Video Game / Bloodborne

http://static.tvtropes.org/pmwiki/pub/images/9ca5568b0d0df4934985a028a7c76fc6.png
Hunt Your Nightmares.note 

"And so the nightly hunt begins..."

Bloodborne is a 2015 Dark Fantasy / Gothic Horror Action RPG developed by FromSoftware with support from SCE Japan Studio. It is directed by Hidetaka Miyazaki, of Demon's Souls and Dark Souls fame.

Hidden amongst the furthest reaches of the treacherous eastern mountains, the city of Yharnam lies in seclusion. Forgotten. Cursed. An affliction has plagued the city for countless ages, an endemic nightmare known only as the Scourge of the Beast. Those afflicted lose all sense of reason, transforming into deranged mutants and beasts. Night after night, "hunters" arise to cleanse the streets of these horrors.

You are an outsider to the city, seeking a cure for a mysterious disease. However, after a blood transfusion at a local clinic, you pass out and awake to a nightmare of blood, plague and death. Your only hope of escape is to serve as a hunter yourself, and descend into the depths of the ancient city to hunt the beasts and madmen that lie within.

In contrast to the Souls games' defensive gameplay elements, Bloodborne encourages the player to use a risky but rewarding offensive playstyle. Countering, for instance, now requires you to shoot your opponents as they wind up for an attack. The game has two equippable shields with limited functionality. Enemy mobs grow in waves and encourage players to go on the offensive, before they're overwhelmed. The game also features a rally system based on attacking enemies: if you take damage, you have a small window of time to attack enemies and earn back the health that you lost.

An Expansion Pack, The Old Hunters, was released digitally on November 24, 2015, with retail bundles released in Europe on November 25 and in Japan on December 3. The expansion is set in a unique nightmare world, The Hunter's Nightmare: a mirror of Yharnam where the blood-drunk legendary hunters of the city's past, such as Ludwig, are forever trapped and engaged in an endless hunt. The DLC also adds new weapons like The Whirligig Saw, Simon's Bowblade, The Loch Shield, The Blacksky Eye Hunter Tool, Special Runes to boost the usefulness of both old and new weapons, and new enemies and bosses.


Bloodborne contains examples of:

    open/close all folders 

    A-C 
  • Abandoned Hospital: Iosefka's Clinic and the Research Hall.
  • Abnormal Ammo: Regular bullets are useless against the beasts, so hunters have to use specially made ones. "Specially made" meaning the absurd combination of blood and quicksilver/mercury.
  • Absurdly High Level Cap: The level cap is 543, much lower than Demon's Souls (SL 712), Dark Souls (SL 709-713), and Dark Souls II (SL 838). As for what level the game is finished at, the guide recommends you be between levels 70-80 for the final story bosses, with the hardest Chalice Dungeons requiring being level 140+ and be playing in online co-op due to how hard they are supposed to be. The PvP Meta level hovers anywhere from 75 to 120.
  • Academy of Evil: The Byrgenwerth College, which gave rise to the Healing Church of Yharnam, and the School of Mensis, which is a heretical offshoot.
  • Adam Smith Hates Your Guts: Consumable items like Blood Vials, Quicksilver Bullets, and Molotov Cocktails become more expensive the farther into the game you get. Luckily, the farther you get into the game, the more Blood Echoes you get from defeated enemies.
    • Thankfully, many enemies drop blood vials themselves, plenty of whom do so at a nearly if not 100% rate. A little back and forth and you can farm yourself to a stack of 20. Enemies with firearms are also guaranteed to drop Quicksilver Bullets at about the same rate.
  • Alien Blood:
    • The corpse mutants in the Yharnam aqueduct are filled with green bile instead of blood.
    • More to the point, Kin enemies bleed a deep grey, and perhaps most alarmingly, the Plain Doll bleeds pure white.
  • All Just a Dream: It's repeatedly implied that the events of the game are occurring in a dream-world created by the Great Ones, and numerous lore bits indicate that what you are experiencing may not be completely real. Some of the item descriptions and two of the endings, however, indicate that the nightmare is very real.
    • You are told at the beginning, "Whatever happens, you may think it all a bad dream" before getting your infusion.
    • When killed, Micolash exclaims that he doesn't want to wake up and forget everything he's learned.
    • The description for the Lead Elixir, which states that the recipe for it is unknown to anyone, but some postulate it only materializes in the most desperate nightmares.
    • The "Yharnam Sunrise" ending has you die in the dream and awake back in Yharnam as the sun rises, just like the other hunters who "no longer dream".
    • This game draws heavily from H.P. Lovecraft, who proposed a number of times in his works that dreams and nightmares were absolutely real. They just take place in alternate dimensions.
  • All There in the Manual: All three ending cutscenes are rather esoteric. Their PSN trophy descriptions clear things up a bit, however.
  • Aluminium Christmas Trees: For the record, Siderite is an actual metal alloy that originates from meteorites. The lore's not wrong when it means 'fall from the heavens'.
  • And Then John Was a Zombie: Due to the nature of the plagues in Yharnam, this can happen to pretty much anyone. It's noted that most of those who are hunting the beasts are infected with the virus themselves. Most of the angry Afflicted Villagers are torch-and-pitchfork mobs who treat you as the monster despite already being pretty monstrous themselves.
    • It is also a special case of Ironic Death, as most Hunters and members of the Healing Church who fight the beasts will usually turn into the most dangerous beasts themselves once they give in to their urges (see Father Gascoigne and the Cleric Beast).
    • The second ending, Honoring Wishes, has the player kill Gehrman, only to be absorbed by the Moon Presence and turned into the next Watcher of the Hunter's Dream.
    • The third ending, Childhood's Beginning, in which the player kills the Moon Presence and replaces it as a new Great One, to guide humanity into its future.
  • Animalistic Abomination:
    • Pretty much all beasts are this by definition, particularly since they are created from the blood of actual Eldritch Abominations within humans. The Blood-starved Beasts, Silverbeasts, and Paarl especially stand out because of how absolutely mangled, deformed, and/or otherworldy they are.
    • The Nightmare is home to giant snakes that can be directly summoned into this world by the Shadows of Yharnam or anyone carrying Madaras' Whistle. They're also presumably responsible for the snake balls in the Forbidden Forest.
  • Animal Motifs: All of the more bestial enemies you fight in the game loosely resemble some kind of actual animals, with werewolves being the standard end result of the Church's old blood. Cainhurst's blood, for contrast, produces more vampire-like beasts (ranging from the Nosferatu-style bloodsuckers in the grounds, to the Renfield-esque floor scrubbers, to the swordbearers which resemble Dracula at his most noble), while Byrgenwerth's insight experiments produce multi-eyed, insectile creatures or blobby lumps resembling brains.
  • Another Dimension:
    • The Nightmare of Mensis and Nightmare Frontier areas exist in separate dream realms.
    • It's implied that most of the game takes place within a dream realm created by the Great Ones. How much of it is a dream and how much is reality being sucked into an Eldritch Location is up to interpretation.
    • The Old Hunters DLC reveals the Hunter's Nightmare, Yharnam's mirror world where the titular Old Hunters are trapped.
  • Anti-Frustration Features:
    • Picking up more items after you've reached the inventory limit sends those items to your storage chest in the Hunter's Dream.
    • If you have blood vials and quicksilver bullets in your storage, after dying (or transporting to the Hunter's Dream), you replenish your on-hand supply of your vials and bullets back in your inventory, just as long as you have such items in your storage.
    • If you just lost a huge chunk of health, blood vials will restore more of your life bar.
    • All of your equipment now scales to your stats. Attire/armor has a percentage based defense instead of a flat static rating, while attack items like Throwing Knives and Molotov Cocktails now have stat scaling to make them viable throughout the game.
    • The 1.07 patch added a new Additional Rite for Chalice Dungeons called "Shared Fixed Dungeon". Said rite has no material requirements and locks the Dungeon to a single fixed glyph code for easier co-op and invasions.
    • Before the first boss of the DLC is a desiccated skeleton banging its head against a gate, this skeleton always drops five blood vials and respawns. Add that there's only one enemy between the lantern and him (a hag who's easily killable) and it makes it likely that you'll only ever have a net gain of vials.
    • Blood Stone Chunks and Blood Rocks were added to the Insight Messenger Bath inventory with the 1.09 patch, making relatively easier to earn materials for weapon upgrades.
  • Anti-Villain: The Great Ones aren't really evil. In fact, the game describes them as "sympathetic in spirit." However, their attempts to uplift humanity and spawn a new Great One have all gone terribly wrong, resulting in the events of the game.
    • Gehrman qualifies as well, as he just wants to be released from the dream after years of being trapped in it.
  • Arc Symbol: Really? However, as the story progresses, the themes of dreams/nightmares, the moon, and pregnancy begin to emerge.
  • Arc Words: "Farewell, Good Hunter. May you find your worth in the waking world."
  • Arm Cannon: Cannon
  • Armor Is Useless: The game departs from the medieval settings of its spiritual predecessors in favor of a more Victorian setting, meaning the development of firearms has rendered heavy armor mostly useless, just like in real life. Furthermore, according to the description of the only shield in the game, shields are useless against beasts, which easily overpower humans in terms of strength. Naturally, this led to the style of fighting which Gehrman codified, eschewing armor altogether in exchange for speed, as well as using versatile weapons in order to quickly dispatch beasts before one is overwhelmed. Attire is generally roughly equivalent in terms of physical defense the earliest proper chest piece gives you 110 defense, while the most expensive set only gives you 120. Instead, clothes are selected based on their resistance bonuses or their aesthetic appeal. Subverted with Cainhurst Set; it is a metallic armor set and has the highest physical resistance among all armors.
  • Ascended Meme: "FashionSouls" gets a vague reference in the Attire section of the official guide and even gets discussed with Miyazaki during the interview with Future Press. As an actual thing, "FashionSouls" got its start in Demon's Souls, where the static defenses for armor essentially became meaningless once you hit a high enough level. It continued in Dark Souls and Dark Souls II, despite the implementation of an admittedly imbalanced armor upgrade system.
  • Attack! Attack! Attack!: A surprisingly viable option, so long as you choose the exact right moment to attack. Bosses often damage you at close range, but thanks to the rally system, you'll regain your health as fast as you lose it so long as you keep wailing on the enemy. The old gameplay of "fall back and let your shield take most of the damage" is no longer possible, so retreating to heal is actually less survivable than getting right in an enemy's grill and stunlocking them.
  • Badass Cape:
    • Charred Hunter Set has one.
    • Gehrman gains one for his battle out of nowhere in between camera shots.
    • The Old Hunter Set also has one.
  • Badass Grandpa:
    • Retired Hunter Djura, an old man from a long defunct sect of hunters who will hunt you if you insist in coming into Old Yharnam. Even without his Gatling gun, he's a serious threat.
    • Gehrman, an old man in a wheelchair who was once a great hunter. If you refuse his "mercy" at the end of the game, he will show himself to still be a master hunter, becoming a Final Boss, and arguably one of the toughest bosses in the game.
    • Eileen the Crow, an old woman who still serves as a deadly hunter.
    • Henryk the Old Hunter, Father Gascoigne's former partner, counts as well as can he potentially kill Eileen if you don't help her kill him first.
  • Badass Longcoat: A number of the attires have long dusters or cloaks.
  • Bandaged Face: A notable number of the more human enemies have some type of covering over their eyes, whether it be gauze or some specially made mask. Due to all the weird stuff seen when you have high levels of Insight, they're either blocking their vision to keep from seeing too much or they have seen too much.
  • Beast with a Human Face:
    • Patches the Spider.
    • Some spider enemies in the Nightmare of Mensis (and sometimes in Chalice Dungeons).
    • Darkbeast Paarl has what appears to be a skull for a face, as the page image shows.
    • In the DLC, Ludiwig the accursed has distinctly human features on his head, and even speaks in an incongruous soft voice.
  • Bedlam House: The Research Hall, where the Healing Church experimented on human beings to gain the knowledge of the Great Ones. It's overrun by the mutated, Ax-Crazy patients and we see evidence of some pretty awful things that went on there, including patients strapped down to beds, mutated beyond all recognition, begging for you to kill them.
  • Beneath the Earth: The Chalice Dungeons are located deep underground. Ailing Loran in particular appears to be built into the sides of an enormous desert canyon.
  • BFG: You can get a literal Cannon as a sidearm! Although it's a case of Cool, but Inefficient, due to how many QS Bullets are used per shot. note 
    • The Old Hunters expansion adds two more: a portable version of Djura's Gatling Gun and a Healing Church variant of the Cannon.
  • Bitch in Sheep's Clothing: One of the NPCs from the Forbidden Woods is nice to you and asks for help to find him a safe place so he can be away from the danger. You can choose to send him to the Oedon Chapel, where the other NPCs you've rescued stay. Turns out, he's a beast himself and will start slowly killing the other NPCs if the player sends him there. Although with each death, he gives you Beast Blood Pellets.
    • Iosefka, the kindly doctor you meet at the beginning of the game, is killed and replaced by an impostor from the Choir after you defeat Father Gascoigne. She proceeds to tell you to send civilians you find on the street to her, promising to take care of them, when she is actually experimenting on them and turning them into Celestial Emissaries.
  • Bizarrchitecture: The idea of Yharnam as an actual, functional city stretches the imagination — it looks like Victorian London as designed by M.C. Escher. And that's before you get to the nightmare areas.
  • Bloodier and Gorier: You have read the game title,, right? Anyway, Bloodborne, true to its theme, is much more bloody than the Souls games. The player character and enemies alike can become covered in blood as they fight.
    • Considering how not all the stains are red and the locations the PC crawls through, there's a chance that not all of that is blood.
  • Blood-Splattered Wedding Dress: Yharnam, the Pthumerian Queen.
  • Blood Lust: Every Yharnamite shares this; from alcohol to medical use, blood is everything for them.
  • Bloody Horror: The Game. "Tainted" blood serves as The Corruption, the resulting monsters have a serious bloodlust (implicitly literally), and the player themselves spends the game injecting, eating, losing, and throwing around a lot of the red stuff.
  • Body Horror: There is not one character in this game who does not go through some horrifying transformation, madness inducing revelation, or other form of turning into a beast. Special mention goes to the lower parts of Forbidden Woods, which feature huntsmen whose heads burst into snakes as you approach them.
  • Body of Bodies: The One Reborn is a massive amalgamation of decaying corpses wrought together to form an abomination that's not even remotely human nor animal in appearance. The lower portion is made up of several human limbs (several of them twitch in a random pattern), and there's a larger skeleton acting as the "upper body", akin to a nightmarish centaur. And there's two distinct ends of the body, each acting on their own...
    • The endgame Scourge Beasts of Yahar'gul are living amalgamations made of various body parts, even having a leg for a tail.
  • Body Motifs: Eyes are a recurring element in Bloodborne. Many characters and enemies wear blindfolds, as excessive blood use causes the eyes to decay. Scholars of Byrgenwerth and the Church make cryptic references to "lining the brain with eyes," with evidence suggesting that this may be literal. Certain changes occur if the player has enough Insight, the most obvious one being several enemies having many more eyes. Even the name of the Greater Scope Villain, Oedon, which is derived from "oedipism", suggests that enucleation is a very common thing in Yharnam.
  • Bonus Boss: There are plenty of well-hidden bosses throughout the world that players might overlook. However, there's one supreme example that requires hours upon hours of work to access. If a player makes their way down to the bottom of the Pthumeru Ihyll chalice (which requires fighting through at least five other dungeons), they come face to face with Yharnam: Pthumerian Queen. She's the same woman that you see after defeating Rom and before fighting Mergo's Wet Nurse.
  • Book Ends: If you choose the third ending of the game, the second and second-to-last boss fights are both with fallen Hunters that use a giant, oversized cleaving tool and a shotgun. Both bosses have three distinct phases, they're both very vocal during their fights, and they both eulogize themselves after you put them down. Furthermore, if you fight the Moon prescence, it moves and feels very similarly to a beast, much like Father Gascoine's final moments.
    • Extends to The Old Hunters DLC. The first and last boss (if you fight it first), is a Cleric Beast. The second one is Laurence's original beast form.
  • Boring but Practical: The Saw Cleaver you can get at the very beginning is one of the best weapons in the game, easily out-damaging flashier weapons only obtainable much later on.
  • Boss Arena Recovery: Conveniently, there just happen to be Antidotes lying around the Blood Starved Beast's arena.
  • Boss Banter: Micolash, Host of the Nightmare, starts taunting you after you've killed the decoy, and adds some lines in after you kill him for good.
  • Boss in Mook Clothing: The endgame NPC hunters, due to being created the same way as the player hunter, have been revealed to have maxed out stats and weapons, with some even having blood gems slotted in their weapons and runes equipped. Add in the fact that enemies have infinite quicksilver bullets and items and, well, they can be harder than most of the bosses.
  • Bottomless Magazines: Zigzagged like crazy. Enemies with firearms have an infinite supply of bullets, but need to reload between shots unless they use the same mechanics and weapons as the player character would. On the other hand, you don't need to reload at all, but you have a limited supply of anywhere from 20 to 32 bullets on your person in addition to the ability to create 5 blood bullets whenever you want.
  • Broke Your Arm Punching Out Cthulhu: Ultimately, little the player does affects the overall situation. You've only accomplished killing a few lesser Great Ones in a city that's close to finished, anyways. Entities like Oedon aren't even inconvenienced by your actions, and depending on the ending, you either blithely leave the cycle, become its next integral part, or in the ending where you actually do Punch Out the Moon Presence, replace it with yourself, transformed into an infant Great One. While the cycle is broken, there's no telling what you, in your alien mindset, have in mind for "Humanity's Next Childhood".
  • Brown Note: Appropriately enough for a video game that is heavily inspired by Lovecraft and the Cosmic Horror Story genre, this is actually incorporated as a gameplay mechanic: frenzy. Frenzy builds extremely fast upon viewing otherworldly horrors in the game (particularly the Winter Lanterns and Brain of Mensis), and if it fills up, you'll lose close to 90% of your health. Sedatives can be used to cure frenzy.
  • Call Back: Some of the enemies and weapons reference other ones from the previous games.
  • Came Back Wrong: Highly implied to be how the Hunter's Nightmare was formed. If someone tried to make a replica of Yharnam by memory, just memory, it would look like the Nightmare.
  • Cast from Hit Points: The Chikage and Logarius' Wheel both have transformed modes that make the weapon more powerful at the cost of draining your health. Ironically, the latter is a weapon of the Church Executioners, who claim the moral high ground over the "depraved, blood sucking" Cainhurst Vilebloods, which used the former.
  • Chekhov's Boomerang: So you used the tiny music box against Father Gascoigne, but listen to the tune. When you get to Mergo's Wet Nurse, it will shock you.
  • Chekhov's Gun: The Old Hunter's Bone's description about the "technique of quickening" may seem just like another part of Bloodborne Lore, but when you refuse to leave the Hunter's Dream, Gehrman will use the technique against you.
  • City of Adventure: Most of the game is set within the ancient city of Yharnam, but the player will have the ability to journey to outlying locales.
  • Coat, Hat, Mask: Seems to be the standard for most of the attires in the game. Though the mask can vary in that it either covers the lower face, or just the eyes.
  • Companion Cube: The Doll is implied to be this if she isn't loved or appreciated. If she is, she gains sentience.
  • Cool, but Inefficient: What the Powder Kegs, and their predecessors the Oto Workshop, are known for.
    • One Powder Keg weapon is the Cannon. It's Exactly What It Says on the Tin; a portable cannon you can carry around. It's incredibly powerful, but not only does it require 30 Strength and 13 Skill to wield, it consumes 12 Quicksilver Bullets per shot. In-universe, this is generally how the Powder Kegs' weaponsnote  are perceived: powerful, but too unwieldy compared to the weapons devised by the other hunter groups. In the Cannon's case, it's too unwieldy for the Powder Kegs.
      • The Old Hunters reveals that the Healing Church did design a variant for their brawnier Hunters. Said brawny Hunters were too stupid to use them properly, leading the Church to put the Church Cannons into permanent storage.
    • Another Powder Keg Weapon is the Stake Driver. When primed, like the Cannon, it does massive damage, but requires a higher charge time when primed.
  • Cool Old Guy: Retired Hunter Djura, assuming the player can figure out how to make him non-hostile. If the player agrees to spare the beasts he protects, he will even give them his badge and a gesture.
    • Gehrman falls under this as well. At first, he's a laid back old dude who gives you useful hints and information. He's not above getting a kick out of misleading comments. When talking about the tools of the workshop, he comes up with this little gem.
    "You're welcome to use whatever you find... (whispers) Even the doll, should it please you..."
  • Corridor Cubbyhole Run: One possible feature of Chalice Dungeons; long corridors with giant boulders rolling through at regular intervals, some of which have zombies blocking the cubbyholes.
  • Corrupt Church: The Healing Church. Their solution to the Scourge of the Beast? Initiate a massive hunt against the beasts that is tantamount to a witch hunt, since most of the city's citizens are already infected themselves, and see the uninfected as the real beasts to be slaughtered. Late game item descriptions also reveal that not only is the Church well aware of the existence of the Nightmare Realm, the physical reality of the Great Ones, and the other strange happenings, they're the ones who brought the Great Ones into our reality in the first place by continuing the work of seeking the 'eldritch Truth' started by Master Willem at Byrgenwerth College. Ultimately, the Church fractured into the Choir and the School of Mensis, both different flavors of Religion of Evil. Both Mensis and the Choir directly communicate with some of these eldritch abominations — Oedon, Kos (or some say Kosm), and Ebrietas — and seek guidance from them in exchange for worship by their congregation.
    • Laurence, the founder of the Healing Church, left Byrgenwerth when they refused to use Old Blood in their ascension research. While it was true that Old Blood had great healing properties, they are more Lovecraftian Superpowers than anything else. Laurence naively thought the Church could "purify" the blood, as seen in Lost in Translation below. In his zeal to spread and refine the technique to this end, he wound up popularizing blood ministration and fostering Yharnam's obsession with blood, turning Yharnam's citizenry into lab rats.
  • Cosmetic Award: The Yharnam Stone, which you get for clearing all the Pthumeru Chalice dungeons.
  • Cosmic Horror Story: This becomes increasingly prominent as you find references to "Great Ones", and stumble upon increasing horrifying tiers of Eldritch Abomination. Then you learn that there's something going on with the Moon... and that monstrous beings are using Yharnam as a kind of nursery to turn mankind into their "surrogate children", as they can have none of their own.
  • Cosmic Horror Reveal: This far into the article, it should be clear by now that this is not actually a Gothic Horror story. In game, this reveal happens by gaining enough insight or defeating Rom, which causes the moon to turn red and several changes throughout Yharnam, such as the enemies becoming more eldritch, the non-hostile NPCs behaving strangely, and the giant Cthulhu-headed spiders on the sides of the buildings.
  • Creepy Cathedral: Cathedral Ward.
  • Creepy Good: Many of the characters that help you are kind of creepy in their own right, including Eileen the Crow, the Oedon Chapel keeper, the Messengers, and even the Doll herself.

    D-I 
  • Damn You, Muscle Memory: The health replenishing blood vials have their own dedicated button. Unfortunately, it's the same button from the Souls games that let the player switch weapon stances (the Triangle button). The new button that changes your weapon stance/form is the L1 button.
  • Darker and Edgier: Compared to the other Souls games alongside Bloodier and Gorier, this game takes the whole Cosmic Horror Story element and ramps it Up to Eleven.
  • Dark Is Not Evil: There's evidence to suggest that this may very well be the case for many of the Great Ones, with the Moon Caryll Rune even describing them as "sympathetic in spirit." Some, like the Brain of Mensis, are shown to be Non-Malicious Monsters, while others, like the Moon Presence and Ebrietas, do seem to want to help humanity in their own way. However, problems arise when humans decide to abuse the knowledge and power of the Great Ones for their own ends.
  • Dark World: The Hunter's Nightmare in The Old Hunters is a twisted version of Yharnam, featuring the same buildings and streets within the same kind of eldritch landscape found in the Nightmare Frontier.
  • Dead All Along:
    • Once you know the password needed to enter the Forbidden Woods, you'll see that the gatekeeper who asked you for it is not only dead, but in a mummified state. How he was able to speak to you earlier is never explained, but it's possible he gained enough insight to survive the death of his body.
    • Micolash, one of the bosses of the Nightmare of Mensis, is found in Yahar'Gul as a mummified corpse and is oblivious to the death of his physical body.
    • In The Old Hunters, it's revealed that Kos herself has passed away long before the Hunter arrived at the Hunter's Nightmare. The only thing left is her Orphan, the Final Boss.
  • Death-or-Glory Attack: The game is more focused on dealing more damage than the opponent while risking your own health to defeat him. Basically, act like Guts.
  • Degraded Boss:
    • The Shadow of Yharnam bosses appear as regular enemies in the Nightmare of Mensis.
    • The Keeper of the Old Lords chalice dungeon boss becomes a regular enemy in harder chalice dungeons.
    • The Blood-Starved Beast reappears as a mook in Hunter's Nightmare. It's also in a small pitch-black cave, so it's nigh-impossible to see without a torch (which fills up your ranged weapon slot). It doesn't Turn Red this time, though, making it slightly easier.
  • Dem Bones: One boss, Darkbeast Paarl, is a giant electrified werewolf skeleton covered in a few remaining clumps of fur.
    • The Skeleton Puppets are disjointed skeletons that are suspended and moved about with magic in a manner resembling their names.
  • Did We Just Have Tea with Cthulhu?: If you use the "Make Contact" gesture in front of the Mensis Brain after dropping it into a pit, after about a minute of holding the gesture, it will give you a rune!
  • Did You Just Punch Out Cthulhu?: One ending has you defeating the Moon Presence, the monstrous perpetrator of the hunting cycle and the True Final Boss.
    • With the kind of enemies that show up in this game after a while, this trope is all over the place. One starts getting the feeling that if the Hunter was allowed to roam the actual Lovecraft-verse, the books would be a lot less bleak.
  • Difficulty Spike: Even for a Souls game, once you kill Rom, Yharnam and Yahar'Gul get a lot more dangerous with the addition of Bell Maidens buffing and reviving enemies, and new enemies in Yahar'Gul.
  • Disability Superpower: While Gehrman lost half of his right leg, he is able to Flash Step, which is far more effective than dodging/side-stepping.
  • Disc One Nuke:
    • The Saw Cleaver and Hunter Axe from are two of the three starter weapons, yet they are proven to be as deadly as late game weapons you can obtain since they both primarily scale with Strength. By the time you maximised the upgrade, attached Cursed Tempering Blood Gems and applied Fire/Bolt paper onto it, you wouldn't even need the rest of the weapons and stats.
    • After the release of The Old Hunters, Simon's Bowblade for Bloodtinge builds. While the weapon is accessibleright after killing Vicar Amelia, it requires navigating an area full of creatures and traps that will probably one-shot you in seconds, and actually getting the weapon requires killing a particularly strong NPC. Doing so however (Whether by skill or using the doors to the first lantern to cheese the fight), nets you the only long range weapon that does damage comparable to your regular ones, which can be charged for even more damage. In addition, many bosses heads can be targeted in order to stun them for more damage and a Visceral attack, but they're usually out of reach 9 times out of 10. With the Bowblade, not only can you deal damage while staying entirely out of reach of some of the toughest bosses in game, but these weakspots can be shot at at will. And if you're fighting humanoid bosses with allies, the regular and charge attack of the bow can stagger them for backstabs that your team mates can utilize. Upgrading it reasonably enough with blood stones and pouring damage into bloodtinge will cause it to easily carry you through to the endgame.
  • Does Not Like Guns: Some of the weapons revealed in The Old Hunters specifically mention early hunters who hated firearms, such as Simon after which Simon's Bowblade is named for.
  • Does This Remind You of Anything?:
    • The Foreign Set is oddly similar to some of Nikola Tesla's clothing.
    • The game itself feels like a Victorian Era Berserk game. With all the blood and monsters along with a BFS that's incredibly popular to players because of its good scaling.
  • Door to Before: EVERYWHERE. The level design uses fewer checkpoints and many more shortcuts back to earlier areas than previous Souls games. It's often possible to have a shortcut leading straight to the boss of an area right next to the save point for the beginning of that area.
  • Dream Within a Dream: If the events of the game are All Just a Dream, then the Hunter's Dream and the Nightmare Frontier/Nightmare of Mensis are a Dream Within a Dream.
  • Drop the Hammer:
    • The Kirkhammer definitely qualifies since it has a head the size of the player character's torso, and it features a detachable hilt with a longsword in it.
    • The new Boom Hammer acts as one with a miniature furnace built in allowing for flaming explosions.
  • Duel Boss: Father Gascoigne, who is a Hunter himself and even uses the Hunter Axe and the Blunderbuss, both of which are potentially your starting weapons.
    • Gehrman, The First Hunter, is also one, though the player can choose not to fight him.
  • Dual Boss: The Witch of Hemwick is this, though the second Witch doesn't appear until the first is at around half health. They each spawn nightmarish creatures that do most of the fighting for them. They also cloak themselves and teleport around whenever they aren't summoning mooks.
  • Earn Your Bad Ending/Earn Your Happy Ending: Played with, as usual for a FromSoftware game. One possible ending only requires you to select a single dialogue option, and results in you leaving the Dream, either having ensured at least a temporary end to the Hunt or simply abandoning Yharnam to fend for itself. Fighting an additional Final Boss earns you either eternal servitude or the opportunity to ensure the safety of future hunters, and locating three secret items and fighting the True Final Boss gets you transformation into a Great One, which may be the best or worst possible outcome for the future of mankind. As per the norm, it's all down to personal interpretation.
  • Eldritch Abomination: There are a number of cryptic references to eldritch entities called Great Ones, several of which can be fought as bosses. Consuming three One Third of Umbilical Cords will allow you to fight the Moon Presence, the creature responsible for controlling the nightly hunts.
  • Eldritch Location: The Nightmare Frontier, and other Nightmares traversed throughout the game.
    • The Lecture Building has somehow been made adrift in the Nightmare, presumably as a result of eldritch experimentation.
  • Every Proper Lady Should Curtsy: One of the gestures, which you get after rescuing Arianna.
  • Evil Is Visceral: The School of Mensis has the most gruesome motifs, and being as its modus operandi is kidnapping people as fodder for their rituals, it's by far the most malevolent faction in the game. Its headquarters in the Hidden Village of Yahar'Gul is home to Body of Bodies creatures, most notably The One Reborn, and the walls of Mergo's Loft are lined with eyes and guarded by a giant, rotten disembodied brain that's also lined with eyes.
  • Evil vs. Evil: While they were once united, the Byrgenworth College and the Healing Church went their separate ways long before the start of the game. The upper echelons of the Healing Church itself, the School of Mensis and the Choir, have also split by the time of the game and each pursue their own, different means of ascension. They don't like each other much. When you travel to the Unseen Village post Blood Moon, you'll find the ground littered with the corpses of Church soldiers, suggesting that the Choir tried to stop Mensis' ritual.
  • Extranormal Institute: Byrgenwerth College, where the nightmare began.
  • Expansion Pack: The Old Hunters, which was originally supposed to be two separate DLC packs.
  • Eyes Do Not Belong There: The description of the Eye Caryll Rune, Great One's Wisdom, One Third of Umbilical Cord, and the rantings of Micolash and Iosefka imply that gaining Insight causes eyes to grow on a person's brain. Whether this is literal or metaphorical is never clarified, though that the more Insight you have, the more the Hunter can see through the illusion that the Great Ones have cast on the world.
    • Certain enemies also have many, many eyes, either by default or they start appearing once you gain enough Insight.
    • The massive building in the Nightmare of Mensis has eyes coming out of the floor, the walls, the ceiling. There's even eyeball spiders that are pinned to the floor/wall/whatever.
  • Eye Scream: Many of the Healing Church-associated characters wear bandages over their eyes, with indications that they've possibly enucleated themselves or outright carved their eyes out to attain inner sight. The enucleation angle is supported by the spinning eyeball of a Huntsman in the cinematic trailer,note  while the outright removal of eyes is supported by the inhabitants of Henwick, the Eye Collector enemies, as well as the jars of eyeballs found scattered in certain levels.
    • The item needed to enter the Hunter's Nightmare is the "Eye of a Blood-drunk Hunter", which has a collapsed pupil.
    • The Orphan of Kos wields what appears to be a CLUB made of them.
  • Face Full of Alien Wing-Wong: Everything that's happened in Yharnam was due to the Great Ones' attempts to create more of their kind using humans. You fight two of these victims; Rom, The Vacuous Spider, and Mergo's Wet Nurse. The Celestial Children and the fetuses that comprise the Red Jelly chalice item are also the product of Great Ones mating with humans, a practice that evidently dates back to the Pthumerians.
    • Both the Childhood's Beginning and Honoring Wishes endings make this happen to you, but just what happens to you changes.
  • Final Boss: The main game has three of them; Mergo's Wet Nurse is the last plot-mandated boss if you choose "Submit Your Life" afterwards in Hunter's Dream, but choosing the "Refuse" option results in Gehrman acting as the last boss. If you consumed at least three of the 1/3 of Umbilical Cord items before choosing Refuse and defeating Gehrman, you will then face the True Final Boss, The Moon Presence.
  • Filk Song: "Paleblood Moon", courtesy of Miracle of Sound.
  • Find the Cure: People journey to Yharnam in search of a medical remedy that once made the city famous: a Panacea said to cure any illness. The protagonist is one of those foreigners, seeking a cure for their own disease. Unfortunately, it seems Yharnam itself is in dire need of a few panaceas already, as most of the folk have been mutated into beasts by the plague.
  • Fire-Breathing Weapon: One of the firearms is the Flamesprayer, a compact one-handed flamethrower.
  • Flash Step: Using the "Old Hunter Bone" Hunter's Tool boosts your rolling and quickstep speed significantly, changing the animation to make it look like you're teleporting. The description of said Tool also mentions a technique used by the first hunters called the Art of Quickening, which Gehrman uses during the boss fight against him.
  • Foreshadowing: In The Old Hunters, upon finding the Whirligig Saw, a strange, pale mollusk-like creature will suddenly fall from the sky. Looking down into the sea from the Fishing Hamlet reveals that the Hamlet is actually above The Hunters Nightmare, trapped behind a barrier. This reveal itself is also foreshadowed in some of the rune descriptions, specifically those that ask the user to look above their heads, up to the cosmos.
  • For Doom the Bell Tolls: Mysterious witches called Bell-Ringing Women appear throughout the Unseen Village (they also appear if you're ringing a bell for assistance from another player, or sometimes in Chalice Dungeons, but the Unseen Village is their main playground). The bell-ringing summons up and strengthens enemies, and for the final area of the Unseen Village, they combine their powers to summon up The One Reborn.
  • Gainax Ending: All three endings have varying degrees of Mind Screw, depending on how much of the lore you've gleaned.
    • Yharnam Sunrise: How was Gehrman able to release you from the nightmare by killing you? Was it all just a dream?
    • Honoring Wishes: What the hell came down from the moon? Why has it turned you into the next watcher of the hunters? What is the hunter's dream, really?
    • Childhood's Beginning: Why did the Moon Presence make a pact with humans to hunt the other Great Ones? Are you the next of the Great Ones? Is this the eventual fate of all of humanity? What will happen to the Eldritch realm now?
  • Game-Breaking Bug: It wouldn't be a From game without them.
    • Before the 1.02 hotfix patch, using either the Small Resonating Bell (co-op) or Sinister Resonating Bell (invasion) while in the Forbidden Woods would make the Lunarium Key not spawn in the Byrgenwerth College, locking you out of the boss fight against Rom.
    • Some of the elevators can glitch out and become unusable, most notably the elevator in the Altar of Despair. The elevator will stay at the bottom of the shaft and the return lever up top will either be non-operational or you can use it but the elevator won't move. Most elevators are shortcuts, meaning that if they break, it's highly annoying, but not impassible; the Altar of Despair's, however, is the only way to reach its boss, so when it breaks, you can never fight that boss again on your own. They finally fixed it in the 1.03 patch.
  • Gatling Good: Not if you're on the receiving end of the barrels. As soon as you step foot in Old Yharnam, Hunter Djura will call out to you to stay back or he will be forced to stop you. Should you ignore his warnings (after all, what could that old guy possibly throw at you?), he'll promptly start to mow you down with hot lead from atop the old clock tower, and in stark contrast to the rest of the game's firearms, his machine gun will kill and/or stunlock you fast, turning the rest of the area into a running-from-cover-to-cover hunt. The entire encounter can be resolved peacefully should you approach the area through another level's shortcut later in the game and walk up to Djura unseen.
    • The Old Hunters DLC adds a portable, if rather heavy, version of the Gatling gun similar to the one Djura was seen using.
  • Gendered Outfit: Mostly averted (both male and female characters can run around in a frilly dress), except for the Black and White Church sets (coats for males, robes for females), the Knight's set (vest and coat for males, dress-like vest and skirt for females), and the Yharnam Hunter set (Badass Longcoat with an open front for males, closed trenchcoat/apron-like garment with a upper-body cape for females).
  • Genre Shift: A story example. The game starts out as a Gothic Horror story, but about halfway through it shifts to a Cosmic Horror Story.
  • "Get Back Here!" Boss: Micolash. Justified, since he isn't armed or mutated like most of the other bosses you fight, not to mention he really doesn't want to leave the nightmare, and its knowledge, behind. He only attacks you directly (with Arcane attacks) at the end of the fight, and will spend a good chunk of it making you chase him down hallways.
  • Giant Spider:
    • The Amygdala, a 30-foot tall spider beast with a squid head and 20 eyes was seen hanging off the side of a building in the distance during the Alpha build, and is fought on foot.
    • Rom, the Vacuous Spider, is a bloated insect closer to a queen larva coated in mist and fires icicles at you, though she is accompanied by several human-sized spiders.
  • A Glitch in the Matrix: The Abandoned Workshop is the spitting image of the Hunter's Dream, just with fewer gravestones. You can even find a chest with the Doll's clothes in it, and the lifeless Doll herself inside.
  • Go Mad from the Revelation: Insight represents the player's otherworldly, eldritch knowledge. It's gained by seeing and slaying bosses, collecting the skulls of those who had said knowledge, or from seeing certain locations. Having too much of it causes strange effects and makes certain enemies stronger. Related to this is the Frenzy effect, which builds up as your character witnesses things that are so horrifying and unknowable, that it makes their heads burst from madness. The more Insight you have, the weaker your Frenzy resistance.
  • Guide Dang It: It is a Souls Spiritual Successor, after all.
    • Getting all the hunter badges is no easy feat, but each badge unlocks more items for the player to use.
      • The Saw Hunter Badge is found in Central Yharnam.
      • The Sword Hunter Badge is received by killing the Cleric Beast.
      • The Powder Keg Hunter Badge is in Old Yharnam on Retired Hunter Djura.
      • The Crow Hunter Badge is received by finishing Eileen's questline or killing her.
      • The Radiant Sword Hunter Badge is found in the Healing Church Workshop.
      • The Spark Hunter Badge is received by killing Darkbeast Paarl.
      • The Cainhurst Badge is received by joining the Cainhurst Vilebloods Covenent.
      • The Wheel Hunter Badge is received by finishing Alfred's questline or killing him.
      • The Cosmic Eye Watcher Badge is found on the Upper Cathedral Ward.
      • The Old Hunter Badge is received by killing Gehrman.
    • Certain weapons have hidden damage bonuses:
      • Serrated weapons, all of which have a flat 20% damage bonus against beast enemies. The weapons in question being the normal mode of the Saw Cleaver, both modes of the Saw Spear, and the transformed mode of the Threaded Cane.
      • Righteous weapons, which have a varying damage bonus against unrighteous enemies. The normal mode of the Threaded Cane has a 20% bonus, both forms of Logarius' Wheel have a 30% bonus, and the normal mode of the Kirkhammer and both forms of Ludwig's Holy Blade have a 50% bonus.
    • The Graveguard set is found by jumping the cliff with the Celestial Children underneath on the other side within the Forbidden Woods.
  • Guns Are Worthless: Zigzagged. The firearms found in the game are on par with Victorian Era firearms technology, ammunition is limited, and they are deliberately weaker than melee weapons, being used to make riposte openings. Miyazaki wanted to make sure the players wouldn't just use guns the entire game. However, while they lack the damage of melee weapons, they have enough stopping power to make even bosses stagger. However again, there are the odd firearms that actually do deal a good chunk of damage, and anything used by enemies will be painful, since they either focus on firearms or don't plan out ripostes and compensate by doing far more damage than yours do.
    • To be specific, shotguns like the Hunter Blunderbuss, Rifle Spear, and Ludwig's Rifle have low individual bullet damage, but their wide spread makes up for it. Pistols, on the other hand, like the Hunter Pistol, Repeater Pistol, the Reiterpallasch, and the Evelyn, trade this spread for damage and a quicker draw. The stranger ones like the Flamesprayer and the Rosmarinus have a DPS kind of damage and require a steady stream of bullets. The Cannon, while powerful, consumes the most amount of bullets out of the entire arsenal in a single shot, hunter tools and all.
  • Handicapped Badass: Some of the NPC Hunters like Father Gascoigne and Retired Hunter Djura bandage or possibly remove their eyes, likely due to gathering too much Insight for them to handle.
    • Gehrman may have lost a foot, but he can still kick your ass if you refuse to leave the Hunter's Dream.
  • Haunted Castle: Cainhurst Castle.
  • Healing Potion: The use for blood vials.
  • Hell Is That Noise:
    • The Cleric Beast's screaming cry. Can overlap with Most Annoying Sound since he shrieks constantly during his boss fight.
    • The Carrion Crow's demonic cawing. So fucking loud!
    • All the ambient sounds: odd mutterings, random growling, the random crying baby.
    • Vicar Amelia's agonized screaming is sure to linger with you once the fight is done.
    • The Orphan of Kos is almost weeping throughout its boss fight, making it even more disturbing than it already is.
  • Heroes Prefer Swords: All Healing Church Trick Weapons have a Silver Longsword that also works as a handle for the Kirkhammer and Ludwig's Holy Blade.
  • High-Class Glass: True to the Victorian setting, it's possible to give your character a monocle during creation.
  • History Repeats: Yharnam was not the first and will probably not be the last to suffer the Scourge of Beasts and inevitable tampering with the Great Ones. Before it came Loran, now buried by sand storms and overrun by beasts and before them came ancient Pthumeru.
  • Hufflepuff House: The Vilebloods. They're an old enemy to the Healing Church and have similar goals as to what it and its branches in the Choir and School of Mensis are trying to accomplish. However, they've been effectively wiped out by the time the game begins and exploring their home in Cainhurst Castle is completely optional.
  • Humans Are Cthulhu: The Doll claims that the Messengers help the player because they love and worship hunters. Given the idea of Gods in the game, the trope stays in-context.
  • The Hunter Becomes the Hunted: The Hunter of Hunters covenant consists of hunters who hunt down hunters intoxicated by their bloodlust.
  • I Choose to Stay: In the Honoring Wishes and Childhood's Beginning endings, the Hunter refuses to leave the Hunter's Dream, either to pledge themselves to the Moon Presence or attempt to slay it.
  • Iconic Outfit: The workshop version of the Hunter's Set. While most of the promotional footage uses the version without the cloak, the very first CGI trailer released for the game used the version with it.
  • Immortal Procreation Clause: The Great Ones are unable to have children and thus yearn for surrogates among humanity.
  • Improbable Weapon User: Logarius' Wheel, the weapon of choice for the martyr Executioners.
  • In Medias Res: The game doesn't tell you how you came to be in Yharnam or why. The opening is just a creepy doctor mentioning something about "paleblood" and that you need an infusion of Yharnam blood to begin exploring the city's mysteries.
  • Invisible to Normals: With high enough Insight or the blood of a Great One like Rom, you'll be able to see the giant Amygdalas clinging to the Cathedral Ward's spires.

    J-P 
  • Jump Scare: In the Old Hunters DLC, on your way to grab the Whirligig Saw, a snail woman from a later DLC level smashes out of the sky right in front of you and spills out of her shell, dead. It can scare the crap out of you and since it'll probably be the first time you see the snail women, can really unnerve you.
  • Jigsaw Puzzle Plot: In grand Souls tradition. While the overarching plot is relatively easy to identify, many of its specifics are deliberately left vague, and various plot elements remain open to interpretation. Anybody who claims to have a full understanding of what's going on in the game is missing the point entirely.
  • Karmic Transformation: According to the Sword Hunter Badge, the clerics of the Healing Church, the Corrupt Church responsible for both the outbreak of the Scourge of Beasts and a heavy-handed way of dealing with them, tended to turn into the most hideous beasts of all.
  • Kill It with Fire: Beasts are particularly vulnerable against fire.
  • The Last of These Is Not Like the Others: Boss fight victories usually end with the message "PREY SLAUGHTERED" flashing in green. Killing Mergo's Wet Nurse and the Moon Presence nets you a red "NIGHTMARE SLAIN" instead.
  • Last-Second Ending Choice: Choosing to consume three pieces of Umbilical Cord will cut off the chance for one ending, and then another choice lies in accepting or refusing Gehrman's request.
  • Lean and Mean: The beast plague elongates the limbs of those afflicted while remaining the same width, causing nearly all the beast-type enemies in the game to appear extremely thin and emaciated.
  • Lethal Joke Weapon:
    • The wooden shield, which, despite being a shield, barely blocks any damage and requires you to give up your gun for it. ...but it does block gunfire quite well, making it situationally useful in areas with a lot of gun-toting enemies. The Loch shield, on the other hand, doesn't block physical attacks very well, but it DOES block spell, meaning it's incredibly useful against arcane builds focused on spellcasting and some of the worst Demonic Spiders in game.
    • The Pebble, while it doesn't do any huge damage, since there's no such thing as poise, you can lob a pebble and knock the others into Bottomless Pit if you timed it well. And if you think it cannot kill? Wrong. You can deliver a One-Hit Kill to Yamamura and Brador with pebbles. Cherry Tapping to the finest.
    • The Kos Parasite. Equipping it, you may note, does nothing but make you swing your arm around like an idiot. Equipping it while transformed into a Lumenwood, however, gives you the weapon's true power, turning it into a massively long-reaching arcane whip with some fantastic stats. This is, of course, having to contend with the Lumen's... erm.. uneasy movement abilities, so only very skilled players will be able to use it effectively.
  • Linear Warriors, Quadratic Wizards: While raising strength, skill, or bloodtinge will raise damage for the weapons based on those respective stats, raising Arcane increases the item drop rate for all enemies, increases elemental damage (and some blood gems change weapon damage type to exclusively be elemental), and grants access to magic items that grant the ability to teleport, launch attack tentacles, hurl angry skulls at enemies, or even summon a miniature star. An arcane build is practically a Magikarp Power, because while it starts slow, once all the items and stats needed come together, it instantly becomes positively devastating.
  • Loads and Loads of Loading: The initial release was criticized for this; while transitioning between areas was seamless, the game still had annoyingly long load times when dying or traveling to and from the Hunters' Dream. While the devs eventually found a way to shorten the load times (and also changed the loading screen to display random item descriptions to make the loading times more bearable), the fact that you have to travel to the Hunters' Dream to level up remains a bit of a hassle.
  • Lost in Imitation: In-Universe, the Reiterpallasch's design was mimicked by the Powder Kegs in the form of the Rifle Spear.
  • Lost in Translation: Quite a few things, apparently, mainly due to the original script being in Japanese, a language with a lexicon ranging from "multiple words for the same thing" to "specific concepts that are difficult-to-impossible to translate".
    • The game revolves around an extreme version of the Japanese concept of kegare—spiritual filth/corruption/uncleanliness brought about by natural things such as menstruation, spilled blood, death, and childbirth—which brings certain things and events into a whole new light.
      • The Japanese script never refers to the Vilebloods as such; they are just called the Cainhurst ketsuzoku (blood relatives or kin)—joining the Vilebloods basically means that you are joining the Cainhurst family. The term "Vileblood" comes from the fact that the Cainhurst bloodline is steeped in kegare, due to them using spiritually unclean blood in their blood ministration. This brings the modus operandi of Logarius' Executioners to a new light: they slaughtered the Cainhurst nobility not because they were a physical threat to the Healing Church, but because their blood was so spiritually unclean that it was considered a source of spiritual uncleanliness.
      • The creation of the Healing Church was Laurence's way of spiritually purifying the Old Blood so that it could be used to gain Enlightenment/Insight.
      • The reason that the "Vermin" that the League seeks to destroy look like centipedes is due to them being the most common animal associated with kegare.
    • The Japanese description of the Old Hunter's Bone doesn't specify whether it came from a man or a woman—gendered pronouns really only show up in Japanese if you're deliberately trying to point out gender—it just states that they were an apprentice to Gehrman. The English translation uses male pronouns and therefore closes itself to possible interpretations.
    • The Tomb Prospector Set can be more directly translated as Grave Robber, a more apt description of the Byrgenwerth archaeologists. Likewise, the Harrowed Set is blatantly called a Disguise Set, with the description outright saying that the Disguised ones were pretty much were sanctioned to find out the secrets of the Yharnam citizens under the pretense of beast hunting. Which explains not only their fear of the Church, but their immense hatred for Hunters.
    • Rom's Japanese title is a fairly vulgar term for "Stupid", somewhat akin to "retarded", carrying a significant greater pejorative context than the English translation "Vacuous".
    • The connotations of Laurence and Willem's talk has a different tone in the Japanese script. The English script has Willem outright accusing Laurence of betraying him, while the Japanese script has him say "You also think to betray me?", putting their talk after one of the Byrgenwerth scholars betrayed their work to the Cainhurst nobility. Also, the "fear the old blood" adage has a different tone. The English version is "We are born of the blood, made men by the blood, undone by the blood"; while the Japanese version is "We are made human (by the blood), we surpass humanity (by the blood), we lose our humanity again (by the blood)". The notion of using blood to surpass humanity is missing from the English script, and the Japanese version of the last verse is "We urge you to fear the blood as you proceed".
    • The Japanese version's words for Insight and Frenzy are Enlightenment and Insanity, making it a little more on-the-nose.
    • The "handwritten scrawl" note in Iosefka's Clinic says "Seek Paleblood to complete the hunt" in Japanese rather than "Seek Paleblood to transcend the hunt". Not only that, but the Japanese version specifically calls the note an autograph.
  • Lord British Postulate: Applied to the player, of all things! Normally it's impossible to die in the hunter's dream except at the hands of the Bonus Boss, but many players have found ways to do so anyway, such as by using Cast From Hitpoints weapons.
  • Lovecraft Lite: Ultimately, while the Great Ones exert greater control over, and have far more understanding of, the universe, humans are more than capable of comprehending and utilizing their abilities. The player will also likely end his or her game having slain a half-dozen of them — some of which in the very dreams they dominate over.
    • The Great Ones themselves aren't really even evil in the traditional sense, with the Moon Caryll Rune's description stating that, "The Great Ones that inhabit the nightmare are sympathetic in spirit, and often answer when called upon." It's a notion that is furthered by Great Ones like Ebrietas aiding The Choir in the search for the eldritch truth, and doing so with no ill will towards them, the Moon Presence creating the cycle of the hunt to give humanity a fighting chance against the beasts, and so on.
  • Lunacy: Lore notes throughout Yahar'gul state that madmen — aka the Healing Church and its followers — toil to beckon the moon, and that's not even the tip of the iceberg. When night falls and the moon comes out, most everyone in the city begins to experience Sanity Slippage. Killing Rom turns the moon crimson and dyes the sky purple with Paleblood, unleashing all sorts of freaky monstrosities and driving people even crazier than they were before. The True Final Boss is an eldritch creature called the Moon Presence.
  • Luckily, My Shield Will Protect Me: No parrying aside, the Wooden Shield can sometimes block bullets and other small projectiles, leaving you unscathed. This makes the Wooden Shield somewhat useful.
    • The Old Hunters DLC introduced The Loch Shield that is useful against arcane attacks, making two shields in total.
  • MacGuffin: The Paleblood. It's never made clear what exactly it is, just that it's supposedly the cure for whatever disease ails the Player Character, thus providing motivation for why he/she must travel through Yharnam and beyond. After killing Rom the Vacuous Spider in Byrgenwerth, it becomes clear that the true purpose of the journey was to find and kill the newborn Great Ones Mergo and the Moon Presence.
  • Macross Missile Massacre: A Call Beyond, which unleashes a barrage of shooting stars and chase after your foes like homing missiles.
  • Magic Music: The Choir Bell uses Quicksilver bullets to heal you and kills Eileen when she's wounded.
  • Make Me Wanna Shout: The Beast Roar Hunter Tool, which unleashes a sound wave powerful enough to deflect bullets and other projectiles.
  • Mars Needs Women: The core purpose of the Great Ones manipulating Yharnam and the Phtumerians is to use humanity to bear its children.
  • Meaningful Name: The Amygdala, which are named after a part in the brain of the same name that deals with emotions (in particular the flight-or-fight response, i.e. fear and aggression).
    • Chikage (千景) translates from Japanese to "Thousands Views"; however, if you separated the word into Chi Kage (血影), it means "Blood Shadow", which foreshadows its transformed mode. Likewise, Rakuyo (落葉) translates from Japanese to "Deciduous Leaf" or "Falling Leaf". The differing names may be a vague reference to the legends of the swordsmiths Masamune and Muramasa: the Chikage being a stand-in for Muramasa's bloodthirsty blades and the Rakuyo being the stand-in for Masamune's divine blades.
    • Reiterpallasch roughly translates from German to Cavalry Sword.
    • Tonitrus translates from Latin to Thunder.
  • Metroidvania: A rare 3D example.
  • Mercy Kill: When Gehrman offers you "mercy", or vise versa.
    • Eileen's job as part of the Hunter of Hunters is this.
    • Pretty much any time you defeat a named Hunter in a Boss Fight
      • Father Gascoigne being a very prominent example. Eileen even tells you that it had to be done when she deduces that you killed him.
      • Then there's Ludwig, who is so far gone that he's pretty much turned into a giant, mutated centaur.
  • Mind Screw: Copious amounts. Several things are flat-out never explained, such as the Hunter's Dream, the Formless One's motives, the weird blood moon that rises at certain points, the degrading nature of Yharnam, etc., the world is populated with mind-destroyingly powerful Eldritch Abominations that the Church worships and are capable of completely altering reality at their will, the game world changes completely over time, and several instances will leave you wondering if what just happened actually happened or that your character isn't just completely bonkers.
  • Mini-Boss: There are several, most of whom are Hunters scattered throughout Yharnam. They make up for their lack of brute strength with their agility. They can also parry your attacks.
  • Mirror Boss:
  • Mix-and-Match Critters:
    • Vicar Amelia is a massive, snarling beast with features of bears, wolves, and stags, with a large mane of hair on its back, as an exaggeration of her human self's Rapunzel Hair.
    • Also, later on in the game, you'll encounter crows with dog heads and dogs with crow heads...
  • Mix-and-Match Weapon / Weapon of Choice: The game has a notable focus on "trick weapons" which possess two different forms that can be cycled through on the fly. Also featured are "off-hand weapons" which, while usually firearms, can be torches or shields as well.
    • The Standard Workshop Weapons are weapons that don't have any strong affiliation with either the Healing Church or the Vilebloods, but belong instead to the old Hunter's Workshop which now exists only in the Hunter's Dream.
      • The Saw Cleaver and the Saw Spear, both Saw Hunter Weapons, are saws with handles that fold out to make them behave like a cleaver and a spear respectively.
      • The Hunter Axe, a Saw Hunter Weapon, can transform between a one-handed axe and a two-handed axe resembling a halberd, which is another Mix-and-Match Weapon all on its own.
      • The Threaded Cane, a Saw Hunter Weapon, transforms between a cane and a metal serrated whip.
      • The Tonitrus, one of Archibald's infamous creations. It's a mace that can generate electricity.
      • The Burial Blade, Gehrman's Weapon of Choice and the original Trick Weapon. It's a scythe with a detachable blade that can act as a scimitar. Like the Blade of Mercy, the blade is made of the magnetic mineral siderite.
      • The Hunter Pistol is a standard issue firearm ideal for dealing solid single-target damage. The Pistol's weight also makes it great for ripostes owing to its faster draw.
      • The Hunter Blunderbuss is another standard issue firearm meant for damaging hordes of enemies on its own. The wide spread of this firearm means that there's little room for error to dodge the spray.
    • Powder Keg Weapons are known for being the most damaging, but the most difficult to use, usually requiring a large amount of Strength and some Bloodtinge to wield efficiently.
      • The Stake Driver, Djura's favorite weapon, is an arm-mounted dagger with a very powerful critical attack.
      • The Rifle Spear, a mimic of the Cainhurst Reiterspallasch, is exactly how it sounds; a spear that can transform into a rifle, or more accurately a shotgun, with an attached bayonet.
      • The Boom Hammer is a Powder Keg variant of the Tonitrus. It's a powerful hammer that houses a miniature furnace that ignites when it hits. This requires continuous priming to use the fire attack of the weapon.
      • The Whirligig Saw is the preferred weapon of choice of Valtr, Master of The League. It's a mace that connects to a head of buzzsaws.
      • The Gatling Gun, a smaller, more portable version of Djura's stationary one, was once used by one of his disciples. The Gatling Gun consumes the equivalent of one quicksilver bullet per second, yet sprays a larger amount of bullets than first thought, since it was designed to be more efficient than standard firearms.
      • The Cannon is a prototype of the more standardized Church Cannon. While it is definitely more powerful than the Church version, it's less efficient in quicksilver bullet usage, consuming a total of 12.
      • The Piercing Rifle wasn't actually created by the Powder Kegs themselves, but rather its predecessor, the Oto Workshop. The design meant that parrying would be difficult to do, but this also meant it would be the most powerful single shot firearm and the one with the most range. This design also meant that it can penetrate many enemies with ease.
    • The Hunter of Hunters is a group that kills other hunters that have been driven insane by the nature of the Hunt. This is not honorable in any way, as they know they signed up to Mercy Kill their fellow Hunters. Eileen The Crow is an aging veteran and one of the few Hunter of Hunters remaining. Their signature weapon is:
    • The Healing Church Weapons are known to be more strength based weapons than the others because of the strength and handling required and are meant for the larger enemies that, ironically, most of the Healing Church Hunters become. Some of the Church Hunters preferred to abandon the use of guns or used smaller weapons, which were mocked by the others.
      • The Beast Claw, made by the Irreverent Izzy, is a two-pronged claw made of the still living bones of a Darkbeast. When transformed, it turns both of your hands into beast talons, with the left hand becoming the size of the actual weapon. If equipped with the Beast's Embrace Covenant Rune, it's given a new moveset and massive damage boost, though in order to get the rune, you need to beat the Bonus Boss of the DLC, Laurence, The First Vicar.
      • The Kirkhammer is the most common trick weapon the modern Church Hunters use. It consists of a silver short sword and a large stone block into which the sword can be inserted to create an enormous maul.
      • Ludwig's Holy Blade, a more mundane imitation of Ludwig's Holy Moonlight Sword that was used by his successors. Its a one-handed silver longsword that can be used in tandem with its massive sheath to become a two-handed greatsword.
      • The Holy Moonlight Sword, Ludwig's personal weapon; the Bloodborne iteration of one of Fromsoft's Recurring Elements: the Sword of Moonlight. This version of the arcane blade has the base form of a silver claymore, and a transformed mode with the weapon's typical glowing blue blade. The transformed mode even has the Sword Beam attack from the Dark Souls versions, but it uses Quicksilver Bullets rather than a chunk of weapon durability.
      • The Church Pick is one of the oldest Church weapons known to exist. Thought to be a myth by the current Healing Church members, It's essentially a large sword that transforms into a long war pick. Its design is both eerily similar to a wooden stake and reminiscent of the Hunter Axe.
      • Simon's Bowblade is wielded by its namesake. Simon himself hated guns with a passion and preferred to use his signature Bowblade, which others mocked him for due to the impracticality of bows when compared to firearms. The standard form is a twisted scimitar, while the bow form uses Quicksilver Bullets as its arrows and is one of the stronger ranged weapons.
      • The Repeating Pistol is a gun with a somewhat misleading name. Though the name implies it is capable of rapid fire, it instead simply fires two bullets at once. While it does consume an additional bullet, it's also the most powerful pistol in the game, albeit very inefficient to use.
      • Ludwig's Rifle is the firearm of Ludwig and his followers. While it has poorer scaling, the weapon has a longer reach and a more narrow spread than the Hunter Blunderbuss.
      • The Church Cannon is the Healing Church's version of the Powder Keg Cannon. Intended to be used by large brutes, this cannon was unfortunately too complex for them to utilize fully. Unlike the prototype, The Church Cannon fires in an arc.
    • The Executioners were a fanatical group of Hunters that pledged their lives to battling the Cainhurst Vilebloods. Formerly led by Martyr Logarius, nearly all the original Executioners are long gone by the time The Foreign Hunter meets Executioner Alfred, Logarius's last surviving disciple. While they're still members of the Healing Church, they have a preferred weapon in the form of:
      • Logarius' Wheel. This trick weapon resembles a Heavy Torturer's Wheel. Transformed, however, it opens up to unleash a mystical blood vapor, which augments it with arcane damage that amplifies the more it revs, but saps the wielders health in increasing amounts as well.
    • The Cainhurst Vilebloods were a decadent noble family shunned by the church for their use of unclean blood, until they were all but wiped out by the executioners. Cainhurst weapons require a more bloodtinged wielder to be effectively used.
      • The Chikage, a strange katana-sabre hybrid used by the Queen's Royal Guards. Its transformation is actually a powerful blood rite that slowly saps the wielder's health away but gains bloodtinge scaling and a rapid poison effect.
      • The Reiterpallasch is the standard Vileblood weapon. It's a rapier that has a pistol attachment. This mechanism was mimicked by the Powder Kegs in the form of the Rifle Spear.
      • The Rakuyo hails from the same eastern country as the Cainhurst Chikage, but lacks the connection to blood magic. Instead it's reliant on pure skill, being a twinblade that can be split into a katana and offhand dagger. It was once wielded by Lady Maria of The Astral Clocktower, a distant relative of the queen and the person the Doll was based on who hated the blood thirstiness of the Chikage.
      • The Evelyn is a powerful single-shot pistol that relies even more on bloodtinge than the Hunter Pistol.
    • The Old Hunter Weapons are actually more bizarre than the current Trick Weapons in design, where some of the hunters dislike and tend to forego firearms. These weapons draw out a more significant amount of blood than the current Trick Weapons in comparison. Unfortunately, this lack of restraint were one of the reasons why The Old Hunters were driven mad in the first place.
      • The Fist of Gratia, while not a trick weapon itself, is very useful with the Bowblade, Rifle Spear, and the Reiterpallasch. Essentially a chunk of iron with finger holes in it that functions like a set of brass knuckles. This improvised slab of iron was used by the hulking huntress Gratia, who was hopeless with firearms.
      • The Beast Cutter is the predecessor to the lighter Threaded Cane and the cleaner Saw Cleaver. It's a massive blade that can separate into a whip sword.
      • The Beasthunter's Saif, the basis of the Saw Cleaver, is a trick weapon that has a secondary blade on the inside. The untransformed mode is essentially a large saif, hence the name, while the transformed mode is similar to the Saw Cleaver and Saw Spear, only it's noticeably quicker and can cover more ground with each swing, something that's essential in all Souls games.
      • The Bloodletter is a unique weapon wielded by Brador. This weapon is similar to Sir Alonne's Bewitched Blade, mechanically speaking. Initially a mace, its real power is revealed when the wielder's blood is given to it, transforming it into a Living Weapon and also the only one that can inflict frenzy.
      • The Kos Parasite is the Kin version of the Beast Claw. Earned from defeating the Orphan of Kos (or some say Kosm), to utilise it fully, one must discover the Milkweed Covenant rune, the kin equivalent to the Beast's Embrace.
      • The Amygdalan Arm is a trick weapon severed from a small Amygdala. Usually used only by madmen, the weapon's untransformed mode is a large club, while the transformed mode works like a sentient chain sickle, which implies that, like the Beast Claw, the Arm is still alive. On a side note, in a sense, this is Bloodborne's version of the Dragon Tooth.
    • The League is a new covenant that all players can join even if you don't have the DLC. This is a covenant that encourages players to help others, sound familiar yet?, and have an online ranking with it. Basically, Bloodborne's Warriors of Sunlight. However, unlike other join-able factions, it doesn't have an associated weapon. The "League Cane" is just the covenant register, with the scroll listing all the members hidden within the handle. The closest thing they have to an affiliated weapon is the whirligig saw wielded by their leader.
  • Molotov Cocktail: A potent weapon against crowds and beasts.
  • Mook Maker: Chime Maidens. In addition to appearing whenever the player calls for help via a beckoning bell, attempting to summon adversaries by ringing their own bell, they can also be found in later levels summoning mooks until killed. They're especially dangerous in the Chalice Dungeons, where they often appear in groups, and start to summon spiders as the player gets into the deeper dungeons. Lots of spiders. Who can spot the player from several rooms away.
  • Monster Is a Mommy: Or rather, the Eldritch Abomination Wants To Be A Mommy. The Great Ones keep impregnating humans. The resulting offspring die, but it doesn't occur to them to stop trying.
    • As revealed in the Old Hunters DLC, the now-dead Great One Kos is revealed to have been pregnant. In fact, her offspring, The Orphan of Kos, is the final boss of the aforementioned DLC.
  • Mordor: The Nightmare of Mensis, an alternate dream world created by the villainous School of Mensis. It is a twisted expanse of black mountains made of fused-together, screaming faces rising impossibly high over an endless sea of fog, where the only building in sight is an enormous cathedral that serves as a prison for one Eldritch Abomination and an incubator for another. It helps that it's The Very Definitely Final Dungeon of the game.
  • Motif: Sound and Water. The currency of Bloodborne is Blood Echoes. Bells are spiritually significant tools used by enemies for summoning. Players use bells to summon allies. Father Gargiscone can hear blood "singing" to him. The voices of the Great Ones, especially Oedon, is heard like ripples in a lake or sea. And in The Old Hunters, the deformed patients of Maria's clock tower constantly hear the sound of water flowing. The DLC ends in the beach where Kos lies dead.
  • Multi-Armed and Dangerous:
    • Amygdala is a gargantuan humanoid with several elongated limbs mimicking a Giant Spider, and makes use of most of them during her boss battle. You can hack them to debilitate her.
    • Mergo's Wet Nurse is a six-armed wraith that wields a sickle-like blade on each hand, and mainly tries to dice you up in a flurry of slashes.
  • Multiple-Choice Past: Character creation has you choosing your origin/upbringing before your journey to Yharnam in order to generate your stats, replacing the "class" system from the Souls games.
  • Multiple Endings: With potentially all the endings coming to pass, on different nights, in different dreams, eventually.
    • Yharnam Sunrise: With the night coming to an end and a number of the other Great Ones' vanquished, Gehrman offers to release you from the Hunter's Dream and forget all you have seen. Agreeing has him behead you with his scythe. You awake the next morning back in the Cathedral Ward's graveyard. The Doll is then seen in the Hunter's Dream, wishing you farewell.
    • Honoring Wishes: You reject Gehrman's offer and have to fight him instead. Upon defeating Gehrman, his Eldritch master, the "Moon Presence", descends to make you its next emissary. Some time later, the Doll is seen pushing you in Gehrman's wheelchair back towards the mansion in the Hunter's Dream. The Hunt begins again, with you as the next Keeper of the Hunters.
    • Childhood's Beginning: The Hunter consumes at least three of the four pieces of Eldritch Abomination umbilical cord hidden across Yharnam to "ascend to the level of a Great One" and face the Moon Presence instead. However, after you defeat the Moon Presence, you end up turning into an infant abomination yourself. You are eventually found by the Doll as a small slug / squid creature, seemingly to be raised into the next of the Great Ones.
  • My Rules Are Not Your Rules: Enemy hunters use many of the same maneuvers, weapons, and techniques that the player is capable of. However, they deal a lot more damage with their attacks (including their guns), have Bottomless Magazines, and have much more health at their disposal. But on the other hand, they can't replenish health via the Regain system, and none seem to carry as many blood vials as the player does.
    • NPC hunters can use their firearms while wielding their trick weapons two-handed mode, which you can't. But on the other hand, the player character is the only person that can perform Visceral Attacks even though you are just as susceptible to staggering as any enemy in the game. Though there are four exceptions to that rule: Djura, the Bloody Crow of Cainhurst, Gehrman, and Lady Maria.
  • Mystical Pregnancy: Several women end up impregnated by the Great Ones in the game's later half.
  • Mythology Gag:
    • Yharnam borrows artistic direction and mood of the Tower of Latria from Demon's Souls.
    • The Cleric Beast draws from Manus's design.
    • In the alpha, Gascoigne would say "sick creature... may you rest in peace... Umbasa" when he kills you. This line is cut in the final game.
    • You once again have to run across a bridge while a huge monster fires ranged attacks at you. In Demon's Souls and Dark Souls I, these were dragons breathing fire at you. Here, it's a Lesser Amygdala firing lasers at you in Yahar'Gul, Unseen Village.
  • New Game+: Returning from the Souls series is the feature to replay the game's story, while keeping your equipment and ramping up the difficulty. Miyazaki and his team even claim to have trouble beating it!
  • Nice Hat: Too many to list. Needless to say, hats are very in vogue are in Yharnam, as just about every person is wearing one.
  • Ninja Pirate Robot Zombie: The Beastly Scourge in the game manage to combine four different monsters into one lifecycle. The Scourge is triggered by consumption of the Old Blood (vampire) - which originates from otherworldly Great Ones (Eldritch Abomination) - and first turns the afflicted into mindless, deformed husks (zombie), before finally transforming them into lycanthropes (werewolf).
  • Nintendo Hard: It's almost redundant to list this trope on a FromSoftware game, but for the sake of completeness...
  • No Name Given: The old man during the intro administering you the Yharnam blood is only mentioned in the credits as "Blood Minister".
  • Nonindicative Name: The OST track "Soothing Hymn" is not very soothing.
  • The Nose Knows: Weirdly, everyone in town notices your smell. Somehow you smell like the moon and that marks you as a hunter. Either there's something very wrong with you, the townspeople, or both.
  • Not Using the Zed Word: The people of Yharnam are effectively vampires, and the Scourge of Beasts pretty much turns people into werewolves...but neither term is ever used.
  • Ominous Latin Chanting: Several examples, and "sanguine" usually appears somewhere in the lyrics. It's taken up to eleven in Yahar'Gul when ending up there early by getting killed by a Kidnapper. Listen. What makes it scarier is that the closer you get to the One Reborn's boss room, the louder it gets.
  • Once per Episode: The game reuses themes and plot points featured in both Demon's Souls and Dark Souls.
    • A mighty kingdom is left in ruins after a Zombie Apocalypse.
    • Adventurers making a pilgrimage to an ancient, forgotten land in search of a cure to a mysterious disease that afflicts them.
    • A cursed katana that damages its wielder. (Okay, Katana-Sabre Hybrid, but close enough.)
    • A huge monster blocks your path and fires a ranged attack at you.note 
    • Miyazaki's favorite Dirty Coward, Patches, shows up. He'll also try to kick you off a cliff yet again.
    • The gods of the world are jerks who care very little for the well-being of humanity.
      • This one is actually subverted; the Moon rune states that "The Great Ones are sympathetic, and will often answer when called upon." And Kos and Ebrietas, at the very least, actively answer prayers addressed to them.
    • Downplayed compared to Demon's Souls and Dark Souls, but the cyclical nature of the conflict is still implied in one ending, and possibly two.
  • Orphaned Etymology: On several occasions. Doctor Iosefka mentions her Hippocratic Oath at one point, and Ludwig, in the Old Hunters DLC, calls his church Hunters "noble spartans". It's never explicitly made clear exactly where the game takes place, whether it is a Constructed World or an Alternate Universe, but considering how damn weird Yharnam and the other in-game locales get, it may not even matter anymore.
  • Our Mermaids Are Different: The Old Hunters has what's probably the closest analogue to mermaids in the Bloodborne world. They're white, woman-shaped mollusk-like creatures that frequently inhabit large ammonite shells who appear to worship Kos.
  • Our Werewolves Are Different: The beast-disease infecting the citizens of Yharnam turns them into mixes of humans and various beasts, like wolves, spiders, crows, and so on. In general, most of these resemble werewolves of some sort; this is the most common enemy type, as opposed to the Soul series' usual penchant for undead zombie-folk.
    • The origin behind the lycanthropes — them being hybrids between humans and a squid-like Eldritch Abomination of the full moon — is also fairly unusual.
  • Our Vampires Are Different: After blood ministration became the medical practice in Yharnam, the sheer popularity of it (healing, an alternative to alcohol, maybe even an alternative to sex) shows such blatant undertones of vampirism without it ever being mentioned. Perhaps vampires never appear because in a world where everyone commodotizes blood, it would be redundant.
    • The Cainhurst Vilebloods, or what is left of them, embody the typical Eastern European vampire appearance-wise: nobles dressed in medieval finery who live in a musty old castle. Their preferred method of gaining blood, however, is to salvage blood dregs from the corpses of the slain for their Queen.
  • Outside-Genre Foe: The starter monsters and bosses draw from Gothic Horror, and while they're very intimidating, they are at least understandable. Then you get halfway through the game and the enemies start becoming more and more alien and bizarre, dreams and reality merge, and the Great Ones start showing up. The giant werewolf of Vicar Amelia is downright mundane compared to the unspeakable thing hidden beneath the altar where Amelia was praying...
  • Pile Bunker: One weapon available in the game is the "Stake Driver", a large gauntlet-like Blade Below the Shoulder that can be extended and retracted.
  • The Plague/Zombie Apocalypse: The Scourge of Beasts infecting Yharnam turns those afflicted into mindless monsters, with the later stages of the disease turning the infected into literal beasts. Although Yharnam isn't the first place this has happened.
  • Plague Doctor: One of the available attires is the plague doctor-esque Crowfeather Set, the signature of the Hunter of Hunters covenant.
  • Platonic Cave: Heavily implied to be the entire setting.
  • Player Headquarters: The Hunter's Dream.
  • Plot Device All Along: The Umbilical Cords may seem like a rare type of Insight-obtaining item, but really, consuming at least three of the four you can find will unlock the third ending.
  • Portal Pool: The Byrgenwerth Lake, which contains a portal to an eldritch realm containing Rom.
  • Posthumous Character: Laurence, the chief disciple of Master Willem.
  • Powered by a Forsaken Child: There are two primary sources of Yarhnam blood. The Healing Church stole Ebrietas, Daughter of the Cosmos from the Chalice Dungeons, raised her to adulthood and used her blood for its healing properties. And the Pthumerians originally used Queen Yarhnam and her dead, unborn child Mergo for their blood.
  • The Power of Blood: The use of blood is a central theme of the game.
    • Blood Ministration, Yharnam's unique medical practice, is based on receiving a transfusion of unique unknown blood in order to cure illnesses. Something happened to those who have received blood ministration, causing the beast outbreak that has enveloped Yharnam. Said healing blood is also implied to be what created the bridge between the human world and the Nightmare Realm that causes the game's plot to begin with, though the link between the two worlds is seemingly what the Byrgenwerth scholars had wanted in the first place, with the blood being an added bonus.
    • Blood Echoes replaces souls from the Souls games as the level up and item buying currency.
    • A stock of blood vials is used to recover health, replacing the Estus flask from the Dark Souls games.
    • The Rally mechanic allows you regain health if you cut into enemies immediately after your own injuries and bathe in their blood.
    • Dying to an enemy can potentially cause them to take your Blood Echoes, which makes them stronger. The player then has to slay said enemy in order to re-obtain their Blood Echoes.
    • Blood Stones and Blood Gems are used to upgrade and augment your equipment.
    • The player can sacrifice some of their health to create five temporary blood bullets at any point.
  • Power of Love: The Plain Doll implies that being loved makes her sentient.
  • Pre-Asskicking One-Liner: "Tonight...Gehrman joins the hunt."
  • Pre-Mortem One-Liner:
    • Father Gascoigne: "Too proud to show your true face, eh? But a sporting hunt, it was!"
    • Retired Hunter Djura: "I should think you still have dreams? Well, the next time you dream, give some thought...To the Hunt, and its meaning..." note  "You still dream I should think, then come as often as you like, I'll show you another death" note 
    • Eileen the Crow: "You still have dreams? ... Tell the little doll I said hello..."
    • Gehrman: "You must accept your death. Be freed from the night."
  • Prepare to Die: Yes, it's not an official Souls game, but it's essentially a gothic spin on the Souls formula. As such, you'd better be prepared to die. A lot. Because Bloodborne is a hard game.
  • Procedural Generation: The Root versions of the Chalice Dungeons. While the default Chalice Dungeons have a set layout, the Root versions always have a random layout. The Root versions even provide a "world seed" code, so that each particular layout can be saved and shared.
  • Punny Name: The School of Mensis. It's a dirty joke, since Mensis can refer to a woman's menstrual cycle as well as to the moon, and blood, the moon, and pregnant women feature heavily in Bloodborne, which in itself is a pun.
    • The Church Cannon is a pun on church canon, which refers to the rules that the church operates under

    Q-Z 
  • Rain of Blood: A brief, subtle one after you complete each boss fight.
  • Reconstruction: In this day and age, the standard Gothic Horror motifs ain't what they used to be. Only vampires still retain any of their weight in the eyes of the public. This game makes them all proper scary again. Infectious werewolf bites not doing anything for you? How's about a werewolf apocalypse? Witches dancing in the light of the full moon laughable? Not when you walk in on the witches and they stop dancing to descend upon you with meat cleavers and red-hot pokers. Torches and Pitchforks are a lot less silly when they're all pointed at you, and there's so much bloodletting and blood-consumption that everyone in town is pretty much already a vampire. This is also probably why Not Using the Zed Word is in play; if it doesn't have a familiar label, then old horrors are new again. And if you thought the Cosmic Horror Story was becoming old hat, this game makes that fresh again too; all the eldritch horrors are an Outside-Genre Foe that just ramps up the horror due to how unexpected and wrong they are.
  • Recursive Precursors: The Healing Church was preceded by the Byrgenwerth College, who in turn based their teachings on the ancient relics of the Pthumerians.
  • Regenerating Health: Of a sort. The Rally system focuses on regaining health, and certain weapons regain more health than others — the weapon with the most regain potential is the Hunter's Axe. Different weapon forms also have different rally values, with the transformed Burial Blade beating even the Hunter's Axe when in scythe form.
  • Religion of Evil: The entire religious practices of Yharnam, which involve the worship of the Great Ones, monstrous beings from another dimension who seemingly care little for the affairs of men except as pawns to spawn a new Great One. The upper echelons of the church — the School of Mensis and the Choir — have differing methodologies as to how to accomplish this. A notable observation is that unlike most works inspired by Lovecraft, this religion is practiced by the majority, up to and including the leaders of the city, rather than people on the fringes hiding from the eye of the law. Then again, Yharnam doesn't exactly have many ties to the outside world, drawing parallels to The Shadow Over Innsmouth.
  • Remixed Level: The Hunter's Nightmare in the DLC, which is most of the areas you explore in Yharnam proper (eg the Cathedral Ward, Old Yharnam, etc.) with completely different level designs and enemies.
  • Romance Sidequest: Defied. If the Hunter can acquire a Ring of Betrothal, then they can use it to propose marriage to Annalise. She rejects it, but she's flattered, and lets them down gently, noting that, should she accept, you'd be in danger, and you're far too important to her for her to let that happen.
    • Repeatedly asking after the first time gets her to giggle like a school girl, lets you know that the thought is enough, and pretty much suggests she wouldn't mind if not for the goals of Cainhurst. Considering the ring itself is a random reward from a chalice dungeon, it's entirely possible it's a nod to the fandom wanting to "wife" characters in other souls games.
  • Sad Battle Music: Like Dark Souls I before it, the track used for the final boss of BloodborneGehrman, the First Hunter — is not an epic and orchestral score, but a sad and somber piece.
  • Samus Is a Girl: You probably couldn't tell that the Huntress with the Rakuyo Trick Weapon is titled Lady Maria of The Astral Clocktower. Oh, and she's the person that the Doll is based on.
  • Sanity Meter: The Insight mechanic and the Frenzy meter. Insight is gained either from using certain items or from encountering and slaying bosses. The more Insight you have, the more you see of this world: more enemies show up, enemies gain new attacks, and the enemies get harder. (Plus, there's the Amgydalas just hanging onto the walls that you can see once you have enough Insight.) Most dangerously, though, is: having a great amount of Insight greatly reduces resistance to the "Frenzy" status effect, which allows certain enemies to kill you almost instantaneously. However, Insight can be spent either by summoning another hunter online or through the Insight shop in the Hunter's Dream.
  • Sanity Slippage: What you presumably experience when your Insight rises (or maybe you become more sane?).
    • Also experienced by most of the NPCs in the game. Most of the ones who won't leave their homes will start to go insane if you check in with them as the game goes on, with some going silent eventually, and of the NPCs you do save, some of them begin to crack after the Red Moon Event. The church lady is just huddled over chuckling to herself and will apparently kill the other young woman under certain conditions. The young woman begins to hunch over as a strange affliction takes her. Ironically, the old lady starts off in a terrible mood and devolving into panic much faster only to become very calm (and mistaking you for her child). This is because she evidently went so nuts that she began taking sedatives to calm down (she'll even share).
  • Scenery Gorn: Just like its predecessors. The environments are dark, dank, and filled with death, disease, and decay.
  • Sequential Boss: Most bosses in the game. As you deplete their health pools, they can act more aggressive, use a different set of attacks, move faster, hit harder, and in some cases, even transform.
  • Shock and Awe: The Bolt Paper and the Tonitrus Trick Weapon, a mace that can spark itself for seven seconds.
  • Shotguns Are Just Better: The Hunter's Blunderbuss, Ludwig's Rifle, and any other spread-shot firearms count.
  • Shout-Out:
    • The Yharnam Hunter outfit is inspired by the Iconic Outfit from Brotherhood of the Wolf.
    • To Berserk:
      • The Hunter's Mark has been compared to the Brand of Sacrifice, although the Heir rune fits the motif better.
      • A more specific Berserk Shout-Out, but this time it's one to the darkest moments in the series: should Arianna be in the Oedon Chapel when the Red Moon Event happens, she disappears into the Tomb of Oedon sewer. Upon finding her, she's sitting in another chair with a Kin baby at her feet. Arianna's Surprise Pregnancy and subsequent labor/childbirth mirror Griffith/Femto's rape of Casca and the early childbirth of her and Guts' demonically corrupted child.
      • Another specific Berserk Shout-Out. Logarius' Wheel, the signature weapon of the Executioners covenant, is highly reminiscent of the torture wheel used by Mozgus' musclebound disciple.
      • Some find Annalise's helmet design to bear more than a passing resemblance to Griffith's iconic birdlike headwear.
    • The Gold Ardeo helmet bears a heavy resemblance to the iconic helm of Pyramid Head, although it is shaped like a conical pyramid rather than a rectangular pyramid. Fittingly, the Gold Ardeo forms the helmet portion of the Executioner Set.
    • One of the enemies in the Nightmare of Mensis is a giant brain covered with eyes. The nickname the fandom gave it is... Mother Brain. Although with the homages to H.P. Lovecraft, the Brain of Mensis is essentially a Shoggoth, which appeared in his novella At the Mountains of Madness.
    • Armored Core
      • The Reiterpallasch is a reference to Wynne D. Fanchon from Armored Core: For Answer; she piloted an AC named Reiterpallasch.
      • The Stake Driver, being a Pile Bunker, resembles the Parrying Blade which can be attached onto various AC as melee weapons.
    • Dark Souls I
      • The Evelyn pistol is a reference to Repeating crossbow Avelyn from Dark Souls
      • Alfred, The Executioner, who openly asks you to co-operate with him is a reference to Solaire of Astora; by the time when you gave him Unopened Summon, he says "Praise the Good Blood", which is a reference to "Praise The Sun" message seen all over the place.
      • Patches the Spider is a recurring character who kicks people into various pits by tricking them with treasures below. Should they survive, Patches will beg for forgiveness and become a merchant.
    • King's Field
      • The Recurring Element, Moonlight Sword, the Infinity+1 Sword crafted by Guyra and reappeared throughout games created by FromSoftware, appears as Ludwig's weapon.
      • There are two small islands on either side of the broken stone bridge to Cainhurst. One of them resembles a scale version of the Island of Melanat from King's Field II.
    • The entire plot plays out like one giant Lovecraft novel, with similar themes and entities to boot. Specifically, it's an homage to his Dream Cycle stories, which feature an alternate dimension that can be accessed via sleep and intersects with our world at points. It is also the home of some of Lovecraft's eldritch abominations, most notably Nyarlathotep.
      • A great deal of the story can be attributed to Lovecraft's works: Yharnam is, essentially, Innsmouth, but with beastmen instead of fishmen; Byrgenwyrth College is Miskatonic University, but without the voice of reason; the Amygdala enemies are entities similar to the invisible spawn of Yog-Sothoth from The Dunwich Horror; and the Pthumerans, the race that came before mankind, are like The Great Race of Yith, minus the bizarre non-human anatomy. Oh, and The One Reborn? That could easily have come out of Reanimator.
      • The Fishing Hamlet in the Old Hunters DLC is a shout-out to The Shadow Over Innsmouth, complete with malformed Deep One-like fish monsters. At least for the first third up to the lighthouse. Although the fans have attributed the last two-thirds to have being influenced by the works of Junji Ito: from the lighthouse to the beach appears to have been influenced by Uzumaki, with the beach containing Kos being influenced by The Thing That Drifted Ashore.
    • The lantern-bearing groundskeepers in the Cathedral Ward cemetery are near-identical in design to the gravediggers from the Castlevania series — in both hooded and hatted varieties.
      • Speaking of which, the entire Cainhurst Castle area is an obvious homage to the series too: a huge, isolated castle in the mountains, haunted by all manner of classic horror creatures, from ghosts to sentient gargoyles to zombified servitude, culminating in a very tough boss fight against a skeleton wielding a scythe and his perpetually spawning flurry of pointy weapons which must be carefully dodged.
    • The final fight with Gehrman is very similar to the final boss fight with The Boss from Metal Gear Solid 3: Snake Eater (such as the fight being in a field of white flowers, fighting your tragic mentor in a final duel to the death).
    • The entire game is extremely similar in theme, tone, and visuals (down to the environment, the monster design, and the sword-and-pistol-wielding masked hero in a tricorn and longcoat) to Guy Davis' graphic novel The Marquis, published 15 years earlier.
    • The shape of the Whirligig Saw's mace head in normal mode has been likened to Bramd from Demon's Souls.
  • Shown Their Work: Ever wonder why the moon is so ridiculously big? It's a reference to an old Italian saying, "La Luna del Cacciatore", which translates to "The Hunter's Moon".
  • Silver Bullet: Or rather quicksilver (i.e. mercury) bullets infused with blood are a staple in a hunter's arsenal.
  • Silver Has Mystic Powers: Many of the Healing Church's weapons are forged from silver and deal Arcane damage.
  • Sinister Scythe:
    • Martyr Logarius wields a staff adorned with a sickle blade that glows red. He mainly uses it to conjure dark magic, but is not above trying to slash you with it, in addition to wielding a sword in his left hand.
    • Gehrman, the First Hunter, carries a large scythe on his back, and uses it in conjunction with both a blunderbuss and a pistol during the Final Boss battle.
  • Soundtrack Dissonance: Some boss leitmotifs fall under this. "Lullaby for Mergo" is a childish, soothing jingle that happens to play when fighting one of the darkest and most unnerving bosses in the game. It's not helped by the boss' disturbing introduction, much less the accompanying baby wails.
  • Spiritual Successor:
    • For Demon's Souls and Dark Souls. Like those two titles, Bloodborne is an Action RPG with horror elements. Similarly, the game is directed by Hidetaka Miyazaki, who also directed Demon's Souls and the first Dark Souls.
    • More than a few fans have also noted how the game's Victorian Era-like setting reminds them of Nightmare Creatures.
    • Some fans consider the game a 3D Castlevania game done right when compared to Konami's own varying track record of 3D Castlevania titles.
      • The Old Hunters DLC introduces Simon's Bowblade. No further explanation needed.
  • Star Power: How "A Call Beyond" works. It creates small exploding stars as a Projectile Spell.
  • Start X to Stop X:
    • Laurence, the Byrgenwerth Heretic, may have undertaken one of the most ill-advised examples of this trope in history. Scattered bits of lore and notes from the Lecture Hall suggest that, as Yharnam fell apart under the blood curse and the Great Ones' presence, he attempted to purge the Great Ones and exterminate the beasts by summoning another Great One — namely, the Moon Presence, which created the Hunt and the Dream to give humans a fighting chance against the beasts, but also sealed Yharnam in an endless nightmare realm until the job was done. If the player decides to submit their life at the end of the game, the plan even succeeds, as the Dream burns, the nightmare breaks, and all the corporeal Great Ones and their acolytes are slain by the Hunter, allowing them to leave the city peacefully.
    • This is pretty much what the first three quarters of the game consist of you doing. In order to stop Mensis Ritual once and for all and reach the infant Great One that's responsible for the horrors in Yharnam, you have to venture into Byrgenwerth and eliminate the one thing preventing the ritual from seeing completion, Rom the Vacuous Spider, and allow the Nightmare to fully take hold of the city.
  • Stealth Pun:
    • The powerful Dark Magic and hexes do not exist in the realms of Bloodborne and are instead replaced by Bloodtinge and blood damage; the weapons that scale with these are usually weaker than the game's other weapons. Let that sink in for a moment.
    • The Old Hunters added two new dog types. One of these are German Shepherds covered in blood. They're bloodhounds!
  • Steam Punk/Gothic Punk: The game has a very Gothic-Victorian Era feel likened to the Jack the Ripper era of Victorian London.
  • Summon Magic: The Executioner's Gloves summon ghosts to attack the enemy as a Projectile Spell. And the Augur of Ebrietas is used to (partially) summon a Great One to kill your enemies.
  • Swiss Army Weapon: Trick Weapons. 'Nuff said.
  • Sword and Gun: The mixture of melee combat and gunplay is to make the gameplay much more aggressive. The character is even featured in the cover using a Saw Cleaver in one hand and a blunderbuss in the other.
  • Take That, Audience!:
    • The description of the shield subtly bashes players who were expecting to rely on them the same way they used to in From Software's previous games.
    "Shields are nice, but not if they engender passivity."
    • In the choice of the Villagers who hide behind wooden shields, the shields can be staggered through in a single hit, leaving them wide open to attack, and even if they shield bash you, it does almost no damage.
    • The game takes the piss out of people who spam-abused dodge-rolling in previous titles by way of the Merciless Watchers; grossly overweight mace wielding ogres in the Chalice Dungeon, naked except for boots that somersault across the floor to get in swinging range of you. This variant has quickly become a laughingstock of a mob; if you pop in an old Souls game and PvP one of the overwhelmingly common heavy armor builds that curls up like an armadillo to back pedal out of a whiffed attack, so will they.
  • Through the Eyes of Madness: Gaining too much Insight can cause some weird things to happen. The whole game is possibly an even deeper extension of this, with the world acting as a mass shared lucid dream that the player traverses through.
  • Thunderbolt Iron: A more realistic example in fiction. Both the Blade of Mercy and the Burial Blade are forged from siderite, a meteoric iron alloy which becomes magnetized after it has been heated. For the Blade of Mercy, the magnetic field is what keeps the twin blades together, as the wielder must force the blades apart in order to use the transformed state. For the Burial Blade, the magnetic field helps keep the scimitar-like blade attached to the folding scythe snath. Keeping with the mythical "magic" properties associated with thunderbolt iron, both weapons cause both regular physical damage and arcane damage.
  • Title Drop:
    "We are born of the blood, made men by the blood, undone by the blood. Our eyes are yet to open... Fear the old blood."
    Master Willem
  • Too Spicy for Yog Sothoth: If you've consumed at least three Umbilical Cords, whatever power they bestow upon you forces the Moon Presence to back off after attempting to embrace you. This also initiates the True Final Boss fight.
  • Torches and Pitchforks: The chosen weapons of many enemy types, who also seem to be prone of shambling around in large mobs until they notice the player.
  • Transformation Is a Free Action: Zig Zagged Trope, as numerous bosses and enemies have different AI routines based on how much damage they've taken, often having them perform some action to initiate that change. In some cases, such as the Snatchers or Logarias, cannot be stopped from buffing but are entirely vulnerable through the process. Others still, such as Maria end their buffing with devastating AOE attacks to punish greedy players, while Ludwig gets an actual cutscene played out.
  • True Final Boss: After consuming at least three Umbilical Cords and defeating Gehrman in the "Refuse" route, the player is treated with an additional fight against the Moon Presence, as well as a third possible ending upon defeating it.
  • Unishment: It's actually worth getting killed by Kidnappers when they first appear. True, you lose your Echoes, but you get dropped off at the Hypogian Gaol. While most of the city is inaccessible at that point in the game, there's still plenty to gain: a useful Caryl Rune, a fancy new Tonitrus, a set of armor with some of the highest defense in the game, and a boss fight against Darkbeast Paarl. Even escaping the Gaol is laughably easy: there's a lantern at the top of some stairs that can be accessed without fighting a single enemy if you take the right path. As for the Blood Echoes you lost, the enemies of the Gaol are high-leveled, yet slow and easy to cheese if you get the timing down, meaning you'll get the Echoes back and then some. To make matters better, there are three of them a stone's throw away from the aforementioned lantern, all-in-all making it a fantastic place to farm.
  • Vagina Dentata: Ebrietas, Daughter of the Cosmos. Her head looks like a massive vagina with writhing tentacle-like teeth. Also, when she hovers, her lower body begins to resemble something else...
  • Video Game Caring Potential: If he is made non-hostile, Retired Hunter Djura tells the player that he has been watching over the beasts in the burnt-out district of Old Yharnam, and asks the player to leave them be. If the player agrees, Djura gives them his badge and teaches them a gesture out of gratitude.
    • Note that it's quite easy to be forced into this, as making Djura non-hostile is somewhat of a hidden process.
    • The Doll is given life by being loved and cared about. If you go into a certain optional area, you can obtain an item to give her as a gift. If you do so, she cries with joy, despite that being physically impossible. The stone itself is an item that gives a persistent Regenerating Health effect.
  • Video Game Cruelty Potential:
    • The player can also choose to simply kill Djura and the beasts he protects.
    • Related to the above, the player can set the beasts' church on fire from the rafters.
    • The player can also attack and kill several friendly NPCs that have done them absolutely no wrong, such as the Oedon Chapel Dweller, for the sake of Item Farming. Even worse, it's possible to attack and kill the Doll, despite all that she's done for the player, and unlike the Chapel Dweller you don't even have the excuse of getting an item out of it. You Bastard. (Luckily, it isn't permanent.)
    • You can put Eileen out of her misery at the end of her quest line before you take on the warrior who nearly killed her.
    • When Gilbert turns into a Beast, he fears the Torch just like the rest of Old Yharnam Beast Patients, you can bring out the Torch, torture him with fear and burn him to death with torch fire.
  • Villain Forgot to Level Grind:
    • Since the NPC Hunters like Djura, the Bloody Crow, and Yurie are created the same way as the character complete with actual stats, they don't get any noticeably (if any) stronger on subsequent runs of the game.
    • The Chalice Dungeons don't scale either, surprisingly enough. It's not surprising to one-hit-kill the bosses of the earlier ones if you're near the end of the game.
  • The Voice: Besides a handful of people that you can send to a safe haven, most of the characters you speak to will remain behind closed windows and locked doors.
  • Warmup Boss: Father Gascoigne. To beat him, you will have to learn how to riposte and use items mid-combat. His fight is the first fight where riposting is almost necessary to win.
  • Was Once a Man: Nearly all the monsters in Yharnam were once human, until they started transforming into beasts.
    • The player themselves, in the Childhood's Beginning ending, as they become a new Great One.
  • Weak, but Skilled: The Hunter of Hunters are known for this.
    • The Blade of Mercy is incredibly ineffective against large hordes of enemies because of it was meant to hunt blood-addled hunters. However, it is still capable of doing so, albeit very difficultly.
  • Weird Moon: The moon seems way too big to begin with and over the course of the game seems to get even closer/bigger. Also, it is never obscured by clouds; in fact, the moon is always in front of the clouds. By the end of the game, it becomes apparent that the "moon" is merely the physical representation of the thusly named Moon Presence throughout most of Yharnam's dream, up until the end (depending on the player's choice) where it will appear in its "real" form.
  • Wham Episode: Byrgenwerth College. This is where you begin to realize that something more otherworldly and sinister than just a simple plague is at work here. And once Rom the Vacuous Spider is slain, the moon turns red and everything goes From Bad to Worse as the Cosmic Horror Story goes full tilt.
  • Wham Shot: Rom the Vacuous Spider. Until she shows up, all of the creatures and locations are at least somewhat in the vein of gothic horror: witches, werewolves, zombies, and other such things. But then you drop into the Moonside Lake and see this...thing. From there, the situation only gets worse: once you beat her you descend into the newly opened Yahar'gul, and you see dozens of Amygdalas crawling over the city like maggots on a rotted corpse. This is when you realize that what you have been playing in is in fact a Cosmic Horror Story.
  • Where It All Began: Both the final boss and true final boss are fought in the flower field in the Hunter's Dream.
  • Wolfpack Boss: The Shadows of Yharnam are three ringwraith-like creatures who get progressively more difficult for each one of them killed.
    • There's another one down in the Chalice Dungeons in the Merciless Watcher trio.
  • Woman in White: Yharnam, the Pthumerian Queen wears a white wedding dress, complete with veil. It doesn't stay white for very long, though...
  • Worst Aid: The primary way you heal is with the Triangle button, in which you quickly jab a giant syringe of Yharnam Blood into your right thigh.
  • Would Hurt a Child:
    • The player character is forced to slaughter an innocent child in order to end the hunt. Granted, said child is a reality-destroying monstrosity, but it's still a child.
    • The Healing Church experimented on orphans in the Upper Cathedral Ward, turning them into grotesque, slug-like beings in their attempts to gain the power of the Great Ones.
  • You Cannot Grasp the True Form: Some of the most powerful Great Ones (like Oedon and Kos, or some say Kosm) transcended physical form and merely exist as concepts. In Oedon's case it's "Blood and Voice".
    • It's averted in Kos' case. You find her corpse washed up on a beach in the Old Hunters DLC, and she resembles a nudibranch with human arms and a human face.
  • You Kill It, You Bought It:
    • Choosing Refuse at the end forces you to fight and kill Gehrman, at which point the Moon Presence appears and makes you take Gehrman's place as the keeper, sitting on his wheelchair waiting for the hunt to begin again.
    • The third ending, which requires more work, has you killing the Moon Presence, with your character being reborn as a Great One and leading the Dream Realm to its next childhood.
  • Your Head Asplode: Effectively what the Frenzy status ailment does to you; if the frenzy bar is filled completely, you lose a huge chunk of your health along with a huge burst of blood from your face. Unlike poison, its meter continues to rise a bit even after you're away from what's causing it, and the higher your Insight, the more vulnerable you are. The Nightmare of Mensis has something even nastier in a chamber that drives you mad and damages you just from seeing it thousands of meters away.
  • Your Mind Makes It Real: The dreams and nightmares of the Great Ones are "just" that, but as they are dreamt by beings that are physical and meta-physical gods, these areas and their inhabitants are as tangible as anything else.
  • Zerg Rush:
    • The Celestial Emissary fight consists of several alien-like monsters bum-rushing you, with none of them lasting longer than two or three hits. Only one of them is the actual boss, and when you've depleted half of its health it will supersize and become a force of its own.
    • The go-to strategy of the Hunter Mob enemy and those horrible, horrible dogs.


http://tvtropes.org/pmwiki/pmwiki.php/VideoGame/Bloodborne