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  • In Addicted, Loren and Jonathan Hale are both alcoholics, along with Ryke Meadows in the past. Loren recovers eventually.
  • Frank Browning in the Ahriman Trilogy is the sad variety, drinking to forget the horrible things he's seen.
  • The Alice Network: Eve drinks far too much, sometimes in place of a meal or to put off sleep. In fact, our very first sight of her was when she was drunk, holding a tea cup filled with gin in one hand and a Luger in the other. She uses alcohol to kill the pain of her memories of the war.
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  • In Apathy and Other Small Victories, Shane is almost completely unable to deal with the rest of the world without getting blitzed out of his mind.
  • In Lawrence Block's thriller Ariel (Block), David, Ariel's father, is a functioning one of these. His portrayal is partly based on Block's own.
  • Big Blonde:
    • Hazel becomes an alcoholic early into the story. Originally she couldn't stand the taste of liquor but her alcoholic husband encouraged her to drink with him. By the time her husband leaves her she's an alcoholic who drinks several times a day and can't stand to be sober.
    • Many of Hazel's friends and lovers are drinkers. Most notable is her husband Herbie. She thought his drinking was funny at first however she soon began to become annoyed by it. This, combined with Hazel's depression, annoyed Herbie which kept him at an arm's distance from her.
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  • Played for cynical effect in The Black Cat. An alcoholic protagonist kills his black cat in an insane manner, and later kills his wife when he's hunting for another black cat with little to no remorse.
  • The Wakecliff family in A Brother's Price had some very bad and rather suspicious times. A family of fifty-eight all died within one season. Eldest Wakecliff, the head of the family, took to drinking heavily and later died of alcohol poisoning after going on a binge when she heard about six of her kin dying in a carriage accident.
  • In Edgar Allan Poe's The Cask of Amontillado, Fortunato has an affinity for wine and a love of drinking that ends up being his doom.
  • Chocoholic Mysteries:
    • Recurring character Timothy Hart, first introduced in Bear Burglary. He's been in and out of treatment for it several times, and it eventually cost him his driver's license. When he appears in Puppy Puzzle, he proudly states that he's been sober for nine months now. Book Bandit, however, reveals he's fallen off the wagon again.
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    • Lorraine Davidson, daughter of the murder victim in Clown Corpse. By the end of the book, she's in rehab for it.
  • Cithrin in The Dagger and the Coin becomes this by the end of the first book, which is especially distressing when you consider just how young she is.
  • In Devdas, the eponymous character relies too much on Drowning My Sorrows after his childhood friend Paro gets married to someone else (because of Parental Marriage Veto concerning their social classes), and becomes this. It leads to his demise, right at Paro's doorstep, and she's not even allowed to go see him.
  • Devils & Thieves: Jemmie drinks a lot, and everyone around her is worried about her bad habit. Crowe even has to cut her off from the bar in his first scene, knowing she'd already had two drinks in the span of twenty minutes. It's a big step forward when she decides to go out without some alcohol.
    • In the sequel series DFZ, Amelia is the Spirit of Dragons, the immortal god of all dragonkind. She's still a drunk. Opal is instructed on how to get her attention using cheap alcohol. Opal is worried, because even she would be insulted if someone tried to summon her with such cheap offerings, but she's barely finished when Amelia has already appeared and is drinking the offerings.
  • In Terry Pratchett's Discworld:
  • Doglands: Dedbone is an alcoholic who mistreats his racing greyhounds.
  • Dragon Queen: the old man drinks enough to knock himself out in his first appearance.
  • Eileen:
    • Eileen's father has such a drinking problem that he is confined to the house due to being too belligerent and delusional to work as a police officer, drive a car, or even walk around the neighborhood. He drinks at least a bottle of gin a day and spends all his time hallucinating about mobsters and verbally abusing Eileen.
    • Eileen herself, while much more functional than her father, still has problems with drinking that involve frequent drunk driving, drinking at work, and heavy drinking. In one incident, she drank so much she passed out in her crashed car and likely would have died if she hadn't been found.
  • Eleanor & Park: Eleanor’s stepfather Richie drinks constantly, spends a lot of time in a bar and has driven drunk with the kids more than once.
  • The titular protagonist of Eleanor Oliphant Is Completely Fine drinks two bottles of vodka every weekend and gets drunk many times through the story, all to deal with her loneliness and desperation for companionship. She later almost drinks herself to death with a suicide attempt.
  • The Elenium: Krager, henchman to Martel and then to Zalasta, is best-known for being an unapologetic alcoholic. He starts out as a Functional Addict, since he's quite clever and even exploits his reputation to Play Drunk. Surprisingly Realistic Outcome occurs later in The Tamuli — he slowly becomes an Addled Addict, compromises a mission due to a bribe of his favourite drink, and only fails to be the sole Karma Houdini because he's teetering over the edge of terminal liver failure at the finale.
  • The Fire's Stone: Darvish undergoes an incredibly rough detox midway through the book that nearly kills both him and Aaron. He's been led to alcoholism by his own family hoping to keep his popularity in check and him useless.
  • Forest Kingdom: The Hawk & Fisher spinoff series features recurring character Lord Arthur Sinclair, who spends most of his time drinking (he even started his own political party based on removing all taxes on alcohol), and it's suggested by some that he's trying to drink himself to death.
  • In The Girl Who Would Be King, Lola's mother Delia was an alcoholic. Over the course of the novel, Lola ends up becoming an alcoholic herself.
  • In The Godfather a doctor is talking to a friend of Johhny Fontaine, telling the man that if he doesn't cut out the smoking and drinking he'll be dead in five years. The man gives off an apparently horrified reaction as he says, "My God! Doc, are you serious? I'll be dead in five years? You mean it's going to take that long?
  • In Guns of the Dawn, Father Burnloft, the priest attached to the army in which Emily is sent to serve, is habitually drunk. It may simply be a consequence of all the death he's seen, but soldiers who've seen just as much and now have to listen to him stagger through the funeral service for their dead comrades don't necessarily have much sympathy.
  • Harry Hole, the protagonist in a series of crime thrillers by Norwegian Jo Nesbø. A detective in the Oslo Police Department, Harry is usually tolerated by his superiors and colleagues despite his habitual alcoholism and unorthodox methods because he is a brilliant detective.
  • Harry Potter:
    • Winky the house elf, who, being an elf, gets drunk on butterbeer.
    • And Professor Trelawney with her cooking sherry. Though it only started because Umbridge put her on probation.
    • Hagrid is heavily implied to be one. He swears at least once that he'll never drink again (it doesn't take), and the trio end up taking care of him more than vice versa.
    • It is implied that Sirius has a drinking problem in Order of the Phoenix. This likely stems from him being forced to stay in the house where he experienced his unhappy childhood.
  • David and Simon from Haunted (1988). The former had cleaned up in the film version.
  • The Heartstrikers:
    • Amelia the Planeswalker, eldest surviving daughter of Bethesda the Heartstriker, one of the two greatest dragon mages in the world, and unarguably one of the most powerful entities to walk this or any other plane, is mostly known for being an unreliable drunk. Considering her own mother has been trying to murder her for centuries for stupid reasons, this is understandable. Of course, as a dragon, it takes a lot to get her drunk. She normally cuts her alcohol with hydra venom.
  • The Hunger Games gives us Haymitch, who is perpetually shown drunk or at least mildly intoxicated, largely an effect of the horrors the Hunger Games he competed in. He is an alcoholic to the point where the main characters worry about him after police shut down the local liquor brewers.
  • A relatable example with Kyle Griffin, the protagonist of The Impairment where he turns to booze to help lower the stress he feels after being framed for the murder of his roommate by an extra-terrestrial. Needless to say, it's not much of a comfort as that's where all the trouble always starts.
  • Jakub Wędrowycz stories: Jakub, as well as most of his home village, this being set in Poland, is heavy on the drink. Yet they don't seem to be intoxicated very often, or at least not debilitated by it.
  • James Bond tends to drink a lot, though more so in the novels than in the movies. He's constantly guzzling down on booze, and sometimes likes to mix it with coffee or water. By the end of Fleming's run, he's consumed over 1150 alcohol units, including martinis, beer, whisky, bourbon, cocktails, gin and champagne. A tragic example comes in You Only Live Twice, where he goes completely off the rails after Tracy's death in On Her Majesty's Secret Service, drunkenly wandering about London, thinking irrationally and getting multiple hangovers on a daily basis.
  • Bertie's Uncle George in Jeeves and Wooster "discovered that alcohol was a food well in advance of modern medical thought." Occasionally "his liver lodges a formal protest" and he goes to a healing center to get cleaned up, only to go back to drinking as soon as he returns to London.
  • Journey to Chaos: Giji Mesh is a regular at "The Full Mug" and inevitably becomes rowdy after drinking herself into a stupor. At that point, her lieutenant takes her home.
  • J.P. Beaumont: Beau drinks heavily to cope with the things he sees a homicide detective. He eventually realizes that he has a problem and joins A.A. In the later books, he is a recovering alcoholic. (Word of God from Jance is that for the first few novels, she did not realize that Beau was showing all of the classic signs for alcoholism.)
  • Several of Marian Keyes's novels feature alcoholics, such as Lucy's father and her boyfriend Gus in Lucy Sullivan is getting married and of course the alcoholics in the treatment centre in Rachel's Holiday.
  • Hunn Raal, from the Kharkanas Trilogy, who is one of the commanders in Urusander's Legion. Nobody likes him and his constant drinking makes everyone think he's a useless fool. Evidence shows it's Obfuscating Stupidity.
  • Several Stephen King protagonists (especially the writers), have this particular affliction, most notably Jack Torrance from The Shining (also Danny Torrance in Doctor Sleep) and Jim Gardener from The Tommyknockers. King himself went through alcoholism and recovery during the course of his career, so that's not too surprising. Ironically, many people think he wrote better books before he stopped drinking. In his memoirs, King himself denies that there's any relationship between being a good writer and being an alcoholic. He mentions in his memoirs that he has no recollection of writing Cujo — that was one pretty impressive bender there.
  • The Last Full Measure references Ulysses S. Grant's previous alcoholism and explains its origins. He's shown almost going Off the Wagon after the disastrous assault on Cold Harbor, but one of his aides intervenes. General Ledlie also appears and gets no sympathy, since his inebriation in two battles resulted in disaster for his men.
  • In The League of Peoples Verse novel Expendable, former Explorer Phylar Tobit is an alcoholic. Festina is disgusted by him, but also secretly feels somewhat envious. All Explorers receive psychological conditioning to make them fastidiously clean and tidy; in becoming a stinking drunkard, Phylar has managed to overcome that programming and in a way beat the system.
  • Grantaire in Les Misérables almost always had a bottle in his hand, and actually sleeps through the final battle because he's passed out from alcohol.
  • In Light a Penny Candle, Tony gets drunk on his wedding night, and passes out before the marriage can be consummated. He's also frequently drunk, and when Aisling finally confronts him about it, he hits her in a violent rage. He ends up dying in a nursing home from liver failure.
  • Terry Lennox in the Philip Marlowe novel The Long Goodbye. And Roger Wade. And, arguably, Marlowe himself.
  • In Madicken, Abbe's father spends most of his time drinking or sleeping, which puts a lot of stress on his wife. He's a much more sympathetic character though than many other examples of this trope, because he's a genuinely kind man at heart.
  • The mugger in The Man Who Controlled Metal is a completely unrepentant drunk. Until he gets scared straight, anyway.
  • The Man Who Fell to Earth: Thomas Jerome Newton is an Alien Among Us who becomes one over the course of the work.
  • Ahmed in Midnight’s Children. After purchasing Methwold's estate, he becomes a bit too attached to the English wine cabinet, and starts "warring with djinns". This eventually makes him very delusional.
  • Nevada: The main character drinks as a coping mechanism for her failing love life and her gender dysphoria.
  • Cat from the Night Huntress books has high alcohol tolerance, and drinks gin like water. She also needs a freaking drink more often than is really healthy; Bones comments that her gin bottle is like a security blanket for her.
  • In A Night in the Lonesome October, the monk Rastov is always drinking whenever we see him. His assistant Quicklime says it's an attempt to numb the pain Rastov feels from his compassion for the suffering people of the world.
  • Nightmare Alley contains two prominent characters that are alcoholics:
    • Zeena's carny husband Pete is a raging one, drinking heavily every night and sleeping throughout the day. He dies when the main character Stan accidentally passes him a bottle of wood alcohol instead of the rotgut he intended to give him.
    • Stan himself becomes increasingly dependent on alcohol throughout the book and by the end falls into complete alcoholism when he is homeless and on the run from Ezra Grindle's hired goons.
  • Sephy's mother from Noughts & Crosses, and eventually Sephy herself.
  • August from Of Fear and Faith is a recovering alcoholic and the stress from his bouts with The Legions of Hell occasionally drives him back to the bottle. Despite some close calls, he's yet to fall off the wagon however.
  • Danny Capistrano is in serious alcohol withdrawals throughout the majority of Paraiso Street . The ending implies that he might be on a real path to recovery.
  • Real-life LAPD chief Bill Parker is a character in James Ellroy's Perfidia. Ellroy portrays him as an alcoholic desperately fighting his addiction in the days immediately after Pearl Harbor. Doesn't help that Parker is under a ton of stress.
  • The Reynard Cycle: Bruin has a drinking problem, and tends to turn into a Berseker when he's had too much. He tends to drink before battle to take advantage of this.
  • Runge Margavo from the sci-fi anthology Riesel Tales: Two Hunters loves his alcohol, though he doesn't usually take his addiction to absurd levels.
  • Secret Santa: During Erik's hunt for his Secret Santa, he finds a bottle of Jim Beam in Company Comptroller Peter Jarry's desk.
  • Richard Lopez of Ship Breaker is an extreme alcoholic, who is almost constantly drunk. Of course he's also a drug-addicted Archnemesis Dad and an Axe-Crazy sociopath so this is honestly the least of his problems.
  • The Silerian Trilogy: Ronall, Elelar's husband, is a hopeless drunk and drug addict. He only sobers up when imprisoned by the Valdani, and the withdrawal was apparently quite hard on him. The very first thing he does after being released is go get drunk once again.
  • Several characters from A Song of Ice and Fire. King Robert Baratheon spends as much time as he can with a comfortable buzz... mainly because he's depressed as hell, and it's his way of coping. It bites him in a number of ways. Cersei becomes one over the course of the series, which is part of the reason Jaime finds her increasingly repulsive. Sandor Clegane has long been one, and even in the second book is rarely seen sober; in the third book, he basically wanders around getting drunk when and wherever possible (with a 10-year-old in tow, no less). It's his downfall. Turns out it's kind of hard to fight when you're that drunk. There's Tyrion Lannister, who is a high-functioning version of this, and is always looking for more wine. But, as the series illustrates, the more drunk you are, the better your chances of catching the Idiot Ball, even if you don't go full-on Alcohol-Induced Idiocy. Even you, Tyrion.
  • Stag Preston in Spider Kiss, and it just makes his other negative traits that much worse.
  • The ditzy popstar Cherry Pye in Carl Hiaasen 's book Star Island drinks constantly and to excess, often resulting in a disastrous aftermath, like Axl Rose headed zebra tattoos, which must be cleaned up by her handlers.
  • Kurak in the Star Trek: Klingon Empire novels. At one point, she refuses to believe that she has alcohol poisoning, because as far as she's concerned alcohol is only a poison to "weak" races such as humans. Usually Klingon physiology fights off the negative effects of alcohol, but she'd consumed so much that even Klingon biology couldn't cope.
  • Lucky's owner in Survivors was an alcoholic who beat him up. As a puppy, he ran out the door and has since been turned off from being anyone's pet.
  • Sydney Carton in A Tale of Two Cities, which, despite being one of his many fall-backs, a drink or two or twenty causes him to work more efficiently.
  • Arthur Huntingdon in The Tenant of Wildfell Hall, to the point that it ends up killing him before he's forty.
  • Arthur's mother in Theatrica who falls of a roof, piss drunk, and dies.
  • A recurring theme in There There, examined through its effects on others. Thomas is an alcoholic and lost his job, Tony's mother left him with fetal alcohol syndrome, Octavio lost his family in a drunk driving accident, and Jacquie is trying to become sober after her daughter committed suicide.
  • 1st Sgt. Welsh in The Thin Red Line, possibly due to the stress of his job.
  • Renzo Leoni in A Thread of Grace occasionally gets so drunk that he'll pass out in the bed of a strange woman and has to check the fabric of his clothes and the class of woman to remind himself which fake identity he had adopted the night before. He's still a charismatic and effective resistance leader.
  • Athos of The Three Musketeers is almost always Drowning His Sorrows, but Never Gets Drunk (or at least doesn't show it).
  • Margo's father in Time Scout. He's the sort who's drinking away his troubles due to the death of an infant child.
  • Sam Houston in Trail of Glory is shown as a high-functioning alcoholic, which he also was in real life.
  • Second Prize in Trainspotting spends the majority of the book intoxicated, often putting his junkie mates to shame through his Alcohol-Induced Stupidity.
  • In Treasure Island, almost all of the pirates and Mr. Arrow. Billy Bones's stroke at the beginning is attributed to drinking little but rum at the Benbow Inn, and Captain Flint was allegedly killed by rum as well.
  • Johnny Nolan in A Tree Grows in Brooklyn.
  • Twilight of the Red Tsar: Mao descends into rampant alcoholism after being forced out of power by the Chinese Politburo due to his insistence on continuing the Sino-Soviet war.
  • In Under the Dome, Sloppy Sam Verdreau fits this trope. He's almost constantly drunk, and although he's fairly functional, this proves to be his downfall by making him more susceptible to the machinations of more villainous characters.
  • Adrian Ivashkov from Vampire Academy, is addicted to alcohol, played with in that it's more to block out spirit.
  • Eren dom Hastrell of The Witchlands is drunk most of the time, having descended into alcoholism after he was dishonorably discharged from the Elite Army he used to be a part of. Or so he wants everyone to think.


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