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  • Alternate Character Interpretation:
    • Arvis' final actions in the game. Did he arrange for Seliph to receive the Tyrfing just because he wanted Seliph to save the children from the Loptous hunts? Or did he also intend to set up a Suicide by Cop situation where he would be killed by Seliph? He had to have known he would eventually fight Seliph since he had been assigned to defend Chalphy Castle by Julius; and considering he was very remorseful for being Manfroy's Unwitting Pawn, he may have become an outright Death Seeker by this point. He also pointlessly taunts Seliph by calling Sigurd, Seliph's father whom Arvis personally murdered, "pathetic" right before the battle; an action that feels out of character for him at this point in the story. Arvis most surely knows that Seliph wants to avenge his father's death, so was this actually Arvis trying to provoke Seliph into attacking and killing him?
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    • Lewyn, particularly regarding his attitude change in Gen 2. It's revealed at the end of Genealogy that he's been possessed by Forseti for at least the last half of the game, but it's up in the air as to when exactly the possession started (after his death and subsequent revival? As soon as he inherited the tome?) and how it contributes to his behaviour: if he has a Forseti-shaped hole in his personality and whatnot, if he's more Forseti than Lewyn at that point, if he's more Lewyn than Forseti but is putting up a Jerkass Façade because he knows that being Back from the Dead (and possibly only temporarily) means that he can't live a normal life, etc.
    • How much of Julius' actions were truly his or Loptous's is debated.
  • Annoying Video-Game Helper: Lachesis' three paladin bodyguards in chapter 2 are infamous for constantly confusing "protecting the princess" with "charge every enemy in range". They aren't very likely to immediately die with their good defenses and high HP (unless they run into Zyne and his Horseslayer), but they are very competent at stealing the player's experience and messing up their formation, seeing as how they move right after the player, but before the enemy.
  • Anticlimax Boss: Julius, the final boss, if you use the plot-dictated method involving Julia and Naga. If you want to do anything else, the final boss becomes a SNK Boss. It is still entirely possible to kill him without Naga, but it requires a lot of patience, as you can only do a tiny bit of damage every turn (20 to be exact, assuming Seliph's attacks hit), and he regenerates 15 HP every turn. (He's immune to skills and criticals thanks to his Nihil.) And hope that he doesn't decide to cast Meteor on whoever you have healing Seliph — he's known for charging (Charge or Duel, a skill that causes combat to act as though another "attack" command was issued, and it can proc on itself, causing combat to last until death in some cases...) those in his meteor range to death (he also has Wrath, so if he's at 35 HP and decides he's gonna meteor someone, say a quick prayer for that character, cause he/she is dead).
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    • A straight example on the other hand is Manfroy. For someone who was effectively the Big Bad for most of the story, he certainly isn't very impressive. He has the same equipment as every other Dark Bishop before him and statwise he isn't any better than, say, Ishtar, so any good unit can easily take him down on their own.
    • King Chagall in chapter 2 is by far the easiest boss on the map, being only level 10 when every other boss was between level 14 and 22. Worse yet, despite being stationary and guarding a castle, he has only a silver blade for offense, so anybody capable of using a ranged weapon can effortlessly attack him without fear for retaliation. He does shape up a bit for the following chapter, though.
    • Lewyn's uncles, Dukes Maios and Daccar, are armed with the formidable Tornado tomes, but their Baron class gives them a very low magic stat for that point in the story, so they should pose no danger whatsoever.
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    • King Dannan follows a similar model as Chagall above. He is a very high-level enemy with good stats for that part of the game, but is a stationary boss with no ranged weapons, fighting the player with only a silver axe when he could use the Helswath instead. He goes down without too much of a fight.
    • King Travant, like Dannan, fights the player in their sole confrontation armed with a generic silver lance instead of relying on the Gungnir. He has some good skills and a strategic advantage as a flying unit on a very mountainous map to make him more dangerous, but he still pales in comparison to both his children in the danger he poses. This is a little disappointing when you consider how much trouble he was built up as by the story.
  • Ass Pull: It is known that Julia is Deirdre's daughter and has major Naga blood, so this is averted when she gets the Naga Tome at the eleventh hour... however, it's not explained as to why the Naga Tome is superior to the Loptous Tome (as it can pierce right through its defensive powers), when it's made known that light and dark magic are on even ground in terms of power in this game.
  • Base-Breaking Character: In terms of just gameplay, Lene vs. Laylea. Originally, Laylea was considered by many to be better than the unit she replaces, Lene, due to her coming with the Charisma skill (which gives units within three spaces of her +10 extra hit and avoid, and combined with Diarmuid and Nanna, who also have the skill, gives +30 extra hit and avoid), being able to get the Barrier Swordnote , and also her brother Sharlow being able to get the only Berserk staff in the entire gamenote . However in recent years, people began to argue that Laylea isn't a better unit than Lene, arguing that compared to Diarmuid and Nanna, Layleanote  shouldn't be anywhere near combat, as well as saying that a third Charisma user in a playthrough where she and her brother Sharlow are the only subsitutes just becomes superfluous. Lene supporters also point out that she is able to join with both the Leg and Knight Rings right when you get hernote  and argue that the Barrier Sword doesn't give a big enough effect to be worth getting and that the Berserk staff is very situational. As such, it's become a debate as to who the better dancer for the second generation truly is.
  • Best Known for the Fanservice: Even nowadays that it isn't the only 'Fire Emblem' with breeding mechanics anymore, people usually still know what you're referring to if you call it "the one with the incest."
  • Broken Base: Over the atypically large maps for Genealogy. Fans are divided on whether it gave the series some of the most interestingly designed and challenging maps in the series, or if it bogged down a game with otherwise interesting gameplay features.
  • Catharsis Factor: Killing Manfroy and Hilda is easily one of the most satisfying moments in the game, especially if the latter is killed with Arthur/Amid or Tine/Linda. Those still bitter with Travant's actions may also find satisfaction in killing him with Leif and/or Finn. For the first generation, it comes from killing Chagall, especially with either Eldigan's best friend Sigurd or his sister Lachesis doing the deed.
  • Complacent Gaming Syndrome: While some pairs are popular based off of chemistry, in regards to getting the best stats for the 2nd generation, you will see a lot of Midir/Edain, Beowolf/Lachesis, Brigid with either Dew or Chulainn, Ayra with either Lex or Naoishe, Lewyn with either Erinys or Tailtiu, and Silvia either unpaired or with Claude.
    • In general, this game is rather badly balanced, with several units and weapons being flat-out better than others, leaving often not a lot of variability as far as strategy and tactics are concerned. The first three and a half chapters in particular can usually be summed up as "Sigurd kills everybody, while Quan, Finn and Lex try to help out as best as they can, while everybody else scrapes by." There is a good reason that this game is given the Fan Nickname "Horse Emblem" with how prevalent cavalry/flying units are in the meta when the maps tend to be humongous.
  • Complete Monster:
    • Bishop Manfroy is a Dark Priest and leader of the Loptyrian cult. Manfroy was determined to obtain revenge on the entire continent of Grannevale for forcing him to live in the desert, and thus spends years patiently paving the way for the return of the evil dragon, Loptyr. Using assassination and manipulation, Manfroy creates a massive war, which initiates the chaos necessary for his plans. To create Loptyr's vessel, Manfroy kidnaps Deirdre, the wife of Sigurd, cruelly and gleefully erases all her memories of her beloved husband and son, and places her for his pawn Arvis to find, fall in love with and marry, despite the fact that she is his unknown half-sister. With his goal achieved, Manfroy awakens Loptyr in Deirdre's son Julius and sets about constructing a nightmarish dictatorship where children are sacrificed and any who resist are massacred. In the end, Manfroy, with nothing less than sadistic relish, exerts mind control over Julius's twin sister Julia to make her kill her beloved friends. In his cameo in the Interquel, Thracia 776, it is revealed that Manfroy murdered his own son-in-law, and drives his own daughter into madness. If Manfroy's granddaughter, Sara, is not recruited, Manfroy will zombify his own granddaughter into one of the Deadlords to do his bidding. Manfroy manipulated everyone around him, was cruel even to his own family, and enacted a endless regime of nightmarish suffering on the entire continent. It is clear that Manfroy has abandoned all potential good qualities solely to facilitate his own greed and personal desire for revenge.
    • Queen Hilda of Friege, wholeheartedly supports, and participates in, the movement of sacrificing kids to Loptyr. Later on, it is revealed that she is responsible for the fatal abuse of Tailtiu and her daughter Tine (a 2nd generation character). Hilda takes extreme pride in her actions, gloating about it in front of her children. If Tailtiu dies childless, her and Bloom's little sister Ethnia will replace her as Hilda's punching bags, alongside her children, Amid and Linda (replacements for Arthur and Tine). And although her daughter, Ishtar, was not physically abused, she was still manipulated by her mom because of her love for Julius, which Hilda saw as a chance to gain even more power than she already had.
  • Crack Pairing: In Genealogy, you can potentially pair any available male with any available female, but it'll take some work for the couples who don't interact in the main story.
    • Once the player understands how the romance and inheritance mechanics work, and if they start pairing people up for items and stats rather than for their in-story relationships, a lot of the resultant pairings are like this.
  • Cult Classic: This is the only sub-franchise that never enjoyed big international exposure (while Roy's tale was never released, he did make an appearance in Super Smash Bros.) and as of yet hasn't been updated to a more recent generation. However, it remains to have a strong following.
  • Ensemble Dark Horse:
    • Ayra is not the main character, but she's so widely adored that many fans consider her the best female character in all of Fire Emblem. Her design, hotheaded attitude, fierce devotion to her family, incredible badassery, and perfecting the Navarre archetype by being the first of the Myrmidon/Sword Fighter class are all contributing factors to her popularity, which leads to her getting a few successors in the next few games. She gets to appear as a Spotpass character in Awakening and is the only female character in the game to be in the top 100 in "Choose Your Legends" poll. She would eventually make it into Fire Emblem Heroes, where she earned her place as one of the single best units in the game, and is beloved by the fandom for her art, skills, voice, and usefulness. She was so popular in fact, that the way she was introduced caused a massive Internet Backdraft because many saw it as a bad usage of her.
    • Finn, for being a character who survived part 1, including being usable in both Genealogy and Thracia 776, and being a solid character for both games. In a series-wide poll conducted by Famitsu, Finn came in the top ten alongside well-loved characters like Lyn, Ike, and Hector, and was the only Jugdral character to do so. (Notably, he was one of only two in that list who weren't Lords, the other being Tiki.) Many, many fans saw his introduction in Heroes as a merely decent free unit whose potential can't be readily achieved as a disappointing way to treat him.
    • The House of Friege is full of these: from memorable one-shot bosses to tragic antagonists and recruitable characters that have a great deal of depth to them, the Frieges have quite the noticeable impact on the story as a whole. The midquel, which promotes the Friege House into the main antagonist house, only increased it even more, as seen on that page.
      • Though probably debatable, despite being considered by some as a Tier-Induced Scrappy and being the last person to join you in the first generation, Tailtiu is actually popular enough that she spawned a lot of fanarts for a late-joiner and people actually bore with her Tier-Induced Scrappy stats and sometimes get surprised when she turns out pretty good. Reasons? Must be because she's probably the closest one to being Moe amongst the first generation as the youngest girl of the team, and very much a Genki Girl to boot, something that the more depressing saga quite needed, and she does have moments of vulnerability that don't look forced. Of course, all in all, it makes her downward spiral to depression and death even more depressing and contributes heavily to her children's depressing stories. When Genealogy got its first dedicated banner in Fire Emblem Heroes, Tailtiu ended up being featured in the main banner alongside Sigurd and Deirdre.
      • Arthur and Tine for their depressing backstory and respective snark and Moe. Tine also gets a very gradual Character Development from a textbook Shrinking Violet to a proper Silk Hiding Steel, making her also well beloved.
      • Amid and Linda are pretty much the most lauded replacement children of the lot, so much so that sometimes, Tailtiu is considered an acceptable sacrifice (to get killed off or get through the 1st generation childless) because there is a chance Amid & Linda could turn out better than Arthur & Tine, and they're the only replacement children that aren't just some random faces, being part of the Freige house, and they even mention Tailtiu in the final chapter. Their characterizations - Amid being a cool, fairly badass yet rational revenge-seeker with a clear, understandable motivation, and Linda being a chipper Plucky Girl who wants to do the right thing despite the chaos engulfing her family and feeling a bit torn on Amid's quest for revenge - also help a lot, and Linda being cute as a button also helps a lot. Not to mention, Tailtiu's fate as well as Tine's suffering is considered to be one of the most depressing moments in Fire Emblem history, and sparing them that can seem merciful. Although it is debatable whether or not Linda is better than Tine or vice versa; see Tier-Induced Scrappy below.
      • On the villains’ side is Ishtar and her brother Ishtore. Both are tragic antagonists who need to be defeated, with Ishtar being the Camus of the generation and having a close role to the Big Bad Julius, and Ishtore being the Small Role, Big Impact minor boss that drives part of the conflict for everyone in the Friege nobility. Ishtar gets a very special mention though, as she placed the highest of all characters in the game in the second round of Heroes's "Choose Your Legends" poll at 43rd.
    • Ced, for being memetic-levels of badass and for being a Hero of Another Story in his own right.
    • Other popular substitutes people enjoy are Muirne, Hawk, and Laylea. Muirne for perhaps how she's a mere commoner in a wide-scale Holy War and still being able to keep up while having an arguably deeper relationship with Seliph than Lana, and Hawk for being almost as powerful as Ced despite being a substitute and just being cool. Both were rather high in the "Choose your Legends" poll by substitute standards. Laylea wasn't that high in the CYL votes, but people enjoy her in the same way as Amid and Linda, considering her being able to be more superior than Lene as well as looking like a mature dancer in the same way as Tethys.
    • Arden is usually the butt-end of weak jokes thanks to being an Armor Knight in Horse Emblem, having no Holy Blood, and his homely appearance, and tends to get forgotten after a few chapters. And somehow, during "Choose your Legends" poll, he ends up being the third-most popular character from this game, just behind Sigurd and Ayra. He's basically Jugdral's answer to Dorcas when it comes to unexpected favorites. Out of nowhere, he's also inserted into Fire Emblem Heroes, though not in the official Holy War banner.
    • In spite of being seen as a Tier-Induced Scrappy by some, Patty does have a sizable amount of popularity among fans. Like Joshua, we suspect it's the hat.
  • Enjoy the Story, Skip the Game: A lot of fans consider Genealogy of the Holy War's story to be the absolute best in the series because of its Game of Thrones-like political intrigue and plot twists. However, the gameplay is rather divisive, as many consider it to be tedious due to the overly large maps and outdated at best due to the interesting, but unbalanced additions it brought to the series.
  • Epileptic Trees: A common fan theory is that Ishtar is pregnant, and that shapes her decision to march onto Seliph's army alone in the endgame. If she really wanted to avenge her family, she'd have a greater chance by fighting beside Julius. If she wanted to keep their child from becoming Loptous' next vessel but didn't want to turn on her lover, well, then it suddenly makes sense.
  • Fan-Preferred Couple:
    • If you take account on characterization, not gameplay prowess (in which any pair is fair game), you're more likely to see the pairs of Lex/Ayra, Azelle/Tailtiu and Finn/Lachesis amongst fanarts that tried to pair the ladies with their prospect husbands. (To compare with some other suitors: Chulainn is often forgotten since he's kind of optional, Lewyn already has a canon wife according to Thracia 776 (Erinys), Dew is typically used a pick-up father for any remaining pairing that has a unmounted swordwielding child and Beowolf is something of a Base-Breaking Character). Because of Azelle/Tailtiu, Edain's Fan-Preferred Couple tends to boil down between either Jamke or Midayle, both of them not having a clear lead yet. Note: Some of them got used for the Mitsuki Oosawa manga, which also further boosted the preference for these couples.
    • A particular case is Brigid: Because only one of her three predestined pairings (Jamke) is considered to be somewhat decent (and even so, he has his flaws, such as giving Febail low accuracy, or giving Patty the somewhat counter-productive Charge skill), an entire slew of Fan Preferred Couples have sprung up, the most popular of which are probably Brigid/Dew, Brigid/Lex and Brigid/Chulainn.
    • Going against the first sub-bullet, there are some who still considered Lewyn/Tailtiu their OTP for Tailtiu, since Lewyn is one of the Game-Breaker of the game, and the pairing will result Forseti on a horse by Arthur and the fact that the dialogue between Lewyn and Tine was the only time that Lewyn temporarily broke away from his 'aloof, uncaring dad' persona to shed tears at Tailtiu's depressing death. This is further boosted with how both Tailtiu and Lewyn were included in Fire Emblem Heroes while Azelle and Erinys still have yet to be added.
    • In the second generation, you have fans pairing Seliph with Tine due to the couple drawing many parallels to Sigurd and Deirdre, which Tine lampshades herself in her lovers conversation with Seliph in the final chapter. Since Seliph's journey is supposed to be a reconstruction of Sigurd's, Tine rejecting Seliph's offer to stay back at home from the final battle seems to be coming full circle considering a very similar situation happened to his parents that obviously did not end well.
  • Foe Yay: Ayra's fight with Lex in the Oosawa manga reeked with this, not helping that the two's respective kindgoms were at war with each other, yet they still develop their relationship despite of it. Some might see this as a precedent for two more axe male and sword female pairings; the optional Hector and Lyn and the set-in-stone Bartre and Karla, both from The Blazing Blade.
  • Franchise Original Sin: For some folks. It was the first game to feature character pairing as a major mechanic (and even a story beat), which even in the 90s led to quite a bit of "shipping wars" in Japan, and pretty much forced The Binding Blade onwards to at least have the "support" mechanic (often explicitly romantic) and later served as the basis for Awakening and Fates using versions of the same pairing system, leading to the birth of names like "Shipping Emblem" and "Waifu Simulator". It still makes perfect sense for this game, but there are very old-school fans who feel it began a trend of drifting the series away from epic tales of conflict to the more "shipping"-focused stories of the 21st century.
  • "Funny Aneurysm" Moment: Silvia's first conversation with Sigurd is pretty funny, until you look up her age and find out she's fourteen... and then think about the Hooker with a Heart of Gold implications from before and the "special dance" she offers to Alec. (Which is confirmed in a roundabout way when Silvia explains her backstory in the Oosawa manga.) Even for a medieval setting, the idea of a girl that young making her living like that is cringeworthy. And depressing.
  • Game-Breaker: If you play your cards right with the pairings in the first generation of Genealogy, you can end up with a whole army of Game Breakers. Justified, since most people wouldn't have a clue on their first time through that pairing people up was actually extremely important, never mind which pairings were good or bad, and the game doesn't take it easy on you, so the few couples that the game does push on you (i.e. Lewyn/Erinys) result in characters that have to take up the slack for the generic replacements.
    • Special mention goes to any magic user who inherits Forseti, the resident overpowered tome that grants tremendous speed to the user and dishes out phenomenal damage. Especially Ced or Arthur.
    • Lex is a goldmine of Disc-One Nukes; he comes at turn 2 of the very start of the game with Paragon (which doubles experience gain), gets a Brave Axe near the end of Chapter 1 if you know where to look, and is arguably the best father in the game, as he passes down his Paragon skill to both of his children, along with minor Neir blood and solid growths. He's one of the biggest ways to make both generations much easier.
  • Gameplay Derailment: Seliph and Julia were not supposed to be pairable. They have a negative love growth, and it's later revealed that they're half-siblings. But that didn't stop many players from exploiting glitches (most commonly the jealousy mechanic) to make them lovers, as the two are commonly teased together.
    • Also, in chapter 5 it is theoretically possible through save-scumming to make sure that Quan and Ethlyn continuously dodge and/or kill the Thracian dragon knights pursuing them and actually survive. This will eventually result in them making their way to Phinora castle and seizing it, though this will crash the game.
  • Germans Love David Hasselhoff: Sigurd is a very popular Lord to western fans, as he is often considered a badass exceeding that of other lords well-loved in the west such as Hector and Ike, and western fans tend to see his son Seliph as something of a minor Replacement Scrappy. Japanese fans, on the other hand, prefer Seliph to his father, due to his relatively kinder nature and that his own badass cred is earned rather than being right there in the beginning.
  • Hilarious in Hindsight:
    • Seliph tells Lana "Nuns and warfare do NOT mix!" at the start of Chapter 6 of Genealogy. Fire Emblem Awakening would later introduce the Battle Cleric class and resulting NUNSWITHAXES meme. And in the English localization, the class is even called War Cleric!
    • The jokes and criticism about how overly reliant the game is on mounted units becomes extremely funny after the release of Fire Emblem Heroes, where the meta was once dominated by a a team composition called Horse Emblem due to how powerful teams of mounted units were. And true to form, Sigurd makes his debut with a treasure trove of skills that make him a defensive powerhouse, all while mounted on horseback. Meanwhile, his son Seliph isn't a mounted unit and is considered one of the single worst units in the game.
  • I Liked It Better When It Sucked: While the Project Naga fan-translation is more coherent, a lot of the old scripts have been planted so deep inside the heart of old fans that the new script looked less fun or memorable. Some lines worth noting that were purged by the Project Naga translation include: "Alvis, YOU DASTARD!!" or "Nuns and warfare DO NOT MIX!"
    • It doesn't help that many of the lines in newer translations are Purple Prose to the point of Narm, or that Lachesis refers to her brother as "Eldie".
  • It Was His Sled:
    • The ending of Chapter 5 in Genealogy in which Sigurd and almost everyone else in your army are murdered seems to be known by everyone now.
    • Julia is Seliph's half-sister.
  • Jerkass Woobie: Depending on your interpretation, Lewyn in Gen 2. While generally the harshest among Seliph's army and not a particularly pleasant person (he's not going to win any parenting awards if Ced and Fee are his kids, for sure), his life is fairly depressing after the Battle of Belhalla: he actually did die in that battle, his mother is soon killed, his wife is likely dead by the present depending on who she is (canonically, Erinys), he had to abandon his family and his beloved country (with Thracia 776 mentioning that the people of Silesse now hate him for that), and his uncaring attitude could very well just be a Jerkass Façade in an attempt to cut off his ties with the world. At the end of the game, it's entirely possible he goes back to being dead, and even if not, Word of God notes in an interview that it's impossible for him to go back to his old life.
  • Love to Hate: What Manfroy did is very horrible and qualifies him as a Complete Monster, but at the same time, he's such a master planner that it becomes a quality for his villain cred. Succeeding in said plans also helps too. Which amounts for a lot more when you compare him with Hilda.
    • It also helps that Manfroy is effectively the Evil Counterpart to the player themselves in a meta sense: Leading a band of fanatically loyal supporters in a war across the continent, defeating his enemies that numerically outnumber him through careful strategizing, and pairing up two people in order to breed super-powerful second generation children sounds suspiciously like what the player themselves is probably doing all along.
  • Magnificent Bastard: Orphaned at a tender age, Arvis of Velthomer managed to climb his way up the ladder of power and prestige. Once war and corruption threatens to tear Judgral asunder, Arvis aspires to construct a peaceful empire of equality. Although he employs ruthless methods like assassination and deceit, Arvis's dream is pure and admirable. Managing to claim land after land without much trouble through his machinations, Arvis caps off his conquest by slaying his last opposition, who he had outed as a traitor, in Belhalla. Crowned Emperor of Grannvale, Arvis makes the utopia he sacrificed so much for. When the second half of the plot proceeds to tear down his dream, Arvis does his best to subvert the Child Hunts, fight back against Manfroy's manipulations, and ultimately gives Seliph the Tyrfing needed to put an end to the evils plaguing Judgral. This shows that Arvis, while ambitious and unfettered, held enough standards to ensure his own sins were ultimately undone for the sake of a better world.
  • Memetic Badass:
    • Ayra is considered by some to be the Action Girl of the series, being the first female Myrmidon-typenote . She can easily be made a Game-Breaker if she's given the Brave Sword, which, combined with her Astra skill, can allow her to hit an enemy ten times in a row. Her kids are just as badass as she is.
    • Finn for being a badass in both games, not to mention the only character who is not only playable, but manages to survive the entirety of the game's events. Like Ayra, he can also get a Brave weapon, and his role in the story is pretty significant too. Some compared Finn to Marcus in this respect.
    • When arguing about broken Fire Emblem characters, Sigurd also gets mentioned a lot. His main competitor in this category is Seth. Unlike every other Lord in the series, Sigurd is a pre-premote and yet avoids being a Crutch Character.
    • Ced, or more specifically Forseti-wielding-Ced. One LP of the game had the player commenting "Anyone who attacks Ced deserves to die, period." A Forseti-wielding Arthur is also regarded as this for a similar reason.
  • Memetic Mutation:
    • "I kill X for Y". Literally, for some characters whose substitute children are considered more preferable character-wise or stat-wise, then the mother (X) must be left childless or get thrown off to a bunch of enemies to die so you get the substitute (Y) instead. Two characters that are unfortunate enough to get this usually include either Tailtiu or Silvia (for either Linda or Laylea), and in Tailtiu's case, it can be substituted as a way to give her a Mercy Kill, because her death should she sire her children was just plain too depressing.
    • She. Has. FURY!! Explanation 
    • Anything concerning Sigurd and fire, given that Chapter 5's ending is fast becoming an It Was His Sled.
    • "I'm supposed to say something if ____ but it hasn't been translated yet." Explanation 
    • On some older Let's Plays that exist of the game, YouTube comments giggled at how "Animation" was written as "Anime" on the fan-translation, and how it was one of the options (it's supposed to be an individual choice on how you want the character's animations to play out) alongside things like "Attack".
    • This game starts the trend of the series replacing the word "Bastard" into "Dastard" thanks to Sigurd's Famous Last Words in the earlier fan-translation.
    • THE POWER OF PURSUIT!!Explanation 
  • Moe: For a dark game, there's a lot of adorable girls to go around, most blatantly Silvia, Tailtiu, and then her daughter Tine.
  • Moral Event Horizon:
    • Arvis brings the brainwashed and amnesiac Deirdre in front of her husband, Sigurd, to taunt him, just before he kills Sigurd and his entire army. And shortly beforehand, Travant assaults and slaughters Quan's entire army in a desert. The catch is, Travant's army are flying Wyvern Knights, Quan's army is made up of Cavalry hindered by the desert. Quan's beautiful wife Ethlyn got killed, her 3-year-old daughter Altena is captured by Travant and is used as a hostage so Quan drops the only thing that could save him: the Gae Bolg. Then Travant kills Quan in cold blood, and takes Altena and the Gae Bolg to Thracia.
    • When you were first introduced to Hilda on screen, you might think she's just a particularly sadistic duchess, but nothing special when you compared with others like Danan or Bloom. She even tried to make you think that she's just trying to preserve the Freege house reputation and also avenging her son Ishtore. Then you sent Tine/Linda to face her and she starts gloating happily about how she drove Tailtiu/Ethnia to her depressing death and rubbing it to their faces that she enjoyed every bit of it. That's the point that all her 'positive' points are swept over and everyone starts demanding her blood for righteous vengeance on those poor ladies.
  • Narm:
    • Deirdre and Sigurd's romance goes beyond Fourth Date Marriage. After meeting each other once, both of them are pining and a separation of just a few turns is enough for them to say things like "I was afraid I'd never see you again!" Even if you interpret 1 turn = 1 day, that's a pretty short time to be saying wistful things like "I tried to forget you" about a person you've known for ten minutes.
    • As if the narmification of the Battle of Belhalla via limited graphic quality wasn't enough, a very antiquated word usage in some fan translations ruins it all over again.
      Sigurd: ARVIS, YOU DASTARD!
    • While the sound direction and the script for the scene can be very heart-wrenching, the whole Battle of Belhalla (the incident mentioned above) is represented as tiny little Super-Deformed mages casting Meteor over an equally cutesy army Wha…?
      YT commenter: There's hardly a more faith-rocking experience than losing this many friends in one sitting. (...) Though, to be honest, the little Fire Emblem sprites of the mages casting Meteor are just a little too... cute... to truly affect any person. I'd love a remake of this game.
    • Many of the lovemaking scenes in Mitsuki Oosawa's manga adaptation are this, natch, as is Sigurd's ridiculously heartfelt declaration of love to Deirdre:
    • The Oosawa manga keeps up with the narm with its massive, terrible, downright hilarious levels of Off-Model. As in "yaoi hands"-level of it.
    • An earlier fan-translation had the placeholder text of "I'm supposed to say something if I'm alive here, but it hasn't been translated yet." This actually made its way into several Lets Plays of the game (including one on the Something Awful archive), so it became very jarring for a random character to suddenly break the fourth wall.
    • When Seliph speaks to the spirits of Deidre and Sigurd after slaying Arvis, he gets a Life Ring from them afterwards. This is humorously misinterpreted as Seliph finally "getting a life" after what was supposed to be a serious and emotional moment with his departed parents.
    • The chapter introduction screens showing the next leg of the journey on the map have been mocked for constantly introducing "new" characters with reused portraits and usually blatantly giving away which characters will end up being portrayed in a flattering light.
  • Never Live It Down: One of Sigurd's most memorable, if not the most memorable, traits is being burned to death.
  • Nightmare Fuel:
    • The infamous aftermath of Chapter 5. The battle is over... or so you think, then suddenly the entire army is decimated by a horrifying and fiery Death from Above via a Meteor shower. Not just Sigurd, but most of the army as well. The very idea of it or even trying to imagine it happening, given the limited hardware of the Super Nintendo, is quite chilling.
    • Oosawa's rendition of Sandima's Fenrir spell is really not pretty.
    • The Child Hunts. Children are forcibly taken from their families to be sacrificed to an evil god. The few survivors end up as nobles of the Empire... but in reality are little more than brainwashed pawns.
  • Older Than They Think:
    • Genealogy is where the weapon/magic triangle and weapon ranks originate from, although Thracia 776 was the first game to use the "modern" weapon ranking system (ranks from E to A; weapon usage increases the rank). The biggest mechanic of all, though, is the marriage system that Fire Emblem Awakening cranks Up to Eleven; due to the fact that all of the kids in the second generation had their classes set in stone, only a small selection of fathers are optimal for each child (admit it, are you really going to have Arden be Ced the Sage's father?), so anyone who knew of Awakening's marriage system first is in for quite a shock should they play Genealogy.
    • At the ending screen, you are given a final grade on your commanding performance which is affected by four stats during the game. One of those stats is affected by how fast you complete a chapter. So, by definition, Genealogy of the Holy War predates Advance Wars by five years in its introduction of the ranking system.
  • Player Punch:
    • In Chapter 5, it is quite painful to watch Quan and Ethlyn ambushed and cut down in the Yied Desert. Your army is, by then, technically in the area — but there is no way to reach them in time. And that's just the start of the hits in this chapter. In which every of the characters you played are killed off. For fans of these characters, it made them really look forward to have Leif or Finn personally kill the culprit, Travant, in Chapter 9, to hell with his sympathetic motives. Same goes with Seliph killing Arvis in Chapter 10 for the latter tragedy.
    • A lot of players usually mourn at the fate that befell Tailtiu. The cheeriest girl from the first generation received the most depressing death, being taken away from home and horribly abused by her sister-in-law, partially to protect her daughter, until she couldn't help but cry at every day, and died due to illness contracted by the abuse and her despair as a shadow of her former self. Even those who thought that she's a bad unit for her generation will think that her death is depressing, and said sister-in-law likes to gloat about enjoying such torture... which makes the players feel more obligated to have Tailtiu's children take bloody vengeance upon her.
    • The Sadistic Choice regarding Eldigan's fate: you either fight him or have Lachesis talk to him. No problem, right? Talking to an enemy unit usually spares them — nope, talking to him means sending him back to what ultimately gets him executed. Lawful Stupid he may have been, but it can still be a bit of a punch, knowing that he was one of Sigurd's best friends and remembering how earlier in the game he went out of his way to protect Evans and take out Elliot's army on Sigurd/the player's behalf. All in all, it makes you want to send someone, specifically either Sigurd or Lachesis, to stab the ever-loving crap out of Chagall in the face. Repeatedly.
  • Scrappy Mechanic: The lack of item trading feature. Because units cannot just give each other items, they're forced to sell their items to the shop and have another unit buy it back at twice the price it was sold for. Units also have their own separate gold reserves that they can only trade to each other under very limited circumstancesnote , which means some units will end up perpetually strapped for cash if they need pricey items but aren't the ones who first acquired them, doubly so if they're poor fighters who can't earn gold in the arena.
  • Scrappy Weapon:
    • All magic that isn't Wind. The only difference between the three classes of magic is weight, with Fire being the heaviest, Thunder being less so but still very heavy, and Wind being the lightest. There is literally no reason to use Fire or Thunder if Wind is available. Because of how heavy Fire magic is, it is much better to fight off Wind magic with Wind instead of with Fire for better hit-avoid matchups. As for the other tomes, Dark is enemy-only and what few Light tomes you get are also cripplingly heavy. Axes are also fairly bad due to similar weight issues, aside from the Brave Axe which is a Guide Dang It! to obtain. It's telling that you never get the legendary Fire and Thunder tomes or the legendary axe, even when those kind of weapons can be strong in the hands of the enemy.
    • Lances, in the hands of the player with the exception of the Brave Lance and Gáe Bolg. While players would be used to axes being heavy thanks to some other titles, lances which are supposed to be in the middle in terms of weapon weight ends up being closer to axes instead. This means that agile sword enemies could easily circumvent the weapon triangle disadvantage. Even magic swords are more effective for 1-2 range than Javelins due to their light weight and the overall low Resistance of physical enemies. On the enemy's side on the other hand, lance enemies are the bane of the player since most playable characters wield swords and the enemy adheres to the We Have Reserves rule.
    • In chapter 6 the player is given the option of outfitting Julia with one of two weapons depending on which mini-boss' castle they capture first. Even though it makes much more sense for her to get her mother's Aura tome, almost everybody playing the game actually gets the other option, the new Resire/Nosferatu tome instead. Not only is it massively lighter than its counterpart, its health-leeching effect (otherwise present only on the Earth sword) turns Julia into an almost undefeatable combat unit, and, as a bonus, is also capable of bypassing enemy generals' and barons' Big Shield skill.
  • "Seinfeld" Is Unfunny: The marriage and children system in this game, which was phenomenal for its time, will likely come off as this to anyone who's played Awakening. It's never made clear exactly how the love system works or which conversations give love points, meaning it's easy to accidentally end up with pairings you don't want. Only a very small set of pairings even get conversations, everyone else is Strangled by the Red String. There's a cut-off point for every 1st generation marriage that the game never tells you about because it involves a major plot twist, and not marrying or killing off a female results in you getting weak "substitute" characters later on. The children's classes are all fixed, so only a very small number of fathers are viable for each, and making the wrong pairings can result in some of them being outright useless, or render legendary weapons Permanently Missable.
    • The game in general as well. While it's held in high regard for its incredibly deep story and for introducing several much-beloved features to the series (like the weapon triangle, gameplay-integrated character relationships, and skills), it has come under increasing fire in recent years for the fact that, because it introduced so many new features, it's one of, if not the, worst-balanced games in the entire series, with an extreme emphasis on high-mobility units due to the huge map size, certain weapon types being flat-out objectively better than others (the magic tome types in particular are all identical except for weight), and half of the metagame behind unit pairings revolving around getting Pursuit on as many children as humanly possible.
  • Shipping: It's a game mechanic in Genealogy. Who you pair up determines what characters, with what stats, you get in the second generation. Thus, Ship-to-Ship Combat is about mechanical benefits as much as it is about romantic chemistry and sex appeal.
  • Some Anvils Need to Be Dropped: While not exactly touched upon in the main game, the Mitsuki Oosawa manga has one anvil is dropped quite often: Don't cling into prejudice. Everyone is equal. Seliph REALLY had to struggle when he saw his men doing atrocities towards his enemies based on prejudice:
    • When Iuchar and Iucharba were being held prisoner by the rebels, they were treated horribly by the rebels because they were servants of the Grannvalian Empire, and because Grannvale (especially the brothers' noble house) has done a number to the Isaachians, they felt justified. Seliph eventually called out their actions and reminded them that he, the hero that Isaach depended on all this while, is also from Grannvale.
    • The reason why the Loptousians, Manfroy included, became mad terror-spreaders was because of the persecutions done by the Crusaders just because they thought any Loptousians would always repeat Galle's reign of terror, when in truth some of them were more like Maera, wanting to co-exist together and move on from the past, yet normal people kept rejecting them violently because of those thoughts. In Chapter 65, Seliph covered a Loptousian child from being stoned and stated that they're also humans, there was no difference except the situation they grew up with. Had Seliph not covered for him, that child might have become another Manfroy in the future.
  • Squick: A lot of the incest can fall into this, with half-siblings Deirdre and Arvis marrying and having children (albeit Deirdre was hypnotized at the time and Arvis didn't find out that they were related until later in life) being the biggest, and arguably most well-known, example. Taken even further with Julia, who's all but stated to be in love with Seliph... her half-brother. Julia herself is the result of inbreeding (she's one of Deirdre's and Arvis' children), taking this particular example Up to Eleven. Yikes.
    • And the best part? Arvis remained heavily in love with Dierdre, even after discovering that they were related. This is the same guy who's implied to have something of an Oedipus Complex. Just look up pictures of Deirdre and Cigyun, Deirdre and Arvis' mother. They almost look identical...
  • Strangled by the Red String:
    • Finn and Lachesis are pretty close to an Official Couple. The Oosawa adaptation of Genealogy goes in-depth into the relationship, Finn can have a conversation with Nanna if he's her father, and Thracia 776 drops some very strong hints that he and Lachesis were married before she vanished in the desert. The only thing is that during the time Fin and Lachesis are both playable in Genealogy, they have no love conversations the way other plotted pairings do. It comes off like the writers forgot to put that in there.
    • Many pairings in FE4 can come off as this due to lack of conversation or even hint of any relations.
  • That One Boss: All of the Mjolnir users, but the final Ishtar encounter especially (if only because she has the highest stats). The thing gives a meaty bonus to skill and speed, and coupled with its already high might, it's a force to be reckoned with. Still, you better get used to it, because you fight against it FIVE whole times across the game.
    • Another surprisingly straight example is Prince Cimbaeth of Verdane. Despite being only the third boss in the game, he is quite the Difficulty Spike. Being not only the first promoted boss (or enemy, period), but also the first boss capable of moving around is difficult enough on its own, but with his Silver axe/Hand-axe combo he has exceptionally good equipment for coming so early in the game. His offensive stats are good enough that he can kill anybody (even Arden) in two hits and he is durable enough that even Sigurd with his Silver sword needs two entire rounds to kill him. And since he stands a 40%-odd chance of hitting even Sigurd, you better start praying. On top of this, he comes also at the end of a very large group of underlings that are very difficult to bottleneck, while your forces at this point have access to only a single mediocre healer (Ethlyn), meaning that you likely have to face him when your army is half-dead.
  • That One Level: Chapter 1 is seen by many as a very difficult level despite being the first non Prologue level. The main setup of the level is that Verdane sends a large wave of Fighters and a few Warriors to attack your castle, meaning you'll need to deploy your army to counter them. However, while that is already difficult since you have only a few sword users, you also have the addition of Dew and Edain, who are attempting to flee the Verdane's main castle, prompting them to send a second smaller army of the same units to kill the two. The level quickly turns into a race to safely get to Edain and Dew before they are swarmed and killed, something that is borderline Guide Dangit because you have to make your movements almost perfectly and rely on forests for extra avoidance. Meanwhile the first Verdane army consists of a few Warriors with bows, and a mini boss with a Hand Axe, meaning the player is forced to essentially throw Sigurd at the head and pray he doesn't get too badly damaged. If you aren't careful as well, you'll possibly have to kill Ayra if you don't claim Castle Genoa before fighting her, and there is the optional Lex's Brave Axe event that takes a lot of time to complete but give great rewards. Worse yet, after taking Castle Genoa, Elliot will appear off to the top left with a large group of Cavaliers, which might make some players panic and retreat to defend their castle, only for Eldigan's army to arrive and deal with the problem. If Dew and Edain aren't safely within the core of Sigurd's army by then, this can easily lead to their deaths. In general the level is just way too big with too many things going on at once for some.
  • That One Sidequest:
    • The Bargain Bracelet in Chapter 2. Obtaining it this early into the game is hair-tearingly difficult due to how much limited time you have to obtain it. You practically have to rush the entire first half of the map in order to get it.
    • While it pales in comparison to a number of Thracia 776's recruitments, Coirpre/Charlot and Hannibal are probably the worst offenders in Genealogy of the Holy War. Hannibal is a free-roaming boss; the actual castle he guards is staged by an Elite Mook. Like most castles, any units attached to that castle still standing when you take it are automatically killed. It's made clear, however, that Hannibal is not exactly a willing participant. You have to keep some units to distract his men (note that this is the castle closest to your own, which if taken is an automatic game over) while Seliph and others go past to the next castle, take that, and rescue Coirpre/Charlot, then head back to talk to Hannibal. Killing Hannibal before rescuing Coirpre/Charlot will cause him to freak out and not join your party. This is the first time in the whole game that multiple castles have been around as viable targets, except briefly in Chapter 6 when both Iuchar and Iucharba are still enemies, so it might not immediately be obvious that you can do this. It won't be the last time.
      • Recruiting Hannibal and Coirpre/Charlot becomes even more of a That One Sidequest when you recruit them and realize that Hannibal is just an awful unit. His movement is far too poor to keep up with the rest of your army unless you want these long chapters to go on even longer and his stats aren't particularly impressive when you will most likely have other units with as much, if not more Defense, and better Speed to not be constantly doubled. The only thing he can do reasonably well (and this is being kind to him) is castle defense, which is useful for once in the same chapter he joins you. Coirpre/Charlot starts out at level 1 when your army is mostly promoted units and units on the verge of promotion (though Charlot and a Lex!Coirpre have Paragon to abate this) and his Magic will be poor unless his father had strong Magic. Coirpre can still be of some use, but his mediocre healing without a good father is not worth the above-mentioned effort required.
  • They Wasted a Perfectly Good Character: Jamke's relevance to the plot largely ends after the first chapter, wherein he defects from Verdane because he can't condone the war his father and brothers are waging. This is a shame, given that chapters 2 and 3 revolve around Eldigan's own struggles with My Country, Right or Wrong. Given that Jamke had faced the exact same choice, one would expect that he might express some opinion on the situation. It also hurts Jamke that he lacks any major Holy Blood, meaning he lacks any chance to wield a special weapon, and in Genealogy, units without Holy Blood are generally left to the side narratively as well.
    • In fact, there are lots of characters like this. Aside of the final lover dialogue and the beginning scene, Naoishe does not get any other dialogues (as opposed to Arden who gets several extra scenes lamenting how much he's the butt of joke of things, or Alec who gets a chance to show off his pervert personality with Silvia). Chulainn has exactly three lines in the game, two of which make him basically Ayra's Satellite Love Interest. Beowulf has more hints to his past revealed in Thracia 776 where he is a barely-mentioned Posthumous Character than in this game. In the second generation, Oifey and Shannan as Seliph's mentors are completely sidelined in favor of Lewyn despite having basically raised him. And many of the other male characters of said generation (Ulster, Lester, and Diarmuid are standouts, especially the latter as he's the only child unit who doesn't have a Lover's conversation in the final map besides Lene, and even she has more character than him) have very little character beyond a certain attachment to their sister.
  • Tier-Induced Scrappy:
    • As armored units, Arden and Hannibal suffer from low Speed and movement in a game infamous for having enormous maps.
    • Do NOT mention wanting to use your high priests as combat units. Ever.
    • Silvia and her children (Lene and Coirpre) aren't well-liked either; forum discussions will practically implore you to kill Silvia or not pair her up and take the substitutes Laylea and Charlot (basically both Lene and Coirpre are going to be garbage in combat no matter who their father is unless Coirpre is Lewyn's son, and Laylea and Charlot come with Charm and Paragon respectively, two skills that make them much better at their non-combat jobs). Lene's star as a character has risen some thanks to Fire Emblem Heroes.
    • Lester is rather infamous among the community, as unless he's given the right setup, he's among one of the weakest units in the entire game. Even with the right father, he has somewhat middling results as he is typically deemed as solely a hit-and-run unit who can be felled quite easily. Some players even ignore using him at all and focus on pairing to make Lana stronger, or even go with his substitute Deimne who is somehow about as good if not better than him.
    • Tailtiu and her children often receive similar reactions; while most would agree that Tine and Arthur are usually better than Linda and Amid (although, thanks to packing Wrath and Paragon, Linda can often end up pretty solid in her own right), Tailtiu herself is regarded as an awful unit who requires too much babying to be worth it given that you have about two effective chapters in which to use her and pairing her with anyone but Lewyn or Azelle (who both have other, potentially better pairings) is generally regarded as pointless. The fact that the player never gets Mjolnir, and Tailtiu and her kids couldn't use it regardless, is another strike against her versus some of your other mages. As a result of her being so fiddly on multiple fronts, and Linda & Amid being perfectly serviceable for their combat roles with no effort required by the player, Tailtiu can often be left to molder so that the player can focus on other units and pairings.
    • Also the thieves, Dew and Patty. Whereas in other Fire Emblem games thieves are vital for opening doors and chests and/or stealing certain items and/or weapons from the enemy, all thieves can do in this game is stealing an enemy's gold... by successfully attacking them. While being unmounted melee units restricted to swords. They can actually become good combat units through serious investment and promoting them, but many people do not deem this worth it, since not only do they start out incredibly combat-shy, even at their absolute best, they are essentially Forresters/Swordmasters with much lower stat caps. Their role in keeping the party's funds liquid could be critical, if not for the fact that literally every unit capable of combat can usually earn enough money through the arena and visiting the villages on the maps. The decisions associated most with them are whether to train Dew or not and whether to pair Briggid with someone who improves Patty's usability.
    • Most people agree that Iucharba as a unit generally can't measure up to his brother Iuchar, even though his base stats are better, for the reason alone that Iuchar has a horse while Iucharba is an infantry unit. Iuchar's much higher speed growth is generally also considered to be more useful than Iucharba's better skill growth.
    • The replacement characters in general get hit with this (aside from the aforementioned Laylea, Charlot, Linda, and Amid, though even they have their detractors). By far the worst hit is Creidne, who replaces Larcei but lacks the ridiculous skillset that makes Larcei useful, and is regarded very negatively because of it. There are a few who are still liked as characters (Muirne is one example) but they're just so inferior to the "real" kids that deliberately missing the latter for the replacements is regarded as very, very foolhardy and a challenge run or completionist objective at best.
  • Unintentionally Unsympathetic:
    • Travant is supposed to be a Well-Intentioned Extremist in Genealogy, a good man driven to brutal actions to save his country from terrible poverty, and the player was supposed to feel bad for him in the end. Unfortunately, his actions in Chapter 5 put him well across the Moral Event Horizon for most players, and in what little screentime he gets in the second generation he doesn't come off much better than your average war-mongering tyrant. Thracia 776 tried to salvage his characterization, but it required the awkward retcon mentioned under Ass Pull in the Thracia 776 page.
    • Areone as well. Even Altena remarks that he comes across more as a deluded egoist than the Noble Top Enforcer he is made out to be. While the narrative (and Altena) insists that he is normally a kind and reasonable man, the fact that he doesn't appear at all before chapter 8 means that there isn't a lot of evidence for this, and the most kindness he shows while on-screen is a vague hesitation to kill his sister. Otherwise, the only things he does is sacrifice his soldiers' lives for the sake of a goal that even his father has given up on at that point, and pressure Altena to fight against her will, which makes him come across as a Manipulative Bastard, especially since he seems to be aware of her true heritage. Likewise, Thracia 776 tried to salvage his characterization a little, and arguably succeeded better, despite his relative lack of screen time in said game.
    • While Ishtar is still the Camus of her generation, there is one particular event that makes her look like this trope. In Chapter 10, Julius invited her to a game where they will race on killing at least ONE of your party members. Ishtar is a bit too happy to oblige and even boasts her victory if she draws first blood. While Ishtar has the excuse of the rebels really doing a number to her family and kingdom (killed her brother Ishtore, forced her mother Hilda to retreat) that she couldn't find a reason to care about them, Julius has showed himself to be an unhinged man and Ishtar was going along happily with his more diabolical game of manhunt instead of questioning it like a Camus character. This is mostly downplayed, as she has other genuinely sympathetic moments to counter this.
  • Vindicated by History: An odd example. The game was massively popular in Japan, but because it never received a release outside of Japan, it went for years as one of the three least known games in the series for the westnote . Once the series got popular in the states, Genealogy became more well known by the community due to an active group of fan-translators working to help bring the game to a readable state, but because many either didn't play roms or couldn't, it stayed as mostly a Sleeper Hit for western fans. The combined releases of Fire Emblem Heroes, and Fire Emblem Echoes: Shadows of Valentia, would turn the tide on the Genealogy perception massively, thanks to Heroes introducing players to the characters for the first time, and Echoes providing the opportunity for a potential remake. It currently is seen as one of the strongest entries in the series, and heavily requested to be the next remake for the franchise.
  • What an Idiot!:
    • Eldigan employs Honor Before Reason like there's no tomorrow (which eventually proves to be quite fatal for him). At the start of chapter two, Chagall is preparing to invade Grannvale after widespread (and true) rumors that he killed his father. Eldigan dismisses Lachesis' belief that a father-killer is not to be trusted and rides off to talk to Chagall. He gets tossed in the dungeon for the whole chapter while Chagall tries to seize his lands and attack his little sister. And then Eldigan rescues Chagall from Sigurd and pledges his continuing loyalty to the king, continuing into chapter 3 when Agustria is clearly losing. If Lachesis asks him to try reasoning with the now-losing Chagall, he goes... alone, leaving the Cross Knights on the field. Chagall immediately has him beheaded. If she doesn't, Eldigan insists on fighting Sigurd despite their years of friendship and Chagall's obvious evil, and dies.
    • The villains have an absolutely fatal one in the final chapter. So, what do you do when you have the only person who can kill you at your mercy? Why, you brainwash her and send her off to fight her friends, of course! As this plan is barely thought out or used fully to their own advantage, this ends up poorly.
  • The Woobie: This game has plenty of them, given the Crapsack World that Jugdral becomes. Special mentions below:
    • It pretty much sucks big time if you are a heroic character from House Friege.
      • Tailtiu: Starts out as a super cheery, devil-may-care Genki Girl that has the markings of a Plucky Girl. The pluckiness starts to shatter the instant her father brands her a traitor along with Sigurd and she felt that her childhood friend Azel is the only one she can turn to. It breaks again when confronting her father and eventually losing contact with her husband after the Battle of Belhalla. Then she gets kidnapped with her infant daughter Tine to Freege, losing contact with her son Arthur, and broken beyond belief due to the torture and abuse of Hilda just to protect little Tine that she degenerated into a depressed woman that dies losing her will to live.
      • Tine: See above. The prospect of being kidnapped since infant age, seeing her mother die protecting her, and spending the rest of her childhood taking further abuses by Hilda now that Tailtiu is gone (like being called 'traitor's daughter'), and Bloom still acting like a controlling uncle instead of protecting her... it's not doing any favors for Tine's insecure self. It was a good thing that there were some kind souls like Ishtar and Ishtore to prevent her going off the rockers. The same also applies for Linda, who takes Tine's role if Talitiu died or had no children.
      • Arthur: Unlike any other children, Arthur pretty much had his life as a normal child robbed from him at the tender age of 7, including the kidnapping of his mother and sister. Other children may have their noble upbringing (Ced/Fee), being in an Orphanage of Love (Seliph & co, Febail/Patty, Leen), be in a good retainer/parent's hands (Leif, Nanna, Julia (yes, Arvis and Deirdre were very kind to her before things went to hell)), or be Happily Adopted (Coirpre). Arthur only had a stranger old lady that picked him up and the rest, he had to fend for himself since young age, shaping up his 'cold' self as mentioned. The same also applies for Amid, who takes Arthur's role if Tailtiu died or had no children.
    • Altena: Kidnapped as an infant by Travant, the man who murdered her parents, and raised to believe that she's his daughter, with the Nea Fuyuki manga suggesting that she had a very unhappy (if not outright abusive) childhood with Areone as her only support. Either way, by the present, she's a Broken Bird, and the bomb that Leif drops on her doesn't help, seeing as how it shakes up everything she's known and pits her against Areone, her Implied Love Interest.
    • Sigurd himself: Gets framed for regicide and capital treason, manipulated into laying the groundwork for The Empire, has his wife kidnapped, brainwashed, and married off to Arvis, one of his only remaining allies, his father dies right in front of him, and he is betrayed by Arvis in his final moment of triumph. And when Arvis is through with him, what's left of him wouldn't fill a matchbox. For the next seventeen years, he is remembered as a traitor and a villain, and his name is only cleared when his son Seliph is able to rise up, clean up his mess, and stop the villains.
  • Woolseyism: Most characters' names are Japanese renditions of various figures from Nordic or Celtic mythology. With the release of Fire Emblem Awakening, the localization team is rendering many of them as the original names (e.g. Sigurd and Deirdre, rather than Siglud and Diadora). On the other hand, some of the changes (Raquesis? Quan?) seem to be just rendering the Japanese renderings back again and making them weirder. It got even better once Fire Emblem Heroes was announced and did much the same, (e.g. Chulainn and Diarmuid, rather than Holyn and Delmud) and strangely also retconned Raquesis back into Lachesis.

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