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CamelCase
manyWordsComeTogether with NoSpaces toForm aSingleWord. eachIndividualWord startsWith aCapitalisedLetter. theEndResult looksLike theHumps onTheBack of aCamel. theMainWay toMake aWikiWord.

The first letter may or may not be capitalized depending on the context. (In the case of Wiki Words on TV Tropes, the first letter generally is.)

  • Also used in programming as one style for defining multi-word variables.
    • This is actually useful so you can give a succinct idea of what said variable is supposed to do, instead of having to write lengthy comments about them in the function in which they're being used.
    • In other languages, such as LISP, the preferred convention is caravan-case, as LISP does not use infix syntax (thus freeing the hyphen), and caravan-case is generally seen as easier to read
    • For those less familiar with the limitations of programming grammars, it's mainly because usually you can't have a space in a variable name.
  • Used by corporations to string together two or more common nouns in a way that can be trademarked.
  • Digimon uses this style for species derivatives.
  • Used by corporations when two or more predecessor companies are merged into one new one (as well as for trademark purposes).
  • May overlap with Portmanteau Couple Name, Portmantitle, especially when the name comes from the first syllable of each person's name (TomKat), as opposed to merely blending them (Bennifer).
  • Used for Twitter hashtags containing multiple words (e.g. #TVTropes).
  • Used in literature occasionally to show a character is a Motor Mouth (as in, "doesn't bother to breathe" fast.) A character in the Animorphs book series, who was something of an ethereal being who didn't so much "speak" as "telepathically slam his thoughts into your brain," had his dialogue rendered this way.
  • Used for most document names on classicthemes.com (e.g., the page on finding episodes of old TV shows).
  • Some people's names have these, especially if they begin with "Le" or "De", e.g. LeVar Burton.
  • Latin script transcription of Hebrew often uses it when a title includes a noun that begins with a definite article, the prepositions "to", "as", "-ly", "in" and "from", and "and", as they are written as part of the word in the respective writing systems they use: שיר (shir) is "song", השיר (hashir) - ‘the song’. So the Hebrew name of the Song of Songs would usually be Shir haShirim. Other systems might use ha-Shirim instead; this convention is usually used for Arabic (e.g. Al-Qur'an and not AlQur'an).

Airstrip OneNew SpeakLanguage Equals Thought
Wiki WordAdministriviaTrope
Calling Your AttacksSelf-Demonstrating ArticleCanada, Eh?

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