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Electroconvulsive Therapy Is Torture

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They strap you down to a special table that flips over. So that you don't choke on your own vomit. Then they inject you with a muscle relaxant. Then they tape electrodes to your forehead and then turn up the juice. When your toes starts twitching, that means you're having a major convulsion, which is what they want. It's what they call "healing".
Derek Lord, "Influence", Law & Order: Special Victims Unit
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In fiction, electroconvulsive therapy (also known as "electroshock therapy") has a negative reputation. It's portrayed as Electric Torture done by cruel, quack doctors at Bedlam Houses. It's about as useful as a lobotomy but with the added fear of being completely awake and able to feel the electricity.

In Real Life, electroshock therapy is not nearly as torturous or ineffective as it is in fiction. In most countries, it is administered only under anesthesia over a series of sessions. It is used for a variety of mental illnesses, including cases of severe clinical depression which do not respond to milder treatments. And over the years with more research, the side effects have been decreased significantly.

Sub-trope to Electric Torture.


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Examples:

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    Audio Plays 

    Comic Books 
  • Arkham Asylum: A Serious House on Serious Earth, Dr Amadeus Arkham really does use the ECT machine for torture and murder, subjecting Mad Dog Hawkins to "treatment" that slowly fries him alive in revenge for what Hawkins did to his wife and daughter. This being a) the 1920s and b) Arkham Asylum, it's dismissed as an unfortunate accident.

    Fan Works 
  • In the Bones fic The Psychologist in the Institution by ASC12, a murder victim is found to have been subjected to electro-convulsion therapy. Sweets goes undercover to figure out what's going on at the institution and ends up tortured with shock therapy while conscious. The team has to rescue him only for the place's director to use legal means to take him back. He's rescued again, but recovering from the mental toll is a tough process.
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    Films — Animation 
  • One scene of Mary and Max shows Max, who has Asperger's Syndrome in the 1980s, at a mental institution receiving some clearly painful electroshock therapy.
  • In Batman: Assault on Arkham, Waller's Suicide Squad straps themselves into electroshock chairs in order to fry the bomb chips inserted in their necks. All of them are in intense pain throughout the entire process (though Harley was enjoying itnote ), but it works for some better than others. Unfortunately for King Shark, his skin is too thick for the electricity to fry the chip, resulting in his death by Your Head Asplode when Waller figures out what they're doing.

    Films — Live-Action 
  • Double subverted in The Snake Pit. Virginia finds electroshock therapy terrifying, but it actually does alleviate her schizophrenic symptoms.
  • In Return to Oz, the 1899/1900-era Bedlam House try to shock Dorothy because she keeps talking about a magical land called "Oz", but she escapes before they can. There are also "damaged" patients shown locked in the building's cellar following the failed attempts at ECT.
  • One Flew Over the Cuckoo's Nest: Mental patient McMurphy is given electroshock therapy that causes him extreme pain and sends him into convulsions. The film was made in 1975, but the book the film was based on was written during the '60s, back when anesthesia was just starting to be used for ECT. But considering this is Nurse Ratched we're talking about...
  • Constantine: While he was still a child, Constantine could see demonic half-breeds in their true form. When he told his parents, his psychiatric care included electroshock therapy. When the current is applied, Constantine's body is shown arching and he tries to cry out in pain through his gag.
  • In the finale of Requiem for a Dream, Sarah Goldfarb is treated for amphetamine psychosis with ECT - by a doctor who can barely pay attention to the fact that she is unable to give informed consent to the treatment. The experience is portrayed like a torture sequence and leaves her lost in her own dreamworld. More appropriately justified in the book, which was written and set in the 1970s, back when ECT was used more cavalierly and a lot less effectively.
  • In The Ward, Kirsten is subjected to electroconvulsive therapy when drugs fail to cure her "hallucinations." The doctor and nurses are genuinely well-intentioned, but as the film's set in the 1960s, there's no anesthesia in use and the procedure is predictably agonizing. Later, Sarah is actually murdered with the ECT machine.
  • In Captain America: The Winter Soldier, the eponymous villain is given ECT treatments by HYDRA via a special machine to wipe his memory and prevent him from remembering that he's actually Bucky Barnes, Captain America's best friend. Said treatments take place without anesthesia of any kind and feature the recipient screaming in agony.
  • Cult of Chucky features a scene in which Nica is given ECT... while chemically paralyzed but fully conscious. Though she can't scream, the voltage leaves her eyes wide open with horror as she violently lurches around.
  • The Town with a Dark Secret in Population 436 uses electroshock therapy in order to "cure" anyone who even thinks of leaving. In extreme cases, they're lobotomized.
  • Murdock is put through a rather painful bout of electroshock therapy in The Stinger of The A-Team. To the doctors' disturbance, he proves Too Kinky to Torture.
  • Stonehearst Asylum: We see ECT used in flashbacks which clearly causes the patients extreme pain (at the time, no anesthetic was given, with its application half-hazard). Lamb later shocks Salt to the point he loses his memory in revenge. Newgate is also tortured by its use on him.
  • In Changeling, Dr. Steele uses ECT to torture patients in his mental hospital into compliance.
  • Sharp-eyed viewers of Joker will notice that Penny Fleck's dossier claims she received electroshock treatment during her stay at Arkham Asylum. Given that Arkham is the comic book Bedlam House, we can safely assume it was traumatic at best and didn't do much for either her mental stability or her relationship with her son Arthur.
  • Joker does this to Harleen Quinzel in Suicide Squad. It’s part of what drives her insane.

    Literature 
  • The Bell Jar: Played With. Esther is incorrectly given Electroconvulsive Therapy by the arrogant Doctor Gordon, and it only succeeds in making her problems worse. However, later one when its applied properly by the much more empathetic Doctor Norton it greatly succeeds in helping her with her depression.
  • In Dan Morgan's Sixth Perception novels, ECT is regarded as dangerous and psychologically damaging — especially to psychics, who may end up so traumatized by the process that they lose their powers altogether. Once again, though, this series was written in the 1970s...
  • Despite the Film example above, this is very much averted in original One Flew Over the Cuckoo's Nest book. It's treated like any other medical procedure, if extreme. The Nurse in charge of the ECT ward makes a concentrated effort to be nice to The Chef and McMurphy when she finds out that they're from Ratched's ward, and this isn't the first time she sent people to ECT as punishment.

    Live-Action TV 
  • In Supernatural Season 7, "The Born-Again Identity" sees Sam driven into a psych ward by his hallucinations of Lucifer and subjected to ECT. It is lampshaded that ECT is usually performed under anesthesia... when the administering doctor doesn't turn out to be a demon, that is.
  • American Horror Story:
    • Justified in American Horror Story: Asylum. While electroshock therapy is presented this way, it's also combined with conversion therapy against the lesbian Lana, and what seems to be a violent attempt to elicit a confession from Kit, who is falsely accused of being Bloody Face. Later in the season, Sister Jude is subjected to the same treatment, this time for the possessed Sister Mary Eunice's sick amusement. For good measure, the voltage is deliberately set to unsafe levels, leaving the "patient" barely functional.
    • In American Horror Story: 1984, Benjamin Richter was subjected to ECT after being locked away in a mental asylum for committing a mass murder. He had been framed and was innocent, but the ECT made him increasingly susceptible to suggestion, and eventually he became convinced that he'd committed the murders.
  • In the "Influence" episode of Law & Order: Special Victims Unit, Derek Lord justify his opposition to psychiatry using his experiences with ECT; Novak asks him if he ever attempted suicide after.
    • Averted in the episode "Girl Dishonored". Detective Benson learns that a rape victim has been forcibly checked into a mental hospital. She arrives right as the girl is about to be given ECT and tries to stop it. The doctors tell her it's too late to stop it, and in any case the girl requested it. The doctors are shown to care about her, and the girl believes it to be her last chance to recover from her trauma.
  • Mad Men: Pete Campbell's brief flame, Beth, is subjected to electroshock therapy because of her severe depression. She comes to Pete to tell him she's gonna undergo the procedure, and he's horrified. She says it does help, but she's shown suffering. Pete comes in to see her after the procedure. She welcomes him, but it's revealed she doesn't remember a thing about him.
  • Six Feet Under: In season 5, George undergoes an ECT treatment to deal with his increasing paranoia. It's shown realistically, with an actual ECT machine, but it's not done under anaesthesia and he's in incredible pain. It somewhat helps with his paranoia.
  • In the first episode of The A-Team, Lynch visits the lovable-but-insane Murdock at the psych ward, and notices bald patches on his scalp. Murdock starts whispering about painful electrical therapies he's been put through, freaking Lynch out. Naturally, Murdock is messing with him; he gave himself the bald patches trying out a new hairstyle.
  • The third season finale of Quantum Leap entitled "Shock Theater" had Sam leap into a mental patient just as he received ECT. The result scrambles Sam's already swiss-cheese'd memory and he ends up assuming the identities of people he previously leaped into. In the end, Al convinces Sam the only way to fix it is to undergo the same treatment again (which is then turbo-charged by a bolt of lightning just as Sam leaps out).
  • Played with in Homeland with Carrie Matheson. On the one hand, she is genuinely, severely bipolar and had become a borderline Yandere towards Nicholas Brody, to the point that she was threatening him and his family, and the ECT helped get her life back under control. On the other hand, her belief that Brody was actually a terrorist was actually true, but the ECT erased her memories of the evidence needed to prove this.
  • In Treadstone, John Bentley is repeatedly subjected to ECT as part of the KGB's efforts to break him.
  • In the BBC historical crime series Vienna Blood, which is set in Vienna in 1906-7, the psychiatrist hero Max Lieberman's academic supervisor Professor Gruner is clearly marked as evil by his enthusiasm for crude (and anachronistic) ECT, naturally performed without anaesthetic or muscle relaxant.
  • Cold Case:
    • One episode's case about the unsolved killing of a mental patient in the 1960s. The victim was a genderfluid/possibly trans man who got repeatedly subjected to ECT for not abiding by the rules which the psychiatrist stipulated in "acting female". This happened so much, it left them with brain damage and comatose. His estranged best friend, who had come to apologize and get him out, then smothered him in a clear homage to One Flew Over the Cuckoo's Nest as a mercy kill. It's also mentioned that the psychiatrist did the same thing to another patient, though then he was sued and fired over it.
    • This isn't the first time that Cold Case has done this. A first season episode, this one set in the early 1960's, involved a little boy being subjected to this in order to cure his "irrepressible naughtiness and wildness" (nowadays, just very high spirits and possible ADHD), in order that he'll be adopted by a loving family. Tragically, this is done with the very best of intentions by his biological parents, a nun and doctor; the father is very reluctant because he knows what it involves but the mother is insistent. The little boy dies from the initial treatment - not only because of his age, but because unbeknown to the parents he's also been a lab rat in a series of experiments of the effects of irradiated food, which weakened his body.
  • Stranger Things Season Two: when Eleven finds her mother, Terry Ives, the woman's unable to do anything except blink and breathe, unable to say anything except a repeating cycle of certain phrases. When Eleven enters her mind, she finds out that Terry broke in to Hawkins lab to get her, but was caught. Her condition is a result of Dr Brenner strapping her in an ECT machine and deliberately turning up the voltage to the exact frequency he knows will fry her brain and leave her unable to communicate but not kill her. The calm and precise way Brenner does this implies that he's done this before...

    Theatre 
  • In Next to Normal, the main character Diana goes through several treatments for her bipolar disorder and psychosis. After everything else has failed, her psychopharmacologist Dr. Madden suggests ECT, which Diana compares to One Flew Over the Cuckoo's Nest above. The treatment ends with her losing her memories, but they eventually return, which also brings back her psychosis. This causes the doctor to recommend more ECT, which she promptly refuses, leading to her stopping treatment altogether.

    Video Games 
  • The Town of Light features a flashback showing the protagonist undergoing electroshock therapy in a Bedlam House. The scene plays out like a Nightmare Sequence and fades to white when the procedure begins. Watch it here.
  • Justified in The Park. While exploring Atlantic Island Park, Lorraine experiences a vision of the ECT she underwent to treat her depression, here imagined as her screaming in pain and begging for mercy as bolts of lightning rip into her. Of course, this isn't actually what happened to her, just the Bogeyman tormenting Lorraine with hallucinations. As it turns out, the real impact of the ECT was on Lorraine's ability to trust others: the doctors were using ECT as a quick fix to get rid of an unwanted patient, and while the treatment may not have physically harmed Lorraine, it only made her less inclined to accept help in the long run.
  • In Dishonored 2, you can choose to sit down antagonist Kirin Jindosh in the same electroshock chair he used for his test subjects. Watch here how he trembles in pain when you turn on the machine.
  • While exploring the abandoned asylum in The Suffering, it's discovered that the projected ghost of Dr. Killjoy has created his own special variant on ECT to make the brain "behave" and has tested it on one of the intruding corrections officers. By the time you find him, the guard is completely brain-dead. However, you can still use the device just to watch him mindlessly writhe in pain - dinging the Karma Meter in the process.
  • In Evil Genius, Elsa "The Matron" Krabb was once a kindly nurse working at a Swiss mental hospital, until a mix-up involving some experimental psychosis drugs caused her to develop an unhealthy interest in electroshock therapy, culminating in her being investigated by the Swiss electricity board for single-handedly consuming more electricity that the entire city of Zurich and placed under house arrest for cruelty to her patients. If you recruit her as a henchman, she has a special attack called "Electroshock Therapy" that can harm multiple enemy agents at once.
  • Sonny 2: Referenced in one of the Psychological build's attacks, called Shock Therapy, which is, quite damaging, utterly unblockable and an excellent buff remover. Notably, the Psychological build has a slew of cruel attacks and boasts that "if insanity were a weapon, this would be its form", and its more electrical side is a full-on Psycho Electro, so it's likely meant to be twisted.

    Western Animation 
  • Robot Chicken: In a short parodying Calvin and Hobbes, Calvin is sent to therapy because he thinks his stuffed toy is a real tiger. He's given shock therapy when he begins showing violent thoughts. Ominous music plays as Calvin is shocked against his will and left twitching afterwards.

    Real Life 
  • The Judge Rotenberg Center is perhaps infamous for its use of electric shocks on the autistic people there as a form of aversive punishment. One former resident of the center describes how the staff would shock them for the smallest sign of movement, for screaming when shocked, or often for no reason at all.
    • During a certain time, electric torture was the favourite "punishment method" of many behaviorist treatments and experiments. For example the early ABA experiments by Ivar Lovaas used an electrified floor, the famous "learned helplessness" experiments were about dealing electric shocks to wolves, and electric torture was used to "treat" drug addictions, mental illnesses, things that were thought to be mental illnesses at the time (like being LGBTQ+) and alcoholism. When reading about behaviorist experiments, it seems like behaviorists were among the biggest sadists among all psychologists.
      • Electric shocks as a treatment for alcoholism were stopped because most patients reacted to the shocks by drinking to numb the pain of the shock.
  • Sadly ECT was the final nail in the coffin for Ernest Hemingway. Two horrible plane crashes in Two days had pushed him into a severe depression and alcoholism to control the pain. The Mayo Clinic gave him 15 EC Ts in three months, leaving him a hollow shell of who he used to be.

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