Spider People

A centaur-esque creature that has the upper body of a human and the lower body of a spider, sometimes referred to as Driders or Arachne. Most of the time they are seen as females since female spiders are bigger and more dangerous than males. They're usually shown as evil beings but occasionally fall into the Cute Monster Girl category.

Not to be confused with Spider-Man or Spider-Woman. See also the Youkai Tsuchigumo and Jourogumo, which are spiders that can turn into people and often have mix-and-match shapes similar to this trope. Naturally, tend to have an Arachnid Appearance and Attire.


    open/close all folders 


  • In Greco-Roman mythology, there was a mortal weaver named Arachne. Arachne boasted of how her skills in making beautiful tapestries were better than those of Athena/Minerva, the Goddess of wisdom and crafts. Athena/Minerva grew so tired of her boasting that she turned Arachne into either a spider woman, an ordinary spider or a giant spider depending on the adaptation.
    • The myth everyone knows about is the PG-12 version. In fact, she was better than Athena/Minerva, but weaving in all the love adventures of the Gods wasn't a bright idea... especially against Athena/Minerva. In most other versions, Athena/Minerva didn't turn her into a spider solely as the punishment of the boasting, but because Arachne was Driven to Suicide after seeing her weaving being torn away by Athena/Minerva. Realizing that she probably went too far and trying to compensate with her pity, Athena/Minerva turned her into a creature so she can continue to weave, this creature being a spider. Additionally, that version states that Athena/Minerva had declared that all spiders should henceforth bear Arachne's name; hence, why we call them arachnids
  • Japanese Mythology has the yokai jorogumo (literally "whore spider") and tsuchigumo. Both are spider-spirits that can adopt a wholly or partially human form, but jorogumos tend to be seductresses who live in disguise amongst human society, whilst tsuchigumos are Giant Spider demons who command armies of lesser yokai.

     Anime and Manga  

     Comic Books  

  • Arachne appears in The Incredible Hercules as she battles (of all people) Spider-Man.
    • She also saves Herc (who himself was turned into a Spider-Person by the Spider Queen). However, as she rescues him, she suddenly finds herself very attracted to his new form, and the two of them have sex. In public. In front of the (captive) X-Men!
  • The Crimson King in the comic adaptation of The Dark Tower.
  • The original form of Ai Apaec, South American chimera god and the Dark Avengers' Dark Spider-Man, is a spider-person with snake hair.
  • The Stalk in Saga is a more terrifying blend of human and spider elements — she has four rows of eyes, no arms on her human torso, and each of her spider legs end in a human hand.
  • Anton Arcane, arch-enemy of Swamp Thing, was once a cybernetic monstrosity in his third appearance, half spider, half zombie, with one compound eye.

     Films — Animated  

  • Some examples from Pixar films:
    • Rosie from A Bug's Life actually looks like this, despite being an actual spider.
    • Also, one of the mutant toys from the first Toy Story film appears to be a baby doll's head mounted onto a spider body made from an Erector kit.
    • Mr. Waternoose from Monsters, Inc..

     Film — Live Action  

  • Not half-spider but definitely half-arachnid: The Scorpion King (at least in his appearance in The Mummy Returns).
  • The spidermonkey in Spy Kids 2 was half-spider, half-gorilla.
  • In Gremlins 2: The New Batch, the gremlin Mohawk drinks a vial of spider genetic serum in Dr. Catheter's lab and turns into a half-spider/half-gremlin monster.


     Live Action TV  

  • A non-human example: The aliens in Falling Skies have spider-like bodies, but their heads and forearms are more like the creatures from Alien.
  • The Captain Proton holodeck episode from Star Trek: Voyager featured Janeway as Aracnia, Queen of the Spider People. Presumably had we seen the spider people, this trope would have been involved.
  • There is the Queen of the Racnoss from the Doctor Who episode "The Runaway Bride", who even had a web motif going on for her spaceship. Full spider below but human upper torso and semi-human head (the actress wore a prosthesis with a big frill on it).
  • The Hercules: The Legendary Journeys episode "Web of Desire" showed a different take on the Arachne myth. She was jealous of her daughter's beauty and drowned her in the ocean. Zeus cursed her into a Spider Person form and banished her on an deserted island.
  • A trio of these creatures popped up in an episode of Big Wolf on Campus with the modus operandi of picking out and "befriending" a social reject to fatten up and eat, knowing he won't be missed since he doesn't have friends. Unfortunately for them, they happen to pick out Merton Dingle this time who has one hell of a friend at his back who is willing to beat some serious spider ass to save him.

     Tabletop Games  

  • Dungeons & Dragons got Driders, failed drow punished (or blessed, in 4th edition) by transformation at the will of Lolth the Spider Queen, who herself appears in another spider-drow hybrid form and keeps yet one more as servants in her domain.
    • Forgotten Realms has multi-armed humanoids Chitines, including female Choldriths. These were created by the drow wizards of Ched Nasad, Turned Against Their Masters, but serve the Spider Queen.
    • The 3rd edition Monster Manual 3 has the lhosk, which is half spider and half gorilla.
  • From Magic: The Gathering:
    • Tsabo Tavoc, the Phyrexian general.
    • Sheoldred of the New Phyrexians have a similar look, although the lower portion is more like a cross between a spider and a crab, with four legs. And a giant mouth across its entire front.
  • Among the possible half-human half-spider forms of the werespider Ananasi in Werewolf: The Apocalypse.
  • The Spiderines are one available race in Smallworld Underground.
  • Spider chimeras (Homo Sapiens Arachnae) in GURPS Technomancer. Their human half looks perfectly human, but they do have a venomous bite.
  • In Warhammer 40,000, the Necron character Illuminor Szeras is the robotic equivalent, sporting four spider-like legs. He takes the appearance one step further by having two small manipulator arms mounted on his chest that give him the appearance of having pedipalps as well as regular arms.

     Video Games  

  • The Spider Witch boss from Ghostbusters: The Video Game.
  • The Contessa from Sly 2: Band of Thieves. She's not really human but in a world where every character is an anthropomorphic animal she kind of stands out.
  • One variety of the Nerubians from World of Warcraft are like this, with spiderlike lower halves and humanoid upper halves. Although one type has four legs and four arms. Most of them are insectoid or arachnoid throughout.
  • The Lesbian Spider Queens from Lesbian Spider Queens Of Mars.
  • The Spider Queen, one of the bosses in Gauntlet: Dark Legacy, was drawn this way.
  • The Star Ocean games have this as a recurring enemy type. Specific enemies are named Arachmene, Black Widow, Scylla, etc.
  • Inverted for the Sharan, a race of spider people in the old Polish rpg Krysztaly Czasu - they are spiders from the waist up and look really awkward (even though their claws had enough dexterity to handle items)
  • Arachne is an enemy in the Castlevania series.
  • The Spider Daedra from Oblivion are half-woman, half-spider.
    • In Battlespire they're half-men, half-spider.
  • The Vagary from Doom 3, a demonic-spider-woman who appeared to be telepathic and telekinetic.
  • One of the bosses from the video game version of Flushed Away looks like this.
  • The Tarantula Mistresses from City of Heroes.
  • Drachnids in both EverQuest games. Upper body of a Dark Elf, lower half of a spider. Made as an experiment / wedding gift by an especially crazy sorceress toward an exceptionally powerful vampire. He didn't care for them, so he released them on Kunark where they quickly populated.
  • Spider-Human hybrids were meant to be the next step up from the first Resident Evil's Chimera monsters, which were humanoid flies. Unfortunately, the concept was created during Resident Evil 2's 1.5 phase -famously abandoned during a late build by the creators, and the creature went along with it.
  • The dark elf unit Spider Queen, in Age of Wonders 2.
  • Two appear in Dark Souls. The first is a boss fight; Quelaag is half-naked-woman, half-MAGMA-spider, so you spend quite a lot of time dodging flame bursts and lava flows. The other is her unnamed sickly albino sister. "The White Lady" is friendly enough because she's so ill she thinks you're her sister and acts as a fire keeper.
  • Bloodborne has Patches The Spider and Nightmare Apostiles, unlike the predecessors above, the only thing human is the head, the rest of the body is a spider.
  • The aptly-named Arachnos in Titan Quest have humanoid torso and spider body. Their queen Arachne is a giant boss monster. Later you can find the asiatic Arachnos, which are brightly colored and have the head of a tarantula, fangs and beady eyes included. Scorpion-people are met in Egypt, but they're not centaur-like.
  • Several Demons in the Diablo series are portrayed this way:
    • Baal in Diablo II's ''Lord of Destruction expansion has a vaguely humanoid torso atop four spider-like legs.
    • Azmodan in Diablo III whose enormous bulk is supported by 6 legs.
    • Also from Diablo III is Cydaea, who plays it straightest of the three, having a very spiderlike lower body with a Succubus' torso. Deckard Cain describes her as simultaneously beautiful and hideous to look at.
  • The Namtaru in Might and Magic: Heroes VI can choose to take the form of either a humanoid woman with six arms, or a woman's torso atop a spider's body and legs. Created to serve the goddess Asha as Angels of Death, the most powerful Namtaru have a limited ability to control the flow of time.
  • Yang Yuan's One-Winged Angel form in Swords Of Destiny is a large spider-centaur form with four legs and six eyes. It makes her less nimble, but more powerful.
  • Onimusha has at least three notable examples: Ginghamphatts in the second game (though is eventually revealed in the last boss battle that his lower body is more like a separate creature). The third game's basic mooks in the 2004 timeline are genma with four spider-like legs and a normal torso. The fourth game has non-centaurid spider people in the form of Hell Spiders (multiple-armed humanoid with spider heads who can move really fast and attach themselves to the ceiling with webs.)
  • In Brothers: A Tale of Two Sons, the brothers save a young girl from what appears to be a sacrificial ritual while on their journey. She accompanies them on their way to the mystical tree that will cure their father's illness. The girl later reveals herself to be this trope, having led the brothers into a trap. Though she is defeated, she manages to fatally wound the older brother.
  • Dragon Fable has the Chaos Weavers from the Book 1 portion of the Ravenloss Saga, who had actually been ordinary humans until a curse was placed upon them by a wish-granting artifact built and used by their leader, Vaal. The curse gets lifted at the end, though, and the effects eventually disappear by the beginning of the next half of the saga.

     Web Comics  

  • Spinnerette has a bad turn when her Lolth-worshiping nemesis "Evil Spinnerette" uses ancient relics and a first-edition Dungeons & Dragons manual to turn herself into a drider. Later she even cons Spinnerette into helping her repeat the feat with two of her minions—complete with a Gender Bender for the male that includes a Lampshade Hanging about the advantages of being female when you turn into a spider.
  • Manspider is a very squicky NSFW Rule34 webcomic built around this concept.
  • Driders in Drowtales (being based off the Forgotten Realms setting) with a few subspecies to boot: Waelinider are the original Driders created by merging drow with the bottom halves of spiders, a process that renders them sterile, while Streekaider are the result of Waeliniders going mad and losing their higher mental functions, and then Ne'kalsaider, who are "natural" Driders who were born with spider legs and are implied to be the offspring of Waeliniders who somehow managed to keep their reproductive functions after their transformation.
  • Princess Vitani, the latest antagonist of Exterminatus Now, is a demonic form of this.

     Web Original  

  • Arachnes are in The Monster Girl Encyclopedia.
    • As are Jourugumo and Girtabilu (altough the latter are half-scorpion).
  • N'ktane from Tasakeru
  • The dridders from Felarya are a larger than usual (as in, really frickin' HUGE) example of this. (Will they eat you? Of course they'll eat you, this is Felarya.)
  • In the online flash game, Lesbian Spider Queens Of Mars, by [adult swim], your Villain Protagonist is an evil lesbian drider who reigns over a vast harem of female Martian slaves who have revolted against her. The title refers to the lesbian spider queen in plural because the endgame reveals the revolution was started by another lesbian drider, who used to be the player-character's girlfriend and is mad at her for being dumped.

     Western Animation  

  • Velma Green, the Spider Queen. The title character of The Grim Adventures of Billy & Mandy episode "The Wrath of the Spider Queen", pictured above.
  • Veronica from American Dragon: Jake Long.
  • Tarantulus and Blackarachnia from Transformers are basically roboticized versions of these.
  • Nephilia from the 1981 Spider-Man animated series, and Arachnoid from Spider-Man and His Amazing Friends.
  • Baxter Stockman in one later episode of Teenage Mutant Ninja Turtles (2003), due to him losing his human body from the neck down.
  • Variation: One of the villains from The Secret Saturdays has a scorpion lower torso.
    • A robotic scorpion lower torso.
  • Darth Maul in the Season 4 finale of Star Wars: The Clone Wars, similar to the Secret Saturdays example above. He does lose all but two robotic legs thanks to Mother Talzin's magic, however.
    • Admiral Trench from earlier (and later) in the series is an inverse of the usual examples of this trope. Instead of being centaur-like, he's a humanoid arachnid with six arms and two legs.
  • One episode of the short-lived The Mummy: The Animated Series had powerful undead Imhotep temporarily merge himself with an ancient Giant Spider named Nihansan, giving him typical spider powers.
  • Dr. Stanley Kirby from Mighty Max ends up like this as the Arachnoid.
  • Grunkle Stan had a bad run-in with one named Darlene in a recent episode of Gravity Falls.

Alternative Title(s):