorship agreements, endorsements, and other non-playing related sources of income. Thanks to so-called 'parachute payments' for relegated clubs (paid over the following couple of years, and intended to help them adjust to the disparity in annual earnings between the Premier League and the second division), similar salaries are found in the richer clubs of the second division as well. As a result, players have money to burn, and since they're often very suddenly catapulted from often working class backgrounds to national (even global) fame and immense fortune in their late teens/early 20s, they do. Spectacularly. Accordingly, their "Check out my money" drink of choice seems to be Cristal champagne, at £200 a bottle. Mixed with Diet Coke. Ugh.
  • A character from the West Country will drink cidernote , particularly scrumpy (a type of cloudy, low-carbonation cider with a higher alcohol content), which is often home-brewed, and the inspiration for Scumble - though usually it's a little less alcoholic than its fictional counterpart. Usually. You can successfully run a tractor on the stronger variants (admittedly, not for very long, and it plays hell with the engine, but you can) and any attempt to tax it is met with severe popular displeasure.
    • Since the upswing of sweet ciders in the mid-2000's, Cider has become the main 'beer for those who don't like beer'. Don't expect them to drink anything more dry than Strongbow though.
  • Chavs may drink cheap cider, in their local park or tower block. Also, Snakebite (half a pint of beer, half a pint of cider, maybe with some blackcurrent cordial) is popular with chav girls, and also with students and other young drinkers (as it seems to be more alcoholic than the sum of its parts).
  • Soft drinks in Britain are generally referred to as exactly that. Regional and time period variations do come in: anyone wanting to evoke the days of Enid Blyton will drink "lashings and lashings of ginger ale." In Scotland, any fizzy non-alcoholic beverage is referred to as "juice" or "skoosh", regardless of whether it's Sprite, Coke, or Pepsi. "Ginger" is also a common generic term for carbonated soft drinks north of the border. Virtually the only drink to be requested by name is Scotland's own Irn-Bru. And even then, it'll generally be shortened to just "bru."
  • Cheap Vodka, sometimes mixed with Red Bull, is quite popular with young students, on the grounds that it tastes fairly sweet and gets you drunk quickly. As anyone who's ever been to the bar street in Magaluf (or, indeed, to a bar or club in any university town on a Friday/Saturday night) will confirm.
  • A clueless American in an Irish pub will order a "Black-and-Tan" in the hope of getting the nice drink consisting of Guinness layered over Harp lager or Smithwick's pale ale. He will instead get anything from an awkward look to a snarky comment to a punch in the face (depending on place and time period), and maybe his drink. This is because the Black and Tans were particularly brutal paramilitaries called upon to "enforce order" during the War of Independence; the drink goes by the name "half and half" in Ireland and is indeed quite popular under that name.
    • A similarly clueless American tourist will order an "Irish car bomb" in an Irish pub. The bartender will address it with a snarky comment. (This drink has no proper name in Ireland, because the Irish really can't see the appeal of curdled Bailey's—nor, frankly, can many other people who are not Irish, including quite a lot of Americans.)
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    Former USSR 
  • A Russian will drink vodka, perhaps straight from the bottle.
    • Only in movie-land, though; in real Russia only hopeless drunks and hobos drink vodka straight from the bottle (unless noone is watching or they're muzhiks note  without the convenience of a glass), and the more common drink of choice would be a cheap beer (straight from the bottle is acceptable with beer—although frankly, it's more commonly straight from the can, since bottled beer is extremely expensive in Russia and a bottle of beer can easily be three times the price of the can for no apparent reason) or the Jaguar brand energy alcopop and even premixed canned cocktails for the youths. Or, you know, vodka, but not straight from the bottle.
      • On the other hand, hopeless drunks and hobos not exactly being in short supply in Russia, some particularly cheap forms of vodka were for quite a long time sold in bottles with pull-tab openings, with the expectation that bottle will be drunk in one sitting—as would its owner. The pull-tabs were banned, but other products catering to the same market—like the bottles of cologne packaged in bottles designed to resemble those of vodka to hide the drinker's shame and the "fanfurik" (alcohol-based medicinal or cosmetic lotions that more often than not are actually just 95% medical alcohol)—have survived.
  • Ukrainians flavor their vodka which they call horilka with honey & chili peppers, the end product is called pertsivka. Likewise, people living in Polish-Belarusian border would put some bison grass in it.
  • Youths who are punks, rockers, metalheads or members of various other Western-influenced subcultures (the so-called neformalnye) often prefer fortified bum wines such as the infamous "777 Port Wine". Because beer and alcopops are so pop and gopnik. Cheap alcoholic cocktails such as Jaguar are also popular.
  • An extra stern and grim survivalist (or just a peasant) will have samogon, moonshine (Pronounced "Sahm-oh-gohn" [Samogon] — saying "Sam-oh-gan" [Sæmʌgɪn] or "Sum-ohg-en" [Səmogɜn] to a Russian will confuse them). Preferably one they brewed and distilled themselves, hopefully with a minimum of methanol in the product.
    • Bear in mind that Russia is the country where government policy has been to encourage beer-drinking as a way of combating alcoholism.
  • Intellectuals (both in real life and in fiction) often dismiss vodka as a plebeian drink and prefer brandy (either local ones, of which there are a surprising variety, or, if wealthy and cosmopolitan enough, imported French cognac) or whisk(e)y, with rarity and price of the bottle often being a point of showing off. The same is true for most affluent classes as well, regardless of education.
    • Curiously, asking for French Cognac is usually the sign of being rich, sophistication is more ofter suggested by choosing a Georgian or Armenian brandy (The word is Kon'yak). Also, stereotypical Georgian will most likely drink red wine, preferably in large quantities, which includes Josef Stalin of all people. (The Stalin of Russian Humour is somewhat different from the historical Stalin, being a bit more stereotypically Georgian for comedy purposes, but nonetheless the historical Stalin really did enjoy vodka, brandy, and red wine—all to excess, especially the vodka, to the point that it was probably a major factor in what killed him.)
      • Speaking of Georgia, there is chacha, which is essentially grape-based moonshine that was made legal because practically everyone was making it.
  • As for hot drinks, tea rules the day almost to the same extent as in Britain. Russian (and other post-Soviet) tea is unique in the manner of its preparation; a certain amount of highly concentrated tea known as zavarka will be prepared ahead of time and left on low heat to keep warm, and when someone wants a cup they'll mix zavarka with hot water according to their desired strength and then sweeten to taste.note  In fiction, especially Western fiction, this tea is often drunk in elaborate ritual around the iconic samovar, with tons of pastries, and jams, and preserves. The latter is more or less Truth in Television, especially in communal setting, but the samovar has mostly died out, the remaining being broken out only for the most important gatherings, as did the oft-depicted way of drinking it from the saucer with a piece of sugar or fruit preserve held in the mouth — anyway, it was only characteristic of the old merchant classes of the Tsarist Russia; if a modern Russian tries to tell you that's the way to do it, they're trolling. In modern days it usually comes from the stovetop or electric teapot, or, in the eastern parts of the country, from the dedicated hot water dispenser, a custom imported from Japan and China, and, arguably, the second coming of the samovar.
    • Note that the type of the tea drunk also carries the class stereotypes similar to the British ones, but it differs not on the basis of what (if anything) your parents did for a living but rather how (over)educated you are personally. The strong and sweet black tea is for the working class too, but also for the coarse and uncouth nouveau riches, while even the poorest intelligentsia would prefer the sophisticated unsweetened types (including green tea, which is almost entirely their territory, excepting the Central Asian immigrant laborers) even if they come from a working-class family.
    • The Mafiya prefers its own type of tea, an extremely strong brew called chifir'.
    • Coffee is much less popular, but still quite frequent, though its use is also centered among the educated. Blue collars, if ever seen with a cup of joe, will be drinking some godawful instant coffin varnish simply to get their gears move during the night shift, while the effeminate hipsters will spend hours discussing the blends and roasting techniques. This is because coffee is very expensive in Russia. Tea can be had for pocket change, but coffee is several times more expensive. Even the cheapest instant coffee still easily costs double what a tea does, and a coffeehouse roast can easily be twenty times the price of that same cup of tea in exchange for what is just a small shot of coffee.
    • A Russian period piece from before the 17th century may show sbiten' instead of tea or coffee. Sbiten' is a hot, sweet herbal drink made from hot water, honey, spices, and jam that was mostly supplanted by tea, but still persists to a lesser degree and has nostalgic, "comforting drink to warm up in the wintertime" associations similar to those of Horlicks in England, mulled apple cider in America,note  and hot chocolate/hot cocoa in both countries (and elsewhere). Sbiten' can, however, also be made with hot red wine (preferably Georgian or Armenian) instead of hot water, in which case it is the Russian take on mulled wine.
    • Mulled wine, in turn, is a popular drink in Saint Petersburg: it's hot and spicy, which helps deal with the city's cold rainy weather, and it's kind of hip, which feeds into Petersburgian intellectual culture. Glintwein, whether alcoholic or non-alcoholic, is sold everywhere around the city, and is even found in vending machines (the non-alcoholic variety, of course).
  • The Russian drink order is not complete without kvass, Russia's national soft drink made from fermented rye bread, it's dark, rich, & slightly alcoholic (about 1% ABV). In Soviet era it was served in tanker trucks, and now it's experiencing a revival due to strong surges in patriotism, with the tankers brought back to service once again. A popular contemporary brand is Nikola, which also mean "not cola". Other brands include "Russkiy Dar", "Ochakovsky" and "Kvas Taras". Hilariously, Русский Дар is made by Coca Cola. Kvas is essentially like a beer rye bread hybrid soda. And yes, there are purists who whine about the mass production Квас not really being kvas due to using syrups and concentrates. Even observant Muslims are generally okay with it, because you'd have to drink a terrifying amount of it to get even the same amount of alcohol as in one beer, and with a belly full of kvas, good luck ever feeling anything resembling a buzz, although if you brew up kvas and let it sit for a week, it'll turn as alcoholic as beer.

    Other Europe 
  • A Norwegian will order pilsener beer, and refer to it as "pils". Brand? What's that?
    • Norway has had a strong non-alcohol policy for decades because of the layman movement, but ask a rural Norwegian for something strong, he will obviously go for the "home made brandy" - distilled beverage with 96% alcohol. This is commonly just referred to as a "ninety-sixer". In some areas, it is mixed up with coffee (Coffee and "karsk", a rather untranslatable term). This home-brewing is known jokingly to be "the most important industry" in some areas of Norway.
  • A Swede will order "a big strong one", meaning a half litre of domestic lager.
    • A Swedish student, at least if they're a member of a student's union (often dressing in patch-covered industrial overalls), might order "Punsch" instead. Not Punch; Punsch. Basically a traditional Swedish liqueur made of arrack, tea, citrus, water and sugar. Generally taken as a shot next to the beer.
    • Or a bottle of foreign booze smuggled from Germany (maybe via Denmark) for half the price it would cost at a Systembolaget shop.
    • Around Christmas, the soft drink Julmust manages to outsell Coca-Cola. (If you want to sample julmust outside of Sweden, you should look for either a Swedish specialty shop...or an IKEA. Either way, you have to go during the Christmas season.)
    • Also on the non-alcoholic side, Sweden is very much coffee country (like all of Scandinavia). Hot, stimulating beverages are a welcome break in the cold, dark Scandinavian winters. The coffee served is usually drip coffee brewed strong enough to float a horseshoe, and with a cookie or other sweet on the side. Coffee is an integral part of Swedish hospitality (if you stay in a Swedish home for more than two minutes, you will be offered coffee), and for someone drink 6-7 cups a day is quite normal (the average Swede consumes over 1000 cups of coffee per year—that's about 2.75 cups/day).
  • Finns drink mostly beer or "lonkero" - a mix of gin and grapefruit soda sold premade in cans.
    • Among some academics there exists a tradition of drinking after shave on special occasions.
    • One of the best selling liquor is "Jallu" or cut brandy that is made by adding a small bit of brandy to neutral spirit.
  • The French drink wine. Disneyland Paris almost went out of business when it first opened. Why? Because they didn't serve wine. Business recovered only starting when they put wine on the menu. Wine is Serious Business in France.
    • Many, particularly in the north and east, also drink beer (referred to as "blonde" (light) or "brune" (dark)); a typical "neighborhood bar" is often called a brasserie (brewery). Beers from the north of France, near the border with Belgium, share in the Belgian brewing tradition; since Belgium is basically the world's beer Heaven, beers from the north of France are the best in the country and some are ranked as among the best in the world.
    • Some drinks are seen as more regional.
      • Cidre is often associated with apple-growing Normandie and Bretagne, as is Calvados (faire le trou normand "to make the Norman hole" means drinking a glass of Calvados between the courses of a meal).
      • Various aniseed spirits like pastis and Pernod are associated with the south.
    • Also regional is the wine. Each part of the country has its own wines, particularly further south, and locals will drink a simple local red wine with their meals or just in general. An exception to the rule that the wine is red is in Jura, in the eastern region of Franche-Comté near the border with Switzerland; there, the locals will commonly drink vin jaune, a yellowish white wine rather like an unfortified sherry, with some walnuts and Comté cheese.
    • The most widely known spirit native to France is cognac. However, cognac is usually seen as a more upscale drink, perhaps to spirits what champagne is to wines. A common spirit in France is eau-de-vie: clear fruit brandy.
    • The French love their coffee, but café au lait is really only drunk from a large bowl at breakfast, and late 19th century artists, writers etc. are stereotypically expected to be addicted to absinthe.
  • Italians also drink a lot of wine, although they're usually depicted as being much less snobby about it. Rustic Italians in particular will stereotypically drink chianti out of a straw-covered fiasco (round-bottomed bottle) with a hearty meal.
    • The chianti in the fiasco are really just Tuscan; different regions have different wines and different bottles. That said, any remotely realistic depictions of Italians will have them drinking a simple red wine. Exceptions: White wines may be drunk with certain dishes, and Italians are universally agreed that a beer, especially a cold pale lager, is an ideal accompaniment to pizza—Italian breweries probably survive primarily on sales combined with pizza. (Americans, rejoice: For once, you got something about foreign cuisine right!)
    • Italians may eat biscotti dunked in vin santo—a sweet amber-colored white or rosé made from partially raisined grapes. In a pinch, they may substitute another dessert wine. What?
    • Italians of course also drink espresso—usually with a sugar or two to cut the bitterness. They regard Americans and others who don't as crazy.
    • There's also a variety of aperitivi and digestivi, each with ritual and tradition surrounding them. The ones you hear about most often abroad are the ones that are commonly used in mixed drinks (particularly three aperitivi: vermouth used in martinis; the well-noted Campari, used in Negronis and such; and Aperol, basically a less-bitter Campari, and used in summer drinks like spritzes), although grappa (a brandy distilled from the pomace or dregs of winemaking), sambuca (an aniseed-flavored liqueur—unlike most other anise-flavored distilled drinks, it has a good bit of sugar in it, making it more suitable as an after-dinner drink) and limoncello (a lemony liqueur easily made at home—it just takes some syrup, high-proof grain alcohol, and lemon peel) are also internationally-noted digestivi. Digestivi are also used as an ammazzacaffè: a drink drunk after coffee to "kill" the lingering taste of the espresso (this is especially common where the coffee is served after a big dinner). Usually, this is a small cup served after the coffee, but it may occasionally be served with the coffee and is even more occasionally poured into the espresso to create a kind of bizarro Mediterranean version of Irish coffee called caffè corretto (literally "corrected coffee").
  • Spaniards are also fond of wine, and like the Italians they are generally not seen as being snobby about it; they are particularly famous for sherry, but that is far from the only kind of wine in the country (Rioja is a common wine to name-drop if you want to be seen to know about Spanish wines other than sherry). Stereotypically, wine will be accompanied by tapas, particularly olives, potatoes, chorizo, possibly a tortilla de patatas (i.e. a thick Spanish omelet with potato and onion), and likely fifty varieties of jamón (that's ham).
    • Note that stereotypically is the key word - Spaniards usually reserve wine to full-scale meals and usually accompany tapas with beer. Also, note that sherry is a well-known export, but not actually a popular drink among Spaniards. That said, it is true that tapas probably originated as an accompaniment to wine (beer having taken off in Spain relatively recently), and that sherry was historically more common in Spain than it is now. Also, tapas today are frequently eaten with some of the casual wine-based mixed drinks, e.g. tinto de verano (for which see below).
    • Patxaran (or pacharán), made from blackthorn berries, is typical of the Basque Country.
    • Oruxo (orujo) is an extremely strong spirit obtained from distilled pomace. It's the main ingredient in queimada, a punch so strong it must be set alight before drunk in order to burn some of the alcohol content off: a traditional winter drink in Galicia, and arguably one of the most hardcore drinks in the world.
    • Spain's ample supply of cheap red wine (commonly called tinto in Spanish, and often sold in Tetra Briks like fruit juice) is also the base for various popular beverages consumed (usually in large quantities) during the summer months, including:
      • Kalimotxo (calimocho): equal parts wine and cola. Also originally from the Basque Country, today popular nationwide; its Basque origins give it the additional humorous nickname "Rioja Libre" (by analogy with the rum-and-cola Cuba Libre, as Rioja is near/somewhat overlaps with the Basque Country), especially if mixed with a bit of lime juice. It's the stereotypical drink of the botellón (grand booze-ups for the 18-25 set notorious in Spain for their rowdiness).
      • Sangría ("bloodletting"): red wine, orange juice, sugar and chopped fruit. Today more popular among foreigners than actual Spaniards, mostly because it's rather time consuming to make and most Spaniards can't be bothered.
      • Tinto de verano ("summer red"): red wine and soda (particularly lemon-flavored). This is the most popular drink in much of Spain, at least in the summer; it is so ubiquitous in much of the country that it often comes pre-mixed in plastic liter bottles at ludicrously low prices.
  • The Portuguese, like the Spanish, are largely wine-drinkers; Madeira and Port wine are their most famous styles. The more interesting thing about them, though, is their beer: unlike most places, where the most popular beer is almost invariably a pale lager, much of Portugal prefers a German-style dark bock.
  • For many Germans it's beer and more beer, but in some regions it may also be wine, especially (obviously) in wine-growing regions. Germans can be expected to drink both, even on one sitting, as there's a popular saying: Wein auf Bier, das rat ich dir, Bier auf Wein, das lass sein. ("Wine after beer is what I recommend to you, beer after wine better not.") In the Frankfurt area cider (Apfelwein, auf Hochdeutsch, Äbbelwoi in Hessian) is also popular. Historically, wine was first introduced by the Romans and during the warmer phase of the middle ages was grown as far north as Pomerania. In Roman times Germans stereotypically drank mead, but then beer took over, becoming the biggest bulk freight good in the Hanseatic League along with salt and herrings. Some German breweries, usually connected to a monastery, go back to the high middle ages.
    • Germans take beer seriously and to some extent regard it more as food than a recreational beverage; you can still hear it being described as "liquid bread". German beer is simultaneously very diverse and very uniform. The Bavarian Reinheitsgebot (beer purity law), the oldest food purity law in the world, mandated that beer be made only of pure water, barley and hops; when the law was applied across Germany after unification, the law was modified to expressly allow yeast (people did not know that yeast existed when the first Bavarian law was promulgated), other grains like wheat (because other parts of Germany had traditions with wheat beer), and cane sugar (to allow fine control of alcohol levels). This means that the basic characteristics of all German beers are rather consistent; German beers tend to be well-attenuated, mildly hopped, and dominated by grain flavors. There are number of brands which enjoy national success, such as Beck's and Paulaner, but there are also many small and regional beers. Many towns have their own local beer, but again, although there is some variation, they do tend to be surprisingly similar. This stands in contrast to Belgium, where the local habit of trying just about anything in beer leads to a to greater variety in beer flavors across a country less than a tenth the size of Germany.
    • There are quite a few regional variations. In Bavaria, manly men are expected to drink from Maßkrüge (stoneware or glass jugs holding exactly a liter) at the Oktoberfest. In other regions, it is much more commonplace to use smaller glasses; the smallest are in Cologne for Kölsch, which is served in a tall, thin, cylindrical 1/5 liter glass called a Stange ("rod"), or a Reagenzglas ("test tube") or Fingerhut (thimble) if you're feeling unkind (or just joking as they do in Cologne). In parts of Northern Germany they think you can't be expected to drink a beer "dry", so a beer will be accompanied by a shot glass of clear spirits, thus Lütt un Lütt (Low German for "little and little") means a beer and a glass of kümmel (caraway schnaps). Some regions prefer certain types of beer, e. g. in the Rhineland you have a type produced with the yeast floating on top—basically an ale, albeit with some odd differences—known variously as Obergärig, Kölsch (in Cologne) or Alt (especially in Düsseldorf), while other regions have a penchant for a lighter beer made from wheat (Hefeweizen). Berliners will stereotypically be expected to drink a Weiße mit Schuss (white beer with a shot of fruit syrup in a big bowl-like glass) in summer.
    • Some drinks are seasonal. To quench their thirst in the hot season Germans may order a Weinschorle (usually white wine and mineral water; the red wine version is sometimes known as Türkenblut, "Turk's blood") or a mixture of beer and lemonade (what is called Shandy in Britain) that is called a Radler ("cyclist's") in the South and an Alsterwasser or Alster ("Alster water", named after one of the rivers of Hamburg) in the North. A mixture of beer and cola is called a Diesel. There are also non-alcoholic variants of Schorle, usually specifying which fruit juice is mixed with mineral water; the most common one is Apfel(saft)schorle (with apple juice). In winter, especially around Christmas, Germans (and Alsatian Frenchmen as well) will frequently drink Glühwein (mulled, spiced wine), while on the coast people stereotypically drink grog. The traditional recipe for the latter is Rum muss, Zucker kann, Wasser braucht nicht, which roughly translates as "rum's essential, sugar's optional, water you don't really need".
      • Glühwein or vin chaud (hot wine), a mix of spices (especially lemon and cinnamon) and red wine is drunk all over France during winter, specifically around open-markets (as it warms people up). It's not really associated to Alsace, as it doesn't have a red wine culture (it's celebrated for its whites, though). It's reputed to not really be alcoholic, so children can often be allowed to drink it.
    • Germany is also well known for various types of spirits, usually clear. The simplest of these is Korn: distilled from grain, and a bit like vodka, but it's less thoroughly filtered so you can taste the grain it came from. Apfelkorn is much the same but from grain and apples. Kümmel is a liqueur, generally distilled from grain and flavored with caraway, cumin, and fennel, so one might think of it as a distant relative of gin. Kirsch is a clear brandy, distilled from cherries and famously necessary for a true Schwarzwälder Kirschtorte;note  darker brandy (Weinbrand) is more of an upscale drink. Sweet liqueurs of more unusual colours are traditionally associated with (tippling) older women. Jägermeister has of course been successfully exported.
    • As regards hot drinks, most Germans prefer coffee (German coffee madness goes back at least to the early 18th century, when J. S. Bach wrote a humorous cantata on the subject and Frederick the Great became a huge fan), execept in tea-addicted East Frisia (where they drink it in an extremely weird fashion, adding rock sugar and cream and then not stirring, to get a layered effect), although many of those Germans who do drink tea like to think of themselves as better connoisseurs of tea than, e.g., Britons. Germans stereotypically consider American coffee weak (as shown in a running gag in the Percy Adlon film Out of Rosenheim aka Bagdad Café), though not as week as the "legendary" Bliemchenkaffeenote  of Saxony. In North Frisia (which is situated to the north-east of East Frisia) they sometimes like to drink Pharisäer, coffee with sugar and a shot of rum covered with a layer of cream, which allegedly serves to hide the smell of the rum. The more recent fad for latte macchiato among German yuppies caused amusement in the drink's native Italy; there latte macchiato is considered something you give to children too young to drink proper coffee. Hot chocolate is also very popular, especially in winter.
    • Fizzy drinks and mineral waters are also drunk, the latter often coming from one of the more well-known spas. If you want some caffeine with your fizz, Coca-Cola and Pepsi are the most commonly found brands, but some people will insist on a domestic brand such as Club-Cola (East German, originally produced in the GDR), Afri-Cola (West German, became legendary for its psychedelic ad campaign in the 1960s) and fritz-kola, an "alternative" brand originally started by two students in Hamburg in 2002 (it has the legally permitted maximum caffeine content). German is also home to Club-Mate, a fizzy drink made with yerba mate extract and concomitantly highly caffeinated; it is thus very popular in the German hacker/computer geek subculture (see "Universal" below). Fruit juices are also common, especially orange juice (often listed as O-Saft) and apple juice. Among youngsters, there is a bit of a fashion for KiBa (Kirsche + Banane), a mixture of cherry and banana juice, usually poured in such a way so you get two layers or a pretty spiral pattern.
  • Austria is very similar to Germany when it comes to beer and wine (some regions in Austria take their wine houses very seriously). For hot drinks look no further than Vienna, who "invented" coffee for the Europeans when (according to legend) the Turks left it behind after the Siege Of Vienna (along with the Italians, who brought it through trade with Turkey, Syria, and Egypt). Famously, the idea of putting milk in your coffee comes from Austria. Traditional coffee orders are small and large "black" or "brown" (without or with milk), Melange (not the Spice but a cappuccino with whipped cream) and for those who have been skiing and need something to warm up, tea, coffee or hot chocolate with a shot of Stroh rum. Stroh is itself interesting: Historically it was made from sugar beets and flavoring to get close to the flavor of authentic rum made from cane molasses, it is today made from real imported cane molasses (to comply with EU regulations about rum) with flavorings to get that "authentic" sugar-beet flavor.
  • Espresso for the euro-sophisticate who wants to sip.
    • In Austria, it is drunk like a shot of spirits. Nice.
    • Espresso with a bit of sugar for the Italians, who are confused most other countries would even consider drinking such a strong brew "black". Mind you, the sugar is not usually quite enough to make the espresso sweet; it's there to cut the bitterness, so the flavor of the coffee can be enjoyed without having to deal with the bitterness. But definitely all espresso, all the time.
  • Czechs are not often counted as beer titans, but they produce some world-famous beers such as Pilsner Urquell, which was the first ever pilsner style beer and was created after an angry mob in Pilsen complained about the abysmal quality of local beer... in 1840. Czechvar was the inspiration for Mr. Bursch to create Budweiser (named for the Czech region, Budwar, in which he had encountered pilsner style beer for the first time). Not that anyone is contending that Budweiser holds a candle to the original Czech stuff. In general, Czechs consider their beer good, but not particularly special.
  • Traditionalist South Slavs (Slovenians, Croatians, Bosnians, Serbs, Montenegrins and Macedonians) will have a "dec" of rakija made in the countryside and wash it down with a local beer (or wine, if you're in Dalmacija, Hercegovina or Montenegro.)
    • Young "posh" people will have the standard club fare of beer and nouveau cocktails like Jagerbombs and B-52s.
    • Wannabe tough guys will have shots of Chivas Regal and chase it down with Heineken.
    • The "alternative" crowd will either eschew the whole concept of showing off with what you drink and gulp down everything that gets them intoxicated, stick to the traditional (and cheap) Raki+Beer or if they are of the "hipster" variety try to top each other by increasingly obscure cocktails they don't really enjoy.
    • A good Bosnian Muslim who don't want to get drunk will take up some boza, a sweet drink made from fermented corn with negligible alcohol content, much like kvass.
  • A Dutchman will order a small glass of whatever's on tap. In summer, a Dutch woman will order a rosé or (if she's trying to be hip) a rosé beer. Or just regular beer. In winter, pea soup is traditional as a drink, especially after a nice day of ice skating.
    • However, nine times out of ten, the only beer on tap (or even served at all) will be domestic. German and Belgian beers are also acceptable, but anything else will often be dismissed as weak or low-quality (often correctly, often wrongly). And, of course, every region has its own preference (though it is not as hard coded as in other countries).
    • A harder-drinking Dutchman will have "young" jenever, a clear spirit distilled from grain or malt with juniper and other botanical flavoring (the ancestral form of gin), typically stored in the freezer. Often taken as a kopstoot ("headbutt"): a shot with a beer to chase.note 
    • Sophisticated hard drinkers will drink "old" jenever distilled entirely from malt, possibly of the kind that is aged in an oak cask for several years and tastes rather like whisky with botanicals.
  • A Belgian, on the other hand, will order an ale from one of the 178 breweries in the country—preferably one nearby—in one of the innumerable styles native to Belgium (dubbel, tripel, witbier, lambic, gueuze, saison, red, blonde, brown...). Said ale will be served in a glass specifically designed to accentuate the unique qualities of the beer, and will be drunk liberally alongside a hearty serving of fries with mayonnaise and mussels. This beer culture is uniquely Belgian, tied to the land as an expression of medieval traditions, good natural conditions for the production of beer, and a trading culture that eased importation of more exotic ingredients. The beer culture exists across the entire country: when a Walloon and Fleming meet, one of the few things they will absolutely agree tie them together is their beer. Also, when the Belgian sees some British tourists talk about getting "good Belgian beer" and then order Stella Artois at the bar, he will laugh so hard he falls off his chair.
    • Note that pale lagers are sold in great quantities in Belgium, but only because they're cheap and easy to get drunk on; that tends to inflate the numbers. The good beer is drunk more deliberately. It's also more expensive, so it doesn't help that Wallonia is basically the epicenter of Western Europe's Rust Belt, with decaying industry and unemployed people everywhere.
  • Greece:
    • Greeks stereotypically drink ouzo, but in some regions they get offended when you ask for ouzo—they instead drink rakki. The difference? Mostly that one is called ouzo and the other is called rakki (both are clear spirits flavored with anise).
    • Truth be told, however, Greeks are at least as likely to drink wine (which they have done for longer than anyone else in Europe). Retsina (wine flavored with pine resin) exists, but it is not drunk universally; it's mostly limited to accompanying strong-flavored medzes like pastirma and garlic dip. Modern retsina contains less resin than in the past, which makes the stuff taste more like wine and less like turpentine, but naturally purists complain.
    • For a hot drink, Greeks drink coffee. It is prepared very similarly to Turkish coffee, but never, ever call it Turkish coffee.
    • Ever since the 1950s, the Greeks have enjoyed frappé coffee for a cold summer drink; it's made by shaking instant coffee with milk, sugar, and ice cubes, creating a cold, foamy, sweet beverage.
  • Poles drink vodka. At least, that's the stereotype; for reals it's mostly lost the role it once played as the go-to drink, save for cultural associations (of which there are plenty — vodka is a serious drink for serious occasions, like gifts of gratitude, weddings, or sitting down to discuss politics with your brother-in-law). They will still get into arguments with Russians and others over who invented it, however.
    • Unless getting wasted is the plan, beer is the alcoholic drink for more casual occasions, like friendly meetings, parties and pub crawls. There is a number of popular beer brands and the pub culture has been growing in popularity.
    • Like in Russia, bums, punks and other lowlifes might prefer to drink cheap, fortified wine-related beverages. These are known as the "cheap wines" (also known as "pissers", "brainfuckers", "sulphurfruits" due to the low production quality leaving a sulphurous aftertaste, or, more poetically, "wines with a stick written" because of the font a particularly memorable brand's labes was written in) and are infamous for their colourful brand names. Here are some loosely translated examples: "Commando" (with red label), "Here Kitty Kitty", "Bacchus", "Cosmos" (the motto: "In Half An Hour To Moon"), "Tractor Driver's Smile", "Mother-in-law's Charm", "Satan's Sperm"...
    • On an intersection between the two above lie recipes for mixed drinks popular on student campuses. These too have been creatively named, examples being "Panoramix's Cauldron" and "Murky Mississippi".
    • Normal people on an any random day will for the most part choose between tea and coffee. Coffee lovers have been mostly gulping down standard black, perhaps with some milk or sugar, but recent times and the proliferation of coffee-making machines resulted in the spread of more sophisticated ways. Tea drinkers, for the most part, are happy enough with teabags (usually black tea) and perhaps sugar, a slice of lemon, or occasionally concentrated fruit juice.
  • Hungary, being associated with eastern Europe, has the stereotypical association with vodka as has befallen all the regions that ended up has unremarkable local beers but good local wine. The local strong liquors are palinka and unikum. Palinka is a kind of light to clear fruit brandy which comes in a huge array of flavors. Unicum is some kind of herbal spirit allegedly related to bitters, not that Hungarians would admit it. As for the taste, think on the last syllable of its name...
    • Be careful with drink prices in Hungary; oftentimes a drink will come in two sizes with two prices, or even just one price listed (guess which one), and unless you make sure to specify that you want the smaller one at the listed price, you're likely to end up saddled with the bigger and more expensive drink.
    • Speaking of the good local wine, see the bit about Tokaji (Tokay) under "Historical" below.

    Australia 
  • The main Australian drink is known as "piss". It's a generic term for any alcohol from finest claret to beer to absinthe to vanilla extract. Which might or might not slow down service if the bartender happened to be American.
  • Australians drink beer. No-name beer, served cold in a glass, no matter where they are. Most Australians drink either Carlton Draught, or the variety of state lagers which are only popular in the given state and have only a vile taste in common: Tooheys New in NSW, XXXX in Queensland, VB in Victoria, Swan Draught in WA, Boags or Cascade in Tasmania, and West End in SA. Outside pubs, the beer is drunk either straight from the can or from a "stubby" (a short, squat glass bottle, in contrast to the "longneck"). A sizeable industry has grown up making foam "stubby holders" designed to keep the ambient heat from raising the temperature of the beer to the point where one might be able to taste it.
    • Not so! "Though Angus loves his whisky dear/And Paddy likes his tot/The Aussie has no drink at all/He drinks the bloody lot!"
    • All of the above beers are invariably characterless pale lagers served at temperatures so cold that even if they did have redeeming features, they would not register on your palate. If an Australian pub boasts 10 different taps, they will consist of 8 different brands of insipid pale lager, plus Guinness and a cider.
    • An Australian will sneer at British beers for being warm and flat and at mainstream American beers as being "pissweak", despite mainstream Australian beer being inferior to the former and indistinguishable from the latter (and unlike the US, where craft beer has fully come into its own and can now be found most places, in Australia... well, we're working on it, honest).
  • As for spirits, the most popular overall are various types of whisky, including bourbon and scotch. Jim Beam, Johnnie Walker Red and Jack Daniels are probably the most popular among the masses — whether bought straight or premixed with Coke. But an Australian who can afford truly good spirits, is usually an Australian who will have what are perceived to be more civilised tastes.
    • For bogans, their flagship drink is rum. The rum will be Bundaberg, distilled from the finest sugar and biological waste, and it is always mixed with coke (in some pubs, "Bundy and coke" will be available pre-mixed, on tap).
    • Younger people tend to opt for vodka. The default choice is Smirnoff, which is what clubs and bars mostly seem to carry. An "alcopops" tax was introduced by the Prime Minister in 2008 because of the huge popularity with the youth of Australia of the flavoured pre-mix vodka drinks that are so sugar laden that they were closer to soft drinks than alcohol. Of course, this just meant that bottles of straight vodka were cheaper as opposed to cases of the alcopops, and youth turned to vodka cocktails drinks like the screwdriver, and caused bottle shops to start selling packs of the vodka and mixers together.
  • If not alcoholic, Australia offers a fine hybrid of multicultural drink influences. If they are "traditional" Aussie, expect tea. If they are suburbanite, sophisticated, white collar etc. expect espresso coffee or the unique Australian variations, "long black" and "flat white," (espresso diluted with hot water and with milk, respectively. The first is not quite an Americano; second is absolutely not a latte.) Australian coffee is surprisingly strong (an Italian legacy). If they are rich and don't understand what they're drinking, it's Starbucks coffee. Not to mention the variety of European coffee variations. Warning however, for calling them by the wrong nationality. For example, calling Greek coffee "Turkish" and vice versa.
    • Non-alcoholic drinks are also affected by geography - coke is still the drink of choice, except in South Australia, where its sales are outstripped by iced coffee (one of the only places in the world where coke is outsold by anything, in fact). In South Australia, all iced coffee is Farmer's Union, and in the Northern Territory it's Paul's. Other flavoured milk drinks are sold in every supermarket and milk bar, fruit juice is the same as everywhere else, and bubble tea is increasingly popular. Less usual is Australia's fondness for ginger beer in of itself rather than as just an ingredient for alcoholic drinks; premixed lemon lime and bitters is also a strange affectation not seen outside of Australia and New Zealand.
  • Drinking wine is not uncommon, middle and upper class Aussies have no social faux pas on drinking it but its still holds a pretentious middle class image amongst working class Australians, with only very special circumstances mitigating this, however if a foreigner were to point that drinking wine is snobbery or excessive in the present context, expect a response of "Weeell I bet you wouldn't know we produce over 100 international awarded red wines, not to mention we have major share of the top white wines on the international market and [Major Winery in the Region] does a fantastic line of Chardonnays, but you wouldn't know that you foreign bastard!". It's often a lot more hostile if the questioner is English, if the person doing the questioning is French even more so. They may drink a lot of beer but they're proud of their wine.
    • Disdain for wine is increasingly a marker of those of very low socio-economic status. You'd be hard pressed to find a manual labourer in any Australian capital city who didn't know their way around a wine shop. (Thank you, Italians. And the globalization of wine. Which Italians in Italy hate. Funny, that.)
    • Cheap white wine is also a popular party drink for the young, bought by the cask rather than by the bottle. The slang term for it is "goon". This leads to the drinking game Goon of Fortune, where players sit beneath a Hill's Hoist (a rotating clothes line) with bags of goon affixed to it, then spin the clothes line until one of the bags hangs over a player. That player must drink from the goon bag.
  • Cider experienced a surge in popularity in the late 2000's with the younger population, as they dislike the bitter taste of beer compared to the sweeter fruit flavours in cider.

    United States 
  • A redneck, regular Joe: "Gimme a beer." If he's feeling particularly sophisticated he'll insist on a longneck (bottle). If a brand is mentioned, it is almost always an American beer, and always a lager.note 
    • Craft brewing didn't get started in the US until 1978note , but national beer distribution was extraordinarily difficult until the mid-1970s, so if it's pre-80s, the beer will often be a regional beer. Regional, not Microbrew. So expect Pabst in the Midwest, Rainier or Olympia in the Northwest, Old Style in Chicagoland, Genessee in the Northeast, Narragansett in New England, Ballantine in New York City/New Jersey, and so on.
    • Note that traces of this regionalism remain, particularly in Texas, where Lone Star and Shiner (see below) reign supreme, and the area around Philadelphia, where if you ask for "a lager" you'll get Yuengling Traditional amber lager (possibly after being queried "bottle or draft?").
  • A Southerner will take bourbon — "...and leave the bottle.", as will the Cowboy Cop—unless the cop is Irish, in which case he'll take Jameson. Note that in some big-city police departments, all cops are "honorary Irish", and will take the Jameson (see The Wire for an example—the Baltimore P.D. is one of those departments).
  • A rich Southerner, though, will take a mint julep. And probably mention the technique of bruising the mint leaves known as "muddling."
  • Southerners are also partial to sweet tea... Which is basically iced tea but with sugar. Lemon, raspberry and mint are optional.
    • Southern sweet tea is distinct from ordinary iced tea because it is brewed hot and sweetened before it cools. This delivers a much higher sugar concentration - some sweet teas contain twice as much sugar as Coca-Cola.
  • Irish-Americans attempting to seem more Irish will drink Guinness (or, for harder drinkers, Jameson's). Lampshaded in Ballykissangel where the pub owner considered dropping what was obviously Guinness stout because only one customer ordered it outside tourist season. (In reality, Guinness is also very popular with real Irish people - to the point that, as noted above, "A pint" in most bars in Ireland means a Guinness, and if not it's almost always an Alternate Company Equivalent like Beamish or Murphy's stout.)
  • A teetotaler will drink a Long Island iced tea — typically after being convinced by his friends that it's a nonalcoholic drink. Hilarity Ensues.
    • This ignores the fact if you're a teetotaler you can taste alcohol immediately, it's instantly recognizable. Also, you can order any mixed drink without alcohol by asking for it "virgin," e.g. a virgin strawberry daiquiri.
    • And a "virgin" long island iced tea would be about a shot worth of cola with a little lemon juice and sugar water mixed in.
    • In real life, most bartenders hate Long Island iced teas and judge people who order them; the general stereotype is that people who order them are cheapasses who want to get fucked up for as little money as possible, tip poorly (or not at all), can't hold their liquor, and will do something to get themselves cut off or thrown out well before the night is over. In short, it's viewed as a trashy drink for trashier people.
  • An Old West cowboy takes whiskey or tequila. A modern Texan might have either, but also likes frosty domestic lagers in their native aluminum cans, and you'd be hard pressed to find a licensed Texan restaurant that doesn't serve at least two varieties of margarita.
    • He's also likely to ask for a bottle of Shiner. Expect him to be very angry if he's out of state, and the bar doesn't have it.
    • If the hero confronts the villain in a Wild West saloon, the bad guy may order two of "the usual" which will be something incredibly strong/borderline toxic/potentially fatal. He downs one like soda pop, and dares the hero to drink the other. Hilarity Ensues.
  • Gangstas will drink a "40" (40 fl oz bottle of beer or malt liquor) and pour out a bottle on the ground to remember their fallen comrades. Goes way back to the days of war.
  • New Mexicans drink Tecate with lime and salt or, if you have a sophisticated palate, Negra Modelo.
  • Fratboys: All the drinks of this entire page in alphabetical order. Twice, with a stomach pump to chase. Alternately, the Fratboy will only be shown choosing drinks that have as little taste as possible, such as bland light beer or vodka cocktails. Alcohol with character will never cross the fictional fratboy's palate. If this is a home event and not at a bar, expect at least one keg, which will be drained dry by the end of the evening.
    • Note that this in no way limited to American fratboys, either.
  • College kids will do Jello shots. If they're on spring break in Florida or Mexico, they will drink tequila.
    • Alternately, they will drink any of a variety of awful mass-market economy pale lagers—typically one of the Big Three's "reject batch" beersnote , although certain particularly vile regionals (Narragansett in the Northeast, National Bohemian in Maryland and DC, Blatz in the Great Lakes, and the historically-Midwestern Pabst Blue Ribbon everywhere) are also in the mix—not because they like it (they usually profess to hate it), but because it's cheap, and gets them drunk.
    • Cheap boxed wines and jug wines are also popular. Pretending to be "classy" ironically while drinking this wine is a surefire sign that you're dealing with intellectuals, if not outright hipsters; actually thinking it's classy just because it's wine is a surefire sign that these students...well...they aren't intellectuals. (Are you sure these students aren't at clown college? And we don't mean the one that actually teaches clowns.)
  • Ordinary Joe orders "coffee." The barista at the fancy coffee bar looks at him like he's speaking Martian.
  • Yuppie wants a coffee: They order the superultradecafmochalattenote  with extra foam, super hot.
    • Or conversely, yuppie wants a coffee and makes the fancy-schmancy order, only to be offered regular or decaf at a little mom and pop coffee shop.
  • New Englander wants coffee. Nine times out of ten, he gets it from Dunkin' Donuts, which has damn near saturated the region. That tenth time will almost invariably be Honey Dew, though Gourmet Donuts is also a possibility if you're in central Massachusetts, as is Marylou's if you're on the South Shore.
    • During the aftermath of the Boston Marathon Bombing of April 2013, the city was shut down almost completely so the cops could search for the perpetrators. Dunkin Donuts were allowed to operate, it being considered an essential service akin to a public utility. And they really are: New England Dunkin' Donuts are basically secondary police outposts.
    • Two South Jerseyans want coffee. Nine times out of ten, they argue interminably about whether they should go to Dunkin' Donuts or Wawa, but end up just going whichever one they come by first.
  • Does a New Englander not want coffee? If so, it's probably something from Polar Beverages; any number of their seltzers will usually suffice, but if they want something sweeter, an Orange, Pink Grapefruit, or Cranberry Dry or one of their other sodas will serve that purpose just as well.
  • The Ordinary High-School Student will often order "Coke", no further specifics (maybe Pepsi depending on who's paid for Product Placement).
    • Coffee is fast becomming an alternative due to the growing popularity of iced coffee drinks and the need to stay awake early in the morning.note 
  • By the way, in different parts of the United States, the standard term for "soft drink" varies. Most notably, in the Deep South, the generic term is "coke" (occasionally "soda", in contrast to the more Midwestern "pop"). Conversations like this really do happen:
    Host: Can I get you a coke?
    Guest: Sure. Have you got any Dr Pepper?
    • Pop is less Midwestern and more Minnesotan. The term is also dominant in Michigan, perhaps due to the proximity and influence of Canada, where it is universally used. Asking for a pop in Wisconsin, Iowa, or the Dakotas will generally result in a weird look. Asking for a soda in the north star state, especially outside the Twin Cities, is often greeted likewise.
    • Chicago tends to have a good mix of all three terms, even "coke", which is nearly unheard-of elsewhere in the Midwest.
    • "Pop" tends to manifest in odd areas around the midwest. Where the northern midwest (Except Minnesota) has soda as a common term, it is entirely possible for someone to honestly have no idea what you're talking about unless you say "pop" in Kansas or Missouri.
    • Also, getting a Sprite from the "coke machine". To be fair it probably is in fact a Coca-Cola vending machine, as Sprite is a Coca-Cola product.
    • The term "tonic" used to refer to soft drinks in Massachusetts, but these days, you're unlikely to hear anyone under the age of 60 or so use the term seriously. It's usually simply called "soda."
    • RC Cola is fairly popular across the Southeast, primarily outside the larger cities (where Coca-Cola and Pepsi have pretty much sewn up the markets). The order will vary in its pronunciation: black Southerners tend to say the letter "r" as "ar-uh", thus "Ar-uh-see cola", whereas a white Southerner's order will sound more like "awr-see cola" or "coler". Southern country folks in general will say "Co-cola", which means Coca-Cola specifically.
      • "Co-cola" is used in-universe in Raising Arizona, when H.I. tries to get out of a social engagement: "Matter of fact, honey, I think I'll skip this little get-together myself. Glen won't mind. I'll just duck out with the boys, knock back a coupla co-colas." It's likely that he actually intends to drink beer.
  • Hardboiled Detective-types always get whisky. More specifically, it's usually Scotch. If he's ordering a nonalcoholic drink, like in a diner, it will always be coffee, black.
  • In fiction, politicians and businessmen have an affinity for martinis or scotch. The latter, possibly because the word "scotch" sounds appropriate to their vocabulary. In real life, their drinks are more varied, but the spirit is right.
  • If you're dealing with Seattle, the Drink Order ranges from drip coffee (in a hurry, not fancy, maybe not much cash) to the ridiculously specific espresso cart order (and will be annoyed when the barista doesn't know how to make it). If he's drinking alcohol, it's usually some kind of microbrew or local wine.).note  Almost Live! used this stereotype as a surprisingly rich source of gags.
  • An Orthodox Jew will be drinking the hideously-sweet (and just generally hideous) Manischewitz or Kedem kosher wine. Hilarity Ensues when he attempts to obey the commandment on Purim (to be so drunk as to be unable to tell "cursed is Haman" from "blessed is Mordechai") using this wine. (Never mind that beer or various distilled beverages could have done the job just fine and not violated any laws...).
  • Guidos (over-muscled, popped-collar- or tracksuit-wearing, spiky-haired East Coast young men of typically Italian ancestry) will have Jagerbombs and vodka with Red Bull, particularly when clubbing, and especially when clubbing on the Jersey Shore. (Truth in Television, by the way—a private club room in Atlantic City, Seaside Heights, and elsewhere on the Shore will typically get you the room, many bottles of Belvedere vodka, and many cans of Red Bull—and nothing else.)
  • Wiseguys will almost always drink something Italian. Hot drink? Espresso. Drink with dinner? Italian red wine (unless it's fish, in which case it's Italian white wine; hey, we're classy!). Drink after dinner? Grappa. Drink to get drunk? Sambuca. The only real exception is beer, where they'll drink the "regular Joe" stuff mentioned above. (This despite Italian brands like Peroni having some presence in the United States.)
  • People from regions with new strong craft brew cultures will typically be inordinately proud of them. Chicagoans out of the city can be expected to order Goose Island wherever it appears (despite the fact that it isn't brewed in Chicago anymore...), while Michiganders can be counted on to order Founders or Bell's outside the state even if they aren't partial to either at home (or, more to the point, if they're partial to the other one back home but can't find it where they are). Meanwhile, a few proud Delawareans are willing to shell out for the Dogfish Head...not that Dogfish Head needs the help...
    • Incidentally, if in Europe, many of these aficionados will loudly proclaim that America is today the best place in the world to drink beer. Whether or not this is true (it's certainly more arguable now than it was in the past), it's certainly not going to earn this guy any friends.
  • Metal fans can go either way; beer is almost always the exclusive beverage of choice, but it can go anywhere from cheap, inoffensive fare (PBR and High Life, aka "hipster water", are both very common, as are Narragansett and Yuengling in areas where they're available) to high-end craft. The latter is helped by the fact that there seems to be a fairly large amount of brewers who are also metal fans, and the fandom's general emphasis on integrity and authenticity lends itself to the enjoyment of brews made under the same principle.
    • In Europe, where metal culture has a much stronger Scandinavian influence, metalheads will often go for mead in addition to beer, and sometimes even wine so long as it's made from any fruit that isn't grapes.
  • The Bourgeois Bohemian will drink wine, probably from the Napa Valley—unless it's from another American wine region that's "an undiscovered treasure." A non-alcoholic drink will probably be coffee made from fresh-ground beans in a French press—unless it's some kind of particularly fancy tea or herbal tea.
  • Women stereotypically drink fruity mixed drinks like Cosmopolitans. Or they'll drink white wine, typically Chardonnay (which has been described as the wine a woman drinks when she wants to get drunk but doesn't want to get drunk quickly) or White Zinfandel (a highly alcoholic, extremely sweet wine which isn't technically a white; it would be a rosé if rosé wine had ever done anything to be associated with the alcoholic Kool-Aid that is White Zin, so it's called a "blush" instead). A woman's coffee order is likely to be a "skinny latte" or some kind of specialty flavor, especially if she's a college student; pumpkin spice latte in the fall and peppermint latte in winter are particularly stereotypical. And forget about drinking anything if you're pregnant.
  • If it's the fall or winter and cold and someone nearby grows apples, it's a good bet that there will be apple cider (which is non-alcoholic—it's just unfiltered apple juice) and old-fashioned cider doughnuts (which have a small amount of apple cider in the batter, which combines with the cooking technique for a unique texture). The cider may be cold, or it may be hot, in which case some people like adding warming spices (like cinnamon, nutmeg, and clove) and maybe some orange slices or orange peel to make mulled apple cider. This custom is particularly characteristic of the Northeast and Great Lakes regions. Powdered instant hot cider exists as well; it tends to be ghastly oversweet.

    Canada 
  • Alcoholic: Beer. Usually Canadian beer (typically either Molson or Labatt), though European beer is also acceptable. But not American beer, which has been the target of ridicule since time immemorial (ironic, since Canadian mass-market lagers are viewed with similar derision in the US).
    • Certain brands are distinctly more popular in some provinces, though, such as Sleeman's in Ontario or Keith's in Nova Scotia. Iconic beers in the prairie provinces are Old Style Pilsner (referred to as just "Pilsner", or "Pil" for short) and Bohemian (nicknamed "Boh"), both currently made by Molson. On the west coast, the cheap beers of choice are Lucky Lager and Cariboo.
    • Note that some Americans, particularly those from the Northeast and Great Lakes states, are fond of Canadian beer. Indeed, in some places, it's sort of unusual not to find Labatt or Molson on tap.note 
    • American microbrews can be acceptable—when they manage to cross the border, that is. Canadian microbrew is somewhat less developed than the American, but still has a strong showing; particularly popular are the Quebec breweries, especially Unibroue (which is oddly owned by the Ontarian Sleeman's) whose Belgian and North French-inspired beers are considered among the finest in North America (the tripel La Fin du Monde in particular is considered to be a must-try for all lovers of Belgian-inspired beer in the New World, and well deserves its champagne-like bottle).
  • The classic heavy liquor is Canadian [Rye] Whisky, though really any hard liquor will do.
    • Canadian whisky is also popular in the American Northeast and Great Lakes region.note  The good stuff (that gets exported) is highly favored, while the cheap stuff is the usual go-to whisky for the poor drinker who likes whisky.
    • It should also be noted that, due to a primarily Scottish and English influence on the drinking culture of Canada, whisky forgoes the "e" seen in America and Ireland.
  • The Caesar: Canada's answer to the Bloody Mary uses clamato (a blend of tomato and clam juice) for flavouring.
  • Wine is becoming more popular, partly due to Canada's increasing reputation in the international wine community (particularly icewine and dessert wines).
  • Non-alcoholic: Coffee. Which is to say, drip coffee, served "double-double" (two creams, two sugars), and purchased from Tim Hortons, which is even more popular in Canada than Starbucks is in the United States. Starbucks (along with other specialty coffee chains) does exist, but is only popular in the heart of large cities. People who drink there have even more of a "yuppie" reputation than in America, because of the essential "Canadian-ness" of Tim Hortons.
    • This may vary from area to area; out West Starbucks has more of a hipster demographic than a yuppie one. See Less Than Kind for an example.
  • Tea is also popular in Canada, though not quite so much as in other Commonwealth countries. Its greatest popularity is among the First Nations, who acquired the taste from the British traders and trappers of the Hudson's Bay Company.
  • Canadian soft drinks are also made with sugar as opposed to corn syrup - and with cleaner water than their other North American counterparts. This means that Canadian visitors to points south of the 49th generally find any soft drinks served them to taste odd, if not outright bad, and also leads to the prevalence of flavoured variants which are less popular (and less available) in Canada. Soft drinks in Canada are usually referred to as "pop" and Coke means exclusively Coca-Cola. Note that until March 2010, non-cola soft drinks (7-up, Mountain Dew, ginger ale, etc.) in Canada were generally not permitted to contain caffeine, and still may not.
    • "Rum and Coke" (known elsewhere in the world as a Cuba Libre) usually means exactly that - dark rum (preferably, although some order with light) mixed with Coke-thank-you-very-much. Lime is optional (as Canadian Coke tends to taste better) and may have to be specifically requested (i.e. "With a twist). Sometimes referred to as "Down And Dirty." Use "Rum and Diet" for the sugar-free variant.
  • Smirnoff Ice is a relatively popular pre-mixed vodka drink in clubs or for parties. Although dismissed as "cheerleader beer" in the United States, this is because the American and French versions are made with malt liquor and generally have a lower alcohol content. The vodka variety sold in Canada has no social stigma attached when drunk at clubs or dance parties.
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    Latin America and Caribbean 
  • Brazilians will order a beer (usually of one of the major 4-5 brands) as a cheap drink, a caipirinha (cachaça with lemon or lime, ice and sugar) at a party or a shot of cachaça (sugarcane spirit; if you're a real Brazilian, you'll call it by its diminutive cachacinha) if they want to get piss drunk.
    • Note: cachaça is not rum. Rum is produced from molasses—the thick, brown, sweet byproduct of refining cane juice into cane sugar. Cachaça is distilled from raw cane juice. This distinction is confused by the existence of rhum agricole from Haiti and other parts of the French-speaking Caribbean, which is made from raw cane juice, but whatever.
  • The island countries of the French Caribbean are noted for the aforementioned cane-juice-derived rhum agricole. A common cocktail is ti' punch (a Creole term derived from the French petit ponch, or "little punch"), consisting of rhum agricole, lime, and sugar (rather like a cachaça)—with the twist that the drink is most commonly served with the host setting out the ingredients and letting the guests mix for themselves (or as they say in French, chacun prépare sa propre mort—"each prepares his own death").
  • Cuba:
    • Cuba, for those in the know, is famous for Cuban coffee (or café cubano if you're being extra-pendantic), a form of super-strong espresso distinct from standard espresso by being sweetened with demerara sugar as it's brewed. Cubans (and Cuban Americans, especially Cuban Americans in Miami—and, these days, even Miamians who aren't Cuban) drink Cuban coffee in small cups; Cuban café con leche is also popular both in Cuba and among Cuban Americans and Miamians, consisting of Cuban coffee with milk, served with buttered, toasted Cuban bread as a breakfast item. White American tourists in Miami (or now that relations have been normalized, Cuba itself, one supposes) who don't know what they're doing will demand to be served a full cup of straight Cuban coffee, and be startled at the results (the comedian Ralphie May once did this, and said, "for the first 30 minutes, I could see into the future!" He then promptly crapped his pants).
    • Cuba is also historically famous for its rum. Historically, because many Cuban distilling families moved to Puerto Rico, the Dominican Republic, and elsewhere after the Revolution. That said, rum remains popular on the island itself.
    • A famous Cuban cocktail is the daiquiri, consisting of Cuban rum, lime juice, and sugar or simple syrup, shaken with ice, and served straight up in a cocktail glass or champagne coupe. (Yes, rum, lime, and sugar is a popular combo.) If you muddle the lime juice and sugar/syrup with some mint leaves in a Collins glass before adding the rum, stirring with ice, and topping off with club soda, you have the summer classic mojito.
  • In the media, in the (English-speaking) Caribbean they apparently only drink rum, or maybe tropical smoothies or ginger beer if they are children. Has elements of Truth in Television as rum production started in the Caribbean and continues to be a major industry there, hence its popularity.
    • Except for Jamaica, because that's where Red Stripe lager comes from.
  • Mexicans in non-Mexican works will be usually seen ordering tequila. Drinking mostly tequila actually happens in Guadalajara, where the town of Tequila is an hour-long drive away; in Mexico City it's far more common to see people ordering rum or brandy, and in the North they very much prefer whiskey and Tecate or Pacífico beer.
    • If someone's done their research, a Mexican period piece set before 1920 or so will feature pulque as a drink of choice for many Mexicans. Pulque, like tequila and mezcal, is produced from agave; however, the process of producing pulque is very different, as instead of taking the agave/maguey hearts and roasting them to produce the syrup, the plant is instead allowed to grow to the point where it is almost going to enter the flowering phase (which takes twelve years at least), and then has a big hole cut in the top part of the heart, allowing the aguamiel (sap/syrup/nectar) to flow. The aguamiel is then collected, and fermentation (uniquely) takes place by the action of the bacterium Zymomonas mobilis rather than yeast. The drink was mostly killed by a concerted Scare Campaign by the recently-arrived beer industry (which came with German and other Central European immigrants), who touted beer as being "cleaner" and "healthier" and more "modern" than pulque (which they accused of being made with human feces—falsely, by the time they started saying itnote ). Ever since, Mexico has been lager country, but pulque survives in some niche areas.
    • You know a writer has really done the research when they mention sotol as a spirit drunk in the far north of Mexico. Made from the fleshy roasted hearts of the "desert spoon" (a spiny distant relative of the agave family), this drink is more or less limited to three Mexican states (Chihuahua, Durango, and Coahuila) plus Texas.
  • In Central America and parts of northern South America (particularly Colombia), a form of rum known as aguardiente ("fire water") is quite popular. Aguardiente is somewhat different from standard rum in that it is generally infused with anise and has a bit of extra raw cane juice added at the end.
  • Both Peru and Chile have good land for viticulture, and produce some decent wines; Chilean wine today is especially widely exported. However, the actual Chileans and Peruvians themselves are most fanatical about a form of brandy distilled from their wine known as pisco. Never get in between a Peruvian and Chilean arguing about who invented pisco, or who makes the best pisco, or who gets to call their brandy pisco. That said, if you are in Peru or Chile, do drink whatever the locals are saying is good pisco, and most definitely try a pisco sour (which is like a whiskey sour but made with pisco rather than bourbon; the drink was a successful experiment by an American bartender in Lima in the early 20th century), as those are quite tasty.

    Sub-Saharan Africa 
  • Palm wine—made from the sap of palm trees—is a traditional favorite in West Africa. It's the same thing as the aforementioned Indian palm toddy. However, beer is seen as more modern, so generally palm wine is used to evoke precolonial times and ancient traditions (for instance, the Igbo people of Nigeria use it in traditional weddings).
  • Guinness is very popular in Nigeria, to the point where it's seen as a national beer. It's so popular, in fact, that not only is there a Guinness brewery in Nigeria, the Nigerian Guinness gets exported to the UK and Ireland to serve the local Nigerian immigrant communities.
  • Millet beer is stereotypically Central and East African.
  • Very East African is the spiced mead tej, particularly endemic in Ethiopia, whose sweetness despite the spicing (also a bittering agent) hides a massive hit of alcohol.
  • Unfortunately, Kenya has a reputation for changaa—moonshine that's as likely to be jet fuel as alcohol.
  • Carling—still called Black Label—is a standard bar beer in South Africa, although more sophisticated South Africans will drink the excellent local wine.
    • People who enjoy spirits but do not wish to be seen as alcoholics will mix their shots with water, much like the aforementioned Indians. Must be a British colonial thing.
  • Across Africa, import duties on liquor are very high (with a few exceptions), so only the super-rich will be seen drinking it.

    Middle East and North Africa 
  • The stronger presence of Islam in the Middle East means that alcoholic beverages are a bit harder to come by. The most common choices are tea, coffee, herbal drinks, and soft drinks.
    • While some countries, like Saudi Arabia and Iran, have Culture Police who enforce the drinking ban, alcohol is actually legal in most of the Middle East, if rather stigmatized socially in some places. As a result, you'll find the region's substantial non-Muslim minorities, as well as many secular or less-observant Muslims, indulging in... well... let's be honest, it's still hard going:
      • Every country that allows it has a single dominant brand of beer. These are rather different in some ways, but much like the beers of the Australian states, share a common vile taste, with the added benefit of no quality control (alcoholic percentage is typically given as something like "3.5-6.5% abv", and the flavor ranges within a single brand, bottle to bottle, from "not unpleasant" to "ohmygod, I can't believe I'm drinking something so foul"). The most well-known of these is the Egyptian Stella (unrelated to Stella Artois and often pronounced "Istella"), if only because Egyptian movies and TV are so ubiquitous in the Arab world. These awful beers are typically found in the hands of people short on cash (including students) and the sorts of unpleasant men who frequent the bars that double as brothels.
      • Domestic wine and liquor will almost inevitably be a cheapnote  and foul imitation of something foreign. There are two exceptions. One is Lebanon, where the Christian and secular populations are large enough (together, they probably form a majority) to warrant attention to quality. The other is araq (aka arak, raki, rakia, and ouzo, and not to be confused with Iraq, or a Balinese drink of the same name) the native liquor of the Eastern Mediterranean. This is a sort of clear grape brandy flavored with anise; the long tradition of making the stuff means that the quality is actually halfway decent (although not always). It is drunk by mixing 50-50 with water, which turns the stuff from clear to milky-white by bringing the essential oil of anise out of solution and into an emulsion; sugar may be added as well. Araq (by all its names) has connotations of poor farmers and laborers in the 19th century and nostalgia for those times (and therefore nationalism); the foul, cheap wine and liquor are again associated with poverty and sleazy-looking johns.
      • Wealthy, secular types will have imported liquor. Depending on the country, this means that it was either imported legally, in which case high tariffs have been paid on it, or illegally, in which case it will command a high price on the black market. Or it will have been purchased at the duty-free store, which while cheaper than the other two options indicates foreign travel—a relatively expensive luxury. Either way, it's more expensive. The brand doesn't matter terribly much, as it's a mark of wealth that you could buy the stuff in the first place, but for whatever reason, the rulers of oil states and other such men are stereotypically associated with Johnnie Walker Scotch—and the most expensive kind within their price range, if you please. Christopher Hitchens—himself a fan of Johnnie Walker—noted that Johnnie Walker Black Label was the favorite drink of the PLO, the Iraqi Baath party, and Muammar Gaddafi.
      • A guy who wants to be seen as "manly" or "cool" enough to drink beer without breaking the Islamic prohibition on drinking alcohol will drink alcohol-free beer and try to avoid grimacing. His drinking friends (if he has any) secretly laugh at him.
    • One more thing to mention: Many of these countries have illegal moonshine operations. One of the biggest markets is Sudan, which has enforced an alcohol ban (poorly) since The '80s: the traditional date-liquor araqi (unrelated to araq except by name; they both derive from a term meaning "sweat") is by all accounts rampant in the countryside and in the vast working-class neighborhoods of Khartoum. Moonshining is also fairly big business in Iran, although not as big as bootlegging of foreign liquor smuggled in from a variety of other countries (typically via Iraq, Turkey, Azerbaijan, or Armenia) or booze bought secondhand from the country's non-Muslim minorities (there are substantial communities of Armenian and Assyrian Christians and—believe it or not—Jews in Iran), who can get alcohol legally.
    • Also, the coffee, tea, and herbal drinks? Most of them are pretty good, and any traditional coffee shop/tea house will have a smorgasbord of them ranging from the typical (hot tea and direct-infused coffee) to the interesting (mint tea, hibiscus tea, cinnamon tea) to the medicinal (e.g. hot lemonade with honey and mint for sore throats and ginger tea for sour stomachs). There are also some drinks that are just weird, the strangest being a thick drink what the Arabs call sahlab, the Turks call salep, and the English called "saloop" back when they drank the stuff four hundred years ago. Made from ground orchid root and flavoured with cinnamon, this stuff is said to help with male potency—and given that orchids are called orchids because their roots look like balls and the actual drink is thick and milky white, you can see why.
  • Israel is an exception to the aforementioned presence of Islam.
    • American Jew visits Israel and is offered a Kosher wine. Trying to be polite, but expecting (based on the aforementioned Manieschewitz and Kedem) that all Kosher wine is awful, he takes the glass, steels himself... then is pleasantly surprised that the wine is actually pretty good. Actually, beyond pretty good—it's one of the better wines he's ever had. He downs the whole bottle. His Israeli hosts are bemused, but happy it's Purim, they down a bottle too, merrily fulfilling the only holiday-related commandment they'll obey all year.
    • Also, Israelis enjoy drinking Goldstar beer (or Maccabee if you're a masochist) and Araq Ayalim (Deer Araq - Domestic, cheap, Israeli brand that has some deer drawn on the bottle).
  • Turkey is also exempted from the general rule of the Middle East, thanks to 90 years of government-enforced secularism. Bear in mind, however, that some Turks will insist that their country is part of Europe, thank you very much—and never mind that Iraq and Iran are just across the border! As for what they drink, the Middle East rules do apply for softer drinks, but as for alcohol:
    • The traditional drink is arak, which goes by the name of rakı in Turkey. As mentioned above is a clear grape brandy flavored with anise, and usually consumed by mixing with water; unlike some other places, sugar is not added, but a glass of plain water is sometimes taken as a chaser/side drink. Purists may drink the stuff straight. Regardless of how you take it, rakı is associated with the kinds of people who drink "traditional" drinks: old men, rustics, nationalists, and hipsters.
    • Several brands of wine can also be found, usually cheaper than but inferior to imported wine. That said, there has been some improvement of late.
    • Imported wine and liquor is available relatively cheaply, as Turkey has been in a customs union with The European Union since 1996.
    • And beer is popular with everyone. Efes is the most common brand, with several variations. Including a weird brown ale with coffee flavour that no one likes.
    • The Turkic peoples of Central Asia are just as religiously less stringent due to centuries of Imperial & Soviet Russian rule. They drink kumis like their Mongolian brethren or vodka brought by the Russians.

    Other Asia 
  • China:
    • A member of the Communist Party of China will down several small glasses of baijiu at Party functions and while entertaining the Western, Korean, and Japanese businessmen who come to visit. The stuff tends to be stronger than Western liquor and even the finer varieties—let alone the mediocre ones provided to middle- and lower-level functionaries—have been compared in flavor to jet fuel. All of a sudden, the Great Leap Forward makes a whole lot more sense.
    • At a quieter or more informal occasions, the functionary will usually drink either traditional huangjiu ("yellow wine," really a form of rice wine that ranges in color from colorless to yellow to deep purple), or a beer. If it's beer, whether it's imported or domestic depends on position in the Party. Besides the bit about position in the Party, an ordinary modern Chinese fellow will be much the same; both huangjiu and beer are common tipples for your average Chinese person, with each having its appropriate time.
    • A commonly shown brand would be Maotai for baijiu and Tsingtao for beer. It is important to note that while Tsingtao is relatively cheap, Maotai is not, usually going for over $200 per 500mL bottle—it's basically the 30-year-old single malt of Chinese liquor.
    • Chinese Nouveau Riche will purchase a rare bottle of European wine at auction for several times its expected price. He will then meet up with his buddies, who all have similarly-overpriced bottles, empty them all out into a big, silver bowl, and drink the resultant cocktail. If the wines boast particularly tannic characteristics, cola will be added. Liberally. The European sommelier brought in for some reason has a heart attack.
    • Chinese period drama has its own stereotypes:
      • A character would usually order nu'er hong if he has come into a small fortune at hand. Either that, or it's his daughter's wedding day (the tradition in many regions was to buy nu'er hong when the daughter was born, bury it, and then dig it up and drink it when she got married—hence the name, which means "daughter red").
      • Also a wealthy man would sometimes drink tiger penis wine for virility if he was getting lucky that night. Or deer penis, or elephant penis, or really any penis.
      • For a vagabond, his liquor would mostly be stored in a bottle gourd.
    • Everyone drinks Kumis in a plate when in Mongolia (be it Inner Mongolia—which is part of China—or Outer Mongolia—the current independent country).
      • That said, beer is popular in the cities, and the local beer Khan Bräu (the brewery was founded as part of a cultural exchange program with East Germany in The '80s) is a decent, if unremarkable, light, pale lager.
  • A Salaryman in his native land will have sake, or perhaps an exotic foreign brew. Say, Budweiser.
    • In Real Life, though, sake has generally fallen out of fashion and beer is the drink of choice, mostly local brands like Sapporo, Kirin, Ebisu, or market-share-leader Asahi Super Dry. Most of these are of roughly equal quality to other mass-produced beers, but still better by far than the alternatives, known as "happoshu" (for low-malt content beers) or "third beer" (for non-malt beers, such as the corn-based Nodogoshi Nama). These beer-alternatives are generally beer-esque in taste, but they're attractive mainly because they're cheap, and thus much in favor among those seeking quantity over quality. note  If a character was smoking and drinking, he would most likely extinguish the cigarette butt on the beer can and throw it in.
    • Or Suntory "Scotch". Makes you happy faster. Well, Suntory whisky is at least drinkable, unlike the ever-popular Old Nikka, which, ironically, nobody outside of Japan ever heard of, despite its massive following.
      • Suntory whisky is not just drinkable — in 2014, their Yamazaki Single Malt Sherry Cask 2013 variety was named the world's best in the Whisky Bible 2015, to the shock of many Westerners, particularly Scotsmen.
    • Japan's true native hard liquor is shochu, which is substantially weaker than whisky. Connotations depend on era; in 1950s-1960s Japan, shochu was the drink of choice for the bohemian artistic types of the postwar generation. After that, it increasingly became identified with old men—including ex-bohemians—until a revival in the early-to-mid 2000s, when it suddenly became hip again.
      • Possibly poured into a plate instead of cup.
      • The post-war years also left another legacy regarding the consumption of shochu: since beer was hard to come by back then, but shochu wasn't, the liquor was added to a malt-flavored non-alcoholic drink called Hoppy to approximate drinking a beer. Since then, shochu and Hoppy has become something of a Japanese tradition.
    • Schoolgirls choose orange juice, from a vending machine. Or just any other kind of soft drink, "juice" being the Japanese equivalent of "soda" or "lolly-water", or indeed "coke". One might also get a nice, warm canned soup from the vending machine during those cold winter times in Japan.
    • Canned coffee is everywhere in Japan, and drunk by everyone from middle schoolers on up. (It's probably got something to do with the long hours of studying and/or work.) The ur-brand is UCC Coffee (made famous outside the country by Neon Genesis Evangelion), but Suntory Boss (with Tommy Lee Jones as its pitchman) is probably the most prevalent.
    • People looking for refreshment on a hot day are equally likely to grab a bottled green tea (or mugicha or oolong tea) as bottled water. Sweetened Western-style teas are also available in the same fashion, but are less popular.
    • Menial laborers on their way home from (or even to) work might grab a single-serving jar of cheap sake (especially One Cup Ozeki). It works its way into reports of industrial accidents and delivery truck crashes with alarming frequency.
    • If you've just done some physical exertion, you could probably do with a sports drink, which in Japan means a cloudy, colorless beverage with a taste that's not quite sweet and not quite salty. The go-to brand is Pocari Sweat, which (as the name suggests) is apparently formulated to replace what the body loses through sweating.
    • Middle-aged women and up are stereotyped as drinkers of umeshu, which is made from shōchu that's had ume fruits steeped in it (along with a fair amount of sugar). It's sweet with a bit of sourness, rounding out the bite of the shochu.
  • Korean men will down soju (hard liquor distilled from rice wine) like it's water. This is aided by the fact that it is very nearly cheaper than water, and very nearly tastes like water. A drinking contest between a Chinese official and a Korean businessman is better known as a contract on both their livers.
    • Soju is a bit weaker than Western liquor (typically in the 30-35% abv range), but the quantities typically drunk, facilitated by its fairly mild flavor, make this an irrelevance. American servicemen newly stationed in South Korea often learn this the hard way, with many a gigantic soldier or Marine having to be dragged unconscious from the bar. Servicemen stationed longer, as well as their Korean comrades-in-arms, typically have a good laugh at the newbie's expense.
    • Beer in Korea, meanwhile, is almost exclusively viewed as something cheap and poor-tasting that exists solely to get fucked up on, which is largely Truth in Television due to domestic production largely consisting of two major companies who collectively hold an iron grip on the market and whose brews are of exceptionally poor qualitynote , while international options aren't much better in addition to being outrageously expensive. Outrageously restrictive regulations kept microbrews out of the picture until 2011, and while they have now begun to enter the market, they're still very much in their infancy and haven't done much to shake the perception that Korean beer is goat piss.
      • While alive, Kim Jong Il was known to be the single-largest purchaser of Hennessy Cognac, spending over $1 million a year on it.
  • The Australian chocolate malt drink Milo is well known throughout Southeast Asia. A legend spreads that Malaysians drink the most Milo out of any nationality, including the Australians (who still love it plenty).
  • Milk tea is pretty prevalent in Hong Kong, Malaysia and Singapore, especially "silk stocking" milk tea in Hong Kong, often paired with egg tart as a meal. For teenagers it would often be soda or bubble tea, especially in Taiwan.
    • Lemon tea is also quite prevalent in Hong Kong. Older H Kers prefer yuenyeung, which is basically coffee mixed with milk tea. Both drinks can be found in cha chaan teng, and commercial versions of lemon tea do exist (the most well known being 'Vita Lemon Tea', or VLT for short).
  • Indonesians usually drink sweet black tea, sometimes iced and/or flavored with jasmine, to the point that it's practically mandatory for every single eatery, either locally brewed or bottled Tehbotol brand. In coffee department they have a countless number of regional cultivars, yet in the end they're mostly served "tubruk", in which coffee grounds are mixed with hot water in the cup, although someone worth their salt usually filter the damn thing first one way or another. Also, don't forget Kopi Luwak which is basically pooped out by a palm civet. Due to the Muslim majority, alcoholic culture is not very visible there albeit the less religious stringency makes them well alive out of plain sight, but here's some rundown.
    • Most native booze starts from palm toddy, called saguer in Sulawesi and tuak in Sumatera & elsewhere, which is further distilled to insanely strong Cap Tikus(meaning "rat brand"), Arak Bali which is popular among tourists, sopi which tastes somewhat like vodka by virtue of using certain tree roots to sponge out the sweetness & aroma, among others.
    • In Java, there are ciu, a strong, clear moonshine which is not that awful made from either further fermented & distilled tape(a sweet treat made of fermented rice or cassava) or molasses/sugarcane distillate redirected from legit alcohol industry. They spawned its very own art of cocktail mixing called oplosan, in which ciu is mixed with things ranging from innocuous ones like juice or soda, other intoxicants like dextromethorpan, prescription pills, or other alcohol like cheap beer, purported tonics like energy drinks, herbs, or pinkie rats, to outright dangerous things like bugspray, methylated spirits, datura, etc. Naturally, they cause a depressing amount of deaths.
    • Also, there is a plethora of herbal wines like Congyang, the regional drink of Semarang city & Orang Tua which its company so big it also produces food, soft drinks, & hygiene products.
    • Indonesian beers like Bintang & Bali Hai is usually regarded as sub-par yet refreshing in a hot day. They are recently banned from minimarkets & small shops due to a new moral policy called the "Mental Revolution", which backfires in a surge of use of the aforementioned moonshine.
  • An Indian who has money will drink imported Scotch. An Indian who wants to look like he has money, but doesn't, will drink the native "Scotch", which is really rum (being made from molasses), diluted 50-50 with water.
    • Or he will have the native Kingfisher beer, which has the same lack of quality control that the aforementioned Middle Eastern beer does.
      • Amusingly, the airline bearing the Kingfisher name and owned by the same family is actually pretty luxurious—and in absolute terms, not just compared to other Indian airlines—but unlike the beer, it loses money...it rather makes one think about their priorities.
    • An Indian trucker will have palm toddy. Hopefully after he's done driving for the day. Hopefully.

    Historical 
  • Any race of warriors who wear fur and armour (from Vikings to dwarves) will quaff beer, ale, or mead — ideally from a drinking horn, tankard, or stein.
    • Mead, we should note, is the oldest known alcoholic beverage. All you need is a container, some honey, and some water, and it'll soon turn to mead.
    • Important to note that they "quaff" their beverages. It's like drinking, only you spill more.
  • Ancient Greeks and Ancient Romans generally drank wine, irrespective of social class. The wine was generally red, sweet, and concentrated to a degree that it had to be mixed with water to be drinkable. The wealthy would generally drink fine wines, which were usually minimally diluted (about a 1:1 ratio), while the lower classes drank ever-worse wines requiring greater quantities of water to become drinkable, to the point that the lowest classes often drank wine that was nearly vinegar (called posca in Roman times) mixed with water mostly so the water wouldn't make you sick.
  • If you're medieval and wealthy, you'll drink red wine from a goblet. If you're not so wealthy, mead or ale. (You don't have much choice about the 'drinking alcohol' part, since the only clean water available will have been brewed into beer or the like.)
  • Pirates will drink whatever's handy—but rum is the usual, either straight (when they can get it) or diluted 3:1 with water (called grog).
    • Truth in Television: Grog was for a long time standard issue on military ships at sea because the booze made the water safer/more palatable to drink. In the late 18th century, the British Navy started adding lime juice to fight scurvy. These concoctions were also the forebearer of alchoholic punch drinks.
      • For an extra kick and quicker recovery in a cold climate you can make your grog not with water, but with the strong tea. This itself is a variant of hot toddy (an old Scottish cold remedy which usually calls for whisky, but any brown liquor would do in a pinch; indeed, brandy, in some opinions, actually makes for a better toddy, although you should never say this to a Scot).
  • The American frontiersman will take a hard cider, or perhaps applejack (distilled or freeze-distilled cider, i.e. American apple brandy—George Washington had a prosperous distillery for it, and Alton Brown recommends that you use it instead of water for making apple pie crust). That is, until about the 1810s-20s, after which he'll have whiskey instead. The hard cider would be reserved for old coots; see below.
  • Tokaji wine was the signature drink of the Austrian and Hungarian upper classes starting around the 17th or 18th century (with the preference continuing through the end of the Empire in 1918 and afterward among the descendants of the nobles to this day), and anyone associating with them (for instance, Joseph Haydn, who spent most of his career in the employ of the somewhat eccentric and ludicrously wealthy Hungarian princely House of Esterházy). They evangelized for it across the courts of Europe, and found great success for it with Louis XV (who poured a glass for the Madame de Pompadour saying Vinum regum, rex vinorum ("Wine of Kings, King of Wines") and The Pope. Emperor Franz Joseph made a tradition of sending Queen Victoria one bottle of Tokaji for each month of her life on her birthday; on her last birthday (her 81st) in 1900, this amounted to 972 bottles.
  • A 19th century aesthete or decadent will have absinthe ... and find the prospect of impending madness and death terribly dull. And maybe, should they be so inclined, write a poem on the subject.
    • Absinthe is actually completely innocuous. Those clichés come from the French propaganda in the 1910s to get it forbidden in a attempt to fight alcoholism. Pastis, which immediately came to replace it, is pretty comparable (and still very popular).
    • The alternative is Laudanum - opiates mixed with wine.
      • Laudanum was primarily used as a painkiller and cough suppressant before the 20th century, so it may also be a sign that a character is dying of a terrible disease instead of decadence. Although it is entirely possible that one got the disease from decadence, so...
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    Universal 
  • Noblemen will almost certainly order a bottle of the landlord's finest wine with their meal. If they're not ordering a meal or courting someone, they'll have the finest brandy instead.
    • Unless it's an Imperial Russian nobleman we're speaking about. They preferred, of course, vodka, but not just any vodka but the artisanal kind that was made by nobles for nobles, very strong (100 to 150 proof), purified and flavored with herbs. There were a lot of traditional vodka recipes, from the sweet ladies' vodka ratafia to the extra-powerful yerofeich.
  • A pimp, a rockstar, or anyone who's flaunting his massive wealth, will order 5 bottles of the most expensive champagne, whiskey or cognac in the house.
  • Fans of hard rock and metal music, as well as musicians, will generally drink Jack Daniels or Jagermeister. If they're a real rock star, they'll drink it straight out of the bottle, though JD and Coke is also well regarded. These are often combined with large amounts of cigarettes. Lemmy of Motörhead was known for huge consumption of JD (he stated late in life—i.e. in his sixties—that he had had a whole bottle daily until relatively recently, at which point—again, ''in his sixties—he switched to a whole bottle of vodka daily "for his health"), as are Mötley Crüe (parodied on the cover of "The Dirt"). The Jägermeister is mostly because they sponsor everything.
  • Mangaka or Japanese student working overnight would usually go for energy drinks which often come in a small glass capsule bottle and perhaps a sipping straw.
  • Teenage or young adult delinquents will have their soft drink with some sort of alcohol mixed in for extra kick. Cuba Libre or a Screwdriver is often the popular choice, and one of the few that doesn't get one laughed at after one can legally go to a bar.note 
  • A young woman (or an effeminate man) will have a martini derivative such as a Cosmopolitan, or else a margarita derivative: sweet liqueurs, comparatively high ratio of mixer to spirit, lots of sweetened garnishes, maybe an umbrella in the glass. Expect it to be pink, blue, or green.
    • One story of the origin of the Cosmopolitan is that the bartender who invented it designed it for her patrons who ordered a Martini solely so they could look sophisticated holding a cocktail glass.
  • An inexperienced drinker (probably young) will take a sip of a spirit like whiskey or vodka. On taking a sip they will grimace and immediately spit it out.
  • A tough guy will order something like vodka by the shot and then drink it down like water. Exclamation of enjoyment optional.
  • Younger, hipper patrons are far more likely to order cocktails and mixed drinks rather than pure spirits unless they're in a group and looking to get wasted.
  • Someone, usually young, with a bit of extra cash, a desire to show off and get drunk, and with little knowledge about booze, will often order Grey Goose vodka.
  • The Cool Old Guy will take a Scotch or brandy (unless Southern, in which case he'll take a bourbon or rye).
  • Farm labourers will order a flagon of cider.
  • Middle-aged, middle-class women of the Real Simple-magazine-reading variety will get together and drink white wine. When they go out to dinner Friday night, they'll have margaritas.
  • The Cloud Cuckoo Lander will have an Umbrella Drink of some kind.
  • Caffeine-addicted geeks are as likely to reach for soda or energy drinks as coffee.
  • Nervous types will order decaf. If someone wants to mess with such a person, they'll switch the decaf for caffeinated, and Hilarity Ensues. A semi-subversion of the trope is the reverse situation, in which a hard-driving personality type or group of same has their extreme caffeine replaced with decaf. As Dilbert's Wally gasps among the fallen (asleep) bodies of his co-workers: "Must... find... antidote..."
    • Note: hilarity may not ensue in real life, so don't try this at home.
  • Recovering alcoholics will have club soda.
  • Geeks are always ready to Do the Dew. Real geeks still have half a case of Jolt Cola. Half a case, because the original stuff is impossible to find nowadays. "Proper" Jolt Cola (i.e. the stuff that children of the 80s drank in high school) is dead, but the brand still exists, only retooled as an energy drink. Has been seen at some gas stations, convenience stores and other random places. Can be ordered here.
    • Many geeks stocked up when Pepsi Throwback or Mountain Dew Throwback hit the stores. Both of these are made with sugar, instead of high fructose corn syrup. Should Mexican Coca-Cola (also made with sugar) be available in that part of the US, add that to the shopping list as well. Now the throwbacks are now available permanently in the US.
    • Mountain Dew is only intermittently available in the UK, so fans will stock up when it does hit the stores (or when they visit America) because it doesn't tend to be available for very long.
    • The all-night-gaming/LAN-Party favorite soda is usually Mountain Dew (either the original radioactive yellow-green variety or whatever limited-time-only flavor is available this month), though Bawls Energy Drink is also popular.
    • In Germany, while geeks may have Mountain Dew, energy drink or coffee, those who identify as hackers will always be seen with at least one bottle of Club-Mate, a yerba mate based soft drink (always from the bottle, though not because of convention, but merely that it tastes rather bad in a glass). This goes so far that the relatively small brewery producing it always has delivery difficulties whenever there's a major hacking convention. Recently it has fallen into fashion with ordinary university students though and is being offered by a few national store chains, as well as in the back pages of 2600, a long-running hacker quarterly magazine. For an alcoholic drink, the hacker will have a Tschunk (rum, limes and cane sugar, topped up with Club-Mate of course).
  • Two types of characters order milk: total pansies and stone-cold badasses. The common gag is when some ornery local mistakes the latter for the former due to his drink order, tries to pick a fight, and Hilarity Ensues. The former has been largely overtaken by the latter in fiction; just look at all the milk-drinking badasses further down the page.
  • If a character identifies as a Juggalo (or Jugalette), expect him/her to drink Faygo.
  • For modern gunman type characters, three drinks are favored. One aligned with the west will go for beer. One aligned with the east will go for vodka. For the toughest of the tough, however, tea is the drink of choice. No alcohol to cloud the system, complex flavors, and contains both a stimulant and a tranquilizer, putting a true stone cold badass in a zen spot to dole out carnage. Interestingly enough, lots of actual fighters don't trust people who don't drink, one of the prime reasons being that because most soldiers, paramilitaries, and peacekeepers are young men and drinking is a key part of bonding for that demographic, teatotalers are seen as standoffish and wierd.

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