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  • Alternative Character Interpretation:
    • Zander Rice's relationship with X-24. He's adamantly against the nursing staff treating the children as anything but experiments, but during the sedation scene his behavior is almost paternal. Hypocrisy on his part? Or did the loss of dozens of valuable test subjects make him rethink his approach so as to not have The Dog Bites Back? Or is he just genuinely proud of his very own killing machine?
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    • Just how much of a mindless killing machine is X-24? Before killing Charles, he seems to actually sit back and listen while the old man speaks to him, and seems to be placing a comforting hand on his shoulder before stabbing him. Charles is also the only character he kills without provocation: As seen when carrying Laura down the stairs, he doesn't attack Logan until the latter attempts to avenge Charles. He also appears capable of experiencing familial care, or something close to it, as he is not too happy when he sees what Logan did to Rice.
    • Will Munson. At his death, when he realises he is out of ammo, it looks like he had a My God, What Have I Done? moment at the thought of what he was going to do. It's clear that, given how close he was to death, and the death of his family, he wasn't thinking straight at all. Did we see one last glimpse of the person Will really is, realising he just tried to shoot a man he had called a friend? Or was it just disbelief he ran out of ammo right when he got to Logan?
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  • Angst Aversion: The somber tone to the film has set some fans off of wanting to see it, even if it's Hugh Jackman's swan song for Wolverine. It doesn't help that this film seems to render the struggles of X-Men: Days of Future Past pointless, since, while the rest of the world is pretty much the same, for mutants, the world went to hell anyway. The only difference is that the death of mutants ends up being the result of secretly sterilizing their kind into extinction, rather than a public culling. The end of the X-Men themselves is utterly bitter as they are indicated to have been killed accidentally by Xavier of all people due to a fortunate and completely unrelated event. It also renders nearly all they've done or will do in future installments pointless. Help mutant kind? What mutant kind, in just a few years? Oh, good, they're taking in mutants with nowhere to go... So Xavier's first seizure will Kill 'em All. Bad guys are often acting on a belief that mutants can't help but be dangerous? Boo... Oh, wait, they're right, as the best of them will go on to cause mass death accidentally. Basically, the whole X-Men saga from beginning to very bitter end is rendered a Shoot the Shaggy Dog situation. You can be forgiven for considering this AU like the comic story it was based on in your Personal Canon.
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  • Award Snub: Despite widespread critical accolades, and being nominated for numerous honors since its release, Logan was completely shut out of the Golden Globes nominations, garnered only a single Oscar (for Adapted Screenplay — becoming the first film based upon a superhero comic book to do so — which it ultimately lost to Call Me by Your Name). And although it received quite a few nominations for other awards, it only actually won a handful.
  • Awesome Music:
    • The use of Johnny Cash's cover of "Hurt" in the trailer.
    • The end credits has Johnny Cash's "The Man Comes Around", which you might be familiar with.
    • Kaleo's "Way Down We Go" for the second trailer manages to not only convey the theme of persevering to the bitter end, even in the darkest of times, but also how the last installment of the Wolverine series goes out on its own terms.
  • Badass Decay: Logan's healing ability is severely compromised.
  • Broken Base:
    • Whether or not Wolverine will appear after this film. One half believes that X-23 may become his permanent female replacement, while the other half still wants Logan to appear, but played by a new actor. Arguments for having X-23 replace Wolverine that the X-Men Film Series is too Wolverine-centric, and that by retiring Wolverine would finally allow other characters like X-23 to grow. Furthermore, such proponents for retiring Wolverine would argue that it would be hard for any potential replacement to measure up to Jackman's performance. Proponents for recasting Wolverine argue that since Wolverine is one of, if not the most famous X-Man, and the X-Men movies tend to sell better when Wolverine is at the forefront (arguable, seeing as Wolverine was at the forefront of every X-Men movie except Apocalypse and First Class, the former of which earned more than six of the other movies in the franchise, including two of Wolverine's three solos). Furthermore, proponents of recasting Wolverine would argue that X-23 would be a little redundant, given their similar power sets and personalities. However, there is a third camp who favor having X-23 be at the forefront for a while and then introduce the recast Wolverine. The Disney purchase of Fox has only added fuel to the debate, by introducing another camp that wants to see the X-Men completely rebooted into the MCU and all previous continuity dropped altogether.
    • The fact that Hugh Jackman's take on Wolverine never got to wear a comics-accurate version of the costume in this or any other X-Men movie, especially after it was teased in a Deleted Scene for The Wolverine. While there are many who thought that They Wasted a Perfectly Good Plot by not at least including the costume in a Fantasy Sequence or a Flashback, others feel that the costume wouldn't translate well to live-action to begin with. There's also another group that would have liked to have seen Hugh Jackman rock the outfit at some point in the movie, but felt as though this movie wouldn't be the place to do it based on the Darker and Edgier and grounded tone that they were going for.
    • Fans are also divided on whether or not this movie belongs in the same timeline as Days of Future Past. Even though Flip-Flop of God says that it does, see Fanon Discontinuity below for reasons why many don't accept that.
  • Catharsis Factor: The Reavers are so terrible that it's therapeutic to see Logan and Laura cut them to pieces. Pierce and Rice also meet gruesomely satisfying ends, ESPECIALLY Pierce.
    • After relentlessly pursuing Logan, Xavier, Laura and the X-23 subjects the entire film while being needlessly sadistic in practically every scene he's been in, watching Pierce die a slow, painful and extremely gruesome death at the hands of the very children he's been hunting while pathetically pleading for his life is nothing short of satisfaction.
  • Complete Monster: Logan proves that sometimes Humans Are the Real Monsters:
    • Dr. Zander Rice is the head of the X-23 experiment. Before heading the X-23 experiment, Rice orchestrates the near-total genocide of mutantkind with a sterilizing virus that eradicates the X-gene, with survivors butchered by his second-in-command, Donald Pierce, and his Reavers to be used for raw material. To create a perfect killing machine afterwards, Rice has numerous women forcibly impregnated with the X-gene afterwards, taking their mutant children afterwards and murdering the women once their use expires. Rice conducts torturous experiments on the children afterwards to breed them into mindless assassins, with full emphasis on treating the children as "things" — a mindset which leads to some of the children committing suicide. Rice ultimately breeds a clone of Logan he dubs X-24 to serve the project's purpose and orders the children all killed, dispatching Pierce to commit further atrocities in his pursuit of the children once they escape. Once Rice himself comes into the fray, Rice looses X-24 onto an innocent family and callously watches as it butchers the entire family and Xavier himself, later rounding up all the children just short of the Canadian border and threatening to kill them all before Logan. Completely devoid of any compassion or feeling towards the subjects of his horrific experiments, Zander Rice ultimately becomes one of the most deplorable characters in the series, mutant or otherwise, in his pursuit to control mutantkind.
    • The aforementioned Donald Pierce is the psychopathic cyborg in charge of the Reavers, Transigen's military might. As the head of security for Transigen, Pierce took part in the butchering and vivisecting of many mutants for their raw materials, also assisting in the X-23 experiments alongside Zander Rice, entailing the forcible impregnation of women with mutant genes, murdering them after they give birth, then raising the resulting children as tortured lab rats to be turned into submissive slaves and assassins in adulthood. When the children began rebelling and even killing themselves to escape, Pierce was tasked with putting them all down, and proceeded to execute several of the children. After many of the kids escape with the help of the nurses, Pierce tracks down head nurse Gabriela, brutally tortures and murders her, and continues hunting the children—torturing and killing anyone in his way in the process. After he and Rice unleash the vicious X-24 onto a small family to slaughter them all, Pierce lays a trap for the escaped children, rounding them up for a mass execution while beating one into submission before releasing X-24 one last time to kill Logan. Motivated only by power, cruelty, and xenophobia, Donald Pierce is easily one of the most depraved villains Logan has faced, mutant or not.
  • Counterpart Comparison:
  • Darkness-Induced Audience Apathy: Given that the movie has a very bleak, harsh tone already, the fact that it establishes that mutants have stopped being born, rendering any progress of the past movies largely pointless, can be quite stinging. Not to mention that most of the cast of the past movies are nowhere to be seen and presumed dead in some cases, making their character development seem equally pointless, AND Xavier and Logan, already living miserable lives, are suffering from terminal illnesses and years of extreme injury. All in all, once the film's done, it's quite easy for one to see the franchise as one big "Shaggy Dog" Story with some Yank the Dog's Chain given how it subverts the optimistic vision of X-Men: Days of Future Past, especially with the deaths of Professor Xavier and Wolverine (and every other named character aside from the X-23 children, with a predictably similar situation to the family getting killed in X-Men Origins: Wolverine occurring). Not only that, the fact that Logan's healing factor began failing at the worst time, along with Xavier's powers failing, in a way that conveniently makes the already dying mutant race's situation even worse, can strain believability. However, the survival of the X-23 children and possible safe haven in Canada do give the audience a slight ray of hope that the mutant race may yet survive.
  • Draco in Leather Pants: Donald Pierce being a Complete Monster wasn't enough to dissuade some fans from depicting him in fanart and fanfiction as much less of a bastard than he is. Him being portrayed by fashion model Boyd Holbrook made this almost inevitable.
  • Ensemble Dark Horse: The doctor who treats Logan following his encounter with X-24, being one of the few humans to knowingly treat mutants with genuine decency, even thinking it an honor to meet one, and is quite possibly the only adult human with lines to survive the movie.
  • Even Better Sequel: To The Wolverine, which was seen as a Surprisingly Improved Sequel to X-Men Origins: Wolverine. It's really not common when the last movie in a trilogy ends up being seen as the best of them, and it's even rarer for a trilogy to get better with each passing installment.
  • Evil Is Sexy: Donald Pierce is played by Boyd Holbrook, a model, and has a pretty charming personality. He's also an utter piece of human garbage.
  • Family-Unfriendly Aesop: In this film, GMO food is secretly used to successfully sterilize a repressed group of minorities. Many a Conspiracy Theorist have claimed this has been happening for decades in real life, so seeing their irrational fears treated as Properly Paranoid may not go well with some people.
  • Fandom Rivalry: To a lesser case, Deadpool for a similar rating yet both are related to the X-Men.
  • Fanon Discontinuity: Make no mistake: the film is very much beloved by fans. However, the very depressing setting and ending made many refuse to accept this movie as the chronological finale of the X-Men film series. See Angst Aversion above for more details.
    • Even aside from the depressing nature of the story, fans argue that seeing Logan as an in-continuity climax does a disservice to major characters like Magneto, Mystique, Rogue, Beast, Jean Grey, Cyclops, Storm, Iceman, Shadowcat, who all simply become victims of a bridge dropped on them, not getting a proper finish and climax worthy of them, and it ends up making the franchise more Wolverine-centric than it already is, and the entire X-Men — their struggle, their Rogues Gallery, their universe — become Satellite Characters for one mutant, which kinds of ruins the entire purpose and appeal of the X-Men as a superhero team, as well as Wolverine's Character Development in the original story about a loner who gradually becomes a committed X-Man and team-player.
    • Others also argue that the film benefits from standing apart, since it doesn't have to rely on many of the franchise's more dubious entries (such as X-Men: The Last Stand, X-Men Origins: Wolverine, X-Men: Apocalypse) for its emotional power and impactnote . The Broad Strokes approach allows the film, in the vein of the similarly beloved Whatever Happened to the Man of Tomorrow?, to work as a more mythical take on the superhero film genre in the same way, and work similarly to The Dark Knight, which is also accessible to, and mainly celebrated by, viewers without having seen Batman Begins or The Dark Knight Rises.
  • Friendly Fandoms:
    • With Hulk because they are equally intense and dramatic films based on Marvel Comics.
    • Also with Deadpool and Deadpool 2 as both are heavily violent R rated stories based on Marvel, both being produced by Fox.
  • Genius Bonus: The decision to use both "Hurt" by Johnny Cash and "I Got A Name" by Jim Croce in the trailers and film make sense from a thematic point of view of this film and Logan's character arc. Johnny Cash was nearing the end of his life when his version of "Hurt" was released, and Jim Croce died before "I Got A Name" was officially released.
  • Harsher in Hindsight:
    • When helping Logan to fight Weapon XI, Victor Creed claims that he's only helping Logan because "nobody kills you but me". In this film, Logan is killed by X-24, who, although still played by Hugh Jackman, is essentially an Expy of Schreiber's Creed.
    • Six months after the film came out, Wolverine's co-creator Len Wein passed away. It's rather poignant that half a year after Logan's cinematic swan song ends with his death, his co-creator joins him.
    • The hopeful ending of X-Men: Days of Future Past becomes one with this film, as not long after the events of that film, Xavier accidentally kills some of the X-Men. On a similar note, Beast asks Logan if he survives in the future, Logan says no, but they can change that; it's highly possible that Beast was among those that didn't survive Xavier's seizure.
  • He Really Can Act:
    • In contrast to most models-turned-actors, Boyd Holbrook was praised for playing a genuinely threatening and charismatic villain, with many calling his performance superior to that of Richard E. Grant. Many viewers were actually disappointed when it turned out he wasn't the film's main antagonist.
    • Also alot of people were impressed how Stephen Merchant as Caliban could pull off drama so well.
    • Dafne Keen was subject to this as well, because of the well-established challenges of getting natural performances from child actors. Instead, her portrayal of Laura was heralded as one of the best parts of the film. Even better is that according to James Mangold, a lot of Laura's quirks were thought up by Keen herself, and advised future directors to give her some room to build on her characters.
  • Hilarious in Hindsight:
    • When Logan first arrives at the school in X-Men: Days of Future Past during 1973, Beast asks him if he's a parent. Logan responds with an amused "I sure as hell hope not". Now, Logan meets his daughter...
    • In X-Men: Apocalypse Jean Grey snarked that the third movie in any given movie trilogy is always the worst. Logan is the third Wolverine-centered movie and received overwhelmingly positive reviews from critics, while the response to the other two was negative (Origins) to mixed-to-positive (The Wolverine).
    • Based on the fact that this film was heavily influenced by Old Man Logan, pretty much everyone assumed that the first trailer depicted a world After the End following some major catastrophe. As it turned out, the desert environment was simply due to the movie being set in Mexico and southern part of the United States, and no major Earth-wide apocalypse has taken place.
    • Much like with Harry Osborn in Spider-Man 3 ten years before, Logan features a death of a film series' version of a long-running character, in this case, the film version of Wolverine. And much like One More Day, released months later in 2007, saw the resurrection of comics!Harry, months after the release of Logan, Marvel Legacy saw the return of comics!Wolverine.
    • The appearances of the X-Men comics in the movie became this now that 20th Century Fox film studio is owned by Disney, making it a funny case of Celebrity Paradox and a retroactive Product Placement.
    • Logan tweaks Laura's background slightly, abandoning the cloning aspect of her comics origin, and instead making her a test tube baby mixing Logan's genetic material with an anonymous Mexican girl to serve as surrogate. Come Hunt for Wolverine: Adamantium Agenda, it's revealed that Sarah, Laura's creator and surrogate in the comics, used her own genetic material as part of the cloning process, making Laura at least partially her biological daughter in a similar fashion.
  • Ho Yay: Logan and Caliban actually act Like an Old Married Couple, and when Pierce lies to Logan and says he killed Caliban Logan gets pissed and tries to kill him right then and there despite being surrounded by bad guys.
  • "Holy Shit!" Quotient:
    • This has been a common reaction to seeing Laura in action, especially to those who were afraid that she'd be toned down in her first incarnation on film. Even Wolverine in-universe has this reaction to seeing her go at it!
    • Only Laura and the X-23 children survive the film, for hardcore X-Men film fans expecting at least either Caliban, Charles or Logan to get through this with them.
  • Idiot Plot: Gabriela insists on dragging Logan into the exodus north, even though Transigen is nipping at her heels. Considering the twenty-thousand dollars she's carrying, and the fact that a dozen other child escapees, apparently without cash or adult help, were able to get to North Dakota just fine (even if she doesn't know that herself), her stubbornness on this point seems illogical. Especially when you consider that the delay leads to not just her death, but by extension Logan's, Charles', Caliban's, the Munsons, etc.
  • It Was His Sled: Wolverine's death. If you were to go literally anywhere in iFunny or other parts of the internet when this movie came out, you would absolutely find a bunch of jackasses blurting out this event in the comments section, even if the post had nothing to do with this movie.
    • In case that isn't enough, Deadpool 2. The poster... and the trailer... and the movie itself outright say "They killed Wolverine", and this is how they did it (reenacted by Deadpool), and this is the music that play in the background."
  • Like You Would Really Do It: Averted. Wolverine really does die and doesn't come back to life.
  • Memetic Mutation:
    • Some fans have been quick to point out the similarities between this film and the video game The Last of Us. For more details, see Spiritual Adaptation.
    • It's become popular on YouTube to recut trailers for other films in the style of this film's first trailer.
    • After the second trailer dropped, the opening shot of X-23 raiding a convenience store for Pringles sparked a surge of art and memes.
    • Xavier's pained expression while spasming uncontrollably, with the camera shaking as well, has been commented by multiple viewers.
    • This image of Logan peering out the window. Even Hugh Jackman got in on it.
    • "What killed the mutants? The corn age!" note 
    • "Wolverine dies." Apparently, the etiquette of not blurting out spoilers became lost to the entire human population as soon as this movie came out, because it was impossible to be on the internet without bumping into several posts saying, well, that. It basically became a meme in itself.
    • "NOT. OKAY." note 
  • Narm: See the film series page.
  • Narm Charm: The ending of the film is so corny yet so powerfully done that it can easily become this. Laura turning the cross over Wolverines' grave to an X very nearly crosses over into narm, but the depressing circumstances and meta knowledge that this is intended to be a farewell to the character make this a heck of a lot more impactful.
  • Nausea Fuel: Really, all of the violence in this film can qualify. It's not the fast-paced, stylized violence like in all the other X-Men movies, (even including Deadpool). It's extremely brutal and realistically bloody. Here are a few particularly gruesome moments which stand out:
    • Logan squeezing the bullets out of his arm, while also trying to cover up fresh wounds, and many not-so fresh wounds, covered in pus.
    • Anytime Logan stabs someone through the head (and especially the face). Specifically, the opening scene where Logan impales a guy through the chin, piercing right through his tongue and leaving him spluttering in pain for a few seconds.
    • Caliban being exposed to the sunlight, burning the skin on his face.
    • Laura throwing Pierce the severed head of one of his men.
    • Pretty much all of the violence involving X-24. He stabs Xavier in the heart and slowly retracts his bloodied claws from his chest, he decapitates a rancher, impales Logan through the armpit, gets rammed by a truck straight into a tractor's spikes and then repeatedly gets chunks of his head blown off by a shotgun, and later on impales Logan through a jagged tree stump before finally having half his head blown off by an adamantium bullet.
  • One-Scene Wonder:
    • The other X-23 test subjects. Any scene where they get to show off their abilities often shows how amazingly powerful they are, and for fans of the X-Men, how their favorite characters still live on.
    • The kindly doctor who treats Logan after the battle with X-24, who insists on showing Logan genuine respect for his mutant status without a trace of Fantastic Racism.
  • Signature Scene:
    • The shot of Laura holding Logan's hand to comfort him after burying Charles. This was clearly the inspiration for the film's first poster. Ironically the most famous shot, where Logan looks down at her for a long moment after she takes his hand, only appeared in the trailer. He does look at her in the final version of the film, but only briefly before tearing his hand away.
    • Laura jumping over Logan to tackle a mook, while Logan slices his way through others has appeared in almost every TV spot since it debuted in the second trailer.
  • Spiritual Adaptation:
    • Fans are referring to the movie as The Last of Us: X-Men Edition because of the similarities such as an old and cynical badass having to watch over a little girl (who is also a Little Miss Badass) in the aftermath of a great catastrophe, and the overall dour and neo-Western look of the film. It doesn't help that Wolverine as he appears in the film bears a downright uncanny resemblance to The Last of Us protagonist Joel.
    • Some note that it's a better one for Warren Ellis' Ruins which also featured Logan dying of Adamantium poisoning, ended up making the X-Men into total failures and Shoot the Shaggy Dog on the entire franchise.
    • Many have also compared it to other "last Superhero stories" like Frank Miller's Batman: The Dark Knight Returns, Whatever Happened to the Man of Tomorrow? and Batman: Arkham Knight. It shares the sudden shocking violence, the large number of Anyone Can Die, and overall sense of tragedy and Götterdämmerung. The Miller Batman was already an inspiration for Old Man Logan. Of course what differentiates Logan is that The Hero Dies in the film, whereas in neither of the other three stories do the characters actually die, merely end up retiring or going underground.
    • Due to it being a Wolverine movie with a "Dark Knight Returns" or "Arkham Knights" feel it is for all intents and purposes the closest thing to an adaptation of Amalgam's Dark Claw.
  • Squick: Logan having to pull one of his claws out of its sheath when it doesn't extend all the way.
  • Surprisingly Improved Sequel: The movie got much more critical praise than both previous Wolverine films and the previous movie in the franchise, X-Men: Apocalypse (itself a Contested Sequel).
  • Tough Act to Follow: Logan is one for the rest of the franchise. It's now the most critically-lauded film in the franchise, edging out Days of Future Past, as well as one of the most profitable relative to its budget.
  • They Wasted a Perfectly Good Character: Donald Pierce and his Reavers. Though Boyd Holbrook's performance has been widely praised, as the film goes on and characters such as Zander Rice and X-24 are brought in, Pierce becomes less and less necessary to the story and characters (neither Laura or Logan are seen reacting to his death), and the Reavers themselves are changed from being full-body conversion cyborgs to simple humans with a few cybernetic replacements that don't give them any real enhanced strength or abilities, leading them to be easily slaughtered in every confrontation with Logan and Laura. Some viewers felt that, if they had at least made Pierce more robotic in order to pose a genuine threat to Logan, he would have been a more threatening Big Bad and there'd be no need to suddenly drag X-24 into the film out of nowhere.
  • They Wasted a Perfectly Good Plot:
    • Regarding the hidden villain of the movie. While some were hoping that X-24 would secretly be a new villain like Omega Red or Daken, the character turns out to be a younger clone of Logan devoid of any personality. Not helping are the similarities to the X-Men Origins take on Deadpool, although it's universally agreed that X-24 is better.
    • Internet reviewers Brad Jones and Martin Thomas felt that Donald Pierce and the Reavers got a little sidelined the moment Zander Rice and X-24 showed up. They pointed out that the movie would have been better had it only focused on Pierce and his crew hunting down Logan and Laura rather than a random villain that showed up during the final act.
    • Laura is never seen reacting to Gabriela's death, despite the latter loving her like her own daughter. She also never interacts with Caliban, who also sacrifices himself to save her and Logan from Rice.
  • True Art Is Angsty: In this movie we have a grim and bleak world where Logan is in pain from a failing Healing Factor, Xavier is senile, and there is no sign of the peaceful and prosperous "School for Gifted Youngsters" as seen at the end of Days of Future Past. Surely it is no coincidence that this is part of the reason why critics have so heavily embraced the film.
  • Unexpected Character:
    • Rictor from X-Factor appears as the de facto leader of the surviving X-23 escapees. Nobody was expecting him to show up in this movie.
    • To say nothing of X-24, whose presence in the film was kept to the absolute minimum in trailers and nowhere in promo materials.
  • Unintentionally Unsympathetic: Xavier accepting the Munson family's dinner invitation against Logan's wishes is seen as this by many. Sure, it's being polite and Xavier found a moment of peace. The problem is that they are being chased by the Reavers who not only found them easily the first time, but proved that they are ruthless killers. Xavier happily accepts it anyway knowing the danger. It leads to not only Xavier's death, but the death of the innocent Munson family as well. In the end, Xavier comes across as selfish and reckless.
  • Visual Effects of Awesome: For a $90 million dollar budget, the visual effects look great. But special mention goes to Donald Pierce's robotic hand which, according to Mangold, is a mixture of CGI and practical effects. Seriously watch the movie, it's seamless.
  • What Do You Mean, It's Not for Kids?: Like Deadpool before it, Logan is a superhero movie... but one filled with enough Gorn and Nightmare Fuel to keep kids away. Also, unlike Deadpool, it's not going to be a joke-a-minute, slap-happy ride, but a much more grim, dour film. It may also be the reason why the name Wolverine is nowhere to be found on any of the promotional material—to prevent unsuspecting parents from taking their little kids to the movie, thinking it might be like the other X-Men movies in terms of content. At least one theater chain included warning labels about the movie's violence at the ticket booth.
    • In some Latin America places like Mexico, the movie is given a C rating, which means only audience from Age 18 onwards are allowed to see it and they must show their ID in order to show they are old enough to see the movie, which would prevent any kid under the age of 18 to see the movie.
    • The fact that China's censored version cut violent and sexual content, such as all head stabbings, does not help matters.
  • What Do You Mean, It's Not Political?:
    • The use of genetically-modified corn as a means of directly rewriting the human genome and eliminating the mutant race, while not intended as a political statement, nonetheless has significant resonance in an era where the risk of GMOs has increasingly become a subject of debate.
    • The portrayal of automation and the way corporations make use of automated tools to build large agribuses that squeeze out the small independent farmers has likewise been noted as quite prescient, with Logan arguably being the first mainstream film to tackle this subject.
  • Win Back the Crowd:
    • The first trailer won over a number of people who weren't looking forward to "yet another Wolverine movie". It helped that it gave the impression of a gritty Western-style action thriller rather than standard FX-laden superhero fare.
    • It has won a large amount of people over by making it absolutely clear that we would finally get to see Wolverine's claws as they were meant to be used — bloodily, messily, and on mooks.
    • After the first forty minutes of the film were screened for critics, the response was overwhelmingly positive, with many claiming that this is the Wolverine film audiences have been waiting 17 years for. Jackman's and Stewart's performances were both highly praised, as was the gritty, worn, neo-Western tone, and X-23 steals every scene she's in.
    • For any fans who feared X-23 being a child rather than a teenager would cause her to not be a fighter like she was in the comic, the second trailer makes it very clear she is still incredibly deadly.
  • The Woobie: All the main cast:
    • Laura brings her comics woobieness with her as she crosses over into the films: Born in a lab, abused, treated as a thing and not a person. Her primary caretaker and the closest she has in the film 'verse to a mother figure is murdered trying to spirit her to safety. She clearly suffers poor emotional development due to her upbringing, and demonstrates little ability to function in normal society. Her father only grudgingly helps her — and at one point is even willing to abandon her to her fate before he's left with no choice but to help her — and is often short and harsh towards her. When he finally seems to be on the verge of warming up to her, he then pulls a Break Her Heart to Save Her, leading to them parting on bad terms, despite the fact she has come to love him in their short time together. And then in the end, she's forced to watch him die in her arms and bury him.
    • Charles. The once-proud founder of the X-Men and one of the greatest minds on Earth is now a shell of his former self because of senile dementia, and has lost everything — his school, his dream, his students, and control of his powers. For extra tragedy, it's strongly hinted that he accidentally killed some his students himself during the first seizure.
    • Logan himself. He's in constant pain due to his fading Healing Factor and injuries accumulated before and during the film, and slowly dying from metal poisoning from his adamantium skeleton. On top of that, he's lost everyone he cares for except Charles and Caliban, both of whom die during the film. He has trouble connecting to Laura but finally accepts her as his daughter right before he dies in her arms. All this after 200 years of war, tragedy, and hardship.
    • Anyone besides the Reavers, Pierce and Zander Rice may as well count towards this trope.

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