Video Game: AdventureQuest

The online Flash game AdventureQuest by Artix Entertainment is a lunch break sized RPG that takes place in the land of Lore. The game, though online, is single player, and uses online functions for updating the game easily and for wars. For a one-time fee, the player can become a Guardian to buy more weapons, more quests, more places, etc. The player can also separately buy Z-Tokens for strong weapons, spells, pets and other things.

The game has various storylines that run parallel or interconnect with each other, presented through a series of quests with the player character's interaction. Some of the storylines have deep plots and impressive characters, such as the long-spanning Devourer Saga, the journey of the Devourer and Uncreator The'Galin to uncreate Lore and the player character's attempt to stop him, and some storylines are short, silly spoofs, such as Mogbusters. Either way, the game's writing covers a wide gamut. Even more so on the forums, where there is plenty of backstory.

The game doesn't have only its simple fighting system to keep players enticed. Wars are special events used to move plots, where the player character enters a series of battles and each monster the player and other players kill works toward a certain number to fight the boss for rare event items. The player can find mini-games in quests. Housing is a big feature, too, where the player clears space of land, start building a house, and even get monsters to protect it.

It is joined with the following sequels afterward: DragonFable (set 5 years prior to AQ in a parallel timeline), MechQuest (5000 years prior to AQ) and AdventureQuest Worlds (which is a multi-player version set ten years after AQ and in a parallel universe), and WarpForce (set at the same time as AdventureQuest but IN SPACE, just expanding on the Space Opera that was going on in the background).


This game provides examples of:

  • Abnormal Ammo: Many '100% proc' weapons tend to be this.
    • Frozen Dinner is a weapon that launches frozen cat food at the enemy..
    • The rewards from the "Lively Hallows" quest are fruit which you throw from fruit baskets.
    • The Apple Launcher, Corn-Missile Launcher, and Pumpkin Chucker from the Harvest Festival shoot produce from a cornucopia.
    • The rare Carrot Gun allows the player to shoot carrots.
    • The Gold-Shooting Gatling Gun and Blingshot use gold as ammo.
    • The Bac-Gun fires bacon at the enemy, giving the player character the chance to paralyze it.
    • The Homework Cannon shoots, well, sheets of homework. What else works against unruly schoolchildren?
    • The Zard Salvo series of weapons shoots live Frogzards at the enemy.
  • Acronym and Abbreviation Overload: The forums had a guide to the shorthand people use while talking about equipment, before it was updated to be less intimidating.
  • Adam Smith Hates Your Guts: The cost of equipment is directly proportional to how far they will get the player in the game, even when the player character should have received the item as a free reward or something. The only exceptions are promotional items, but those usually require payment of another sort.
  • Adaptive Armor:
    • Protean armor, V.I.X.E.N., and Shield of Awe give the player character increased blocking against the enemy's last attack type.
    • The Cyclops' Eye item defends against the enemy's last element. Ironically, this makes the item more useful against enemies that use the same attack, since the defense boost is constantly nullified if the enemy constantly changes how it attacks.
  • Added Alliterative Appeal: Everything the Bun-Bits name start with the letter B. That's not a chef, that's a broiler! That's not a hankerchief, that's a bandana! That's not a wand, that's a baton! So on and so on.
  • Advanced Ancient Acropolis: Talados seems to be the go-to dead, ancient civilization, that was rich in magic, monsters, and delicious tarts.
  • Aerith and Bob: Most of the game consists of Aeriths, but you get the occasional Bob in the form of Aria or Smith.
  • After Combat Recovery: In most quests, the player character is fully healed after every two encounters. This is sometimes justified by having Twilly being around to heal the player character, but he's not always around, and the player character recovers anyway.
  • All There in the Manual: The forums contains guides to the gameplay and its story, and is the source of the developers' Word of God.
    • Most of the backstory for the Devourer Saga is this, with several 'demicanonical' stories written by Falerin (which are somewhat retroactively applied to the game content). They're available in the aforementioned forums.
    • Not to mention the IRC sessions and logs that also play an interesting role in the story.
  • Allegedly Free Game: Becoming a Guardian, which costs $20, is necessary to max out the player character's level, use every skill for classes, get the best equipment, and access a number of quests.
  • All-Powerful Bystander: Many gods who visit Lore cannot directly assist in Lorian affairs due to the Celestial Bureaucracy. The'Galin does not use his power of frequently because of the ripples in time it causes—especially if such uncreation would cause a Temporal Paradox related to his own ascension to godhood.
  • Alternate Dimension/Alternate Universe: During the Bizarre Flecks Saga, we got a glimpse of some Transdimensional Realities (or TDRs), which are in essence, "like parallel worlds but where some very fundamental change happened."
  • Always a Bigger Fish: During the "Big Trouble in Little Granemor" quest, the player character is attacked by a Giant Hungry Zombie after fighting off some vampires with Vampire Slayer E. The zombie makes about one attack before a scary Ribber randomly comes up and drags it away (with its mouth).
  • Always Accurate Attack: The Undead Archer's rare attack will never miss, and the Divine Kusanagi Sword pays a hefty damage tradeoff for the ability to always land its strikes.
  • Always Chaotic Evil: The Drakel more or less started out like this, but it became increasingly subverted as the series progressed and humanity started to get to know them better.
  • Ambidextrous Sprite: Due to the animation style and the amount of Fashionable Asymmetry.
  • Amplifier Artifact: Miscellaneous items like the Weapon Master Emblems or Elemental Orbs boost damage done by a type of weapon or against a certain enemy's element, respectively.
  • Amusing Injuries: Anything that happens to Twig, since he is widely considered to be a) cute and b) really annoying.
  • Anchors Away: Of course, one of the weapons available from Talk Like a Pirate Day is an anchor the player hold over his hand.
  • Animesque: Not huge, but is very noticeable by now. Even more so as part of its Art Evolution.
  • Animal Mecha:
    • The Drakelon Steam Dragon is an enemy that is a mecha dragon.
    • Transformer Armor has three forms which resemble a horse-and-chariot, hawk, and cobra, where all of them deal different attacks.
  • Anyone You Know: At the start of character creation, the player is asked for a name, and in Death's Domain, the player character can randomly time travel back to change it.
  • Anti-Grinding: Most quest and war monsters are level scaled.
  • Anti-Poop Socking : There are daily caps for experience and gold.
  • Arc Welding: Carnax got attached to the Epic Quests got attached to the Nightbane storyline, and the result got really, really confusing in places. There is a guide to AdventureQuest lore, and we see that every plot except the Seekrat stories either leads up to or is a direct consequence of The Devourer Saga.
  • Art Evolution: Since the game has expanded so much from the time it's existed, there's been an enormous change in the art when it stealthily shifts from western-styled to Animesque. The forum-based "encyclopedia" even has a catalogue of old monster pictures, which are still being updated.
    • Deliberately played with when fighting the Iron Golem monster: the battle starts with the old version getting CRUSHED underfoot the updated version, possibly overlapping with Always a Bigger Fish.
    • When Warlic is fading from the effects of a time ripple, his sprite reverts to older versions.
    • The Tenth Anniversary Special event showcases the art evolution by having the hero go back in time to face past threats. We even get to see both of Twilly's earlier forms. The first form, "Retro Twilly", is available as a reward in the event. He's a fairly powerful healing pet too.
  • Attractive Bent-Gender: All of the Genderbent NPCs are at least somewhat good-looking, and Galana (Galanoth) says that female Warlic looks cute.
  • Auto-Revive: The IceFall armor has a 15% chance to revive the player character on what would be death, and the Angel Guard guest sacrifices its own life to restore an attack that would have been fatal.
  • Author Avatar: A lot, and maybe even the majority, of major NPCs are based on staff members.
  • Awesome but Temporary: While most temporary equipment is balanced to have around the same stats as other permanent equipment, the Dragon Blade is notorious for being potent on almost all dragons. Given that Dragon Wars occur every so often and dragons drop plenty of gold, many players go through the Dragon Blade quest to get the weapon and cut through dragons like butter.
  • Awesome McCoolname: The player character can have any name, so many player names fall under this category.
  • Awesome Anachronistic Apparel: Inverted. Falerin, Galrick, the Order, Agent Smith, Ryuusei Cartwright, his analogue, Gaiden, Lkeas, all of them look out of place by wearing suits (and Galrick and Lkeas's casual outfits) in a medieval-inspired Lore.
  • An Axe to Grind:
    • The player can specialize in axes as his/her Weapon of Choice. Axe-type weapons tend to be slightly inaccurate and slightly more powerful than the average weapon, and axe damage can be boosted further with the Axe Master Emblem weapon.
    • Zhilo's iconic weapon is his axe. The 2012 Frostval Gift Delivery rewards allow the player to equip a zombified version of his armor. If the player is wielding an axe, the armor gives the player a buff.
  • Back from the Dead:
    • Riona claims Death offered her a chance to life if she helped collect his hourglasses, but he sics Carnax's ghost on Riona to make sure she can never fulfill her task. The player character has to enter Death's domain and slay Carnax's ghost so she can return to the living.
    • In the Devourer Saga, Galrick and Balius don't stay dead for long. Falerin explains that risked Lorian godwar to revive Galrick as his agent for Terra instead of for The'Galin. However, the event is still portrayed as Ascend to a Higher Plane of Existence, given that he and Balius can't return to Lore.
    • The player character, as the Chosen, essentially gets a free pass from Death, so long as he/she returns the favor...
  • Badass Santa: Kringle the Barbarian is Lore's version of Santa Claus. In the 2008 Frostval quest, Visia warps him, his elves (now Helves), and reindeer (now PainDeer) into bloodthirsty monsters, requiring the player character to save Frostval from them.
  • Bad with the Bone:
    • The Skull Club series of weapons are necromantic totems fashioned out of bones that can drain the enemy's hit points on its special attack.
    • The Dragonfang Scimitar is made by the bones of a dragon.
  • Bag of Holding: Before a quest gave a tongue-in-check explanation, most players wondered how their characters could hold eight suits of armor, weapons, shields, and accessories and be able to switch out their equipment mid-battle.
  • Bare-Fisted Monk:
    • The Martial Artist class allows the player character to use fists in place of weapons. The animation for the Gi armors also show the player character kicking the enemy.
    • Fist- and claw- type weapons tend to be more accurate at the cost of lower damage. The Cat Scratch Fever item boosts the damage these weapons, encouraging a player to keep an inventory for this playstyle.
  • Barrier Change Boss: Certain monsters, such as the Chaos Knight, HapHaZard, or Drako, change their damage resistances each turn, forcing the player to switch equipment to match.
  • The Beastmaster:
    • A character with a high Charisma stat gets increased damage and effects from pets and can use animal-themed weapons such as Twig's Swordfish or a War Hawk more effectively.
    • There is a Beastmaster class that allows the player character to increase pet/guest damage, summon animals as guests to attack, and absorb enemy attacks to use against them.
  • Behind the Black: In "Dinozard Island", the player character claims he has the power of '4th-Wall Sight', allowing him/her to see what's just off-screen.
  • The Berserker: Eselgee is the trainer for the Berserker class, which encourages reckless abandon in battle, as Berserker-class skills deal increased damage the lower the character's health is.
  • Better Than a Bare Bulb: While there are consistent plots in the game, quests are mired with lampshades and lampshades about lampshades.
  • BFG: Several guns in the game tend to be gigantic. The Six-Ton Gun is a Hand Cannon, the Gold-Shooting Gatling gun looks like a one-handed machine gun, and there is literally a weapon called a BFG.
  • BFS: HOLIDAY. COLOSSUS. It's huge sword that covers most of the player. On the character page, it covers up some information.
  • Big Creepy-Crawlies: There are quite a few scaled-up insects in Lore.
    • The Sectus/Sectid are remnants of an ancient time where they competed against dragons.
    • Kresh are rather standard Darkness-element Giant Spiders.
    • Brain Spiders are horrific creations of the Drakel and Brilhado. They are giant spiders with bones as limbs and eat brains.
    • Mantiks are giant, humanoid praying mantises that eat the head of their mates—so of course, they're vicious against any adventurers.
    • Buzzers are gigantic bees.
    • Hybees are humanoid bees that are, in fact, the size of humans.
    • BuzZards are half-giant bees, half 'zard.
    • Wind Wasps are quite small compared to be 'giant', but they are still giant bugs compared to standard-sized bugs.
    • In Lore, a FlibbityGibbit (or its boss version, a FlibbitiestGibbest) is a cyan-colored bug with gigantic, mammalian eyes.
    • A Skeeter is a gigantic, human-sized mosquito.
  • Big Red Devil: The monsters from Heck are Hoof Soldiers—and their Elite Mook versions, Big Reds.
  • Big Screwed-Up Family: Wolfwing/Erimus's family, due to Erebus/Dhows's manipulations.
    • Nine hundred years ago, Erimus was a normal human who got married to Cara, who had dated Constantin (Erimus' best friend) many years ago. Then, Constantin was turned into a werewolf and began antagonizing Erimus, partly fueled by frustration. Years later, the two friends having grown further apart, Erimus and Cara have had two children, Balius and Katarina. When the children were in their teens, Erimus was tainted by a coerced Constantin, something that someone thoroughly hid from Safiria who turned Erimus thinking he could be of use. Expecting Erimus to die because of both infections, she abandoned him in the forest's edge, where he was found by Katarina. Erimus killed her, while mentally unstable and in the process of becoming the first ever Werepyre, who managed to become Wolfwing thanks to Dewlok. Then, Cara, influenced by Drageth, accepted Dhows' offer and time travelled to the future, to protect Balius from his father, whom they thought was dangerous. Safiria and Constantine kept fighting each other for centuries, while Erimus became a leader on his own and was confined to an outcast's solitude. All grown-up, Balius (who had become the Avatar of Death at some point) got married to Evina, with whom he had two children, Edward (to whom the Annunaki was passed onto) and Cenara. This resulted in Balius becoming a Forsaken and, subsequently, NightBane just to be able to (un-)live on (...and get mad with power, later). Due to his newfound obsession, Evina left him and married another man, a farmer, with whom she had another son, Donovan. Donovan deeply resented his step-siblings for the attention Evina paid to them and grew ever more jealous. And JUST THEN, the Devourer Saga kicks in, with Balius turning against the Devourer because of Cenara's plea (and, indirectly, Wolfwing's request) and, then, realizing he's been an idiot to his children after he fails to kill E to become the Avatar of Death once againnote  due to Cenara's intervention, who reveals she's the Avatar now (yup, E has been Forsaken, too). And then, NightBane gets killed by Omega in The Final Battle, trying to redeem himself. Afterwards, Donovan starts a four-way war between humans, vampires, werewolves and werepyres, during which Cenara is infected with her father's blood and becomes a Dracopyre herself (Gracefang) with Dewlok's help (thankfully, without becoming Forsaken), just as Donovan becomes one himself and takes the name of NightReign. An Action Girl now, Cenara vows to become Darkovia's protector in her brother's stead and fight Donovan, while also learning the messed-up history of her messed-up family and the role an Eldritch Abomination had in it.
  • Blade on a Stick: Lances, spears, and polearms make up many of the weapons that deal ranged damage. They tend to have higher-than-average accuracy but slightly reduced damage. Using the Spear Master Emblem compensates by boosting their damage somewhat.
  • Blah Blah Blah: The opening scene of "Dragons!" has Cyrus and Galanoth arguing in this manner.
  • Bling-Bling-BANG!: Numerous weapons the player can get are made of gold or encrusted with magical gems. The player can wield a blade forged out of pure gold or wield a gatling gun that shoots gold as ammunition.
  • Bling of War: Uncle Sham, the miserly president of the Central Bank of the Leprechaun nation, loves to deck his battle equipment out in gold. The player can purchase the Communicant set and Leprechaun Power Au-rmour after defeating him for his or her own battles.
  • Bonus Boss:
    • The Void is used for both testing the difficulty of bosses and for adding optional bosses into the game. When it's being used for the latter, the bosses considered beatable give unique rewards, while those that are undefeatable give just bragging rights.
    • Besides boss-only events, quests may offer the player the option to encounter optional bosses. Some, such as the Z.A.R.D.I.S. Baron Darjeeling, or Loco, are strictly optional—in-universe, it's justified as letting the Chosen personally deal with a threat or letting a more capable NPC take care of the opponent. Other bosses, such as Etherseid, are required, and the 'option' is between a standard-power boss fight vs. a challenging one. For Frostval 2007, the player is given the option to battle a weak or strong Nightmare Queen (to get her sword as a temporary weapon) or skip the battle entirely.
  • Boss in Mook Clothing: The Dracovamplantess enemy from the 2014 April Fools quest, for some reason, has a ridiculously strong poison attack and would love to use it on the player. Many players complained about having to struggle to defeat two of them in a row without healing, while the actual 'boss' of the quest was easy enough with its 200% resistances and the weapon the quest gave the player that did extra damage to him.
  • Brats with Slingshots: In "Battleon's Nightmare!", Timmy is coerced by Khandie Khain to fight against the player character with a slingshot.
  • Bribing Your Way to Victory: Guardianship and Z-tokens.
  • Bunnies for Cuteness: Bun-Bits weaponize their cuteness as an enemy encounter; they have a chance of having damage against them cut because the player can't handle attacking such cute critters.
  • Butt Monkey: Before its renovation, the city of Granemor sure liked to get invaded and destroyed.
  • CamelCase: Like pretty much all Artix Entertainment games.
  • Cartoon Creature: Moglins are mammals which resemble anthromorphic mice/rabbits with overly-large ears.
  • Cast from Hit Points: The Blood Orb item takes a small amount of the player character's hit points to boost the damage and accuracy of spells.
  • Cast From Money: Several pieces of equipment allow the player to burn gold to boost damage.
    • The golden Ebil Scythes takes gold to empower its special attack.
    • The player can feed a Golden Gween gold to transform it into a Golden Hallow, which deals more Earth damage than any other unboosted pet.
    • Mercenary-type guests require the player to pay gold for damage, but they are better than 'standard' guests. Nezujimbo can freeze the enemy and Shogun & Ansatsu can switch between what element they attack with—or attack with both elements at once.
  • Catapult to Glory: The original way to visit Isle d'Oriens was to build a catapult and send the player character flying through the rip in the sky that led to it. An update made it possible to visit the Isle from Battleon with a click.
  • Cave Mouth: The Wolfgate is the entrance to the Werewolf Lair, and it fittingly has the shape of a wolf's head.
  • Celestial Deadline: The Eternal Dragon of Time absorbs the dark energy generated from villains, and it must have magic words spoken to it every ten years to prevent it from becoming evil and destroying reality. Too bad for the player character that the deadline was yesterday.
  • Charged Attack:
    • The gimmick of the Kindred Mastercraft set and the Hourglass Axe is to 'store' multiple turns' worth of damage before unleashing it in one burst.
    • The ShellZard may retreat into its shell, which both boosts its defense stats dramatically and allows it to unleash a high-power attack.
  • Cheap Gold Coins: The player will be paying for equipment with millions of gold coins. A basket of Pearapplos costs 'only' a value between 19 and 2,201 gold depending on what stat boosts they give the player.
  • Christmas In July: There is a quest, "Frostval in July!", released in July of 2008 that shows what the villains of the 2007 Frostval quest are up to. The player gets to see Zorbak's Freudian Excuse why he hates Frostval and Khandie Khain's identity before she was 'adopted' by the Nightmare Queen.
  • Circles of Hell: The dimension of Heck loosely follows The Divine Comedy in structure.
  • Class Change Level Reset: Most classes allow the player to keep their levels, but switching between Martial Artist styles and Dracopyre subraces drops the player's class level to 5 and 0, respectively.
  • Clipped Wing Angel: Donovan breaks Hybrid Overkill Avoidance in the 2014 April Fools quest and becomes an amalgamation of a wide variety of monsters... but at the cost of losing his sanity and gaining all of the weaknesses of the creatures whose traits he gained.
  • Clothes Make the Superman: Class abilities are accessed by being equipped with the class armor. Similarly, a lot of armors give the player character multiple attacks or other special powers.
  • Cloud Cuckoo Lander: Radaghast, whose grip on reality can frequently be said to be questionable. His justifications for the trouble he causes generally floats between "Ehh... why not?" and "It Seemed Like a Good Idea at the Time".
  • Combat Hand Fan: The Crane Fan and Razor Fan are weaponized fans, and they fittingly come from Japan-style quests. The Crane Fan in particular deals Wind-element damage and can fold or unfold for different stats.
  • The Computer Is a Cheating Bastard: Monsters aren't bound by the same stat restrictions at the player, leading to most high level opponents breaking the player's stat caps and having loads of HP without having to pay for it using Endurance points. Some monsters even have negative stat points in order to further increase their other stats.
  • Cosmic Keystone: The Eight Elemental Orbs and the Orb of Creation.
  • Cowardly Boss: The Vile Love boss from Snugglefest 2015 runs away when it reaches 2/3 and 1/3 hit points. This gives the player the chance to recover hit points between encounters, which makes it a less one-sided in favor of the boss.
  • Critical Hit: Players and monsters alike inflict Lucky Strikes if if they have stats points in Luck, which increases damage by 37.5% of the Luck stat. Several items can make them more common.
  • Crossover: There have been a few crossover events between AdventureQuest and other Artix Entertainment games:
    • "The Crystal Cave", a crossover created when Dragon Fable was young and wasn't determined to be an Alternate Universe yet, starts in DragonFable and shows the results two years later in AdventureQuest.
    • Cysero of DragonFable makes cameo appearances in a few quests.
    • "Fading Warlic!" has characters briefly mention their DragonFable counterparts.
    • Red Skies Crossover:" Operation: Gameocide" and "The Curse of the Phantom Pixel" are Artix Entertainment-wide events that are tangentially connected.
    • Required Spinoff Crossover: As WarpForce is AdventureQuest's sci-fi spinoff, there is a quest dedicated to showing introducing WarpForce from Lore's perspective.
  • Cognizant Limbs: The player character battles Carnax and Chillax by separately targeting their heads, arms, feet, and tails. There is the option to attempt to battle against them one-on-one, but that battle nearly impossible to survive.
  • Content Warnings: In "Absol-ution III", Lanfiré parodies warning labels:
    Lanfire: Warning: What follows is full of hackneyed puns, melodramatic emotions, overblown dialogue, and more exposition than Antarian Colonist Jordan Robert's Circle of Space series. Or, as a certain young shadowkitten might say, "Lots of talky bits ahead."
  • Costumes Change Your Size: Some armors make the player character look gigantic compared to the standard Guardian Armor. The Armor of Awe once belonged to King Awethur, yet it seems so scale the player up to his size.
  • Cut-and-Paste Environments: Due to the sheer number of quests compared to the number of art assets, the backgrounds for most quests are reused for other ones. Even for quests with mazes, rooms tend to look indistinguishable.
  • Cute and Psycho: Shii is a hyperactive schoolgirl holding a lollipop. She also enjoys killing people.
  • Cute Witch: Wandy is a talented mage for a child, compared to the older mages. She's eager to help the player character out in battle against the Tyrant King.
  • Cutlass Between the Teeth: Ratliver likes his knives; he holds one in each hand, two stashed in his boots, and holds another in his mouth.
  • Damage-Increasing Debuff: Several pets—Thunder Cats and Nerfbats—make the enemy more vulnerable to the element they attack with. This status influences all damage sources, not just the pet's own attacks.
  • Darker and Edgier:
    • For the most part, AdventureQuest is a light-hearted game— family-friendly at worst. And then the player tries the Assassin Class quest chain...
    • Given the growing age of players, Eukara Vox (the developer) introduces quests with heavier storylines, although they still take a sideways glance at serious topics.
  • Dark Is Not Evil:
    • The player character can choose to become a Werewolf, Vampire or Werepyre (a blend of the two) with the help of each respective species leader's help.
    • The player character can also become one of two types of Dracopyres, though the leader of one seems to be more evil than the other.
    • The'Galin's color motif is red and black, has power over Uncreation, and has followers that seek to purge the world of Lore. He's really just a decent guy whose role had attracted internal corruption from his followers.
  • Dark World: The world of Lore has multiple ones:
    • There is an analogue Lore where characters are their opposites (such as Artix being a Necromancer instead of a Paladin, Galanoth is a Dracomancer instead of Dragonslayer, etc.), and instead of being safe from evils, it has been run to the ground. Several analogue NPCs flee from this realm to call on the help of people from the player's world.
    • The Nightmare Realm consists mostly of its own fauna, but Nightmare versions of Lorian NPCs have manifested there and oppose as a threat to the player.
    • The Shadow Universe consists of 'Shadow' versions of NPCs. While not malevolent in general, the SeekRat plots to use the power of the Shadow Universe for his own needs, and Ultimon comes from the Shadow Universe to conquer and corrupt Lore.
  • Deader Than Dead: Uncreation, the process in which something (which can be pretty much anything, really) is returned to the Void. Being uncreated means that you cease to exist, everything you've done in your life is erased and no one will remember you (though there are exceptions), and it's the go-to way to kill someone totally and definitely if, well, you can do that sort of thing.
  • Death Is a Slap on the Wrist: It kicks the player out of any quest he or she was on, but that's about it. The player character will also owe Death a favour, but nothing has come out of that yet...
  • Death Is Not Permanent: Death's quota is always full, and will bring the Chosen back to life for a favor.
  • Death's Hourglass: The favor for being revived countless times is finding his lost hourglass in a secret quest. There was originally no resolution or answer to why the hourglasses were stolen. Riona claims it's a Snipe Hunt so the dead stay dead. When the quest was updated, it is discovered that Sneevils from Dragon Fable were stealing the hourglasses and that with the player character's help, Death could track the stolen hourglasses down.
  • Degraded Boss: The fate of many a war boss, like Elder Vampires, Undead Paladins, Undead Skull Apes, and the Herd Boss is to be stuck on the random encounter list. Lampshaded when, after the player character has to defeat Drakath the dracolich as part of a quest, they wonder, "Who keeps reanimating that dragon?"
  • Dem Bones: Many of the undead enemies.
  • Demon Lords and Archdevils: Ancient Demon Lords and simple Demon Lords from Heck and Stormfallen.
  • Dialogue Tree: During The Devourer Saga, they affect the player's Karma Meter but not the plot. In most other quests, they affect the plot but not the player's Karma Meter.
  • Did You Actually Believe?: For the 2014 Blarney War, Uncle Sham, the undisputably wealthiest character in Lore, offers the Chosen 10% of his fortune for the Chosen's help in battle. After the Chosen finishes the deed, however, Uncle Sham gives the Chosen his fortune—the in-universe explanation for special attacks now being able to deal lucky strikes. Sham then derides the player character for thinking he would give up his gold
    Uncle Sham: Are ya daft? Ya know how much I love me gold! I won the "Lore's Greediest Miser" contest ten years in a row! What in the name of all me gold would make me PAY you the gold I love so much?? ESPECIALLY when I can do it in exchange fer a bit o' magic??
  • Did You Just Punch Out Cthulhu?: The player, being the Chosen, combats enemies that would otherwise be out of his or her league. When the self-proclaimed god of Etherspace claims that the Chosen cannot stand up to him, the Chosen responds:
    Player: So you're a god. So what? I've beaten up gods before. Let's see... War, Falerin, Limkragg, Eldron, to name a few. And two of those are quite a bit more powerful than you are.
  • Does Not Like Shoes: The Huntress is never seen wearing them.
  • Draconic Humanoid:
    • Although Drakels are often believed to be related to dragons or even believed to be that, the Vartai fit the description much better.
    • The Vartai are dragon and human hybrids that can shapeshift into human form with varying degrees of success, some of them able to pass for normal humans easily, while others have horns, wings, tails, very varied skin and hair colors, marks, etc. Some (i.e. Cyrus and siblings) possess, at least, three forms: human (either fully or with draconic traits), humanoid (human-shaped/sized dragon) and dragon (full dragon).
    • The Chosen can, with a Dracomancer's class armor skills, or with the Full Set Bonus of the Dragon Knight set, take a humanoid-dragon form.
    • The dragons themselves are able to take human and humanoid form through magic (allowing them to seemingly avert Hot Skitty-on-Wailord Action).
  • Dragon Rider:
    • The reward for defeating fire dragon Akiroth, an early Big Bad, is to temporarily train one of his offspring for good, giving the player character the opportunity to ride a dragon.
    • During Frostval, the player character doesn't deliver presents with a reindeer—he/she rides on a Reindragon, which happens to be very effective against the Ice-elemental monsters in the way.
  • Drop the Hammer: Hammer-type weapons tend to inflict melee damage, have very high damage, and have very low accuracy. Among such weapons are the Ogre Whalloper, Glacius Hammer, DragHammer, Block Hammer, Mjollnir, Face Hammer, Whammer, Toymaker's Hammer, FlameStop Warhammer, Tiki Masher, Oaklore Hammer, Hammer of Unity, Love Hammer, and Wolfhammer.
  • Dude Looks Like a Lady: Donovan.
  • Dual Wielding: A specialty of the Assassin class.
  • Early Installment Weirdness: Besides the obvious Art Evolution that comes with being a game released in 2001, many early game mechanics were strange.
    • Equipment wasn't tiered, so players had fewer options as they leveled up, but in return, some items would be useful regardless of level, like the Light Orb, which gave a flat 20% damage bonus against Darkness-elemental monsters, or the Ironthorn shields, which gave a flat 50% damage bonus against all monsters but reduced accuracy.
    • Miscellaneous items required mana to activate and took up a player's turn.
    • Weapons that had tiered versions may not attack with the same element, so it was not as easy to balance an inventory when 'upgrading' a weapon meant switching other weapons around.
    • The Krieger Blade, the first rare weapon to be added to the game, would do Earth-element damage for the first ten seconds after entering battle before permanently switching between light and darkness.
  • Eldritch Abomination:
    • Subverted with, Carnax who regrets what his master makes him do.
    • A lesser example, but the Grabbi is one, being a tentacled beast that eats the player character's pets.
    • Seth Cay Dhows is a major one. being able to exist in many places at once and can see through time, he even manages to split the mind of Falerin (who is a GOD!) and avoid nasty side effects of such an act. he was also recently reveled to be a man made god known by the name Epsilon who has gone insane and wishes to destroy everything and recreate it all in his own image (What he wishes to do is similar to uncreation which means he is a bigger bad then The'Galin).
  • Elemental Embodiment:
    • The updated Wizard class is able to summon these as guests, one for each of the eight elements.
    • The Elemental Lords of Lore embody the in-game elements. During Seth Cay Dhows's arc, the Lady of Light and Dark Lord are given prominence among other Lorian deities.
    • To hunt for the Dragon Blade, the player can optionally fight the essence of dragons, which are the most powerful embodiments of each elemental dragon.
  • Elemental Powers:
    • The updated Wizard class allows the player to specialize in casting one of the eight elements.
    • Most inventory items specialize in dealing or resisting a particular element.
  • Elemental Rock-Paper-Scissors: There are eight primary elements in an Elemental Wheel, where opposing elements are highly-effective against each other, and allied elements tend to resist each other. The other elements of Void, Harm, Heal, and Poison do neutral damage regardless of elemental affinity.
  • Epic Flail: Flail-type weapons tend to inflict melee damage and have high 'random', meaning they can deal much less or more than the average. Some flails the player character can wield are Limkragg's Flail, Energy Flail, Flare Flail, Rat Flail, Death Flail, and Flux Flail.
  • Equippable Ally:
    • A Ramleon is a creature that has the body and head of a lion, the horns of a ram, and the tail of a serpent. The player character can equip one of a Ramleoness's babies as a shield.
    • The player character can also wield a fiery fox as a shield.
  • Even Evil Has Loved Ones:
    • For Frostval 2014, what sends Zorbak over the edge when seeing his projected Bad Future is the vision of his wife, Mu Glen, falling for Kabroz instead.
    • It turns out that Ryuusei Cartwright sent his son, Gaiden, to live with his analogue to be safe. When Gaiden is threatened by Xitra and later Etherseid, Cartwright is quick to react.
  • Everybody Hates Hades: In-universe, The'Galin is seen in a villainous light due to his duties of removing people and concepts from existence. It doesn't help that he is dubbed "The Devourer" and chooses a red and black color motif, which further increase his perception of being evil. The reality, of course, couldn't be farther from the truth.
  • Everything Trying to Kill You: Some of the enemies from Random Adventure are quite... unusual.
    • One of the random encounters is an animated bush.
    • The player can fight against Killer Ice Cweam, a monster stemming from Cloud Cuckoolander Twig's mind.
    • There is an unusually wide range of zombie vegetables, courtesy of amateur necromancer Seahawk.
    • Unlike other plant-based enemies like Deadwood, Am-Bush, Professor Akamu's mutant flowers, or the above-mentioned zombie vegetables, Razorweed is just a plant without any strange origins, and yet it manages to pose itself as a threat to adventurers.
    • The player character can fight Granny when delivering Frostval presents. She's been upset at being run over by your Reindragon so many times.
    • Due to the various NPCs that terrorize Battleon at times, monsters such as a bird that spits out its skeleton or giant samurai rats are considered typical.
    • The Rock Star enemy is a rock with googly eyes and hair.
    • The player can fight against Seeker White Blood Cells in the "Innard Space" quest.
  • Evil Weapon: The rewards from "The Return of Stragath" are cursed weapons that have special attacks that inhibit the player character. Three of the four weapons drains the player's health on their special attacks. The last plain just has a chance of killing the player character outright.
  • Evolving Weapon:
    • The blade of the Banisher Scythe grows in size according to the level of the player.
    • The Zombie Master Axe absorbs souls from monsters the player character defeats, growing to a maximum of 110% strength.
  • Expospeak Gag: Due to Falerin's verbosity, there are several occasions where he describes a concept in highly technical detail and the Chosen realizes the idea is quite mundane.
  • Fairy Battle: There are several 'battles' that are not battles in the traditional sense.
    • When The Devourer Saga was live, there were several Random Battle encounters with plot-important NPCs that foreshadowed their role in upcoming quests.
    • Treasure Chests can be found in Guardian missions or in Crossroads. The player is just prompted to open the chest and receives a large amount of gold, potions, or pieces of the Blade of Awe for 'winning' the battle.
    • The Moglin Friends encounter has the player either receiving potions (if at full health) or playing Heal or No Heal (if injured).
    • In "Quest for the Dragon Blade!", a Ninja Cleric appears and heals the player character after every battle.
    • The Aerodu Defense Machine is a minigame implemented as an enemy.
    • The Sympathetic Shadow Sprite appears to be this—indeed, it does heal the player character at first. However, if the player character brings its health under 50%, it turns into a tentacled creature and attacks back. Unfortunately, because RPGs Equal Combat, the player must attack the Sympathetic Shadow Sprite to continue whichever Ultimon's Fortress quest he/she was on.
  • Fake Ultimate Mook: In "Zorbak's Evil Mistake!", some Ebil Scythes brings the player character's HP to One. As the player is in Darkovia, finding any place to heal would be unlikely. Then the player encounters a level 130 Soul Banisher... that he or she beats in one hit.
  • Fantastic Flora: There are plenty of strange plants in the game.
    • Floggs are carnivorous plants that eat giant bugs. They also have their Man-Eating Plant cousin, Nepencreeps.
    • Professor Akamu and Kamui accidentally create vicious mutant flowers that serve as opponents in a war.
    • The Razorweed was known for being a Boss in Mook Clothing thanks to its high health and attack bugged to do 150% of the damage of a standard enemy. That is a significant feat for a grass.
    • The Am-Bush has the unique gimmick of being able to strike before the player can prepare—even before the battle formally starts. It's literally an animated bush that casts wind-element magic shaped like bunny ghosts.
  • Fantastic Fruits and Vegetables:
    • The Harvest Festival quest requires the player to hunt down an Orange, Sqrapple, Graplant, Bluestar Flower, and Bread Fruit as an offering for Serenia, the goddess of the harvest.
    • An April Fools reward the player can buy is a CrabApple, which is a literal apple with crab claws.
    • Soraya sells Pearapplos fruit, which pets love. In terms of gameplay, the item gives a small bonus to pets' damage and accuracy.
  • Fantasy Kitchen Sink: The game references many mythologies and works—besides the list of Shout-Outs, there are:
  • Fate Worse Than Death: Being Forsaken. The Annunaki, upon leaving a still alive host, rip their hosts' soul, leaving none of it behind, and physically and psychologically changing them in very significant ways. Although they gain enhanced senses, the ability to see the dead, walk in the shadows, and immunity to Uncreation, the Forsaken are, in fact, dying a slow and painful death. They possess no aura, are hunted by the Reaper (as they belong to the realm of Death) and are sent to Nowhere when they meet their end... Some are basically doomed to never find rest, unable to die from mortal wounds (which can be good thing, but most of the time, it's not. Even if they are revived, they won't return to their old pre-Forsaken selves.
  • Feather Flechettes: The Brilhado and Winged Truphma shoot quills from their wings at the player character as an attack. The player character can cast the Brilhado Feathers spell to do the same thing against enemies.
  • Fish People: The Mermazons and Vagarans are some water-affiliated enemies the player character may encounter. Mermazons pretty much look like mermaids, while Vagarans are blue, shapeshifting humanoids with a tentacle for one arm and a crustacean claw for the other arm.
  • Fighter, Mage, Thief: The three builds the game provides to characters are the Warrior, Mage, and Rogue. Warriors focus on the Strength stat and use melee weapons to bash enemies. Mages focus on the Intellect stat and use magic weapons and spells for burst damage. Rogues focus on the Dexterity stat and use ranged weapons and focus on dodging enemy attacks.
  • Fission Mailed: Multiple quests provide no penalty for a death or require them as part of the plot.
    • In one quest that the Chosen has to do as the form of a ninja cat, Death sends him or her back to the quest upon death because the Chosen's cat form is too cute to be taken.
    • There are several quests that require the player to go through a Hopeless Boss Fight (e.g., "The Final Battle!", "Dense Red Fog/The Tower of Xyphos", "It's a Wonderful Life of Crime: Killing Spree Ending").
    • A random quest in Death's Domain allows the player to temporarily control Zorbak. Should he die, the player learns that he and Death have a contract that allows him to avoid a permanent death.
  • Fixed Damage Attack: Weapons that have high 'base' damage tend to be extremely consistent in damage, although the actual value of the damage can by modified by boosts and resistances. The Unlucky Sword and Eyes of Chillax weapons are examples of such weapons, and the Stable Spell skill from the mage class armor doubles the base damage of magic spells.
  • Fluffy Tamer: The player character can collect quite a few beastly creatures as pets. By the description, the player character created his/her baby Sacragon pet. Sacragons are in-game described as crimes against nature and Eldritch Abominations.
  • Fog of Doom: DragonClaw island is surrounded by a mysterious Red Fog that poisons the player. A spell the player can get after completing a quest allows the player to use the Red Fog as a spell that inflicts self-damage in exchange for increased damage.
  • For the Evulz: The SeekRat, his reason for all his plans?
    SeekRat: Silly hero. You have always dealt with villains whose motives were so simple. 'Destroy Battleon' or 'take over the world'. How droll. True villainy needs no such things!
  • Fungus Humongous: FunGuy is a giant mushroom on legs that attacks with spores.
  • Fur Against Fang: In Darkovia, the vampires and werewolves naturally battle each other for dominance. However, there are werepyres and dracopyres who embrace both sides but are rejected by both vampire and werewolf clans.
  • Furry Confusion:
    • The gattas, which are anthropomorphic cats... who ride on non-anthropomorphic war cats.
    • Ravil is a werewolf-like creature who rides on a non-anthromorphic DarkWolf. The player character points out that he is a WolfRider in every sense of the word.
  • Fun with Acronyms: Regular acronyms show up frequently in and out of the game, as Acronym and Abbreviation Overload shows.
    • The Rodents of Unusual Size that plague each years' harvest are named Big Ugly Rat Pests.
    • There are characters whose names are based on their original abbreviations, but phonetically pronounced, such as ElBhe note , Dhe Ehmn note , and Eselgeenote .
  • Futureshadowing: The Ghosts of Frostval spell from Frostval 2008 shows the ghosts of Frostval past, present, and future as King Frost, Kringle the Barbarian, and a mysterious stranger wrapped in black robes. It's not until the 2012 Frostval quest that the player sees who the 'future' person is.
  • Fuuma Shuriken: The Shivuriken is a giant snowflake shuriken thrown to deal Ice-element damage.
  • Game Over Man: Death shows up when the player character dies, but tells you he's over his quota and sends you back to town owing him a favor. The player character can fulfill that favor and get an aesthetic Skull for a Head as a reward.
  • Gameplay Ally Immortality: Only the player character will take damage in battle. Pets and guests are essentially immune (bar rare monsters that remove them from combat).
  • Game-Breaking Bug: The updated Darkshifter had the offensive stats of a Lightning Bruiser and the HP of a Tank. its attack power was five times that of the updated version with twice the HP. now add on to this already Boss in Mook Clothing with the power bonus for magic use and you get a monster with 20 times the attack and twice the HP of its updated release of it.
  • Gameplay Ally Immortality: Pets and guests are allies that deal extra damage, boost player damage, or inflict some other effects. They can't take damage, but they require the player character to be alive.
  • Gardening-Variety Weapon: VegiSplatic is a pitchfork weapon that deals extra damage against plant-based enemies. Peasant's Nightmare is another pitchfork, twisted by Nightmare magic.
  • Gender Bender:
    • In the 2010 April Fools' event, most of the NPCs got genderswapped. The ones seen were Artix, Galanoth, Warlic, Aquella, Robina, Safiria, and Cenara. The Wereking was mentioned as being swapped as well, and it seems likely that Donovan changed.
    • Robina Hood is a genderbent Robin Hood. During the 2010 April Fools quest, she is genderbent again as Robin Cap.
    • All it takes for the player character to change gender is to pay 20 gold at Warlic's mirror.
  • Gender-Neutral Writing: The player character is either referred to by name, as the Chosen, or with gender-neutral word like 'friend'. Certain quests imply the player to be male, though—Lucretia and the player character flirt with each other when questing for potion ingredients.
  • Genius Loci:
    • Carnax became living from magic animating the mountain Talados was on. It died as the Taladosian civilization did, but then Makkisar, one of the last Taladosians, revived Carnax.
    • The'Galin is represented at times as a dark red moon with glowing eyes.
    • The Shadow Universe is outright stated to be a sentient entity.
  • Giant Foot of Stomping: The player character encounters a brobdingnagian Ultra Giant in the "Out to Sea/Little Problems" quest, which is represented by this trope. The Shadow Colossus, similarly, is gigantic enough that the player character attacks its feet.
  • Glass Cannon: Goggs pretty much exemplify it. They nearly always go first, and can, in some cases, blast the player character for thousands of hit points worth of damage over the course of one turn, but can be taken out just as fast by a player who knows what they're doing.
  • Global Currency: The player character uses gold to purchase equipment regardless of where the quest takes place, even if that location is an alien planet or Dark World.
  • God Is Evil: Seth Cay Dhows who was recently reveled to be a man-made god known by the name Epsilon.
  • God of Evil: Falerin of Caelestia has the portfolio of Evil, but he isn't evil. He compares himself to an enforcement officer who has to know about crime and malignancy in order to counter it most effectively.
  • Going Through the Motions: Not too common, but egregious during cutscene of the fight between Wolfwing and Nightbane.
  • Grim Reaper:
    • The Chosen sees him every time upon death, so he or she probably owes him a lot of favors.
    • One of the rare Special Attacks a Weapon of Awe can perform is summoning Death. Against monsters that aren't immune, the attack instantly brings the enemies to 0 HP.
  • Guardian Angel: Guardian Angels are used by Guardians to heal the wounded after battle. The player character can pick up a Guardian Angel to join him/her in battle. Similar to Guardian Angels are Angel Guards, which don't heal the player character but instead sacrifice their lives to resurrect him/her from death.
  • The Guards Must Be Crazy: The player character is stopped by a guard at the gate to New Granemor. To enter, all he/she has to do is say that he/she isn't evil.
  • Hailfire Peaks: Paxia is a microcosm of all eight Lorian elements, so the player can see, for instance, a volcano next to a frozen lake.
  • Hard Mode Perks:
    • Beating the hardmode dragons of the Eternal Dragon of Time's heads gives the player Mastercraft versions of the Void Vanquisher set of equipment.
    • Fighting dragon essences instead of assorted dragonkind gives the player character a guaranteed chance of finding the Dragon Blade instead of a 25% chance.
    • Defeating certain Void bosses in Hard Mode give more or better rewards.
      • Defeating hardmode Smittens gives a Mastercraft version of the Cabbit quest.
      • Defeating hardmode Chaos Knight gives the player Chaos Armour as a reward.
      • Defeating hardmode Nulgath gives the player Nulgath's armor as a reward.
  • Harmless Freezing: Freezing is a status condition that both the player character and enemy can inflict on each other. All it does is make the inflicted skip a turn and increases vulnerability to Fire-element damage proportional to ice resistance.
  • Harmless Villain: Zorbak, most of the time. According to the 2014 Frostval quest, he is a necessary evil that prevents worse villains from successfully conquering Lore.
  • A Head at Each End: Fundead Dragons move like see-saws and swing around 360 degrees during their attacks.
  • Headless Horseman: The Horseman enemy in the game a satyr rather than a man on a horse. The in-game description lampshades how unoriginal the Visual Pun is.
  • Head Swap: Most elemental dragons share the same body and only differ in head and possibly wing design. Water Dragons and Void Dragons are an exception.
  • Healing Checkpoint: The "Taladosian Relics!" and "Death's Domain" walkaround quests have healing spots in the form of underwater bubble baths and smoking vents, respectively. Most quests just have After Combat Recovery as a method of healing.
  • Healing Herb:
    • The quest "A Cure for Cenara!" has the player searching for Darkovian plants to cure a mysterious sickness (which turns out to be dracopyrism), and the player character can use the same herbs for a boost during a battle.
    • The Bora'jee is a bluish root that can be eaten during a player's turn to heal the player character's health.
  • Hello, Insert Name Here: The player can use any name that uses ASCII symbols (or leave it blank) and NPCs will say the name during cutscenes, leading to instances where x-x-DRAGONMASTER Adam-x-x is being called on for help.
  • Hero with Bad Publicity: Celestra is a Good Is Not Nice Fiery Redhead with relations to the Devourer who just so happened to appear when other NPCs were warned that agents of the Devourer were coming. Epheel intentionally uses this superstition to send Battleon on a witch hunt for Celestra before she starts explaining.
  • High-Class Glass: The SeekRat wears a monocle for that air of scholarly sophistication while still being a giant rat. He also has some animals that similarly wear monocles.
  • Hijacked by Ganon: Except it was old villains being controlled by an even older one.
  • Hilarious Outtakes: Yes, it can be done with a Flash game; it was parodied in the 2009 Frostval Event.
  • Holiday Mode: Seasonal events occur around the same time as real-life holidays of the same theme. Usually, there is a recurring 'main' quest and new side-quests that are added every year.
    • Valentine's Day Episode: The Snugglefest main quest requires the player character to do favors for various NPCs to make him or her their Snugglefest hero. Other quests typically involve NPCs dabbling in romantic relationships and all of the antics that come with those.
  • April Fools' Plot: April Fools does not have a main quest—rather, the quests themselves are sometimes jokes or involve the demigod of mischief being unbound for one day to cause jokes in-universe.
    • Easter Special: The Grenwog Festival main quest is played by having the player character collect werebunny eggs and trading them in for equipment, as well as stopping the Grenwog from eating these eggs. In later years, the new Grenwog quest involves fighting against various rabbit-like creatures.
    • Halloween Episode: The player character goes trick-or-treating around Mogloween in a similar manner as the Grenwog Festival. Mogloween quests typically involve Zorbak's monsters or other undead.
    • Thanksgiving Episode: The Harvest Festival's main quest is a hunt for crops to present to the goddess of the harvest. The side-quests typically involve fighting against BURPs who would otherwise eat that year's harvest.
    • Christmas Episode: The entirety of real-time December is dedicated to Frostval quests, starting by decorating the Frostval tree and later Saving An Ass-Kicking Christmas from some Grinch-like figure. During December, Battleon is covered with snow and the tree in the middle of town is decorated.
  • Hopeless Boss Fight: Several, including The'Galin and the Nightmare Queen.
  • Hopeless Suitor: Galrick tries hitting on Celestra frequently during The Devourer Saga. Celestra is more concerned about getting revenge on The'Galin at first.
  • Hope Spot: The playerbase got one during "Mostly Harmful". Almost two weeks of furious fighting, and it seemed like it was going to come down to the last hour... then the fourth stage arrived and dropped the meter by a full 18% with less than a day to go. Cue Downer Ending.
    • Averted for those on the forums, however. It had been made clear that the war consisted of four waves.
  • Horse of a Different Color:
    • While there are horse 'Rider' armors, most steeds the player character can ride on as an armor tend to be fantastic creatures, such as 'Zards, unicorns, direwolves, chimeras, dragons, salamanders, butterhooves, and literal horseflies.
    • Dewlok the Moglin rides a Koofu, a large bird-like creature, as a mount.
    • Valencia uses Grumbugly, a giant Salamander, as a pack animal.
    • Wolf Riders ride wolves, of course.
  • Humanity on Trial: The'Galin's plan.
  • Hurricane of Puns: The creators know it. They consider it part of the game's campy and fun atmosphere.
    • Now say hello to the event that is called... Drakelcube P.
    • And meet mighty heroes and villains such as Gokar, Bhelma, Panfluti and Gherkina.
  • Hybrid Overkill Avoidance: Averted. You have your average vampire and werewolf. Then, you have your werepyre (a combination of the two). Then, you have your Dracopyre, a werepyre with dragon blood mix. Donovan tries to add more creatures in the mix in the 2013 April Fools quest, ending up with some Dracopyre Moglins, plants, robots, and, uh, whatever 'Evolved' Nightreign is.
  • Idiot Hero: The player character can be a spectacular moron, but in "The Bizarre Flecks Part 1: Double Take", the player character comments he/she is a master of playing dumb, as it makes other people underestimate him/her.
  • If You Kill Him, You Will Be Just Like Him: In the epilogue of the Absol-ution Saga, Gaiden prepares to kill a De Powered Etherseid for causing havoc that indirectly led to his surrogate father's death. Other proximal NPCs ask Gaiden to stop. Lkeas in particular states that Gaiden would be stooping to Etherseid's level. Ultimately, Gaiden respects the others' wishes, and Etherseid is killed anyway by a less morally wholesome protagonist.
  • If You're So Evil, Eat This Kitten: The enemy Fundead Kitten's description says that Kabroz dared Zorbak to make this monster.
  • I Have Many Names: What makes some plotlines confusing are characters' propensity toward using multiple aliases to be covert, which is often used for The Reveal. Erebus takes on many names over the course of the story because he doesn't become a 'being' until the end of "Dhows' True Form Revealed".
  • I'm Having Soul Pains: The Cold, used by servants of The'Galin, affects the willpower of the soul in a manner akin to brainwashing. On several instances, it has been used for Brainwashing for the Greater Good.
  • Impossibly-Low Neckline: Lucretia, the apothecary in Granemor.
  • Improbable Weapon User: The player can use, shall we say, a wide variety of weapons.
    • The player can use a cupcake as a weapon.
    • Or candy floss.
    • Or a guitar.
    • Or a wrench.
    • Or a toy pinwheel.
    • Or a paintbrush.
    • Or a fishing rod.
    • Or a fruitcake.
    • Or a volleyball.
    • Or a surfboard.
    • Or a thermometer.
    • Or a giant spider leg.
    • Or a bottle of soda.
    • Or a sock.
    • Or a Killer Yoyo.
    • Or a mummy's leg.
    • Or a decorated Christmas tree.
    • Or a candy cane.
    • Or Christmas lights.
    • Or a piece of fruit.
    • Or a turkey drumstick.
    • Or a sword made of gum.
    • Or a bow made out of books.
    • Or a live electric eel.
    • Or school supplies fashioned into a crude doll.
    • Or a Grass Blade.
    • Or a MissleToe.
    • Or a supercharged Electric Joybuzzer.
    • Or an Archimedes Death Ray.
    • Or a burrito of DOOM.
    • Or a shovel of DOOM.
    • The player character get a plunger to help him or her make way through a link between realms. And yes, he or she fights with it.
    • What happens when a Frostval gift is stolen? Pay large amounts of money to use the wrapping paper as a weapon.
    • In order to channel Water-element magic, the player can use a giant feather pen.
  • Inexplicable Treasure Chests: Lampshaded occasionally.
  • Infernal Retaliation: A kind of wolf-like monster named Razorclaw is particularly weak to fire, but if the player character hits it with fire, it will deal increased damage back while on fire. This occurs even if the fire attack misses.
  • Instant Armor: Several non-armor items can give the player character a temporary armor, such as Airenal's Lance, Snide Transformation Formula, and the Shapeshift spell series.
  • Instant Awesome, Just Add Mecha: At Mt. Thrall, the player character can fight Titan-sized monsters in an appropriately-sized Mecha. And it has no point to the plot.
  • Interspecies Romance: Several sentient species/races can interbreed, although for many cultural and physical differences some are less likely to appear. Humans alone can interbreed with dragons, elves, orcs, demons (ones from Heck, and maybe even Brilhado), Dwarves, Drakel, Moglins, etc. (without even mentioning the compatible species in other AE games). And there has been one case of a half-Moglin, half-Drakel... hybrid thing.
  • It's Up to You: The player is justified in-game as being The Chosen One, hence why he or she can go toe-to-toe with, say, Eldritch Abominations and gods. It also helps that the Chosen also has the support of deities up-close.
  • Item Crafting:
    • Players can make a custom sword, spear, or staff and have control over its damage, element, and accuracy/power offset.
    • To a lesser extent, spellcrafting allows the player to customize the Spellcraft spell with one of nine elements.
  • Karma Meter: AdventureQuest's "Morality Compass" which measures good vs. evil and unity vs. chaos.
  • Kaiju: ZardZilla. Even his description text says so.
  • Katanas Are Just Better: Early on, some of the best weapons in the games were katanas, like the Power Katana and the Ice Katana. Over time, though, other weapons surpassed them in damage.
  • Kaizo Trap: Some enemies, notably Adalons and Thunderbirds, will get a surprise hit in during their death animation. The damage dealt is usually light, but it can still kill the player character if health is that low.
    • Health draining status effects such as poison or bleeding will hit the player character after the player's turn... even after the enemy's HP has been reduced to 0. Considering that these status effects can take off quite a good chunk of HP if they're strong enough, this can result in quite a nasty surprise as the game checks for the player's death before the enemy's.
  • Killer Rabbit: Several versions, and most literally with the Grenwog 2014 boss Bundorable. It looks like, of course, an adorable bunny, but then the player fights it and it reveals that it can transform into a bunny demon and bunny dragon.
  • Knight Templar:
    • Galanoth does not like dragons. While this is not usually a problem, they're not Always Chaotic Evil, and he occasionally gets rather... overboard.
    • Nemesis just wants to enforce justice. Unfortunately, his definition of justice is "kill everyone who doesn't agree with him".
    • Artix's tendencies come to a boil during the "Edge of Extinction" war, where he whips most of the Paladin Order into a fervor, sparking an all-or-nothing war with the Necromancers with the intent of stopping Necromancy forever. Comes back to bite them HARD when they are not only excommunicated by the Elemental Lady of Light for their actions, but the damage caused to Lore's "ley lines" as a result of the war robs BOTH sides of their signature abilities. Word of God says that Artix will be going through a My God, What Have I Done? phase for a while.
  • Leave No Witnesses: Used as an excuse on one occasion in the Assassin class quest chain to justify Violence Is the Only Option.
  • Leeroy Jenkins: There is an entire quest about him, in fact, which uses the actual script from the video.
  • Level Grinding: A typical battle is expected to take ten turns, and each turn takes about ten seconds, more or less depending on attack animations. Experience gained from a battle fills a tiny sliver of the player's experience bar, and there are 150 player levels in total. There is a limit to how much experience and gold the player can get in one day, but for most players, they will never reach even half of that cap. It's estimated that it takes at least a month of straight grinding to reach the level cap.
  • Level Up Fill Up: The player character restores all of his or her HP and MP upon a level up.
  • Linear Warriors, Quadratic Wizards: Was a constant problem and the cause of many a nerf.
    • As it stands now, Mages specializes in Spell burst damage and special weapon effects and Warrior specializes in a long, drawn out battle with the high power of their standard attacks with higher stats bonus and MUCH more powerful weapon, in term of quality and quantity. Warriors skill cost are also MUCH more cheaper than their magical counterparts at the cost of being slightly weaker. Mages are much better at farming, especially since the elemental Wizard Robes are available fairly early, while Warriors are better against bulky monsters such as bosses.
    • In a sense, its more of a Linear Wizards Quadratic Warriors right now. Wizards started out strong and is capable of farming easier than Warriors while Warriors dominates late game after getting all of the necessary equipment and stats boosts.
  • Literal-Minded: Eldron, Caelestian God of Good, has this as one of his quirks.
  • Little Green Men: The Cor-Dem are small, psychic, green aliens that try to warn the player character of some mysterious doom despite their inability to speak the language of Lore. They can be taken as pets that make the enemy more susceptible to magic.
  • Living Shadow: The Shadow Universe is populated by beings made of pure shadow. Contact with the Shadow Universe can also turn monsters (and people) into shadows.
  • Living Weapon: Beyond Attack Animals, the Malengua and Protector Rod weapons are alive. The former gets stat bonuses from Charisma, while the latter can shift between melee, ranged, and magic forms.
  • Lizard Folk: The Drakels are (normally) green-skinned dracomammalians against whom Dragonslayer class abilities are effective. Unlike many other words, they're also a Higher-Tech Species, equipped with various Magitek weapons ranging from genetically engineered warbeasts to Mecha and, although depicted in the beginning as a Always Chaotic Evil race, the conception was subverted as they are as varied as humans and other races are.
  • Loading Screen: There are jokes on them; laggy computers can read them while faster computers cannot.
  • Lost Forever:
    • Early quests (before The Devourer Saga) tended to disappear after they finished being 'live', meaning any of their rewards also disappeared.
    • Promotional items only have a short lifespan when they are acquirable.
    • Frostval event items are only available during December and early January before they're gone for good.
    • Unusually, the Hurricane Blade weapon can only be acquired the first time ever the player character enters the game, as it only appears in the starter shop, which never shows up after completing the tutorial.
  • Lost World: Dinozard Island.
  • Love Imbues Life: During Snugglefest 2010, the ambient love energy on lore manifests itself into a being called Amoria.
  • Luck Manipulation Mechanic:
    • The game asks for a stat roll in certain quests. Newer quests allow the player to Defy a failed roll by paying SP proportional to the difference in points needed.
    • The Clover Essence and Blue Server Cap double the frequency of Lucky Strikes but cuts damage in half; the Red Server Cap halves the frequency of Lucky Strikes but doubles damage. Damage done is the same on average either way, however.
  • Luck Stat: Luck is used for Lucky Strikes and stat roll saves, and it gives a small overall bonus to attack damage, attack accuracy, and dodging chance.
  • The Magic Goes Away: The Paladins and Necromancers lose the ability to use their talents as a result of their actions in the "Edge of Extinction" event.
  • Magic Knight: Player characters with 'hybrid' builds, as they're called, can deal both physical and magical damage. The player can also meet Undead Spellswords which use similar attacks.
  • Magic Wand: Wands are magic weapons that typically cast spells instead of striking the enemy outright.
  • Magitek: The Drakel specialize in 'magiscience' and are the Higher-Tech Species on Lore.
  • Mana Drain: The Banshee and Braken can do this to the player, and the player can also do this to enemies using certain weapons.
  • Mana Shield:
    • The Gandolphin healing spell provides a mana shield to deflect a small amount of damage.
    • The Shield Generator item uses the player character's SP to reduce incoming damage.
    • The Sea Fiend monsters use their SP as extra, regenerating health; the player has to either deal enough damage to bring their SP to zero to deal 'actual' damage or use a special weapon that specializes in ignoring Sea Fiends' SP shields.
  • Manual Leader, AI Party: The player can control the player character directly and choose which pets and guests to use. Pets and guests attack on their own, though they do not have as many battle options as the player character.
  • The Many Deaths of You: Death animations are dependent on the armor the player is wearing. Some are more amusing than others—like the Zard superhero costumes, which are portrayed in a cheesy superhero manner.
  • Marathon Boss:
    • Sine qua non is a non-boss example. It has high hit points, no explicit weaknesses, and deals pitiful damage.
    • The Night of 100 Ninjas, while not particularly powerful, can take a long time to defeat.
  • Marked Change:
    • Various armors, shields and weapons have 'triggers' that make them deal extra damage when they are out against certain enemies. Almost all of them are accompanied by some change in design.
    • Ryuusei hunches over, grows Creepy Long Fingers, and sports glowing red eyes when acting as Omega. The'Galin points out that he doesn't necessarily have to look so creepy when acting out his role.
  • Mask of Power: Some of the miscellaneous items a player character can equip are masks and helms. They typically boost an elemental and damage type resistance.
  • Master of None: The player can choose to invest stat points evenly between the six stat attributes. Most people do not build a character like this, however, since the corresponding boosts to damage, accuracy, hit points, and mana are spread too thinly to be of use.
  • Maximum HP Reduction: Any changes to the Endurance stat causes a corresponding change to maximum and current Hit Points. The Decimator armor's special skill allows the player to reduce the Endurance stat of a monster by between 10 and 50 points for a turn.
  • The Maze: "The Maze" quest is played with the arrow keys as a Stealth-Based Mission instead of the typical battle-after-battle style of quests.
  • The Medic: The vast majority of Moglins. The only exceptions are the evil Zorbak and Kabroz and the one and only Bad Ass Moglin in the game, Dewlok.
    • Zorbak has healing magic, he just doesn't like to use it. One of the Death quests lets the player control him. He can indeed heal himself.
  • Medium Awareness:
    • A Dirty Snowman in "Frostval in July!" asks why the player character wasn't paying attention to a cutscene that had all of the exposition in it.
    • The player character says that he/she can see past the border of the screen during the "Dinozard Island" quest.
  • Mercy Kill: According to the Dull Ramleon's description, this is the only way to free a being converted into Truphma.
  • Mercy Rewarded: Sparing the undead paladin in "Failure to Communicant" allows the player to get the highest-tier versions of the Communicant set.
  • Minion with an F in Evil: Erebus tries to use Ardendor to gain access to Falerin's godly domain, but while Erebus is manipulative enough, Ardendor is... not. His contribution to Erebus's war are 'reversed' monsters—that is, monsters that attack with a certain element and are weak against the opposite element (in contrast to standard monsters that attack and resist the same element). Gameplay-wise, this allows players to use otherwise rarely-useful Full Set Bonuses to quickly take down Erebus's forces.
  • Mirror Match: A Mogloween quest pits the player to fight against It's You!, a monster has the player character's face, weapon, shield, and stats.
  • Mirror Universe: They are called alternate realities, and the roles of NPCs in them tend to be switched—Artix is a necromancer rather than a paladin, Galanoth is a dracomancer instead of a dragonslayer, and Ryuusei is fixed on the side of good rather than morally ambiguous.
  • Mobile Fishbowl:
    • The Fishguts enemy (and its pet version, Goldyfish) hops and slides around from inside its fishbowl.
    • The Desert Conqueror armor fills the player's head with breathable water, all the better to survive in a xeric desert.
  • Money Spider: Explained, amazingly enough. It's somewhere between a subversion, a parody, and a justification: Robina the Hood steals from the rich and gives to "the cute little cuddly-wuddly forest creatures!" There's even the note that "How did you think level 1 spiders got so much gold on them?"
  • Monster Allies: Some of the quest rewards are pet or guest versions of the enemies fought during the quest.
  • Monster Clown: In AdventureQuest, clowns are powerful demons from the inner circles of Heck that worship the demigod of mischief and induce fear upon their victims. The Truphma convert clowns into Enemy Mimes that inflict Silence instead.
  • Monster Mash: Mogloween thrives with all sorts of spooky creatures; we have Zorbak's MonsterManiacs which consist of a werewolf, vampire, Frankenstein's monster, and fish monster. Other Mogloween quests has the player character fighting against mummies, skeletons, zombies, ghosts, and Moglin monsters.
  • Mook Chivalry: Zig-zagged. If the player character faces multiple of the same monster as a single encounter, they will use multiple attacks in the same turn. However, to keep it fair for the player, they will only do at most double damage. However, there are two monsters—the Green Nasty and Legion—that do not adhere to this rule. These monsters keep dividing until there are eight copies of the original—and they don't deal reduced damage to compensate.
  • More Dakka: The Robodeer pet has a small chance of dealing double damage on its attack. When it does double damage, a message says, "MOAR DAKKA!", as it launches a second round of Gatling-gun fire.
  • Morph Weapon: Numerous weapons can alternate between multiple forms to deal either damage of different elements, attack types, or leans. The Shadowscourge Pyracepter, Z-Blade Scythe, and Shifting Blade are examples of such weapons.
  • Mortality Ensues: In the 2011 April Fools quest, Radagast and Khold summon demigod Loco to Lore stripped of his powers. Bad thing is that now his powers are running amok around Lore without him to control them.
  • Multi-Mook Melee: "Triple Challenge" has the player character fighting three enemies at once in battle. Other quests may have the player character battling multiple enemies as well.
  • Mutually Exclusive Powerups: The player character can only activate one miscellaneous item at a time. For the item Beleqwaya's Gift, the description states that humans can't handle all three powers the Gift might be.
  • Myth Arc: The Devourer Saga
  • The Napoleon: Despite being the god of Etherspace, Etherseid is mocked by human characters for looking like a tiny pony. Even his own minions laugh at his stature, which only enrages him more.
  • Nerf: This is decided by the staff group the Knights of Order (KoO). They appear in-game in several places: Aelthai in Battleon, Zephyros in the Azamay quest, Khold and Radagast in the '09 and '10 April Fools' events, Shii as an Assassin class trainer, and Kalanyr in several quests.
  • Nerf Arm:
    • In the April Fool's Day 2008 event, a Nerf Wraith turns the player character's sword into a foam covered version of the default warrior weapon. After the quest, the player can purchase nerf pugil sticks, boffers, and guns as 'real' weapons.
    • The Club Bouncer enemy is meant to be lethal, even though he wields the same Nerf Boffer weapon from the April Fools quest.
  • Never Bareheaded: Galanoth never takes off his armor—a fact that is lampshaded in the Snugglefest 2013 quest. His alternate counterpart is a Dracomancer, so his armor lacks a face-obscuring helmet; to prevent the player character from seeing his face, every quest with alternate Galanoth has some prop conveniently blocking his face, except for a split moment in "Us vs. Regeirk!"
  • Never Say "Die":
    • Death is rather commonplace in AdventureQuest, given the abundance of undead, NPCs threatening to kill each other (and sometimes succeeding), and player character deaths. Because Death Is a Slap on the Wrist, since there are clever ways to use magic to skirt death and Death is a pretty nice guy about resurrecting people, mentions of the words 'kill' and 'die' aren't uncommon for a family-friendly game. In contrast, Eukara Vox's "Seeking Silence" tries its darndest to explicitly avoid the topic of suicide. The online AQ encyclopedia entry for Morcef skirts around the words 'die' and 'kill', instead preferring 'terminate' and 'end', while many other entries just use the standard words.
    • Unusually, while there are Hellhounds in Lore, the place they originate from is called Heck.
  • Ninja Pirate Zombie Robot: It's very possible to be a ninja-pirate-dragonslayer-vampireslayer-dracomancer-paladin-necromancer-knight-beastmaster-shapeshifter-assassin with a black belt.
    • Reaching level 10 in the Necromancer class lets the player character optionally become a lich. Since the player can choose to be any one of four possible subraces, this means you can double the undead fun and become a vampire lich.
  • No Celebrities Were Harmed: Among the many parodies AdventureQuest includes are ones of real-life figures. For example, one of the Void bosses is Death Flair, which is Death dressed and acting like Ric Flair. He is a deceptively difficult boss, being easily able to stunlock the unprepared player.
  • No Fourth Wall:
    • The Guardian Dragon is especially prone to this, with quips like "Sorry I'm late, the server was lagging again."
    • Frostval 2014's giftbox armor is based off of fourth-wall breaker Deadpool, so the armor's special attack uses the game's interface to stun the enemy.
  • No-Gear Level:
    • Being 'nerfed' from either the 2008 April Fools quest or through a Rayfish's Desperation Attack replaces the player character's equipment with Nerfage equipment, essentially reducing their effectiveness to zero.
    • The Dracopyre of Night enemy can disarm the player's weapon, forcing him or her to use bare hands. Yes, the game acknowledges that the player character has to beat a dragon-vampire-werewolf with his/her bare hands.
  • Non-Elemental: The rare Void/Harm element can be used to bypass elemental resistances.
  • Non-Human Undead: It seems that anything that can be made undead will be by some enterprising necromancer. The player can encounter undead versions of Zards, Moglins, dragons, chimeras, gnats, elves, cats, Braken, apes, Goggs, trolls, leprechauns, Ribbers, Frostval bosses, and whatever can be cobbled from bits and pieces of any of the previous.
  • Non-Linear Sequel: DragonFable, MechQuest and AdventureQuest Worlds
  • Non-Mammal Mammaries: Female Drakels and the gecko Pae, though the Drakel has have hair in later renditions. The staff have stated that this was intentional and not an artistic drift.
  • Noodle Incident: Falerin mentions some Uncreated events in "The Restoration" and states that they are better left undiscussed.
  • One Bad Mother: Mother is the primordial creature that created the Shadow Universe and all of its inhabitants. It sends its Shadow creatures to a Fate Worse Than Death if it is too disruptive, although it seems it has benevolent intentions in mind.
  • One-Hit Kill: PowerWord Die instantly zeroes any monster's health, as long as it isn't too strong for the player character (so a level 1 player can't fish for PowerWord Die on a level 150 boss to gain a few million experience points).
  • One Stat to Rule Them All: The Dunamis and Poelala pets/guests once provided abnormally large boosts for warriors and mages, respectively; most pets/guests deal direct damage for the player, but Dunamis and Poelala boost the player's damage by the same amount a pet would deal scaled with the Charisma stat. Having Dunamis/Poelala as both the pet and guest multiplies player damage instead of adding, and there was no penalty for their boost being always effective against the enemy, making them much more powerful than any other strategy. When Thernda, the ranger version of Dunamis and Poelala, was released, all three pets/guests were nerfed to be less useful than the average pet.
  • One Steve Limit:
    • During the "Bizarre Flecks" saga, several characters meet their alternate-universe counterparts. The naming scheme for differentiating alternate counterparts is inconsistent; some pairs of characters have the same name, some have Sdrawkcab Names, and some are just called 'Alternate' or 'Mirror' <name>.
    • When Erebus splits Falerin into Literal Split Personalities, everyone seems to agree on naming all of Falerin's pieces differently depending on their traits.
  • The Only One Allowed to Defeat You: Zorbak claims in Frostval 2012 that he's the only one that should destroy Frostval—meaning he's willing to save it from being destroyed by new villain Frigidere.
  • Our Monsters Are Weird: Boy, howdy. The player character can fight everything from worms to the stat roller to ice cream to giant ticks to tomatoes to Sarah the Nerfkitten to leprechauns to were-seals... the list goes on and on.
  • Our Vampires Are Different/Our Werewolves Are Different: They're generally pretty much standard-issue, but there are also vampire-werewolf hybrids and vampire-werewolf-dragon hybrids.
  • Our Werebeasts Are Different: Beyond the standard werewolf, AdventureQuest is home to Werepyres, WereDragons, Were-Hares, Werehogs (really a man in a pig costume) WereBats, and Selkies.
  • Out of the Inferno: Not only can the player character battle right next to the lip of a volcano, but he/she can survive being directly hit by Ultra Magma Akiroth's dragonfire while his/her armor melts into slag.
  • Oxymoronic Being: The "Mystery! AQ Live" event is spurred on by the sight of paradoxical beings around Lore: a dragon that is half-living and half-dead (but not undead), a fairy-centaur that is half-good and half-evil, a two-headed humanoid beast that's half-molten and half-frozen, a flying animal with a giant hippo's head and tiny hummingbird's body, and a fusion between a Moglin and Gogg (half-healing, half-destruction). For finishing the quest, the player receives contradictory items as rewards.
  • Percent Damage Attack: A few rare attacks scale according to enemies' hit points; the most commonly-recognized example is the Guardian Dragon special attack from the Weapons of Awe, which deals around 33% of the monster's health, adjusted by the level difference between the player and monster.
  • Petting Zoo People: The Nekos are humans that slowly transformed into Cat Folk by magical cat ears. It was intended for Nekos to be a possible player character subrace like Vampires and Werewolves, but since Lord Barrius's exit, any chance of that happening seems rare.
  • Physical God: Lorithia was once said to have been a physical god at one point, which led to The'Galin's ascension to godhood. This was only told through forum backstory information. Falerin and Eldron are the gods of Evil and Good for the world of Caelestia.
  • Pirates Versus Ninjas: The Pirage and Ninja class leaders are rivals of one another. There have been wars between the two.
  • Planet Terra: Earth is one of the planets in the AdventureQuest universe, and it is referred to as Terra and natives as Terrans.
  • Pointy Ears: In "Mostly Harmful", the Chosen accuses Falerin of being an imposter due to his pointy ears, given that he is human. Falerin claims that be specifically shaped his appearance to be similar to Eldron, who is an elf with naturally pointy ears. After Falerin starts mulling over the exact circumstances of how his appearance was created, the Chosen relents that it's Something Only They Would Say.
  • Poisoned Weapons: The Poison Arrow Vial gives any bow-type weapons the ability to poison enemies. Other weapons can also naturally give the Poison status effect, or the player character can sic the venomous tail of his/her chimera on the enemy.
  • Pop Quiz: When infiltrating N.O.V.A. in the "Worlds in Peril" quest, the player is asked questions about the organization that are never mentioned in the game. It redirects the player to a link to the forums where the player can ask about it before the quest starts, though.
  • Portal Book: Some of the scrolls in Falerin's library allow the player to re-experience historical quests, but they are more 'museum' locations, given there are no rewards beyond gold given from beating monsters.
  • Portal Picture: House portraits sometimes allow the player to visit events and claim quest rewards from them, even if they are seasonal or permanently rare.
  • Power Creep:
    • An early update to game mechanics gave melee and ranged weapons a damage boost of 4/3. Some older weapons were unaffected by this, so rewards from older quests (for example, the weapons summoned from the Mark of Hope) became obsolete.
    • Mastercraft equipment were once rare and only applied to sets of items acquired from the end of hard quests. Nowadays, nearly every item is Mastercraft, and any items that don't get the Mastercraft boost are quickly dismissed.
  • Power Creep, Power Seep: The Chosen can defeat gods in some quests but be KO'd by wild animals in another, depending on the writer. Usually, though, the writers agree that when the Chosen Gets Dangerous, his/her power can't be denied.
  • Power Equals Rarity: Downplayed.
    • It's possible for the player to get an end-game inventory just from shopping around town, but usually items from quests and have an advantage.
    • Items from the common Golden Giftbox shop are not mastercraft, while items from the rare and ultra-rare shops are and tend to fill niches not satisfied by other items.
  • Power Glows: Lauren, being the manifestation of the Lorian God of Creation, has a sprite with a yellow glow around it.
  • Power of the Void: Void-element monsters skip elemental resistances and inflict 2x damage, making them highly dangerous, considering resistances are critical for most matchups. Void Dragons drain the player character's health for each miss incurred, and dragons tend to have high dexterity, making the match tip further in the Void Dragon's favor. The'Galin's Head from the 10th Anniversary quest takes these traits up a notch; it takes 40% of the damage from a normal monster and has a special attack that allows it to skip the player character's turn.
  • Power-Up: Potion chests can be found as enemy encounters, and the potions inside can be used to restore Health and Mana.
  • Punny Name: Plenty of NPCs have them.
    • Warlic a mage, and another term for mages are Warlocks.
    • The SeekRat is a rat person who seeks the secrets of the Shadow Universe.
    • Wandy is a water witch that uses a Magic Wand. She says her parents thought they had a sense of humor.
    • Lorithia's/Lauren's name is intentionally similar to Lore, given that she is the Lorian goddess of creation.
    • Makkisar's name plays off of 'massacre', having only two consonant phonemes swapped. He fittingly sends Carnax and Carnax-like monsters into the past to conquer it.
    • Irolustre is the in-game name of an artist who worked on "Mystery! AQ Live" and the Eclipsus Quest Chain. Her name is a short distance away from 'illustrator'.
    • A Leprechaun that has been converted into Truphma has the suitably fitting name O'Press.
    • Wabio is a parody of romance novel trope The Casanova—evidenced by his name punning on Fabio Lazoni's.
    • Loco is a demigod of mischief, much akin to the original prankster god Loki.
    • Uncle Sham is a Scrooge-like leprechaun in a top hat and beard.
    • Khold Staeirgh, an associate of Radagast, appears for a few April Fools quests.
    • Annech Dote is the name of a certain librarian's analogue with a suitably noted name.
    • Louis Zephyr is a messenger of thought-to-be Big Bad The'Galin. He is never seen, instead preferring to organize and work behind the scenes.
    • Val Kyrie is, in fact, a valkyrie. And a Clingy Jealous Girl.
    • D'scvr is a long-lost space probe that had just been discovered.
    • Safiria's Plea has the player character fighting against werewolves as a ninja cat. Two of these werewolves are named Ad-Were and Spy-Were. The Ad-Were's description claims he's trying to sell something, and the Spy-Were's description lampshades that his disguise—an out-of-place mustache—fools no one.
    • Many 'zard' variants are designed off of punny names. We have:
    • Throwaway NPCs tend to have punny names.
      • The host of the Wizard Games is Aye'kent Spelle.
      • The Drakel who is Shiela's match in "The Matchmaker" is named Kasn'hova... not that we get to see much of him.
      • In "Germinator: Plantation!", Vince states that a man named Myarkul Grao (Miracle Grow) came to his workshop claiming to be an avatar of the Demigod of Fertility.
    • Frostval characters tend to have the punniest of names:
      • Khandie Khain, the adopted daughter of a Frostval villain. In a gag cutscene, we see her mother having the name Shugga Khain.
      • Sandy Claws, a Christmas-themed Giant Enemy Crab.
      • Tydlee Wynx, a Moglin toymaker.
      • Of course, Tydlee Wynx changes Chilly into a Carnax-like abomination just to be able to call him Chillax.
      • Frigidere, an ice necromancer.
    • The Lightcan, a Light-element lycan pet, has a description that mentions a few rejected puns that might have been its name.
    • The Uvee enemy is deals Light-element damage that can blind the player character. Its name is a pun of UV rays.
    • Mu Glen's name is an easternized version of the Moglin species name.
    • Pet Trobbles (and some enemy Trobbles) have puns based off of various 'troubles'. "The Trouble with Trobbles" introduces the Car Trobble, Legal Trobble, and Big Trobble, and old Snugglefest quests add Girl Trobble to the mix. The "Big Trobble in Little Syna" quest adds Storm Trobble as a mini-boss.
    • The previous wearer of the Armor of Awe is named King Awethur.
  • Pun-Based Title: Many quest titles are this, if they aren't shout-outs.
    • The "Absol-ution Saga" puns off of Absolix's name.
    • There are a sequence of quests that pun off of the similarity between "Trobble" and "Trouble", such as "Trobble on the High Seas!" and "Big Trobble on Little Syna".
  • Purposefully Overpowered: "Mastercrafted" items are much more powerful than other items at their level, by balancing power with expensiveness, with 10% more power for 10% higher cost.
  • Pyrrhic Victory: The Paladins over the Necromancers in The Edge of Extinction war. The war was won, but at the cost of Halenro and all of their magical energies.
  • Rainbow Pimp Gear: Since Clothes Make the Superman, some armors that look silly can be extremely powerful. Bunny Jammies, for example, makes the monster less capable of defending or less likely to hit because it's laughing at the player character.
  • Randomized Damage Attack: Some attacks can have high 'random' damage, giving the chance to deal extremely high or extremely low damage per strike.
    • The Kite series of spells, Love Machine pet, and balloon items released in the 2015 April Fools quest are random-heavy.
    • The Wild Spell skill from the mage class armor doubles random damage for spells.
    • The Loco Costume armor converts all damage to random, much befitting the demigod of mischief and randomness.
  • Random Number God: The player has to make Tabletop Game-like stat rolls during class training or Mastercraft quests to progress.
  • Random Drop:
    • 'Monster hunt'-type of quests requires the player to find a particular monster out of a pool of encounters for some loot. Thankfully, the drop is guaranteed, even if the encounter chance is random.
    • Most quest rewards are guaranteed, but the ones at "Jagged Peaks", "Mount Thrall: Alien Bounty", and "Transient Immortality" may change every time the quest is completed.
    • Choosing to battle dragonkind has a 25% chance of rewarding the player with the Dragon Blade, rather than 100% against dragon essences.
  • Razor Wings: Razorwings, of course, are metallic birds that slice the enemy with their sharp wings.
  • Red and Black and Evil All Over:
    • More than half of the major antagonists of the game have this motif—it's best exemplified by the heads of the Eternal Dragon of Time. Besides the first head, which is a Dracolich, and the fourth, which is a mountainous titan, the others are primarily red and black in color.
    • Subverted with shadows, which are black Living Shadows with Red Eyes, Take Warning. While there are malevolent shadows that follow Ultimon, the player character sees a fair share of shadows that act normally.
  • Really 700 Years Old: The Huntress explains in "Trouble From Beyond" that she and her father, who became known as The Eternal, survived the coming of The'Galin from 1000 years ago and so were cursed with immortality. The Huntress also shows that she is a very skilled Action Girl adamant on stopping The'Galin's next return.
  • Red Oni, Blue Oni: Galanoth and Cyrus. Galanoth's a Hot-Blooded Dragonslayer with a red cape who deals Earth damage as a guest and tends to command the spirt of a Fire Dragon to attack, while Cyrus is a blue half-Ice dragon stoic Dracomancer that does Wind damage as a party member. They're leaders within their own groups, whose personalities and wits clash, and are usually seen together due to circumstances. Even Vampire Slayer E recognizes them to be like Yin and Yang.
  • Respawning Enemies: In exploratory/maze-like quests, backtracking can make monsters respawn. How frequently depends on the quest—some force the player to re-battle all monsters with each step taken. "Maze of the Mana Dragon" has an unlucky 1/13 chance of fighting an enemy when returning to a previously-cleared room. "Taladosian Relics!" features no respawning enemies at all.
  • Respawn on the Spot: Most quests need to be restarted if the player character dies. Some quests expect the character die as part of the plot—in that case, the quest goes on normally after some in-game explanation for recovery.
  • Retractable Weapon: The Telescoping Sword.
  • Revenue Enhancing Devices: Z-Tokens can be used to get the best equipment, but they can also be used to purchase a house, which have only minor contributions to gameplay besides being a sink for Z-Tokens. Houses allow the player to pick up a few temporary items, visit out-of-season quests using Portal Pictures, and, with an estate, send an army into an ongoing war, but they are by no means necessary.
  • Reverse Mole: Erebus takes one of Falerin's fragments—Ardendor—under his wing. Falerin manages to find and recohere with Ardendor, and he and the Chosen decide to bait Erebus by having Falerin act as Ardendor. The ploy works; Erebus, for all of his deceit and manipulation, is manipulated himself when 'Ardendor' lets Atlas free and gives Erebus a coherent identity.
  • Ridiculously Cute Critter:
    • In-universe, Bun-Bits are cute enough that that as an enemy encounter, they charm the player into dealing less damage.
    • One of a Thunderchick's attacks is staring at the enemy with huge Puppy-Dog Eyes, and that inflicts damage.
    • The Rose, Carnation, and Lavender doll pets also use their cuteness as a gameplay mechanic, giving them the chance to burn, control, and blind the enemy, respectively.
    • The Eye of Chillax and Nightsever weapons deal increased damage on 'cute' enemies, which include Moglins, Trobbles, and Bun-Bits.
    • Moglins. However, many of the fans find them annoying, especially Twig and Twilly. This has led to all sorts of... interesting quests, including a minigame where the player character punts Twilly and an April Fool's Day quest that featured Twig as the Devourer.
      • Twig being the Master of Evil was also referencing a forum in-joke.
      • Then, of course, because this is AdventureQuest, they decided to subvert their whole joke: After the Mogbusters spend quite a while abusing him, the myth that "moglins can fly with their ears" turns out to be true. Then Twig lands in a patch of piranha-infested water. For most people this would be a problem, but Twig is a Big Eater when it comes to fish and ice cream. They never stood a chance.
      • The only Moglins who are not ridiculously cute in some way are Zorbak and Kabroz, "ebil" and evil Moglin necromancers, respectively.
  • Rule of Fun: The weapons and armor are often ridiculous, the puns numerous, the monsters... surprising... and every quest will involve the player character fighting. Some might say it's a rather popular game.
  • Sai Guy: Sais are available as weapons from the Ninja class shop and deal Darkness-element damage, fittingly.
  • Sapient Ship: Falerin's 'abode' is actually one of his avatars, capable of communicating with him and projecting memories.
  • Schmuck Bait: The Ancient Mana Dragon at the end of the "Maze of the Mana Dragon" quest offers the player character the helmet piece of Dragon Knight armor. Every NPC encountered on the quest warns that the dragon will offer a corrupting power. Should the player not read the quest dialogue or decide out of curiosity to take the helmet, then the player character will be corrupted into a half-dragon soldier and brainwashed into serving the Mana Dragon. This is considered an 'ending' by the game, so the player has to restart the entire quest and decline the helmet to get the Dragon Knight rewards.
  • Sdrawkcab Name:
    • Zorbak and Kabroz, two Moglin necromancer brothers.
    • Varax and Xarav. two djinnis—one working for Drakkonan, one as a guide for the Igneus clan.
    • Xitra Regeirk is Artix Krieger's Evil Twin from an alternate universe.
    • Xov Arakue is Eukara Vox's antithesis. Eukara is a teacher and champions creativity, while Xov controls the Truphma, Humanoid Abominations that use boredom to conquer others.
    • In "Mystery! AQ Live", Galanoth claims he slayed Nogard, the Dragon of Paradoxical Conundrums, which is what was causing Oxymoronic Beings to spawn around Lore.
  • Selkies and Wereseals: Were-seals are dubbed Selkies in the game. They pose as Water-element enemies that like to spike the player character with beach balls as an attack.
  • Sequential Boss:
    • The Shadow Colossus/Serpent/Storm is a single boss with three forms, using three different strategies.
    • The Eternal Dragon of Time has six heads that the player tackles one-at-a-time chronologically by what each dragon's head represents.
  • Serrated Blade of Pain: Most weapons that inflict the Bleed status have this.
  • Sesquipedalian Loquaciousness: Falerin's speech, which has become somewhat of a minor meme on the forums.
    • Falerin has lampshaded it:
    Parenthetical note to self. I am slipping. Two uses of the same word in the same sentence. Substitute archaic or something similar. I would use "antediluvian" but I am not sure there ever was a Lorian deluge of some sort. "Old" simply lacks feeling. Hmm. "Archaic implies lack of utility that is a problematic connotation. Of course, given the contents... and I am rambling once again.
    • In "Tangled Web of Fate", Lorithia lampshades that Falerin's face should be example for the word "sesquipedalian".
  • Set Bonus: Mastercraft sets tend to have them in order to compensate for the fact that most of the time, the weapon and armor don't work well together.
  • Sexy Man, Instant Harem: Snugglefest 2008's Quest involves Warlic trying out a Love Potion and becoming a Fabio parody, instantly mesmerizing female NPCs in Battleon.
  • Shout-Out: Loads, ranging in scale from a couple of random lines from Hamlet to an entire quest devoted to an Affectionate Parody of MythBusters.
    • One of the first NPCs in the game, the Frogzard Hunter, is a parody of Steve Irwin, down to the speech pattern.
    • Any item or monster description with the format "It won't ____, but it'll instead ____," is guaranteed to have the former part of the sentence be an external reference.
    • When having Radagast as a guest, if the player runs out of SP to keep him fighting, he'll suddenly disappear while commenting about Jack Candle.
    • The Guardian Dragon is full of this.
    • In "Absol-ution Part I", the spaceship to travel through Etherspace is named after Danny Phantom, and the landmarks in space are named after The Fairly OddParents.
    • The Centerprise crew of "The Bizarre Flecks Saga - Part III: Star Blecch!" are all Expies of Star Trek characters in name.
    • The Ninja Flyrtle pets are, of course, Expies of Teenage Mutant Ninja Turtles.
    • Each of the samurat enemies references another work involving samurais: Samurat's description, Afro Samurat, Samurai Pizza Rat, and Cauliflower Samurat.
    • There is an entire series of enemies found in "Mogbusters! - Twig's Dilemma!" whose names are aquatic puns of American Idol winners.
    • The Bun-Rangers are half parodies of Captain Planet and the Planeteers with their elements of Fire, Earth, Fire, Water, and Snuggles and half of Power Rangers as they summon MegaZard and DragonZard mechas from an ocarina.
    • The Mighty Morphin' Golem Stranger pets named after the Power Rangers seasons.
    • Cara Loft is a obvious play on Lara Croft. The player meets her when searching through the Ruins of Rundlecrum.
    • One of the cats from Thunder Mountain the player character can purchase is called a Znarf.
    • The final enemy the player character meets during the Martial Artist class quest chain is named Bruised Lee, and the enemy looks awfully like the original.
    • Alricon the UnDeadeye's description says that he died from an arrow to the knee before backtracking and saying 'head' instead.
    • The final enemies of the "Transfarmers" quest are 'zard and dragon Transformers.
    • "Transmorphers: Beast Hostilities" has a standoff between four different Funny Animal creatures done in the narration style of Iron Chef/Iron Chef America, of all things.
    • "Shadows Are Magic!" is essentially takes My Little Pony: Friendship Is Magic and shadow-ifies it, as ElBhe Waxes Lyrical about making a shadowcupcake out of shadowingredients to catch shadowponies.
    • Lord Barrius revisits My Little Pony in the "Elements of D'awww!" quest, where ElBhe meets a shadowpony named Inky Sky who gives a detailed description of the history of shadowponies, which involve defeating Queen Fillymeana using the Elements of Daw. Inky Sky also mentions how the veil is always fifty shades of black, and finding an Element of Daw will have the game triumphantly proclaim "DA DA DA DAAAAA!"
    • In "Zorbak and Safiria's Challenge", the player is tasked to conquer four fortresses. It seems the quest was made just so Zorbak could claim All Your Base Are Belong to Us.
    • The Goldyfish pet and Fishguts enemy is a small goldfish that Turns Red, turning into a large, serpent-like creature stuck inside its glass bowl, not unlike Magikarp and Gyarados of Pokémon.
    • The prefix descriptor of the TwEbil line of guests go from 'Bad' to 'Troublesome' to 'Impish' to 'Wicked' to 'Naughty' to 'Rascally'... but the highest-level variant is TwEbil KinEbil.
    • The Rosethorn Lance has prefixes that go from 'Wilting' to 'Field' to 'Wild' to 'Bluestar' to 'Prickly' to 'Hip' to 'Blood' and then Axl. The description for the Axl Rosethorn Lance also changes to incorporate the song and album titles "Sweet Child o' Mine", "Appetite for Destruction", "Welcome to the Jungle", and "Paradise City".
    • The Void hosts some unusual enemies at times.
      • The Salek Sprayer (that is also found in "Fading Warlic!") is a photo of a salt shaker (somehow) holding a water gun. It yells "EXTINGUISH! EXTINGUISH!". The monster references Doctor Who's Daleks which are vaguely similar in shape and have a parodied catchphrase.
      • Queen Raychael the Sunray references Rachael Ray's $40 a Day by claiming to be able to feed her sunray followers for 40 gold per day.
      • King Raymooned the Moonray references Everybody Loves Raymond by stating that "Everybody loves him and his wacky family."
    • In the 2009 April Fools quest, Loco brainwashes Radagast and Khold, and the next time the player character sees them, they are in clown makeup. Radagast asks the player, "Why so serious?"
    • The Revengers are of course based on Marvel's The Avengers. Invincible Hogg is a green, muscular boar in purple shorts that engages in Hulk Speak, Irony Man is a loudmouth in red-and-yellow armor, Logan is a literal wolverine with a yellow-and-dark-blue coat, and Lieutenant Lore is Lore's Captain Geographic. They fight Dr. Boom, an evil clone Technopath, Varnak, a villain with spider-themed powers, and Lead Skull, a robot with a very fitting moniker.
    • The description for the Drill Lance is written in the style of Tengen Toppa Gurren Lagann.
    • The Amphibious Oyster enemy is gigantic and blue, and the description mentions a cult that worships it. "They set cities on flame with rock and roll."
    • Paxian Defender's description starts off with "Do you hear the people sing," and the rest of the description is metered and rhymed like the original song.
    • The Necrochaun enemy's special attack inflicts a status debuff that lowers the player character's Luck and increases its own. The description for the Unlucky debuff says, "Target feels unlucky, punk."
    • The former VampireSlayer class leader was Vampire Slayer E, and he has a similar appearance to D. The player character can meet Vampire Slayers C, T, and V during "The Cure".
    • As the player character fights against a Nerflord, the Nerflord will chant a Nerf version of The Fellowship of the Ring's One Ring inscription.
    • Kaley Obsidia's pet raven is named—what else—Eapoe. It doesn't say "nevermore", but Kaley seems to be able to communicate with it.
    • The Predecessor enemy is a green-skinned, reptilian alien with long braid-like hair, not unlike a Predator alien.
    • The GO-LD Walker is named after the Star Wars's AT-AT walker, though they share few similarities beyond name.
    • A Boomstick is a rare weapon in the game. It's actually more of a gunblade than either the trope namer or trope of the same name.
    • The 2010 Frostval Gift Delivery armor is a stretchy suit, and the highest-level version of the armor is named Mr Funtastic.
    • The quests involving Barry Jotter are blatant parodies of Harry Potter titles.
    • Another Harry Potter parody comes up in the first half of "Wizard Games" as a Bun-Bit mage named Harey Potter.
    • In "Fern Bully" (whose name is derived from Fern Gully), the boss is a rat parody of Mr. T that speaks with Antiquated Linguistics.
    • The Sneak on a Plain enemy references Snakes on a Plane in both name in description.
    • A Mogloween quest has the player fighting Zirkon, a sparkly vampire.
    • One of Tydlee Wynx's mooks is called a G.I. Gnome, and the description mentions how they fight cobras.
    • Lord Etherseid, god of Etherspace, is named after Darkseid. He is significantly less threatening than his namesake, however.
    • Kamui's security system is named P.O.T.A.D.O.S. and quotes lines from Portal. When it stuns the player character (or an enemy, once the player gets it as a pet) with its hammers, a text bubble appears and says, "Stop! Hammertime!"
    • Svadilfari's Oath is an Electric-locked armor with a paralyzing attack. Should the paralysis roll succeed, the game states that the enemy "can't get beyond the thunder dome".
    • The Flaming Skull item gives Fire- and Darkness-element resistance. The description makes it clear that it's a reference to Ghost Rider, saying that "Flaming motorcycle and chains sold separately."
    • The Firing Toupée bears resemblance to Donald Trump's hairstyle, and of course, the 'Firing' part means it both boosts Fire-element damage and is recommended for firing people from the office. The description additionally references The Fellowship of the Ring as a parody of the One Ring engraving.
    • The description of the Hammer of Unity are the lyrics of "If I Had a Hammer".
    • The Helslinger weapon references Van Helsing, as it is a gun whose description suggests that it helps against fighting vampires.
    • The "Fading Warlic!" quest is full of references to Doctor Who. The player character and NPCs are trying to find why Warlic is fading from the current timeline. Warlic looks for a Doctor (in particular, Dr. Voltabolt) for answers. Dr. Voltabolt has two children, Gallie and Frey, and a device called the Z.A.R.D.I.S., a time-traveling Zard partially stuck in the form of a police box. Dr. Voltabolt has the last of the time cords, which the rest were destroyed in some Great Offscreen War, which he uses to send the other NPCs into the past to find the answer to Warlic's dilemma. Along the way, they encounter Salek Sprayers, a salt shaker in place of a Dalek, and a Cyberhen for a Cyberman (although that may also reference Robot Chicken). Along the way, the NPCs quote Doctor Who frequently. Then at the end of the quest, they start quoting Back to the Future.
    • The latter half of the "Ep-pig!" quest is played like a Scooby-Doo episode, and the player character hangs many lampshades on the work's tropes.
    • The Beast King Jammies armor is a reference to Max's pyjamas in Where the Wild Things Are.
    • The Gauntlet of the Western Horizon item plays on Fist of the North Star in its name and description. It allows the player to inflict a spiritual seed (delayed damage) and to daze the enemy. If the enemy has been dazed before by the item, a text bubble says that "You are already dazed!"
    • "Jypley's Believe it... or Rot!" is named after Ripley's Believe It or Not!, and the quest features Mr. Jypley's Museum of the Strange and Bizarre.
    • The 2012 Mogloween quest is named "Zombielands", and the One-Shot Character for that quest is named Harryl Woodson who has a Nice Hat and fights with a banjo. He's looking for Taladosian tarts, a.k.a., Twinkies.
    • The Blood Orb item has the line "Blood for the Blood Orb!", referencing Warhammer 40,000.
    • The Pixel set of items is based off of Minecraft's aesthetic. The Pixel Stalker pet from the set is a pig that acts like a Creeper.
    • A ghost in the "Canyon of Lost Souls" quest states that "Something wicked this way comes!" before fleeing from the Spectre approaching them.
    • Warlic creates Love Potion #729 in the 2008 Snugglefest quest. He claims it's named because it's the cube of Love Potion #9.
    • Two zombies in an early Zorbak War were named Bill & Ted.
    • From Frostval 2009 is Bergos, an ice bear in golden armor, not unlike Iorek Byrnison of His Dark Materials.
    • The Beach Boy and Beach Boy Imitators are a quartet of enemies that, of course, derive their name and description from The Beach Boys.
    • A trio of Badger Berserkers is called BadgerBadgerBadger, and their description states that "We don't need no stinking badgers!"
    • The LOCOmotive is a train that's been infused with Loco's chaotic energies. The description says its name is Thomas.
    • The Emerald Wizard Staff summons a Flying Monkey as a guest, a reference to The Wonderful Wizard of Oz's wizard of the Emerald City and the Wicked Witch's flying monkeys. The description additionally mentions that all the player needs now is a tiny china doll.
    • St. Elmo's Fire is a real thing, but AdventureQuest's version of it shows Elmo's head from Sesame Street in a mitre with blue will-o-wisps around him.
    • Dinozard Island is essentially Jurassic Park, since it is a secluded island filled with prehistoric reptilles. The SmartZard wants to call it Cretaceous Park, even. There's a CaveZard that babbles "Bibbity bobbity boo!" as a primeval language.
    • A clown from the 2015 April Fools quest is named Nickelwise, and he claims to be the rock-star leader of the band Loco's Clowns. His name is a mash-up of Pennywise and Nickelback, and his backstory plays the part.
    • The Abominable Snowman enemy mentions And Call Him George in its description—essentially likening Elmyra Duff of Tiny Toon Adventures a brute.
    • The Gong of the Wind! pet is a clear reference to Gone with the Wind.
    • The Mastercraft set based off of Norse Mythology is named after Marvel Universe's Asgardians.
    • The Shikyo Mask miscellaneous item says that it makes the wearer feel hollow inside. It looks almost exactly like Ichigo's Hollow mask from Bleach.
    • Moglinator enemies have tiers named in the same manner as Terminators from Terminator.
    • The player character says "Helloooo--- Newman." toward the end of the Eclipsus quest chain, additionally lampshading the pop-culture reference.
    • The Scizzard is designed after Sweeney Todd: The Demon Barber of Fleet Street, what with its Skunk Stripe hair, scissors, and description that says it's 'part demon' and 'part barber'.
    • The Snowglobe miscellaneous item damages the enemy with ice particles—or, according to the description, "Hail for your enemy, baby!"
    • There is a Duke of HaZard enemy with the same color and pattern as the The Dukes of Hazzard car, and the description is a modified version of the show's theme.
    • The "Mostly Harmful" quest derives its name from Mostly Harmless but is otherwise only tangentially related, what with its sci-fi introduction leading back to Lore.
    • The "Phantom of the Opera" quest is a literal interpretation of the referenced work's name.
    • Ardendor in "Mostly Harmless" departs with Erebus with an "Allons-y!"
    • Void Dragons are designed after Xenomorphs, what with their slick, black bodies, large foreheads, emaciated bodies, and multiple jaws. The'Galin's Head from the 10th anniversary quest is another void dragon, which also has a dark color scheme and Nested Mouths.
    • The Babby pet has its description reference the How Is Babby Formed? meme.
    • The Am-Boss's description states that it has ambushed the player—like a boss!
    • The description for the Hand Mirror item references The Man Your Man Could Smell Like with the first two lines being "Look in the mirror, now at me. Now look in the mirror, now back at me."
    • The title of the "Germinator: Plantation!" quest is an obvious pun of Terminator Salvation, and the enemies in the quest have plant-themed versions of the Terminator codenames.
    • One of the rewards from "Germinator: Plantation!" is the ToxiCleen spell, which does Water-elemental damage and can poison the enemy.
    • The Hayu is an animated scarecrow whose description forelornly muses "If he only had a brain...", a reference to The Wizard of Oz film.
    • The Alpha Dracoglin house item references Sarah McLachlan's song "Angel", but with "Brilhado" in place of "Angel".
    • The most powerful Eel weapon is the 1.21 Giga-Eel, a reference to Back to the Future and its DeLorean requiring 1.21 gigawatts of power.
    • The Legion boss references a certain Imageboard's credo and LOLCats.
  • Signature Style: The writers for the quests tend to write their specific storylines, but some patterns are noticeable when they write for holiday events and other plot-irrelevant quests.
    • Falerin likes far-reaching and thick Kudzu Plots that follow the First Law of Tragicomedies. During comedic moments, the characters bat off enough puns that Artix would be proud. The lore in his quests tend to spill into the game's forums, given that his characters would be Mr. Exposition otherwise.
    • Lord Barrius favors quests with non-human characters such as cats, rats, foxes, and ponies. His in-game NPC ElBhe loves to make external references, general punniness, and a healthy dash of internet memes. Even in his more serious quests ElBhe acts as Plucky Comic Relief to take the weight off of things.
    • Eukara Vox has a sort of Gothic Horror and romantic style to her writing, with focus on a discrete, focused storyline with a small cast and fleshed-out characters. Her works tend to lean toward the serious side.
    • In Media Res, while typically a coder, has written for quests after Lord Barrius's departure. Thus far, his style a writing style hearkens back to the old style of AdventureQuest plots—the dialogue is light and funny, mostly meant to carry the gameplay along, but it has enough details and depth to make a substantial story from start to end.
  • Significant Anagram: Seth Cay Dhows/Shadowscythe
  • Situational Damage Attack: The Manasplosion and Drop the MOAP spells deal damage scaled to mana and skill points, respectively. Manasplosion can backfire, however, as having too much mana causes Explosive Overclocking.
  • Situational Sword: Several pieces of equipment have been introduced to the game before what enemy they were meant to fight against had been introduced. For the Aegis shield, those enemies were Visia's shifters.
  • Skeletons in the Coat Closet:
    • The Terror Mastercraft set is adorned with bones and skulls on the shoulders and waist. The pet for the set looks like a skull on spider-like legs.
    • Brain Spiders are formed from synthesizing magic and technology. They are giant spiders with visible bones across their backs and spine-like protrusions as their legs.
  • Small Annoying Creature: In some Grenwog Festival quests, the player character gets peeved at Bun-Bits, while, despite adorable, are wholly ignorant that they are troublemakers. According to them, creatures this cute and innocent can't be wrong!
  • Snowlems: There are three varieties of Snow Golems in Lore: the standard snowman-with-a-carrot-nose kind, a cyclops with limbs made of ice, and a Nightmare Realm creation where the snowman has a Belly Mouth with icicles for teeth.
  • Soul Fragment: At the end of the Carnax Saga, Carnax divides its soul into pieces and sends the pieces into Azru Stones to prevent Makkisar—or anyone else—from controlling it again.
  • Spock Speak: Falerin's Running Gag. When the player character starts speaking in a similarly detailed manner to other NPCs during a quest, they comment that the player has been hanging around Falerin for too long.
  • Standard Status Effects: Subverted; while there are normal ones, like burned, frozen, poisoned, and doom, there are ones like soaked, entangled, and afraid. There's a whole section of the forums encyclopedia. that list the status effects.
  • Starfish Language: The language of Predecessors is rendered as green letter-like lines and dots.
  • The Starscream: Ryuusei acts this way to The'Galin. The'Galin has his own intents for Uncreating Lore, but Ryuusei is a little more pushy. This eventually leads to The'Galin abandoning Ryuusei in the Void. He takes him back later and watches his actions more carefully. When Ryuusei goes against The'Galin's orders again at the conclusion of the "Absolution" saga, he's enacting Redemption Equals Death/Villain's Dying Grace, and The'Galin seems content at his change of heart.
  • Storm of Blades: Truphma (and the player character, if his/her armor is the Truphma Suit) have a special attack that rains cleavers on the enemy.
  • Story Difficulty Setting: For a few plot-heavy quests, there is an option to play the quest by only seeing the cutscenes instead of battling through legions of monsters, but this has the drawback of not being able to claim rewards at the end. "The Restoration" and several Mastercraft set quests fall under this category.
  • The Straight and Arrow Path: Despite having a sister Space Opera game, the player character can use both bows and guns as ranged weapons. Neither choice of weapon has significant advantages over the other.
  • Stylistic Suck: The 2011 April Fools event looks like a kindergartner's attempt at making a quest, where the dialogue bubbles are mired with typos, the monsters are a pushover for anyone past level 5, and the NPC directing the quest is a scribble that is meant to look like a beefed-up Twilly.
  • Summon Magic: Summon and Call spells.
  • Super Not-Drowning Skills: It's lampshaded that everyone can breathe underwater because an accident caused breatheable-water potions to be spilled into the seas.
  • Swiss Army Weapon: Many weapons can switch damage types between melee and magic or sometimes melee, ranged, and magic, making it useful for almost all builds.
  • The Symbiote: Proteans are alien symbiotes that bond with other organisms—like people—and give them excellent dodging abilities.
  • Taken for Granite:
    • Enemies like Meduso and the Robocockatrice can inflict the Petrify status, which prevents the player from taking his/her turn and increases vulnerability to Wind-element attacks.
    • Carnax was made from a mountain, so it turns back to stone after it is finally defeated.
  • Talk Like a Pirate: An event synchronized with the real-life holiday of the same name.
  • Technicolor Ninjas: Ninjachauns are dressed primarily in white and decorated with rainbows, which make them fit perfectly in the land of Leprechaunia.
  • Third Eye: A trademark of Carnax and Sacragons are the three red eyes on their head. They can shoot Eye Beams from their third eye and set up a psionic link through it.
  • Thirteen Is Unlucky: "Hostage to Misfortune", one of the first quests involving the antagonist Entropy, was release on Friday, March 13th, 2015. The quest in particular shows luck being drained from the Leprechaun nation as one of Entropy's actions.
  • This Is a Drill: Shogun Akunezu uses a Drill Lance as a weapon. Completing the quest he's in allows the player to use his Drill Lance for himself or herself.
  • Tiered by Name: Many tiered items in the game have adjectives that increasing describe the item's power.
  • Time-Limit Boss: The Circle of Doom kills the player character instantly after ten turns.
  • Too Many Belts: The Assassin class armor has what appears to be 19 belts altogether on the outfit.
  • Trademark Favorite Food: Twig loves "Fish and ice cweam!"
  • Throw the Book at Them: An Umazen is implied to have learned magic over the internet. The "sort of" lampshade, turns out that all she knows is throwing a magic book at the player character. Despite the lame-appearing attack however, it does relatively high damage when the player is on par level with her.
  • Throwing Your Sword Always Works: Most weapons include at least one variation where they are thrown, which usually ends up providing more damage.
  • Timed Mission:
    • "Bradakhan: Dracomancer Usurper" was an early war with the consequence that failure penalized all players by reducing their gold rewards to 90%.
    • The "Division by Zero" and "Mostly Harmless" wars.
    • The trope as become moderately popular in recent years, where the second war in the Bradakhan saga, the "Terrible Twelve" war, and "Emerge from Shadow" were timed.
  • Tin Tyrant: War fits his role as a Horsemen of the Apocalypse, being donned in full plate armor and seeking to instigate war to empower himself.
  • Totally Radical: In contrast to Loremaster Falerin's more elegant speech, one of his fragments—dubbed Ardendor—is much more slack about how he talks.
  • Trade Snark: One of Falerin's fragments is Super-strong Ultra Mega Falerin Man™.
  • Treacherous Quest Giver: Some of Zorbak's quests stem from him trying out new "ebil" magics on the protagonist, although just as many consist of him asking the protagonist to fix his mistakes.
  • Tube Travel: The player cannot simply 'leave' Isle d'Oriens, since it's in a portal in the sky and there's no way to get back down. The solution? Go down the Lo-Flo, a giant tube whose entrance is a toilet, which takes the player character to the stalls inside Yulgar's inn.
  • Turns Red:
    • A number of enemies become significantly tougher over battle. Deery, Moglin Freak, and Transmorphers mutate into monstrous forms when under 50% hit points. The Werehog, Luminous Wyrm, and Drakkonan's Head quest bosses increase damage as their health decreases.
    • The player can equip a Transmorpher shield, Ep-Pig armor, and/or Luminous Wyrm Helm to gain effects similar to their corresponding monsters as his/her health diminishes.
  • Twenty Bear Asses:
    • A minority of quests consists of collecting parts from monsters to forge some weapon or to create some magical construct.
    • Parodied with the final scene of "Death's Domain". Having gathered twenty five hourglasses, Death asks the player character for a long list of materials to construct a Tracking Device for the hourglasses. He prepares to send the player character out on a long and dangerous quest... only for the player character to return within minutes because there happens to be a box ready with just the materials needed.
  • Ultimate Blacksmith: Yulgar forges the The Frozen Claymore out of the pieces of the Ice Scythe in order to slay Akiroth. Adder implies that Yulgar's teacher is even better than him, but this is only mentioned in passing.
  • Underground Monkey:
    • Frogzards are said to be able to adapt to many conditions, and that holds evident with how many variations the player will encounter. For elemental variants, there's the FireZard, Zardine, CloudZard, IceZard, Lightning Zard, LightZard, and DarkZard. There are other variations such as the ToadZard, DebilZard, OrcaZard, BuzZard, CommunicantZard, and VorpalZard.
    • There are four variants of Shifter enemies, one for each pair of opposites on the elemental wheel.
    • It's common enough that antagonists alter monsters for their own needs. This leads to adventurers fighting 'Undead', 'Zombie', 'Shadow', 'Nightmare', 'Ethereal', 'Reverse', and 'Dulling/Dull' variants of typical enemies.
  • Unexpected Shmup Level: The "Doomquake Caverns!" quest has a minigame where the player attacks monsters by pointing-and-clicking a magic staff at them, in contrast to the turn-based battles of norm.
  • Unfortunate Names: The backstory of Master Terror is that he was teased for his name, Terry Fluffendil, so he found a man—implied to be Ryuusei Cartwright—and traded his conscience to become a truly fearful warrior.
  • Un-Person: The act of uncreation wipes out any trace of existence that a person existed—besides those the uncreator left Ripple-Effect-Proof Memory.
  • Vampire Hunter: An early class the player character could take was the Vampire Slayer, which was renovated into the ShadowSlayer and NightHunter classes. Both classes specialize in skills that deal increased damage against undead, vampires, werewolves, and other night creatures. The class trainers are Cenara and Donovan, respectively, who are dracopyres and hunt each other down.
  • Vampire Vords: Most vampires in Lore can speak just fine. It's when the Grenwog is transformed into the VereWog that the player lampshades how he's speaking.
  • Vancian Magic: Most magic does not need preparation, but Spellcraft spells do. The player must go on a quest to 'charge' casts of the attack to use another time in battle.
  • Vendor Trash: In the early days of the game, Robina would sell four gems that did nothing but could be sold back at a higher or lower price, depending on random fluctuations. The 2007 Blarney War also rewarded adventurers with leprechaun loot that could be sold at a higher price after March ended.
  • Viewers Are Geniuses: The entire Devourer plotline was nigh-impossible to follow with reading the pages and pages of explanations given on the forums. The staff swear they learned their lesson from the trouble handling it, and the next Myth Arc will make a lot more sense. Even worse was a good bit of information was released over an IRC chatroom in a chat with the staff or roleplay with one of the staff as its GM, giving the twenty players a distinct advantage. Information on the IRC channel is available on the forums, but it's so overlooked most players don't know it exists. The characters from the roleplay are sometimes referenced in-game establishing the worlds created by the players as part of the Extended Universe.
  • Villain Forgot to Level Grind: Due to the level cap being raised from 100 to 136 to 150, the monsters from older quests don't have top-level versions, so players can plow through them. However, because these older quests weren't meant for high-level players, their rewards are too weak to be of use.
  • Villain Team-Up: During the Devourer Saga, the Sinister Seven, consisting of seven previously beaten antagonists, banded together to prevent the protagonists from uniting the elemental orbs. The Seekrat assembles a similar set of villains called the Terrible Twelve, because "quite frankly, because I couldn't convince any of the talented villains to come."
  • Violence Is the Only Option: Lampshaded, of course. The player character tries bluffing his/her way past a werewolf camp in "Light in the Darkness!". If he/she fails, he/she asks if they should just cut to the battle.
  • Waif-Fu: Lady Akai is the class trainer for the Gogg Claw style of Martial Arts. Gogg Claw style specializes in being brutally ruthless and fast before the enemy has a chance to respond. Lady Akai is demure and looks like a Geisha, not the first thing the players would expect.
  • Wallet of Holding: The player can have a maximum of one billion gold coins in his or her possession. How the player's pack mule lugs that much gold around would be a mystery without one of these.
  • Wall of Text: Falerin, he of many words, provides one during a quest in lieu of battling. If the player denies him to tell the account, he will still speak on and on as the player battles on.
  • Wall of Weapons: There is one in the background of Shii's and Wallo's room for Assassin class training.
  • War Has Never Been So Much Fun: Wars are a frequent event in AdventureQuest, and whatever Pretext for War that might have started them doesn't stop them from having the same style and cheesiness as the rest of the game.
  • Weaponized Ball: The Selkie (were-seal) enemy has a special attack where it balances a beach ball on its nose before spiking it at the player character.
  • Weaponized Offspring: The MotherZard enemy spits out baby 'zards at the player character as one of its attacks.
  • Weapon of Peace: The weapon named the Blade of Peace is summoned from shards of the Ice Orb. It would make a decent weapon except that it has an extremely low accuracy stat, which makes it useless for damage, even with other accuracy-boosting equipment.
  • Weapon of X-Slaying: A subset of weapons have 'triggers'; they deal below-average damage on most monsters, but they compensate by dealing more damage against certain enemies.
    • The Dragon Blade (and variants) is the de facto weapon of choice against dragons.
    • Salvation weapons deal increased damage on agents of The Devourer.
    • The player can pick up the BURP Slayer on the "Rats o' War" quest, which seeks against BURPs and hits them for whatever element they're weak against.
    • Tarnished Caliburn is effective against a variety of undead creatures, dealing Void damage and having a chance to poison the enemy.
    • The Shelayleigh and Bladehenge weapons are effective against Leprechauns.
    • The Rat Flail seeks against Shadow monsters' greatest weakness.
    • The Paintball Gun and Paxian Deliverance weapons deal increased damage against Truphma.
    • The Nightsever exaggerates this trope; it triggers on a wide range of monsters, and the triggers can stack. However, only a few monsters hit enough triggers such that it deals substantially more damage than a normal weapon. According to the official encyclopedia, the weapon triggers on 'Rasputin', 'Reggae', 'Grey's Anatomy', 'Hippy/Hippie', 'Alot', 'Frat/Sorority', 'Canadian/DemiCanadian', é, 'Cheezburger', 'Tom Cruise', and 'Foron'. None of those correspond to actual enemies.
    • An almost-full list of 'trigger' weapons can be seen here.
  • Weapons Kitchen Sink: Because AdventureQuest is a Fantasy Kitchen Sink with a highly humorous side to it, we see any and all items being used as weapons. Sadly, the kitchen sink itself is not available as a weapon.
  • Weather Control Machine: Hollow's Weather Remote can summon a local windstorm, blizzard, rainstorm, or lightning over the enemy.
  • Weird Moon: In Darkovia, it's always night and there is always a full moon. And when the Devourer's attack was imminent, the moon changed into a weird red-eyed thing. And before the Devourer attack, Dewlok's home had a Zelda-ish moon complete with creepy face.
  • When Trees Attack: Deadwood trees are one possible enemy the game sends at the player; they attack by lashing their roots from under the ground and spitting a barrage of acorns. They can also restore their health with water.
  • Whole Plot Reference:
  • Who Wants to Live Forever?: Garavin was cursed with eternal life by The'Galin so that he would suffer the loss of his loved ones and see through The'Galin's return, helpless. His daughter, Celestra, was also granted eternal life, but she is set on using it to hunt The'Galin down.
  • Wide Open Sandbox: While quests are set, the player can still choose to do most of them at any time in any order.
  • Winged Humanoid: The Brilhado have purple wings with red-tipped feathers. They are affiliated with the Light element, but they are considered demons rather than angels.
  • Winged Unicorn: Lucius, leader of the Lucian clan.
  • A Winner Is You: After defeating the Legendary Warriors in Fairwind Springs: "You have defeated the Legends! Victory is yours!"
  • A Wizard Did It: Used to explain away many plot inconsistencies. "It's MAGIC!"
  • Wolfpack Boss: Unsurprisingly, the Wolf Pack boss from the Void, which was made to test how the updated gameplay formulas for health regeneration worked for multiple enemies. The Alpha Werewolf attacks with Earth damage while its flunkies deal Light damage, making resistance to both elements difficult.
  • Wolves Always Howl at the Moon: The healing animation for a Diretooth (feral werewolf) and Dracoglin (dragon-vampire-werewolf Moglin) shows them howling at the moon.
  • Woodland Creatures: Some of the enemies encountered in quests that take place in forests include Deery, Owl, and Woodland Pack, which consists of a rabbit, beaver, owl, and turtle.
  • Words Can Break My Bones: "Red Fog." *Red Fog rolls past and knocks the Chosen's HP to One* "Okay, that's really annoying."
  • The World Is Always Doomed: The player, in the "Fred On Strike!" quest, lampshades how many villains he or she has had to battle to keep Lore safe.
  • World of Pun: The game is infamous for this, and they tend to be so spectacularly lame that they end up So Bad, It's Good. Or, as Artix described it:
    Arch Knight Style Humor (adj) — A savory blend of caffeinated epic failure served with with a side of cheese. This also probably means Artix wrote it himself... it is sort of like a train wreck. You really want to look away, but for some reason, you just... have to watch.
    They (giant rats) really like you (the PC). It must be all of the cheesy puns you have been exposed to.
  • Wounded Gazelle Gambit: Ryuusei goads Amilara into striking him with lightning, and when he's down, calls on The'Galin for help. The'Galin responds by manifesting as Omega.
  • Wrap Around: The Backstab attack from the Assassin class armor has the player go left off the screen to strike the enemy from the right-hand edge.
  • Whatevermancy: Each of the eight elements has a Wizard class 'mancy associated with it, and the player character can choose to specialize in one of those magics. Beyond that, there is necromancy, dracomancy, golemancy, and demonmancy, and chronomancy.
  • Xtreme Kool Letterz: X-Guardians and Z-tokens.
  • You Can't Thwart Stage One: Devourer/Uncreator/The'Galin
  • You Gotta Have Blue Hair:
    • Purple seems to be a popular color for NPC hair. Aelthai has a bright shock of purple hair, Lady Tomo has purple hair, and Valencia has dark purple hair, although that might represent brown or black given the Animesque art style.
    • The hair of archmages like Warlic, Beleqwaya, and Kalanyr are white.
    • Maxwell's daughter Emma has hair that randomly changes color.
    • The player character can customize his or her hair color to be rather exotic.
  • Yellow Snow: The Yellow Snow DOOM! spell from Frostval 2007 weaponizes yellow snow against enemies.
  • You Mean Xmas: Quite a few real-world holidays have AQ equivalents, such as Frostval (Christmas), Hero's Heart Day, (Valentine's Day), the Grenwog Festival (Easter), and Mogloween (Halloween).
  • Your Mind Makes It Real: Riona taught the legacy of Talados to her son, Danail, which included knowledge of the creature known as Carnax. Danail turns out to have some mysterious magic that allows his horror in Carnax to make it real again.