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Gardening-Variety Weapon
"Maw! Them zombies dun' got in the cornfield agin!"
Let's say you're not one for fancy weaponry. All these available weapons look hard to use...oh! A shovel! That's it!

Gardening Variety Weapon is when a character (not necessarily incompetent with more traditional weapons) turns a mundane garden tool into a competent weapon.

Truth in Television: Many modern weapons are derived from garden tools.

A subtrope of Weapon of Choice and Improbable Weapon User. Supertrope of Shovel Strike, Machete Mayhem, Sinister Scythe, An Axe to Grind (when it's a woodchopping axe and not a battle axe) and half of Torches and Pitchforks. See also Sai Guy, when an agricultural tool becomes widely known as a weapon.

Examples:

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     Anime and Manga 
  • Shinigamis (sans Undertakers) from Black Butler have gardening tools as weapons.
  • Suiseiseki and Souseiseki from Rozen Maiden use a watering can and a pair of giant shears, respectively. Suiseiseki can use her watering can to make plants grow and manipulate them, while Souseiseki's shears are used like a melee weapon.

    Film 
  • In a montage in V for Vendetta, a Fingerman shoots a preteen girl dead for graffitiing V's symbol on a wall. He gets surrounded by angry townsfolk who could not care less about his badge, and the scene does a Gory Discretion Shot as one of them swings a shovel at him.
  • Braindead aka Dead Alive is most famous for the scene where the hero straps himself to a lawnmower to... erm... mow down the undead.
  • Most of the murders in The Stepfather III are committed with gardening equipment, such as a shovel, a rake, and a woodchipper.

    Live Action TV 
  • In It's Always Sunny in Philadelphia, Dennis and Dee are trying to get into the mind of a serial killer, so they decide to figure how they would go about committing a murder. They wind up getting a pair of gardening shears, content that they would cut through bone.

    Literature 
  • In Journey to the West, the pig Zhu Bajie uses a gardening rake as his Weapon Of Choice.
  • In the beginning of The Wheel of Time: The Gathering Storm, an ex-soldier farmer tells his neighbor to rework his scythes into polearms or a sword in preparation for the upcoming Last Battle. Several peasant armies are seen throughout the series using such rudimentary weapons, but they tend not to do well, especially against trained soldiers.
  • Terry Pratchett likes this trope. In Night Watch, many of the rebels are retired military armed with halberds or these sorts of weapons. Vimes suggests that a sufficiently pressed attack against them would simply come out as mince on the other side.
    • In Snuff, Vimes is forbidden from carrying a sword while visiting his country estate, and instead takes a bill hook to a midnight meeting, commenting that it would be a sad day when a landowner couldn't take a walk and prune any errant limbs.

    Video Games 
  • In Ultima VII, a farmer near Britain complains that he brought his broken hoe to a mage to be repaired, but it got mixed up with a sword that was supposed to be enchanted, resulting in the Hoe of Destruction, which you can retrieve from his shed.
  • Mass Effect 2: according to the Shadow Broker's files, Mordin once killed a Krogan by stabbing him in the eye with a pitchfork.
  • Dead Rising emphasizes improvised weapons that you find in a mall. As such, this trope comes into play with mostly joke weapons like rakes or the like, but certain ones can be effective or turned into other weapons.
  • Jagged Alliance: The character "Unnecessarily Ruthless" Reuban got the "Ruthless" part of his name for wiping out his own family with a cordless hedge trimmer. The "Unnecessarily" bit was added because, during the process, he had to recharge the appliance twice. The hedge trimmer in question is actually in-game as a melee weapon, and Reuban gets some added lines when using it.
  • The Dark Souls expansion has living plant creatures that use gardening tools to maintain a massive garden and assault wandering adventurers.
  • Plants vs. Zombies allows you to purchase a rake which will kill the first zombie who steps on it. Additionally, each of your rows has a lawnmower which, as soon as one reaches the end of the row, will activate, clearing out all the zombies in the row.
  • Any medieval-themed strategy game in which peasants can be drafted to a military force without gear or training will invariably supply their own Torches and Pitchforks — minus the torches.
  • Team Fortress 2: The Pyro's Backscratcher, a rake with increased damage, increased health gained from health pickups, but decreased rate of healing from healing sources.
    • The Soldier has the Market Gardener, basically an Awesome, but Impractical garden shovel which does a Critical Hit on enemies while in a Rocket Jump. His standard melee weapon is a trench-digging shovel, which understandably can also be used for gardening purposes.
  • Luigi's Mansion: Dark Moon: Some of the Greenies in the Haunted Towers use gardening tools such as shovels as weapons.
  • The Beach in Kingdom of Loathing must be an ant farm, because the fire ants in the Arid, Extra-Dry Desert have an entire set of gardening tools, with which your familiar can "sow pain and reap Meat". The 'Zombie Slayer' challenge path starts you out with a rake, acquired from your first victim. Other garden weapons in the game include pitchforks, scythes, shovels, and a gardening trowel.
  • In Penny Arcade Adventures, the player character uses a rake as a weapon in the first episodenote , and a Gardening Hoe in the second.
    PC: "Come rake, let us begin our dark work!"
  • Hoes and rakes are among the earliest weapons you come across as a player character in Dungeon Siege.

    Webcomics 
  • In Rusty and Co., Madeline the Paladin is all about this. She first shows up wielding an alleged "holy avenger", which turns out to be a simple hoe. Then the gnome who originally sold her the hoe shows up offering a "+1 trident", which is actually a rake. When Madeline reappears in a later scene, she's armed with a spade.
    • She more recently lost the vorpal spade in an ambush, and has since picked up a +2 Trident Of Warning (formerly a pitchfork). Should be noted that this actually is a Trident of Warning, as seen here. (A Trident of Warning detects hostile aquatic life.)

    Western Animation 
  • In Robot Chicken, one episode has Bob Barker become a vigilante pet spayer/neuterer. His weapon of choice? A pair of hedge clippers.
  • In Wallace and Gromit, Curse of the Were-Rabbit, a shopkeeper hastily changes his sign from "Gardening Supplies" to "Angry Mob Supplies" when the monster is sighted.

    Real Life 
  • War scythes and Billhooks. The Billhook article also mentions that Finnish combat engineers are issued with billhooks rather than entrenching tools.
  • One of the most iconic ninja weapons in popular culture is the kunai, which originated as a gardening trowel. Another is the kusari-gama, a pair of sickles connected by a chain. While not useful as a tool in that form, it's something any farmer would be able to quickly construct.
  • Various varieties of heavy utility blades like the Germanic sax, the machete, and the Kukri. The eighteenth century fascine knife would count except it was a purely military tool(designed to cut twigs to bundle together in bundles called "fascines" to serve in a similar roll as sandbags); however the work it did was similar to gardening and it could be used as a gardening tool. In any case the basic concept is known in several cultures.

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