Video Game / Choice of Games

Choice Of Games is a limited-liability company dedicated to producing high-quality, text-based, multiple-choice, Choose Your Own Adventure-style games. The games are written in Choicescript, a scripting language which they developed to allow authors to create games with no programming experience.

Like many adventure games, they center around branching storylines and puzzles based around sousing out the correct action from a palette of options. Unlike many such games, however, they include various stats and build options for the player that are affected by the player's choices, and multiple victory strategies are possible. Thus, which option is "correct" depends on the type of character the player has built or roleplayed up to that point.

Their games include:
  • Choice of the Dragon, in which the player is a dragon in a fantasy world.
  • Choice of Broadsides, a sea and sails adventure in which the player character is the crewmen of a naval ship belonging to a nation suspiciously similar to Britain.
  • Affairs of the Court, a trilogy of games set in a Latin-esque fantasy world in which the player character is an upper class youth searching for a romantic partner. It's trope page is here.
    • Consists of Choice of Romance, Choice of Intrigues, and 'Til Death Do Us Part.
  • Choice of the Vampire, in which the player is a vampire in America from 1815 onwards.
  • Choice of Zombies, in which the player has to deal with Zombiepocalypse.
  • Heroes Rise, in which the player is a newbie Superhero looking to accrue recognition. Its trope page is here.
    • Heroes Rise: The Hero Project is the sequel to Heroes Rise. This time, you're thrust into a game show just for heroes. But is there something bigger at work than a simple Reality Show?
    • Heroes Rise: HeroFall is the final in the trilogy and sees you fighting against a corrupt president who wants to stop all heroes.
  • Choice of the Star Captain, in which the player takes the role of a freelance... well, star ship captain and their smarmy AI who get caught in an intergalactic war against the mysterious Blobs.
  • Choice of Kung Fu, a Wuxia tale where the player is a monk seeking the right to ask a question of the Dragon Sage.
  • The Fleet, in which the player takes command of a fleet fleeing from their captured homeworld, and is charged with bringing back a force capable of liberating it.
  • Treasure Seekers of Lady Luck, in which the player joins (or infiltrates) a band of space pirates.
  • Slammed!, in which the player is a wrestler on their rise to becoming pro wrestling's biggest star, but it's a journey fraught with hardship and betrayal, both in and out of the ring.
  • Choice of the Ninja, in which the player is a ninja village's chosen warrior operating amidst a conflict between two feudal lords.
  • The ORPHEUS Ruse, in which the player is a psychic spy who can leap from body to body by touch, but when their own body is stolen, they must find the truth before their mind disintegrates.
  • Showdown at Willow Creek, in which the player is a newcomer to Willow Creek after a rancher's daughter mysteriously disappears.
  • Reckless Space Pirates, in which the player is a Space Station resident kidnapped by Space Pirates along with a member of a race of Starfish Aliens.
  • There are two games in the Deathless series, which share a setting with the Craft Sequence novels:
  • Choice of the Rock Star, where you try to make your mark on the rock scene of the mid 1980's.
  • NOLA is Burning, where you play a mob enforcer out to save your boss's kidnapped spouse (who you've been seeing behind their back...).
  • Neighborhood Necromancer, where you are a youth living a rather miserable life in a small English town, until you find a bone that lets you control the undead...
  • Mecha Ace, where you play as a Humongous Mecha pilot in an interstellar war.
  • Yeti's Parole Officer, where you play as an officer of the Pan-Galactic Prisons Bureau, charged with keeping notorious galactic criminals like the Yeti, Loch Ness Monster, Chupacabra, and Mothman behind bars on Earth, while maintaining The Masquerade.
  • Thieves' Gambit: The Curse of the Black Cat, where you play the world's second great jewel thief, and your goal is to steal a jewel known as the Black Cat, which has never been stolen before but is notorious for its previous owners dying under unfortunate circumstances.
  • Psy High, where you play a high school student who has developed psychic powers along with your friends, and must solve mysteries in your school.
  • Choice of Robots, where you take on the role of a brilliant scientist who makes a revolutionary breakthrough in robotics technology that can change the world.
  • The Hero of Kendrickstone, where you play a novice adventurer trying to make ends meet in the Medieval European Fantasy city of Kendrickstone.
  • Choice of the Petal Throne, in which the player is a new captain in the Prince or Princess's army in a fantasy setting influenced by South American, Middle Eastern, and Indian cultures.
  • Hollywood Visionary, where you are a movie producer attempting to make your dream project against the backdrop of the Fall of the Studio System and the Red Scare.
  • It's Killing Time, in which you are an assassin-for-hire working for a group known as The Syndicate.
  • Champion of the Gods, in which you are chosen by the gods to fulfill a great destiny, and you can choose either to follow their wishes or to rebel against them.
  • A Wise Use Of Time, where you are a normal office worker who suddenly develops a strange and powerful ability: the power to stop time.
  • Ratings War, in which you are a news reporter in the year 2061, trying to rise to the top of your career by covering the biggest stories and scandals of your time. Along the way you'll become tangled in a massive conspiracy that may make or break your career, and possibly your very life.
  • Diabolical, in which you are an aspiring criminal mastermind and supervillain.
  • Pendragon Rising, in which you are a young aspiring leader in an Arthurian setting.
  • MetaHuman Inc., in which you are the CEO of a corporation that sells either magical or technological superpowers to the highest bidder.
  • Sixth Grade Detective, in which you are a sixth grader who solves mysteries in your school.
  • The Daring Mermaid Expedition, in which you are an up-and-coming researcher seeking to prove the existence of mermaids and gain admittance into the Royal German Marinological Society.
  • The Hero Project: Redemption Season is the beginning of a new trilogy set in the Heroes Rise universe, starring a new character on the second season of The Hero Project'.
  • The Sea Eternal, in which you are a citizen of an underwater society in which the inhabitants have discovered the secret to eternal life.
  • Choice of the Pirate, in which you are an aspiring pirate hoping to rival the Pirate King himself.
  • Choice of Alexandria, where you are a scholar at the Library of Alexandria and the tutor of prince Ptolemy IV.

Choice of Romance, Heroes Rise, and Choice of the Vampire have sequel games. Upon completion of the first installment, you will be given a password which should transfer your character over to the new game. (If you made the right decisions, of course...) Choice of the Deathless also has another game set in the same universe; however, you play as a different character, meaning that no save system is used.

The Web site also hosts some user-contributed games, some of which rival the official games in length and quality. These include:

Some of their recent games such as Eerie Real Estate Agent and To the City of the Clouds veer away from 'traditional' Choose Your Own Adventure settings and styles.

The blog can be found here; the forum can be found here.

Needs a Better Description.

Choice of Games provides examples of the following tropes:

    open/close all folders 

    Tropes Present in Multiple Games 
  • Anything That Moves: The King/Queen from Choice of Romance.
    • The PC in Choice of the Vampire will be this unless you expressly play them otherwise.
  • Bi the Way: Possible in Choice of the Dragon and Choice of the Vampire but not Choice of Broadsides or Choice of Romance. Choice of Romance makes sense in that by choosing what gender you are attracted to you choose the gender of your love interests, but Choice of Broadsides seems to deliberately invoke No Bisexuals - you can only have an affair with Villeneuve if you choose that you don't want to get married because you aren't attracted to the opposite gender. Otherwise, you'll just have a drink together and end up good friends. Explicitly asked and possible in Heroes Rise, though if you choose this option, you are asked a follow up question of what you were last attracted to since this determines the gender of your romantic partner.
  • Character Customization: The point of each game.
  • Choose Your Own Adventure
  • The Cutie: Silas, Magdalena/Mateo.
  • Cutting Off the Branches: You get a password at the end of Choice Of Romance to transfer your character over for the sequel, but only if you ended up with the Queen/King!
  • Dating Sim: All the games (except for The Fleet) involve romantic elements in one way or another but Choice of Romance focuses entirely on this aspect.
  • Dance of Romance: The ball at the end of Choice of Romance. Also possible as part of the romances in Choice of Kung Fu.
  • Deadly Decadent Court: The entirety of Choice of Romance/Intrigues, and New Orleans in Choice of the Vampire.
  • Dialogue Tree
  • Gay Option: The programmers actually considered this a pretty important element, and every game with romance elements has one of these. In Choice of the Dragon you can decide which gender you want your mate to be (or if you don't care), in Choice of Broadsides you can have an affair with Villeneuve, who is always the same gender as you, in Choice of Romance you choose at the outset what gender your love interests will be and that will be the only thing that changes about them, and in Choice of the Vampire there are two main love interests, Clotho and Silas, regardless of what gender you are. (You can also engage in some pseudo-sexual actions with your Dominus and Jesse, both of whom are always male, regardless of your gender.) Choice of Broadsides is especially interesting in that Villeneuve is much more vital to the plot than any of the opposite-sex choices, and their route is arguably the 'main' one.
    • This is possible in Choice of Kung Fu, but unlike the other games, gender can get in the way if you don't have sufficient resources (status, honor, or loyalty to a cause) to convince Daddy to tolerate his son or daughter becoming a "companion." The Rival and the foxgirl don't care.
    • Black Magic in Heroes Rise, and later Lucky in The Hero Project, both become male or female depending on what you say your character's preference is but there's also your friend within the hero supervision agency who's always a gay female no matter what. However, if you're also playing a gay female, near the end of the game it's possible to express an interest.
  • Gender Flip: A rare case of an entire genre being flipped: In Choice of Broadsides, rather than force the player to play as a male, it's possible to to set an option such that the entirety of both navies (including the player) is staffed with females, thus turning the genre into Wooden Ships And Iron Women.
  • Gray and Grey Morality: Choice of Intrigues is a fairly dark version, where Nice Guys Finish Last, no one's hands are clean, but no one is completely unsympathetic either. Choice of Broadsides, of course, is about sailors fighting for their respective countries' wealth and power, and morality doesn't enter into it.
  • Guide Dang It: Due to how Stats can open up (or close off) certain options, this is in full effect.
  • Hello, [Insert Name Here]
  • Honor Before Reason: Silas, Gabriel(a).
  • In Medias Res: All of their games start out with an action scene (yes, even Choice of Romance). Afterwards, they segue into flashbacks about your childhood that determine your stats.
  • Loved I Not Honor More: Silas is ready to leave you for his army and probable heroic death. Also Villeneuve, when he gets his command. This can also be Lu Jin's story, should you refuse to back the Blue Scarves.
  • Multiple Endings
  • No Bisexuals: You can only get together with Villeneuve in Choice of Broadsides if you state that you aren't attracted to the opposite sex. Also, the first version of Choice of the Vampire enforced this, with the protagonist unable to get together with Silas if they pursued Clotho far enough. Later versions avert this, however.
    • In Choice of Romance, you can't be bisexual, though the King/Queen is.
    • That said, it is possible to romance Luis de Vega in the third game regardless of the Monarch's gender.
  • Politically Correct History: Choice of Romance is set in an alternate fantasy past where gender is irrelevant when it comes to marriage. Choice of Broadsides also uses it unusually - if you choose to play as a female sailor, the game world becomes a completely gender-flipped version of 18th-century Europe, with an all-female Navy.
    • Funny thing is, Choice of Broadsides is actually a subversion of this trope, because the gender-flipped world is just as politically incorrect towards men, as the real world once was towards women: men aren't allowed to join the army or the Navy, they are thought to be fit only for nursing babies at home; in romantic affairs, they are courted by females.
  • Purely Aesthetic Gender: In most games the only difference your gender makes is a few minor references in dialogue. Some of the more recent games like Diabolical have stopped bothering altogether and left it completely to the player's imagination.
  • Railroading: Choice of Games titles are generally designed to move towards a single climax with only a bit of flavor difference based on the character you have played, so there are many times when a possible diversion will be cut off, or when a character cannot be saved, no matter what, in order to force you back onto the main storyline.
  • Romance Sidequest: Present in most games, with Choice of Zombies, The Fleet and Treasure Seekers Of Lady Luck as the exceptions. Choice of Romance doesn't have a romance sidequest, as romance is the main plot, but there's a second romantic subplot in Til Death Do Us Part. The original version of the first Heroes Rise title was often criticized for being extremely pushy with its romance sidequest and subplot (part of a broader critique of the first title in general), but later versions of the game and later installments in the series were much better about it.
  • Second-Person Narration
  • Schrödinger's Question: Common during the character-building sections. Occasionally occurs in later sections such as in Heroes Rise on several encounters Black Magic where you determine who they look similar to, what they want out of life, and what kind of style they have.
  • Starbucks Skin Scale: In Choice of the Vampire, both Clotho and her descendant have café au lait skin. In Heroes Rise, The Diva is described as having caramel skin.
  • Straight Gay: As noted above, you can pretty much be whatever gender or sexuality you want and it won't affect your character one bit. Well, any more than you decide to change them, anyway. Also Villeneuve, and Silas if you pursue him and are male. Sort of in the case of Fistfull of Heroes Rise since he's in a secret relationship with Monk who is a hermaphroditic alien.
  • Story Branching: Nearly all games under the Choice of Games label go with a braided version. Taking different story paths will lead to different and often mutually-exclusive changes to your stats, and may lead to altered outcomes later in the game, but by and large you'll be hitting the same major events in every playthrough. A couple of games have split paths that last for about a chapter or so, but they usually re-merge after that (unless it's the ending, of course).
  • What the Hell, Player?:
    • The games usually go along with you, but sometimes they call you out if you make some cruel choices. For example, in Choice of Broadsides, if you choose to hang the sailors you suspect of mutiny without launching an investigation first you get this:
    I wonder how you can sleep at night after murdering some innocent sailors.
    • In Affairs of the Court, if you ruin the life of Lucio/Lucia de Vega for no reason, and then pick the option that says you found it a thrilling bit of sport, the narration says:
    I...I don't know what to say. You do realize that you are a monster, don't you?
  • Wide-Eyed Idealist: There's usually at least one in the more-cynical titles, like Silas Hope or Gabriel(a) de Mendoza.

    Choice of the Dragon 
  • The Bully: Axilmeus, one of your dragon's elder clutchmates, who even as a hatchling always tormented others hoping to take what didn't belong to him. No matter what choice you make as a hatchling, he always succeeds in stealing your golden shield, but as an adult, you have an opportunity to teach him a lesson after he encroaches on your territory with designs on your treasure hoard.
  • Curb-Stomp Battle: When your hatchling-hood enemy Axilmeus reappears as an adult, if you choose a method of dealing with him in which you have a high enough statistic, you can vanquish him very quickly without suffering any injuries.
  • Dragon Hoard: In Choice of the Dragon, you play as a dragon and one of your objectives is to acquire and protect a pile of treasure.
  • Dragons Prefer Princesses: The player can choose whether their dragon follows this trope or not.
  • Dumb Is Good: Well, not "good" per se, but in Dragon, Honor and Cunning are mutually exclusive.
  • Noble Demon: An Honorable dragon in Choice of the Dragon, especially if they prefer Finesse to Brutality.
  • Our Dragons Are Different: Choice of the Dragon.
  • Personality Powers: Choice of the Dragon: A dragon's physical traits are bound to his personality. A brutish and cruel dragon is also a mighty dragon, while a dragon who focuses on Pragmatic Villainy (or a Noble Demon) will be swifter and more agile. Honorable dragons are also more skilled in direct combat.
  • Romance Sidequest: There is an optional mission in Choice of Dragon where the player is able to search for a mate. As the player can choose what gender they are looking for, a Gay Option is available.
  • Sweet and Sour Grapes: Early on, an elder dragon drives you away from his lair no matter which of the five choices you make, but you then find a "perfect lair" afterwards.
  • Villain Protagonist: In Choice of the Dragon, you're a Card-Carrying Villain who kidnaps princesses and defeats knights because that's the dragonly thing to do, though you can play as a Noble Demon if you so choose.

    Choice of Broadsides 
  • Badass In Charge: You, eventually.
  • Blonde, Brunette, Redhead: A trio of potential Love Interests you encounter at a social gathering should you decide to look for a wife (or husband).
  • The Captain: You eventually. How old you are when you achieve it depends on the success of your choices.
  • Elites Are More Glamorous
  • Fighting Your Friend: You will eventually be sent to capture Villenueve, who you may have grown to be a good friend of yours.
  • Grow Old with Me: Can happen in Choice of Broadsides.
  • Hello, Sailor!: In Choice of Broadsides, you can choose to say that you aren't attracted to the opposite sex. If you do so, the game will note that that sort of thing isn't unusual for navy men or women, but it's not the sort of thing you can generally talk about.
  • Honor Before Reason: Your "Honor" stat, which goes up as you pass by opportunities to be a Combat Pragmatist.
  • Istanbul Not Constantinople: Choice of Broadsides is set in the royal navy of Albion (Britain), who is at the time at war with Gaul (France).
  • Marry for Love: You can choose to aim for this rather than finding a spouse with connections. If you marry the right person, it'll help towards creating a happy ending but won't boost your score much. However, if you marry the well-connected partner after announcing your intention to marry for love, it'll be a very bad match, while if you explicitly go looking for a bride for reasons of social position, the two of you will get along well and be happy together anyway.
  • Master Swordsman: If you have a high "Fighting" skill, your ability with a blade is unparalleled. It even lets you turn the final fight against Villenueve into a Curb-Stomp Battle.
  • Nepotism: Your "patronage" score. If you choose to start with it set as one of your high scores, the narration will state your father is an Admiral, it's also possible to boost the score later in the game by marrying another Admiral's daughter. Though you can subvert it by also being competent if you want to.
  • Only a Flesh Wound: You get shot and sliced with a sword in almost every confontation, how bad the injuries are depends on your fighting ability but none have any lasting effect. You can even lose a hand in the final fight with Villeneuve and it's never even mentioned again.
  • Relationship Values: If you treat Villeneuve well early in Choice of Broadsides, he/she is a viable romantic interest later.
  • Screw the Rules, I Have Connections!: A game mechanic in Choice of Broadsides. Your patronage stat determines just how much leeway the brass gives you if you don't do perfectly.
  • A Taste of the Lash: Doesn't happen to you but does happen to others during the game.
  • What You Are in the Dark: The Bloodthirst and Honor stats don't actually do much of anything, and they will often be adjusted based on your reasoning rather than action. Doing the honorable thing simply because you fear the punishment for cowardice... not actually honorable.
  • Wooden Ships and Iron Men: Or Iron Women, if you choose the appropriate option.
  • World of Action Girls: Choosing for your character to be female also makes the navies staffed entirely by women, while men are hidden away to tend to housekeeping and other less exciting tasks. It also gender flips the ruling monarch and the convention of referring to inanimate objects as female.
  • Worthy Opponent: How you and Villenueve can regard each other.
  • Would Hurt a Child: When you find a young boy on an enemy ship, you have the choice of shooting him or knocking him unconscious to stop him from raising an alarm.
  • Wouldn't Hurt a Child: Another solution to the situation described under Would Hurt a Child, although the child risks causing an alarm.

    Affairs of the Court 

    Choice of the Vampire 
  • Boy Meets Ghoul: There are several mortals whom you can befriend and woo. It never ends well.
  • Break His Heart to Save Him: You have to do this to Clotho and Silas if you want them to live. Otherwise, they die.
  • Character Customization: There's a lot in this game; you have a say in your race, religion (or lack of), creativity, political views (both mortal and undead), romance, favorite type of human to eat...
  • Dead Man Writing: If Clotho is killed by your Dominus, you can find a letter in her remains detailing how she knew this was coming, and asking you not to blame yourself.
  • Foregone Conclusion: You become a vampire, Vicksburg goes under siege, and Memphis falls.
  • Fragile Flower: Samantha Withers cries quite easily.
  • Funetik Aksent: Often used in Choice of the Vampire.
  • Hollywood Atheist: In Choice of the Vampire, the choices necessary to reduce your level of superstition generally involve openly mocking religion. You can be quiet about your lack of belief, but the stat won't go down as far that way.
  • Hypnotic Eyes: Some vampires possess the ability to use these. You can learn how to do it yourself.
  • I Hate You, Vampire Dad: It's possible to turn on you Dominus at the start of the game and kill him out of hate for what he did to you.
  • Irony: In Choice of the Vampire, you decide that Vicksburg is a good place to wait out the squabbles between slave and free states. It is not.
  • Jerk with a Heart of Gold: Jesse is an asshole, no doubt, but if Clotho is killed by your Dominus, and if you're on decent terms with him, he'll try, in his own rough way, to comfort you.
  • Lesbian Vampire: You can play as one.
  • Lover, Not a Fighter: Though faithful to his principles, army is not for the meek Silas.
  • Mayfly-December Romance: Downplayed, since you can romance Clotho as a fledgling vampire and Silas in your 60s or 70s and neither affair lasts, although Clotho lampshades the trope if she asks to become a vampire as well.
  • Meaningful Name: Silas Hope.
  • Morton's Fork:
    • When romancing Clotho, either you petition your Dominus to turn her into a vampire and she gets killed instead, or you turn her yourself and your Dominus kills her in retribution.
    • When romancing Silas, if you wait to turn him into a vampire, he dies in battle the next day; if you turn him against his will, he goes berserk and runs into the sunlight.
    • You are inevitably run out of St. Charles if you settle there; the last straw that incites a Torches and Pitchforks mob is either you ignoring an injured child's cries for help, or going to help him but inevitably losing control of your Horror Hunger when you see his blood. This is notable as a later addition, since in the original game, the mob would run you out even if you were a benign philanthropist with a 100% Adoration Rating.
  • Optional Sexual Encounter: If you have a good enough relationship with him, you and Jesse can participate in a "thrilling hunt" during The Fall of Memphis.
  • Our Vampires Are Different: Choice of the Vampire actually fits in pretty well with the standard modern vampires - they can't go out in sunlight, must drink blood to live, and can have some supernatural powers. Whether they're affected by holy symbols depends on their own beliefs.
  • Paranormal Romance: Optionally.
  • Reassigned to Antarctica: Samantha Withers.
  • Scary Black Man: Apollo Carothers seems like one at first glance, though he's quite amiable and kind unless you get on his bad side. By the end of The Fall of Memphis, though, he's rather more unstable.
  • Sickeningly Sweethearts: You and Silas.
  • Sinister Minister: You can be as evil as possible and still not only be a priest, but fervorous in your devotion to god.
  • Useless Useful Skill: Unfortunately, things like "technology" and "lore" seem to have little purpose at all in the game.
  • Undying Loyalty: It's possible to cultivate this in several people, depending on your actions, including Jesse, Samantha, and Estefania.
  • Voluntary Shapeshifting: Another power you can learn.

    Choice of Zombies 
  • Action Survivor: The protagonist in Choice of Zombies can develop into this, along with a hint of Blood Knight depending on choices.
  • Action Girl: If the protagonist is female. Also, the companions will all be female, although not all of them is this trope.
    • Dark Action Girl: The female protagonist can be sort of this. Especially if she treats the other companions in very nasty way, loves doing Kick the Dog moments, and kills zombie more for their own satisfaction than saving other people! Up to Eleven if you choose to burn down the church full of non-infected humans.
  • Bad Ass: Brian/Bonnie played this trope very straight. The protagonist can be one, too, of course. The other companions are not so fit for this, yet they have their own exceptional role.
    • Bad Ass Grandpa: Brian.
    • Never Mess with Granny: Bonnie.
    • Bad Ass And Child Duo: If you only managed to save Kayden in the end.
    • Bad Ass Bookworm: Chris/Carrie, sort of. They have some zombie knowledge from various sources, one of which is zombie video games.
    • Back-to-Back Badasses: Hard to tell, but during the horde in finale, it can be assumed the protagonist is doing this with Brian/Bonnie. Only if you choose the route to take them as your companion, of course. For the other route, it's harder to tell if the protagonist is doing this with the other characters in that moment, where they choose the route to take Michael/Michelle and/or Lev/Lisa instead, since none of them are straight Bad Ass.
  • Bi the Way: Anita, the refugees leader in church. She's heavily implied to had sex (perhaps outercourse sex and without naked... possibly) with Justin/Jennifer.... OR, if Justin/Jennifer and Kayden are not present, she will target on you (the protagonist). You can turn her down, though, and fortunately won't affect your survival.
  • Big Bad Wannabe: Anita.
  • Blood Knight: Brian/Bonnie are obviously this. The protagonist can be one, too!
  • The Brute: Luke.
  • Bury Your Gays: If you choose to kill Anita, either by electrocuting her, or knocked her unconcious and then burn down her church while she's still inside.
  • Crazy Survivalist: Brian/Bonnie, sort of, for a very good reason. They have some shades of Great White Hunter, too, though.
  • The Dragon: Laura, to Anita.
  • Dying Moment of Awesome: One of the better ways to end up in Zombies, staying behind to fight the zombies alone after you get bitten and giving the rest of your group a chance to get away, as they promise that everyone in the world that comes after the Zombiepocalyse will know your name.
  • Dr. Jerk: Michael/Michelle is pretty much this trope. Thankfully, he/she has Hidden Heart of Gold.
  • Faux Action Girl: Lisa, who is very smart in setting traps for many zombies, but still needs to be rescued when being directly confronted by a single zombie.
  • The Friend Nobody Likes and The Load: Justin/Jennifer, unsurprisingly. In fact, his/her special role is only telling the protagonist about the exact location of Lev/Lisa, or Chris/Carrie in alternate route, so you can save them.
  • Gadgeteer Genius: Lev, or Lisa in female version.
  • Guns in Church: If you choose church as the shelter.
  • Five-Man Band
    • The Leader: The protagonist.
    • The Lancer: Michael/Michelle/Brian/Bonnie, they're first adult character to join you, regardless of the route (not counting Kayden who is a kid). Also, they are very often giving some advice during survival, despite how Jerkass they are.
    • The Smart Guy: Lev/Lisa/Chris/Carrie, obviously.
    • The Chick: Justin/Jennifer
    • Tagalong Kid: Kayden, both version, the only child in your group. Interestingly, s/he is more useful than Justin/Jennifer who is an adult.
  • Jerk Ass: Michael (or Michelle in female version), and also Brian/Bonnie in alternate route. Unsurprisingly, the protagonist can be this one, too.
  • Katanas Are Just Better: Hidden weapon. Can only be used once, unfortunately.
  • Kick the Dog: The protagonist can do this, to an extreme, towards Justin/Jennifer by throwing him/her to the horde of zombies. Doing so will cause your companion lose their faith on you, naturally. Ironically, Michael/Michelle/Brian/Bonnie are hardly have this moment.
  • Pet the Dog: The said jerkass characters are naturally have this moment of their own, though perhaps only if you know how to deal with them in right way. The protagonist can have some, such as being nice toward the kid Kayden, and/or later comforting Justin/Jennifer when he/she feels very stressed by the situation.
    • Anita has this moment, too, especially towards Justin/Jennifer (see Bi the Way above, though). The old lady Laura is also very nice towards Kayden.
  • Zombie Apocalypse: Choice of Zombies.

    Heroes Rise 

    To the City of the Clouds 

    Eerie Estate Agent 

    Choice of the Star Captain 
  • Deadpan Snarker: Lloyd the computer, and the PC has the option to be one too.
  • Humans Are Bastards: Or at least Strat-Comm are bastards, they staged a war to harvest dead Blobs as a power source. The rest of humanity didn't really know about it.
  • Servile Snarker: Technically Lloyd as he's your computer, thus is either your property or your servant, whichever way you want to look at it.
  • Wrench Wench: Gressle the mechanic, who upgrades your ship.
  • You No Take Candle: The Blobs' attempts at speaking English.

    The Fleet 
  • Death from Above: The initial enemy attack on your homeworld involves many pod-like ships appearing in orbit and wiping out whole cities with deadly beams.
  • Featureless Protagonist: In The Fleet, you're just the Fleet Captain. Not quite a Non-Entity General, as you can become directly involved in personal combat or captured at some points.
  • Gondor Calls for Aid: Your job in The Fleet is to bring the Alliance to reclaim your homeworld.
  • Number Two: Lieutenant Demian is loyal but decidedly anti-Alliance and will turn on you after the enemy is defeated in an attempt to strike at the Alliance, if you're not anti-Alliance as well.
  • Space Whale: You encounter a bunch of space-dwelling creatures that begin to eat at your ships. Depending on how decisively you fight them off, they may come back later.
  • We ARE Struggling Together: In The Fleet, the members of your fleet hate The Alliance even more than they hate the invading aliens who have taken over your homeworld.
    • Not only that, but the civilians are for the Alliance, which may cause a rift between them and the military personnel.
  • You Are in Command Now: As Admiral Kalla's fleet is getting pounded by the enemy, he gives command of the remaining ships (minus a small squadron) over to you, promotes you to Fleet Captain, and tells you to get out, protecting the civilian ships, and find allies.

    Choice of Kung Fu 
  • Armour Is Useless: In Choice of Kung Fu when duelling against the western heavily armoured knights, it's very easy to turn the enemy's armour into a disadvantage.
  • Arranged Marriage: In Choice of Kung Fu, most of the possible romances are begun by meeting the boy or girl's father and being introduced to their child, and the marriage is expressly for the purpose of securing a political alliance or (for the farmer) to ensure that his family will be provided for. However, this isn't a forced marriage, and the partner must be courted and give their consent as well. In addition, should you meet the requirements, a father will allow the protagonist to court their child of the same sex as a "companion," though the irregularity of the situation is noted.
  • Ascend to a Higher Plane of Existence: If you ask the Dragon Sage the right question, you will become the next Dragon Sage.
  • Captain Ersatz: Zhuge Miao from Kung Fu is a gender-flip of Zhuge Liang.
  • Fantastic Foxes: Feng from Choice of Kung Fu is a fox spirit.
  • Flight: For most of the game, flight relies on Wire Fu empowered by chi and magic, but there is a way to gain the power to fly unconditionally.
  • The Four Gods: In Choice of Kung Fu, the challenge where you lift the cauldron sears your wrists with two brands; either the tiger and the dragon or the tortoise and the phoenix.
  • Heir to the Dojo: If you particularly impress Zhuge Miao, you can be adopted as the heir to the Zhuge family and style of kung fu, abandoning your previous family and martial style.
  • La Résistance: The Blue Scarves, although in an unusual variation of this trope, instead of rebelling against the Empire for abusing its power, they are rebelling because they feel the Emperor is doing nothing with the Empire's strength, even as foreigners invade and drive citizens from their livelihoods.
  • Master-Apprentice Chain: A complex example, because there are a lot of sifus in this story and it's common to learn from more than one. Zhuge Miao trained Master Shen, who then trains you. Then you're sent to learn directly from Zhuge Miao, and after that you take on students of your own, possibly including Sun An.
  • Maybe Magic, Maybe Mundane: While there's a lot of open magic in the game, the existence of immortals still fits this trope. Among others, Zhuge Miao and Sun An are both rumored to be immortals, but according to Zhuge Miao, even she won't live forever (though she is Long Lived), and Sun An is an open question. Of course, there's also spirits and the Dragon Sage, but they don't really count. You can, however, become an immortal for real in one ending.
  • Mind Game Ship: In-Universe in Choice of Kung Fu. One of the possible romance options is Feng, the nine-tailed fox spirit, who is playing tricks on you from your first meeting, and continues to do so even if she becomes your lover.
  • Mundane Wish: In Choice of Kung Fu, one of the questions you can ask the Dragon Sage is "Why do kites fly?"
  • The Rival: Lu Jin is your rival in your martial arts order, but is an unusual example because you can befriend him/her early (Lu Jin's gender is randomized each time you play a new game) if you share his/her political views and if you express approval instead of resignation at being teamed up with Lu Jin on a mission.
    • Later in the story, you get another rival, Sun An, a wandering hero, who challenges your school to test your worthiness. He can be befriended like Lu Jin if you beat him and then invite him on as a teacher in the school.
  • Supernatural Martial Arts: The Magic stat in Choice of Kung Fu combines flight and Ki Attacks with more straightforward magic, such as divination and command over the forces of nature. It's all part of the same thing.
  • The Three Trials: To advance in the Order, you eventually need to pass at least two out of three trials: making it through a room full of attacking monks, carrying an urn full of hot coals to the river, and retrieving and interpreting a scroll from behind a waterfall.
  • Trickster Mentor: Feng, the nine-tailed fox in Choice of Kung Fu is screwing with your head from the very beginning, but she's quite helpful if you can match wits with her. Also a Stealth Mentor. It's her purpose to test monks and lure them away from enlightenment, but succeeding in the tests builds character.
  • Wuxia: Choice of Kung Fu. One possible character is someone who was a xia before they joined the Order.

    Treasure Seekers of Lady Luck 
  • Action Hero: If your character's expertise is "tactical."
  • The Captain: Isan is the captain of the titular Lady Luck.
  • Cute Mute: Taloo from Treasure Seekers.
  • Guile Hero: If your character's expertise is "infiltration."
  • Insectoid Aliens: Rallix is one.
  • It's Personal: Detective Garce's sister is Isan's wife, who is clinically dead but is still powering the Lady Luck's engines. This is the real reason why Garce is so adamant on arresting Isan.
  • Living Shadow: Kraska is from a race of people called the "Shadow Fiends".
  • Petting Zoo People: Shelou from Treasure Seekers is the bird variant.
  • Plant Person: Thisi from Treasure Seekers
  • Plot Armor: wherever you are when your spaceship suffers a crash, you will be the only survivor rescued by the Lady Luck.
  • Ragtag Bunch of Misfits: The Lady Lucks crew.
  • Science Hero: If your character's expertise is "science."
  • Slave Race: The Vervoo. However, you later find a transport vessel named the Andax Theta that was owned and operated by Vervoo, so not all Vervoo are slaves. This revelation causes Vervoo crewmember Borion to feel conflicted.
  • Sympathetic Inspector Antagonist: Detective Garce. Subverted at the end where you find out that, rather than hunting down Captain Isan for being the leader of a crew of pirates, as Garce claimed, it's actually for a personal reason, as Garce blames Isan for the death of his wife, who is Garce's sister.

    Slammed! 
  • Action Girl: If the PC is one, then loads of them will pop up. Even if she isn't, there will still be some of these.
  • Adorkable: Ecstasy tends to babble when s/he gets nervous, leading to many moments of this.
  • Always Someone Better: The PC can consider themselves as having always been stuck in JJ's shadow.
  • As You Know: A number of industry-related terms are given explanations for non-wrestling fans, though this doesn't enter the dialogue itself.
  • Batman Gambit: JJ eventually reveals that the reason they betrayed you was because they wanted you to get angry, so the two of you could finally have an all-out, guilt-free match.
  • Bitch in Sheep's Clothing: JJ and Griss/Giana, who pose as your friends and then stab you in the back. Though the former is just trying to act out a Batman Gambit, and the other is just being dragged along for the ride.
  • Career-Ending Injury: Usually what triggers the game overs.
  • Charlie Brown from Outta Town: After you're (genuinely) fired, you rejoin the GWA under a mask.
  • Clingy Jealous Girl: If a female PC romances Ecstasy, She'll mention to Sam later that he's "The Jealous type." The female version shows signs of this as well.
  • Consummate Professional: One way to play the PC is as a wrestler who doesn't care for attention or looking good, just doing their job and getting the money.
  • Cruel to Be Kind: This is what Super Horns thinks he/she's doing by betraying Solitary and pushing him off the scaffold before he can grab the title belt; Super Horns is convinced that Solitary has "spinal stenosis", a disease caused by damage to the spine that can lead to paralysis if left untreated, but Solitary refuses to let a doctor examine him for the disease, so Super Horns thinks if Solitary no longer has a title to defend, Solitary would have no choice but to get examined.
  • Deadpan Snarker: The PC and JJ, which usually leads to Snark-to-Snark Combat.
  • Determinator: Despite being massively unsuited to wrestling, Ecstasy won't give up trying and can even place in the final two of the Reality Show if you help them, which is noted to be their greatest asset. When you ask them about it, they'll say they're doing it as a sort of homage to their birth dad.
  • Drowning My Sorrows: It's telling how bad the PC's Heroic B.S.O.D. is that they can drop their "no drinking" policy to do this.
  • Et Tu, Brute?: This happens twice:
    • First, JJ betrays you by getting you fired from the GWA by having Griss/Giana plant an illegal drug in your bag, and sabotaging a mandatory drug test to motivate the promoters to search your bag.
    • Second, in the Ladders and Scaffolds match with you, JJ, Solitary, and Super Horns vs. Paul Prototype and his Lawgivers, just as Solitary is about to grab the belt, Super Horns betrays him by pushing him off the scaffold.
  • Face–Heel Turn / Heel–Face Turn: During your comeback, you can pull one of this as part of your Kayfabe.
  • Frame-Up: JJ frames you for illegal drug use, resulting in your firing and subsequent Heroic B.S.O.D..
  • Gambit Pileup: It's a mess, and not just under kayfabe either.
  • Guile Hero: A possible way to win the final challenge on the Reality Show portion is to get Ecstasy to sing instructions, which drown out the instructions given by the opposing team's manager.
  • Harpo Does Something Funny: After your return to the GWA and subsequent unmasking, Alex Dobbs doesn't even try to script your storyline, though she'll interfere if you don't create any hot angles for her to work with. All she cares about is that you play your part with complete commitment. invoked
  • Heroic B.S.O.D.: A six-month long one occurs after the PC gets betrayed and ruined by their supposed best friend.
  • It's All My Fault: The PC never really talks about it, but it's clear they blame themselves heavily for the car accident that seriously wounded JJ.
  • Kayfabe: Exists, and with the integration of shootfighting into the GWA, all the lines between reality and kayfabe are getting tangled. How strictly you keep kayfabe is up to you.
  • Lets Wait Awhile: Non-sexual example; Ecstasy will ask you this the first time you pursue them, because they aren't ready for a relationship. Later, the PC can do the same to them for the same reason.
  • Love Interest: Three of them—JJ, Ecstasy, and Madeline Rio. The former is always the same gender as you and thus a Gay Option, Ecstasy is always the gender you're interested in, and Madeline Rio is always female.
  • Love Triangle: Can be booked at one point under Kayfabe. You're expected to play along; how real it gets is up to you.
  • Manipulative Bastard (possibly Magnificent Bastard): JJ and Alex.
  • Masculine Girl, Feminine Boy: If the PC is female and Ecstasy male, this trope comes into play, with her being the athletic wrestler and him being the charming singer.
  • Mean Character, Nice Actor: If you play a heel in the arena but don't bring the Kayfabe into your real life.
  • Obfuscating Disability: Alex Dobbs was kicked in the head as a child as part of a storyline, and no one outside of the upper-echelons of the GWA know for certain that it's an act.
  • Politically Incorrect Villain: Paul Prototype is a misogynistic asshole and the only unambiguous (non-kayfabe) villain in the game.
  • Purely Aesthetic Gender: Averted. Most of the wrestling world doesn't care about your sex, but Paul Prototype is a Straw Misogynist, and this becomes a plot point at one point.
  • Revenge: This is seemingly why JJ betrays the PC... after which the PC can choose to get some revenge of their own.
  • Shout-Out: So, so many to the world of wrestling storylines.
  • Shown Their Work: The game is filled with industry terms and, as evidenced above, shout-outs to famous wrestling storylines.
  • Stepford Smiler: Ecstasy tends to cover up their insecurities and sadness with a big smile. They'll even try to do so if you gently turn their advances down.
  • Straight Gay: Solitary is gay, but there aren't any hints of it in his behavior, fitting this trope. It's only mentioned briefly during an overview of his career, a blink-and-you'll-miss-it line if you successfully earn a title match with Solitary by grabbing the belt during the Ladders and Scaffolds match, as a blog post will report that Paul Prototype will accuse Solitary and Alex Dobbs (who is a woman) of being in bed with each other "literally, despite Solitary's known orientation".
  • The Teetotaler: The PC has a strict "no drinking" policy, after their drinking and driving resulted in an accident that mangled one of their friends' legs and emotionally scarred another.
  • Training from Hell: Part of an off-screen bit where the PC trains with Sagramore in preparation for their return to the GWA as a Charlie Brown from Outta Town.
  • Unskilled, but Strong: Having a high Strength and low Technique. Inversely, it's also possible to be...
  • Unusual Euphemism: Promoter Vinnie Gaider's most prominent idiosyncracy is his use of wresting terms in place of curses.
    "What for clothesline's sake are you still doing here?!"
  • What Happened to the Mouse?: Griss/Giana vanishes from the story after they help betray you.
  • Will They or Won't They?: Part of Ecstasy's romance line is how you're both interested in a relationship but never have the right time for one, leading to this.
  • Wrestling Family: The Atuas, a real (In-Universe) family of wrestlers (though Griss/Giana isn't a wrestler, but remains important to the plot).
  • Worked Shoot: The GWA has begun including shootfighting in their lineup to mix things up, but except for the championship (always a shootfight), whether a fight is a work or a shoot is kept under the tightest secrecy. One fight is both at once: a fight that starts as a work, then goes shoot, and switches back to a work.
  • Would Hit a Girl: If you choose to play as a female PC, most of your opponents will be gender-swapped to female as well. However, if you choose to refuse Paul Prototype's deal and go for the championship instead of settling things with your rival, the final fight will be against either the reigning champion Solitary or Prototype himself, both of whom are always male, and they will not hold back on account of the PC's gender.
  • Xanatos Gambit: Alex Dobbs' response to Paul's coup d'etat is to run with it, since it's not her ass on the line. If Paul wins, then she gets rid of Solitary; if he loses, she loses nothing, and she has another champion lined up to challenge Solitary's reign. She even points that you and JJ are also not at risk, but in this case she's incorrect.
  • Xanatos Speed Chess: In a world where only half the storylines are planned out, Alex' greatest strength is her ability to simply roll with events and take advantage of opportunities.
  • You Fight Like a Cow: Your "promo" skill is (among other things) your ability to taunt opponents.

    Choice of the Ninja 
  • And the Adventure Continues: At the end of a successful playthrough, assuming you didn't switch sides, Lord Matsuya is defeated and Lord Sano's interests are protected. However, General Araki escapes during the final fight and takes his loyal samurai with him, planning a rebellion, so the story ends with Lord Sano tasking you with another job, that of tracking General Araki down and stopping him.
  • Big Good: Lord Sano is a more gray example, as technically your ninja village is only supporting him because he's the village's patron, but ultimately you do find out that Lord Sano is a far kinder and more reasonable man than his enemy, Lord Matsuya.
  • Big Bad: Lord Matsuya is a more gray example, as technically he's only your ninja village's enemy because he's against the village's patron, but ultimately you do find out that Lord Matsuya is a nastier person than Lord Sano.
  • Conservation of Ninjutsu: It depends on how you play. If you play a martial arts-oriented ninja, you can curb-stomp the enemies you face, but if you focus mostly on stealth and still get involved in fights, the fights are a lot more even and can turn against you.
  • Co-Dragons: Lord Matsuya, the Big Bad, is backed up by General Araki, who killed Maki's parents and is rumored to be getting supernatural help, and by your childhood friend Kaoru, who can optionally persuade the player to switch sides and become another Dragon to Lord Matsuya.
  • Et Tu, Brute?: You can optionally turn on Lord Sano and your allies and join Lord Matsuya.
  • Heel–Face Turn: Subverted. If you character still has feelings for your childhood friend Kaoru, then during the last mission, you get a dialogue option to try to persuade Kaoru to join your side. Kaoru considers it briefly, looking as if in pain, but ultimately refuses and fights you anyway.
  • Highly Visible Ninja: You can optionally play like this if you constantly fight every enemy instead of trying to hide or turn invisible.
  • Ninja
  • Ninja Brat: After you rescue Lord Sano's son Ryousei, you impress Ryousei so much that he wants to be a ninja when he grows up.
  • Not Cheating Unless You Get Caught: At the very beginning of the game, your ninja character and all your classmates are put through a "final exam" consisting of finding one of ten hidden coins (which would fail at least half the class, as there are twenty students including you) and then putting that coin into a pot without getting caught. You're allowed to fight people for a coin, lie to teachers and use illusions to get away, etc., the only thing that would disqualify you is if a teacher outright catches you putting the coin into the pot.
  • Pay Evil unto Evil: Maki wants to do this to General Araki, who killed her parents, and Lady Sano, Lord Sano's wife, will ask you to kill Lord Matsuya since Lord Sano is too noble to do it. It's up to you if you wish to follow this trope yourself.
  • Romance Sidequest: You can optionally romance your childhood friend Kaoru, who is simultaneously both a straight option and a Gay Option, because you pick both your gender and Kaoru's gender.
  • Stock Ninja Weaponry: But not as much as you might think, as most of the fights involve martial arts or swords.
  • True Companions: Your classmates Maki and Kenta, each of whom accompanies you on a mission, and both of them will accompany you on the last mission where, optionally, you can subvert the trope by betraying them if you think Lord Matsuya's on the "winning side".

    Showdown at Willow Creek 
  • Cowboy
  • Cowboys and Indians: Played straight or subverted, depending on whether your player character dislikes the Utes as much as some of the townsfolk, or whether your player character sympathizes with the Utes instead.
  • Driving Question: The plot is driven by the mystery of Victoria Frye's disappearance: did she leave on her own, or was she kidnapped? And if she was kidnapped, by whom?
  • Gay Cowboy: You can play one, if you choose a love interest who's the same gender as your character.
  • Hooker with a Heart of Gold: Summer Rain, one of the possible love interests for the player character. She's actually called a "soiled dove" in the game itself, but this is a euphemism for "prostitute", as the nickname is a reference to the Soiled Dove Plea.
  • The Rival: Deputy Winslow, who you have to work alongside to solve the case but behaves like he should run the investigation.
  • Romance Sidequest: And like many Choice of Games games, the romance options are available regardless of what gender your player character is.

    Reckless Space Pirates 
  • The Captain: Captain Zoa is a 60-something woman who kidnaps prospective crew members and forces them to prove their usefulness and loyalty. She is the only one who can keep Krantic in line.
  • The Cracker: If your Hacking skill is high enough, you can solve many problems if you're near a console.
  • Evil Cannot Comprehend Good: Captain Zoa does not understand altruism, compassion, or emotions of any sort.
  • Future Slang: "Groundsiders" are people who live on planets, "Shippers" are people who live on ships, and "Stashies" are people who live on space stations. An old saying is mentioned a few times: "Stashies lazy, Shippers crazy".
  • Happily Adopted: Zeeber in one of the endings.
  • Improvised Weapon:
    • The Medusae yell at one of the pirates, resulting in the pirate being hit by a nonlethal electrical discharge. Once they figure this out, they start yelling at the pirates as a means of defending themselves.
    • You can grab a needle from a medi-bed at one point to use as an improvised weapon.
    • You can hack the speechbox to mimick the Medusans' shouts.
  • Insanity Defense: If your Empathy is low and your Infamy is high, and you are taken into IHP custody, the sentencing committee will decide that you've been contaminated by living on a pirate ship and sentence you to Groundside rehabilitation.
  • Lightworlder: Ny-bat is from a human colony where gravity is 3/4 of Earth norm. S/he is tall and lanky with all features stretched out. However, s/he is far from being weak and is the best hand-to-hand combatant on the ship.
  • Mega Corp.: "Spider" is a Medusa conglomerate that has a monopoly on vermite trade with outsiders.
  • The Metric System Is Here to Stay: A variation. Shippies and Stashies don't use "minutes" and "hours", preferring to keep everything in multiples of 10. So, their equivalent of minutes would be "kiloseconds" (1000 seconds = 16 minutes 40 seconds). Groundsiders still use the old-fashioned time units.
  • Organic Technology: The Medusae are masters of this, and their "vermite" substance, capable of altering its shape and density on command is highly valuable to human ships and stations, as they can quickly seal hull breaches.
  • Parental Substitute: Gao may become this in some endings.
  • Space Is Cold: Averted and lampshaded. If you opt to escape your cell by going outside the ship, you will muse that such things as boiling blood and instant frostbite that Groundsiders think are the first thing to be afraid of are not a concern for a short spacewalk without a suit. It's the lack of pressure and oxygen. You must breathe out before attempting such a spacewalk.
  • Space Pirates: Your kidnappers.
  • Starfish Aliens: The so-called "Medusae" are a race of fungus-looking aliens who communicate by electrical discharges in their highly-moist atmosphere. They are frequently referred to as "Mushrooms".
  • Torture Technician: Krantic is a sadist who loves to inflict pain on others even when torture doesn't provide useful results.
  • Translator Microbes: The speechbox allows humans to communicate with the Medusae, although the translation has a feel of somebody running it through Google Translate (i.e. you still have to guess at the meaning, as grammar is terrible).

    Choice of the Deathless 
  • Aerith and Bob: There are names like Damian Stone and Ashleigh Wakefield mixed with names like Cassoway Chen and Golan Varkath.
    • It's there for the preset PC names, too. You can make names like Jamie Shepard or Ailing Cavendish.
  • A Fool for a Client: The goddess Ajaia is immensely powerful, and thinks that that means that she can win a court case against a firm as powerful as Varkath Nebuchadnezzar Stone without an attorney of her own. Your firm would like to keep it that way.
  • Amoral Attorney: Your law firm can be extremely ruthless in its dealings and especially its internal politics, and there are plenty of chances for you to act out this trope. Varkath barely comprehends the concept of morality.
  • Back from the Dead: Can happen to the PC more than once.
  • Badass Bookworm: Your PC can easily become this if they have a high enough craft skill.
  • Badass Bureaucrat: Everyone. Manipulating the rules of a contract is an even more powerful weapon than magical combat.
  • Belligerent Sexual Tension: The PC and Wakefield have BST that takes several years to resolve, going back to their college days.
  • Black Magic: As Nebuchadnezzar points out, the Craft is very cruel. The fact that it's powered by sold souls that are traded as currency is just the start.
  • Blood Magic: Blood is used to sign Magically Binding Contracts.
  • Celestial Bureaucracy
  • Crusading Lawyer: Cassoway Chen and possibly the PC.
  • The Dark Arts: Craft.
  • Deal with the Devil: Contracts between humans and demons. Which, of course, require lawyers to sort out.
  • Dem Bones: Skeletal undead are apparently fairly common, but special mention goes to Golan Varkath. Unnervingly, he wears a painted leather mask with glass eyes. You can also be turned into a skeleton if you're injured too severely in the final battle.
  • Did You Just Punch Out Cthulhu?:
    • With enough stats, you can depose a goddess. This is a Stealth Pun; you're actually taking a deposition from her...but it's a harrowing mental battle on par with the other kind of "deposing a goddess."
    • The final battle allows you to defeat John Smith, an Eldritch Abomination with limitless power due to a broken contract. You can do it yourself, or call on allies to do it. Golan Varkath's method of defeating him would be particularly exemplary if Varkath weren't so powerful himself; doing it yourself without destroying yourself in the process shows everyone how lesser mortals do it.
  • Energy Economy: The currency of this world is "thaums," which are a measure of soulstuff. Used both for the Craft and as currency.
  • Evil Counterpart/Shadow Archetype: You can conduct a meeting with a mirror image of yourself that just feels wrong inside the Demon Embassy.
  • Friends with Benefits: Possible with Chen and Vega, with room for a Relationship Upgrade.
    • Wakefield claims that their relationship with the PC is this, if you chose to drop the big L word during their I Uh You Too moment. Though it's quickly obvious to both parties that they don't really mean it.
  • Glass Eye: Nebuchadnezzar has one.
  • Great Offscreen War: The God Wars, from which much of the planet is still recovering.
  • Gentleman Snarker: Ashleigh Wakefield. S/he is almost constantly sarcastic and superior while being polished, dignified, and dressed to the nines.
  • How We Got Here: The game begins with the PC facing off against the Big Bad and having their body and mind shattered into pieces. It then flashes back to the PC's early days in the firm and works its way forward as the PC tries to piece him/herself back together.
  • Humanoid Abomination:
    • John Smith, a major client of Varkath Nebuchadnezzar Stone. Until the end where he switches to his real form.
    • Golan Varkath, Deathless King and senior partner at Varkath Nebuchadnezzar Stone. An undead skeleton who hails from the early years of the God Wars, who has produced children both as father and mother, who wears a mask of human skin, and who barely even comprehends the concept of morality. He also can trivially destroy a being of unlimited power with a quick interpretation of a standard contract.
  • I Uh You Too: All of your love interests give statements to this effect during their confession scene. You can chose to respond in kind, or outright say you love them back.
  • The Legions of Hell: Aren't really bad sorts, just completely inimical to the laws of physics in our universe and vice versa.
  • Loophole Abuse: It's primarily your job to prevent these. Unless it's your job to commit them; being a lawyer puts you on either side of it.
  • Man in White/Woman in White: Wakefield has a penchant for wearing very light colored clothing, and wears an all white suit while attending your PC's workshop. Though their choice of dress in said chapter becomes very ironic when they suffer from Demonic Possession.
  • Mundane Made Awesome: Courtroom drama (admittedly rather awesome even in its unrefined form) that involves magical battles, in a world where you can really sell your soul if you get into a bad contract.
  • My Life Flashed Before My Eyes: When the PC's body and mind are shattered, he/she has to review his/her memories over the years in order to piece him/herself back together.
  • Naďve Newcomer: Cassoway is very new to the lawyering business and makes several mistakes that could prove disastrous for her or the firm. You get to choose whether to help her out or stand by and let her take the fall.
  • Near-Death Experience
  • Obviously Evil: John Smith. Everyone can tell that he's up to no good, but he's a valuable client, so...
  • Occult Law Firm: Varkath Nebuchadnezzar Stone, where the PC, Chen, Ngabe, and Vega are employed. There's also Kelethres Albrecht & Ao, the law firm where Wakefield works.
  • Pride: The goddess Ajaia is well aware of how powerful she is. So powerful that she doesn't think she needs a lawyer to represent her at her deposition.
  • Psychic Powers: Craft can function this way.
  • Really Gets Around: If your PC plays their cards right, it's possible to sleep with all three potential love interests on the same playthrough.
  • Rescue Romance: You have to save Wakefield from demonic possession while keeping him/her in one piece in order to romance him/her.
  • Scars Are Forever: In this business, your body's as much at risk as your soul. Multiple characters have injuries or lost body parts, or can lose part of themselves over the course of the game. That includes you.
  • Sesquipedalian Loquaciousness: Wakefield and, occasionally, the PC. This naturally leads to...
  • Sophisticated as Hell: The PC moreso than Wakefield, who cusses about once or twice the entire game.
  • Surprisingly Elite Cannon Fodder: On the mission to depose the goddess, you're not supposed to win, you're supposed to make your firm look weak so she doesn't retain counsel. That doesn't mean you can't actually win it.
  • Triple Shifter: Working for a law firm does not leave much time for sleep. That goes double if you live in a bad part of town, because you have to spend more time commuting when you could be sleeping.
  • Tsundere: Wakefield is very Type A. Their Establishing Character Moment is sweeping into your house, insulting you, and then asking you out for dinner — just to catch up on old times, of course. And they gain approval even when their tone is very insulting. This continues all the way right up to your Relationship Upgrade.
    Wakefield: Above all else is the question of whether you do or should trust the obviously pseudonymous Mister Smith.
    Player Character: Oh, gods. You're actually worried about me.
  • Video Game Caring Potential: If want to play as a Crusading Lawyer, you're going to do a lot of this. The most noticeable example is after you discover that the firm was outright expecting you to lose the case against Ajaia. With this information in mind, you can chose to either offer her a chance to get counsel by referring her to Wakefield, or outright leak your battleplans to her so she's on more even footing. Playing this way nets you a lot more opportunities for your PC in the endgame.
  • Video Game Cruelty Potential: If you're going down the Amoral Attorney route, there lots of opportunities to be a total jerk in the story. If you wish, you can join Stone's slow smear campaign of Vega just to suck up to him, outright force you demon pro-bono client to return to the demon world with his parents, completely ignore Wakefield's Demonic Possession and double cross a goddess in order to get the upper hand in a case. And that's not even taking into account all the mean dialogue choices you can pick...

     Choice of the Deathless: City's Thirst 

     Choice of the Rock Star 
  • Annoying Younger Sibling: Inverted with your player character's brother, Casper, who is older. But it's possible for your character to be close to him anyway. If you have a close relationship with him and ask him to split the cost to get into the Battle of the Bands, he'll reveal he has spare cash and pay the entire cost, since you've been so awesome about the whole band thing.
  • But Thou Must: A very minor example, but when choosing your character's gender, if you pick the "alien from the planet Rocktopia" option, the narration says for the sake of argument that you're assuming a human form and have forgotten life on Rocktopia, and then asks you to pick male or female.
  • Consummate Professional: You can play as this if you have a high Role Model stat and constantly keep practicing and rehearsing.
  • Happily Married: One possible ending, if you agree to support Layla/Marq Gold's goals. This will cause a break-up of your band, but you later have children and start a happy and successful rock-and-roll-family.
  • Hoist by His Own Petard: If you choose, as a child, to skip out on your birthday party to go on a joyride because you think the party will be boring and you don't like the classical instrument your parents had you play, you later get grounded and sent to your room without any cake or presents—and one of the presents was to be a record player, something your player character badly wanted.
  • Sellout: Some people will express fears that you've become this if you sign on to Joey Greenback's company.
  • Sex, Drugs and Rock & Roll: Sort of. You can either play a hard-partying lifestyle (although it's mostly the "alcohol" type of party) with a high Bad Influence stat, or avert the trope and concentrate on high-quality music with a high Role Model stat.
  • Shout-Out: When asked to select your character's gender, you can either pick male, female, non-gendered, or alien from the planet Rocktopia. The non-gendered option is labeled "Bowie", and choosing it has the narration compare you to Ziggy Stardust.
  • The Rock Star: Your goal as the player character is to become this.
  • Yoko Oh No: In-Universe. If you sign on to Joey Greenback's company, he helps you start dating Layla/Marq Gold, whose gender and first name are determined by the gender your character is interested in. Layla/Marq is a very creative artist, who even makes his/her own music, but eventually he/she will ask you to place one of his/her songs on your album. If you agree, this can cause a break-up of the band. You can compromise by having Layla/Marq do backup vocals instead, but this will later lock you out of a possible marriage as Layla/Marq will leave later.

    NOLA Is Burning 

  • Big Bad: The Pitt, a rival gangster who has kidnapped your boss's wife/husband. Your player character and The Pitt used to know each other, but The Pitt has hated you ever since you stopped him from doing something especially heinous (you can choose what it was, such as torturing animals, burning down a neighbor's home, etc.).
  • Damn, It Feels Good to Be a Gangster : The premise of the game casts your player character as a "headcrusher" for the New Orleans mob, and you can decide your character enjoys this if you choose.
  • Et Tu, Brute?: If you attempt to kill your boss, The Bull, after rescuing Elle/Luke from The Pitt, then Elle/Luke will betray someone, but who she/he betrays depends on which option you picked when the narration asked how sure you were of Elle/Luke's feelings. If you answered that you know she/he loves you, then Elle/Luke will betray The Bull and help you kill him/her, allowing you to take over the New Orleans mob. But if you answered that you aren't sure if Elle/Luke loves you, then Elle/Luke will betray you and help The Bull kill you.
  • In Love with the Gangster's Girl: Possibly played straight or Gender Inverted. Depending on player choice, your boss, The Bull, is either married to a woman named Elle or a man named Luke, and since your character is in love with Elle/Luke as well, you can choose to retrieve Elle/Luke from The Pitt only in hopes of coaxing them to leave The Bull for you.
  • The Mob Boss Is Scarier: As a "headcrusher", your player character is scary in his/her own right, but it was your boss, The Bull (whose gender you can pick), who taught you your trade.
  • Mob War: Since The Pitt has kidnapped your boss's wife/husband, your boss, The Bull, is threatening that if his/her wife/husband isn't safely returned by 6AM, The Bull will turn New Orleans into a war zone. Thus, your player character needs to get Elle/Luke back safely from The Pitt before the night is over.
  • My God, What Have I Done?: You can choose for your player character to being growing sick of his/her "headcrusher" job and of the endless violence, with plans to retire from the mob for good once your mission to retrieve Elle/Luke from The Pitt is over.
  • Neighbourhood-Friendly Gangsters: You can play as this if your player character consistently chooses to use words over violence.

     Neighborhood Necromancer 
  • The Bully: The three Kendall kids, and they go even further than most examples of this trope as they attack an off-duty soldier and kill him.
  • Jerkass: As part of the premise, many of the people in your player character's hometown are this. A woman cuts in front of you in the haircut line, you're overcharged for a soda while buying fish suppers for your father, etc. You can play as one yourself if you play a character with a high Corruption stat.
  • Friendly Neighborhood Vampire: If you invite the vampire who visits later into your home, he turns out to be this (you even get to choose his name, since your character doesn't know the Transylanian Saxon necessary to pronounce his real one). You can ask him a couple of questions about vampires, and he can even help you get past the gate of The Base, though only as far as that.
  • Seen It All: The police officer PC McMurdo, who's seen some strange things in his day, but considers them all vulnerable to good old-fashioned police work, which he explains to you if you bolt from him if he investigates your house.
  • Take That: You can ask the visiting vampire what he thinks of pop culture's portrayal of vampires. He likes Bela Lugosi and Christopher Lee's portrayals, cannot understand "that lady" who writes sparkly grumpy teenage vampires who cannot communicate (he is referring to, and insulting, Stephanie Meyers and the Twilight novels), and he finds the Buffy franchise to be very funny and sad, though he thinks they got vampires confused with The Incredible Hulk. And finally he says Joss Whedon is a vampire himself.
  • "The Reason You Suck" Speech: Or rather, The Reason Your Shop Sucks Speech in this case. If you command the dead to take revenge on the fish and chips shop, and if you win, then instead of killing them you have the option of lecturing them on all the ways their shop sucks and could improve.
  • What the Hell, Hero?: After your first day commanding the dead, you'll get a minor one from the bean nighe, or "banshee" as she lets you call her, since you've been commanding the dead without seeing to their hygiene. She gives you another one later, for not letting the skeletons relax on the Day of the Dead despite them putting aside the afterlife to work for you for free.
  • Who's Laughing Now?: Part of the premise. You're a kid in a suburb full of rather unpleasant people; then, circumstances give you the ability to command the dead and possibly take revenge.

     Mecha Ace 
  • Ace Custom: You and Hawkins both start with customized versions of standard-issue mecha before possibly upgrading to Super Prototypes.
  • Ace Pilot: You. You start the game with 60 confirmed kills, and go up to 63 before you need to make any choices.
  • Anti-Frustration Feature: Unlike other titles from the company, this one has various Checkpoint saves to allow players to more easily explore the branching storylines.
  • Always Female / Always Male: The player can either randomize the genders of any love interests or choose each major character's gender, but Captain Baelyn is always female, while her former classmate Star Marshal Nicholas Steele and Doctor William Chatham are always male. If you're captured by the enemy near the end, the interrogator seeking information from you is also always male.
  • Audience Surrogate: Watanabe if you choose to spend time with him/her (in Mecha Ace, genders of major characters are either randomized or chosen by the player) when not in battle, as your player character can explain basics to him/her such as when it's necessary to follow rules and what is done with casual clothing while in military service.
  • Birds of a Feather: The love interests generally prefer player characters who have similar dispositions and alignments to their own—Weaver will only accept your advances if you're more Disciplined than Passionate, Hawkins will only show interest in a Warrior instead of a Diplomat, and so on.
  • Blood Knight: Commandant Hawkins definitely, with a side order of Spirited Competitor. Ensign Asadi also fits at least at first glance. And of course, you can be one yourself—in fact, you have to, to romance Hawkins or Asadi.
  • Blue Blood: The Imperial military is neatly divided into two categories—those who have this, and those who don't. Usually those of noble birth are higher ranking, simply due to their status and wealth. Commandant Hawkins is of noble birth, but unlike most, they earned their way to their position.
  • Bottomless Magazines: Averted - the game makes a point of detailing when the Lance-group needs to refuel or resupply on ammunition.
  • The Chains of Commanding: You can definitely play it this way. Ensign Asadi gets hit by this pretty hard after he/she nearly gets the squad killed during his/her first command.
  • Char Clone: Commandant Hawkins is the mysterious blond masked rival, though their color scheme is blue instead of red.
  • Cold-Blooded Torture: The Player Character is subjected to this after their capture by the Imperial military. They can crack at any point, or resist it to the end, with potentially permanent damage to their piloting hand.
  • Competitive Balance: Depending on which stat you raise the most, your ideal fighting style will be a little different:
    • Close Range Combatant: With a high Piloting stat, which makes you faster and improves your melee skills, you'll be better at winning melee skirmishes up close.
    • Long-Range Fighter: With a high Perception stat, which makes it easier to detect enemies and improves your ranged skills, you'll be better at ranged combat, sniping enemies from afar.
    • Stone Wall: With a high Willpower stat, you'll be able to take more hits and keep your cool under fire, which can later open up strategies such as charging into the middle of enemies and marking targets for the Caliburn to fire missiles at although, word of warning, a high Willpower build has no reliable way of retrieving the prototype early on without losing a member of your lance, so Willpower is more useful later than it is early.
    • Lethal Joke Character: With a high Presence stat, you're better able to lead the members of your lance, but your combat skills won't be ideal...however, having a high Presence also increases your persuasive skills, allowing you to outright skip some battles. It's also required to have high Presence in order to save every named character and Crown Station.
  • Dirty Coward: Commandant Hawkins will accuse you of being this, although not in exact words, if you flee from your first encounter with him/her and/or if in your second encounter you have your lances fight Hawkins instead of you.
    • If you play with a more warrior mentality, this will be your opinion on enemies who retreat or flee—playing with a diplomatic mentality means you simply see them as being pragmatic.
    • You can flee from the final battle for Crown Station, but doing this gets you a bad ending, as you've left your fellows to die and left the rebellion to fall, and your character ends up spending his/her days drinking in a bar, filled with regrets.
  • Downer Ending: No matter what choices you make, no matter how many people die, most of the endings are at least bittersweet. However, if you side with Hawkins and self-destruct the Lightbringer, you and your love interest end up as hard, joyless pirates with no real future, and the protagonist bitterly reflects that the philosophy they followed was deeply wrong.
    • If you choose to flee the battle for Crown Station, the game ends prematurely, with your character Drowning Their Sorrows in a bar on a backwater planet, full of regrets.
  • Earn Your Happy Ending: It takes a lot of work and a very specific character build, but if you make the right choices it is possible for your entire squad, the millions of civilians aboard Crown Station, and every other named character to survive.
    • Hawkins is the hardest Love Interest to keep with you and have a happy ending, but if you do, it pays off big time, especially in the "ceasefire" ending.
  • Energy Weapon: Both sides have access to Plasma Cutters, but CoDEC has a monopoly on long-range particle rifles. They're also developing the particle storm rifle, which allows for Beam Spam from a single mech. Unusually, The Empire's monomolecular hand weapons are considered superior to ordinary beam weapons in single combat, mostly due to the extremely fine control and rapid cutting power they bring to the table.
  • Escort Mission: One of the backstory options has you rising to fame after pulling off the escort mission from Hell: singledhandedly defending around a dozen fleeing civilian transports from three enemy lances, with each lance consisting of around seven units.
  • Everyone Has Standards: Commandant Hawkins expresses disgust at the Lightbearer, especially for its use on Crown Station, stating there's no honor in targeting unarmed civillians.
  • Excited Title! Two-Part Episode Name!: Chapters are titled in this matter, much like mecha anime episodes.
  • Flawed Prototype: The Lionheart has some very buggy piloting software that chokes when the Lionheart goes to full speed, and fixing that means installing limiters that make it move as slowly as a mook mech.
  • Foreshadowing: In your first battle with them, Hawkins makes a point of mentioning your 'lion's heart'. Now take guess of what the codename for that shiny new prototype you've liberated is...
  • Fun with Acronyms: The Federation is properly known as the Coalition of Democratic Extrasolar Colonies, or CoDEC for short.
  • Gender-Blender Name: For most of the characters whose gender can be chosen or randomized, while their surnames remain the same, their "given names" change depending on whether they're male or female. But in Commandant Hawkins' case, whether they're a man or a woman, their given name will always be Camille.
  • Genre Deconstruction: The game isn't shy about taking potshots at tropes that the author doesn't like (such as No Plans, No Prototype, No Backup, or the idea that aces are some kind of superhuman Newtype), and it does its best to justify the existence of combat armatures in the vein of the original Gundam.
  • Get A Hold Of Yourself Man: You can do this to Watanabe, and even get an achievement for it.
  • Grand Theft Prototype: Multiple cases, starting with stealing one of your side's prototypes back from the Empire. Oh, and the achievement for hijacking said prototype mid-fight is actually called Grand Theft Prototype.
  • Grey and Gray Morality: While The Empire is a corrupt, stagnant monolith kept in line with fear, secret police, and brute force, and The Federation are the scrappy underdog fighting for democracy and progress, the Imperial Navy has a strong tradition of "honorable" conduct that CoDEC doesn't always share, and a Warrior player can repeatedly commit what essentially amount to war crimes without even a slap on the wrist from his or her superiors.
  • Heroic B.S.O.D.: Early on, you're required to select one of four weaknesses to make your character imperfect (which, in stat terms, will reduce one of your stats to 1). One of the choices is "Combat shakes", which causes your character's teeth to grind and hands to freeze at the controls due to the stress of constant war, and to demonstrate the weakness right away, you have a heroic BSOD as an enemy mech is about to fight you, requiring Asadi to shoot it down to rescue you.
  • Honor Before Reason: A fatal flaw of the Imperials, as "dishonorable" tactics such as flanking and ambushes are considered beneath them.
  • Hot-Blooded: You, if you have a high Passion score. This also fits Asadi to a T. In Asadi's case, it's deconstructed, as his/her recklessness nearly gets their lance killed in their first command, leaving them shaken.
  • Humongous Mecha: Do we really need to spell it out?
  • Jack-of-All-Stats: Of the three starting mechs, the aging-but-reliable Pictus is the most versatile and performs well for characters whose builds haven't focused on either Piloting, the close combat stat, or Perception, the most important ranged combat stat.
  • Macross Missile Massacre: Play your cards right and you can send a send heavy missiles from the Caliburn in Hawkins' direction during your second battle with him/her. The achievement is even called "Itano Circus" in the code.
  • Necessary Drawback: Early on, during a battle, you're required to select from one of four weaknesses that causes you to falter, requiring your team to bail you out. This is a gameplay element to reduce one of your stats to make up for an earlier choice that increased one of them. The weaknesses you can choose are being outmaneuvered by a superior pilot (reduces your Piloting), being blindsided by an enemy you didn't detect (reduces your Perception), losing the ability to command the others (reduces your Presence), or the "combat shakes" (reduces your Willpower).
  • Precision F-Strike: If you use a convoluted argument to talk Hawkins into retreating instead of getting into a second duel.
    Asadi: "Boss? What the fuck just happened?"
  • Reconstruction: The Char Clone of the game, Camille Hawkins, reconstructs the Masked Warrior. The mask isn't there to hide their identity from anyone, it's something they wear to display who they are, like a knight's helm.
  • Sadistic Choice: During the Battle of Crown Station, once the Lightbringer comes online. The Lieutenant Commander must choose between saving ten million innocent people aboard Crown Station, or the retreating battlefleet, including, potentially, his or her love interest. And the best third option available, offering oneself as a hostage to the enemy admiral in exchange for breaking off the assault on the retreat and not firing the Lightbringer, requires high Presence to pull off. Alternatively, you can sacrifice your squadron to save the other objective, which still fits this trope.
  • Shout-Out: The game is absolutely studded with shout-outs.
  • Shrinking Violet: Watanabe is very shy and stuttery when you first meet them.
  • Slasher Smile: At one point, Commandant Hawkins is described as giving a "grim slash" that is "predatory, intimidating, and nothing like a smile."
  • Standard Sci-Fi History: It fits the broad outline of the earliest parts of the timeline, though The Empire is actually a degraded corporate-bureaucratic entity that has degenerated into a stagnant feudal entity, and The Federation is starting to emerge as a way to derail it into something more in line with a Real Robot Genre setting.
  • Starbucks Skin Scale: Asadi is described as having "skin the colour of milk tea".
  • Super Prototype: The Lionheart and the Roland on the imperial side. However, the concept is also sporked when its designer points out that they can just make more Lionheart units if you get shot down. Also, it may not be as "super" as your own Ace Custom. You're still required to use the Lionheart anyway past a certain point.
  • Talking the Monster to Death: Gather the right information and have the right stats, and it's possible to skip the a number of fights with Hawkins. The first involves playing on his or her nature, talking about how you've been on patrol for days and are so tired you won't give him/her the fight s/he wants. The second involves either demonstrating that his/her philosophy is deeply flawed or telling him/her that you love them and don't want to see them like this. The latter, obviously, is only possible if you're in a romance with them.
  • Übermensch: Commandant Hawkins is a philosophical warrior who believes that humanity can only become strong through conflict and warfare. In one ending, they change their motivation to a constant struggle against war.
  • Wave Motion Gun: The Lightbearer, the super-weapon of the Imperials, which is capable of destroying over half the Co Dec military fleet in one shot. Capturing it is key ending the war, as you can either use it to destroy the Imperial fleet, intimidate them into an unconditional surrender, or threaten both sides into a ceasefire.
  • Worthy Opponent: Commandant Hawkins sees you this way. Can become Friendly Enemy and outright Foe Yay if you play your cards right.
  • You Owe Me: If you're out-maneuvered by an enemy pilot during the first battle, Asadi will quip this after they bail you out.

     Thieves' Gambit: The Curse of the Black Cat 
  • Always Someone Better: The game's description as well as the prologue mentions that you're the second greatest thief. So who is the first? Bouchard, your rival, who has never been met in the flesh; all anyone has seen of them is their calling card. They could be a man, a woman, or even a group of people, although since the newspapers call him Maurice Bouchard, there is a strong possibility that he's a guy. You do find out who Bouchard is near the end of the game, and Bouchard is indeed a guy.
  • Book Dumb: If your character has a low Intellect stat but you still successfully complete the game without getting arrested.
  • Classy Cat-Burglar: If your character is female and has a high Honor stat.
  • Gentleman Thief: If your character is male and has a high Honor stat.
  • The Handler: Reg Claythorne, your right-hand man with a British voice, who speaks to you through your earpiece.
  • Refuge in Audacity: If your character has a high Flash stat.
  • The Reveal: You finally find out who your rival, Bouchard, is near the end of the game, because Bouchard is none other than Nick, who's on your side until you actually get the jewel, at which point he attempts to steal it for himself. However, there's a way to figure out who Bouchard is in advance and thus prepare yourself: when given a choice of reading material before the heist, choose to read up on Bouchard's Venice heist. Since Nick said earlier that he was in Venice, and he has a similar build and haircut to the person in the foggy photo, your character will realize that Nick is Bouchard.
  • Stupid Crooks: If your character has a low Intellect stat and you get arrested.
  • Sympathetic Inspector Antagonist: Inspector Marie Leclerc from Interpol's Cultural Property Theft Division, who has made you into one of her special projects and is described as "scarily competent."

    Psy High 
  • Alpha Bitch: Mackenzie. You can even choose the reason for the animosity: either it's because she resents you for having more people come to your twelfth birthday party than to hers, because you resent her for being mean to your friend Alison/Andrew as a child, or because, well, you just don't like her.
  • Anguished Declaration of Love: This is how Alison/Andrew, your best friend, confesses their feelings to you.
  • Arc Words: "Model citizens." That means "brainwashed into being a straight-A student."
  • Big Bad: Randall Pierce, the principal.
  • Brainwashed: Mr. Pierce and Ms. Clay are using the Vinculum to brainwash the students. Mr. Pierce is using this for his political ambitions, Ms. Clay honestly believes that making the students into "model citizens" is what's best for them.
  • Childhood Friend Romance: Alison/Andrew, should you choose to pursue them.
  • Clairvoyance: Your primary psychic power.
  • Delinquents: One of the four possible love interests, Carla/Carl, has a free-spirited attitude and even sells drugs.
  • De-Power: The Vinculum's mind control also screws with your powers if it affects you.
  • The Dragon: Janet Clay, one of the teachers.
  • Drugs Are Bad: Upon finding out that Carla/Carl sells drugs, you can either play this trope straight or not, depending on how your player character feels.
  • Eldritch Location: The Nexus of the Moon, or Nexus for short, a magical tidepool formed when witches tried to get rid of their leftover magic by throwing it in the ocean.
  • The Exotic Detective: You're a detective with psychic powers.
  • Face–Heel Turn: You have an opportunity to perform one if you personally investigate the detention room; one possible choice is to voluntarily submit to the Vinculum and become a "model citizen". If you do, you can pursue an ending where you help Pierce and Clay with their plans to turn the rest of the class into "model citizens".
  • Gentleman and a Scholar: You can play as this if you have a high Academics stat and a high Altruism stat.
  • Girl Next Door Alison/Andrew Faulkner (whose gender and first name are set by the gender your character is interested in).
  • Good Parents: The player character's parents are very supportive despite having little money, and are very invested in your player character's future. However, they're totally out of the loop on the game's plot, so you may have to work around them at some point. It's possible for them to ground you later, but you may or may not deserve it.
  • Has Two Mommies: Your childhood friend Alison/Andrew has two mothers, both of whom are lawyers, although it's only mentioned briefly.
  • High-School Dance: Junior prom, the single most important event of the year! Because Pierce is going to take control of the Nexus during it and turn the junior class into model citizens.
  • I Can't Believe a Guy Like You Would Notice Me: This is your player character's reaction if you successfully win over the heart of your longtime crush, Taylor/Tyler (whose gender and first name are set by the gender your character is interested in).
  • Insufferable Genius: You can play as this if you have a high Academics stat and a high Selfish stat.
  • Jerk Jock: If you play a character with a high Athletics stat and a high Selfish stat, you can play a character of this type.
  • Lovable Jock: ...or you can play this type, if your character has a high Athletics stat and a high Altruism stat.
  • Mind-Control Device: The Vinculum, and once your player character finds out about it, it's also the MacGuffin that drives the larger plot.
  • No Social Skills: Your character is this with a low Social stat.
  • Popularity Power: Popularity is a stat in this game that means how well-known you are and how much others like you. If this stat is high, it can help you win allies later.
  • The Social Expert: Your player character is this with a high Social stat, which determines how well you can talk to and persuade people and how well you can "read" people. Interestingly, in this game, it's a separate statistic from Popularity, which means how well-known you are and how much others like you.
  • The Starscream: Ms. Clay can sabotage Mr. Pierce to take over the school. She's not a nice person, but she does care about the school for its own sake instead of as a platform to Take Over the World, making her A Lighter Shade of Black. She's even a good ending, if you don't object to the whole "model citizens" thing.
  • Starter Villain: Your very first case has you tracking down the thief who stole Haley's iPhone.

     Choice of Robots 

     The Last Monster Master 
  • Big Bad Friend: Your player character was friends with Alumig as a child, and if you were either an orphan or an outcast Alumig was your only friend. But he becomes a main villain later.
  • The Bully: The lanky monster (whose name you can determine) acts like this at first to the small monster and the muscular monster, but you can talk her out of it.
  • The Dragon: Orlich. He thinks he's a (well-intentioned) Big Bad, but he got a lot of help from Alumig, and Alumig had plans of his own.
  • Face–Heel Turn: At the climax, Alumig attempts to cause two of your monsters to abandon you and join Alumig's cause, it will always be the two monsters who have the least affinity for you. However, it's possible to talk your monsters into remaining with you, and you get an achievement for preventing their turn.
  • Gambit Pileup: The last battle is a circus as everyone's attempts to control the monster army crash headlong into one another.
  • Guide Dang It: How the ending is determined is not explained outside of the code. It depends on your Compassion/Discipline meter and on which of four stats you've trained the most.
  • Hello, [Insert Name Here]: Like all Choice of Games games, you can name your player character, but in a case notable enough to list this trope here, you can name each of the four monsters you train, as well.
  • Hippie Teacher: You can play as this type of trainer if you have a high Compassion stat.
  • Inherent in the System: Humans' treatment of monsters is essentially slavery, but the fact is that untamed monsters are wild and dangerous to humans, and only certain humans have the necessary telepathic ability to communicate with and tame them. It's possible to build a more equitable society once monsters break their chains. It's also rather easy to screw things up.
  • Love Triangle: Eventually, the horse monster and the muscular monster will develop feelings for each other. If you break them up, the horse monster will hook up with the small monster afterwards, much to the muscular monster's dismay. If you don't break them up, the horse monster and the muscular monster will remain together, much to the small monster's dismay.
  • Red Herring: The story begins with you having to calm down a monster named Tansiat from throwing tantrums over frustration with his job. Since your friend Alumig is much more accepting of his position, you're led to believe that Tansiat will become a problem later on. It's actually Alumig who later turns, after hearing the arguments of the foreign monsters.
  • The Revolution Will Not Be Civilized: Both groups of rebel monsters fit. "The rebels" are a Barbarian Horde who want to burn everything down, while Alumig is a would-be fascist dictator. And even if you beat both of them, the monster army will still establish a new system not based on Monster Masters, which can be just as bad as the old system or worse if you don't know exactly what you're doing when raising your monsters.
  • Sadist Teacher: You can play as this type of trainer if you have a high Discipline stat and a low Respect stat.
  • Starter Villain: Your first task is to try to calm down a monster named Tansiat, who is throwing tantrums because he is fed up with his job as Treasure Guardian.
  • Stern Teacher: You can play as this type of trainer if you have a high Discipline stat and a high Respect stat.
  • Title Drop: In the ending, you will always be "the last Monster Master."
  • Villain Has a Point: Alumig is trying to free monsters from human rule. While that isn't entirely a good thing, and he is a Jerk Ass who's mostly using the cause for his own ambition, he has a point that human treatment of monsters gets oppressive at times.
  • Well-Intentioned Extremist: Late in the story, Orlich attempts to take over Granaugh and enlist the monsters in his army, reasoning that he needs to do whatever is necessary to fight the Brugarnns.

     The Hero of Kendrickstone 
  • Action Prologue: You begin The Hero of Kendrickstone fighting and about to slay a dragon, but it's All Just a Dream, the real adventure happens after your character wakes up.
  • Adventure-Friendly World: Plenty of ruins around to plunder, bandits and monsters to fight, to the point where "wandering adventurer" is a recognized occupation.
  • After the End: 216 years ago, the Flowering Court ruled a magical empire over the lands that are now controlled by the Concordat. Then it vanished, and left behind ruined cities full of monsters and magical treasure.
  • Being Good Sucks: In the endgame, you have to decide how to punish the captured bandits, who committed hanging-worthy offenses under Mind Manipulation. The compassionate thing to do is to pardon them all, but the crowd wants them hung and isn't interested in excuses. Freeing them will put a serious tarnish on your name.
    • You can placate the crowd by sentencing the bandits to ten years of hard labour - more compassionate than hanging, and it gives the bandits a chance to repair the damage they have done to the city.
  • Black and Gray Morality: The game's villain is a bad man (using Mind Manipulation to turn innocents into murderous bandits isn't the behavior of an upstanding citizen), but Kendrickstone's elite aren't always nice chums themselves; William of Hallowford is a mafia boss and Isan of Korilandis is an amoral wizard most concerned with his own research. Even Dame Mildred is willing to engage in underhanded behavior to serve the needs of the city, such as ordering her squire to cooperate with William of Hallowford and break into someone's house to catch a smuggler.
  • Character Alignment: Played with. "Lawful Good" and "Chaotic Evil" are available as achievements, and you have two Karma Meters for Compassion/Pragmatism and Order/Freedom. However, the game itself avoids passing moral judgment on your actions.
  • Court Mage: Isan of Korilandis, a foreign wizard who works for the Duke of Kendrickstone.
  • Fantasy Counterpart Culture: Korilandis is a counterpart to medieval Mali, ruled by a Mansa and with an economy based on gold and salt.
  • Glory Hound: You, to a greater or lesser extent. Part of your motivation for adventuring is inevitably going to be fame and glory.
  • Keep the Reward: In this game, refusing the reward for a heroic deed is generally not purely altruistic, it's a publicity stunt that earns you fame.
  • Knight in Shining Armor: Dame Mildred of Sonnemerci, Knight of Kendrickstone and the only one of the possible mentors who can be unambiguously called "good." William of Hallowford does make the claim that he and she are Not So Different, though, in that they both enforce order in the city.
  • Legitimate Businessmen's Social Club: William of Hallowford is an honest, upstanding merchant of Kendrickstone who provides, among other services, protection from the city's criminal element. Of course, sometimes his men need to remind everyone why they should buy his writs of protection. Order must be maintained in the city, after all. The achievement for joining his organization is even called "Legitimate Business."
  • Mentors: There are three possible mentors who you can sign up with, each of whom favors a different stat and influencing each of the three quests, though you also have the (harder) option to go it alone. Regardless of who you join, each of the mentors also gives you one of the game's major quests; if you're working for another mentor, they bring their own agenda into each of the other mentors' quests.
    • Dame Mildred of Sonnemerci is a Knight in Shining Armor and defender of the Duke's peace. She offers you a position as her squire if you impress her in your first encounter, and a servant-at-arms if not. Either way, she helps train the Prowess stat.
    • Isan of Korilandis is the Court Mage. If you impress him, he'll take you as an apprentice; if not, he'll make you a servant in his tower. If you're an apprentice, he'll help train your Willpower stat and magic lores. (He's not much help, statswise, if you're a servant.)
    • William of Hallowford is a "legitimate businessman" who controls all criminal activity in the city. If you work for him, he'll either train you in Subterfuge or give you a rich piece of the action.
  • Morale Mechanic: Good food, fine clothes and quality alcohol keep you in good spirits, which give you a boost to all of your stats. Conversely, if you live like a pauper, all the privations wear down on your ability to get anything done.
  • Murder Is the Best Solution: William of Hallowford's plan for stopping the Big Bad starts with "s" and ends with "-litting his throat."
  • Neighborhood Friendly Gangsters: William of Hallowford certainly tries to put on a front of this, and he does do a fine job of ensuring that those who buy his writs don't have to worry about criminal activity. He's also extremely willing to chip in to defend the city when it's in trouble - it's his larder he's guarding.
  • Power-Up Letdown: Becoming an "associate" in William of Hallowford's organization means that you get a little more money from your job, but you miss out on the practical training in Subterfuge you might get if you remained as an enforcer and took one of the other rewards from the relevant quest.
  • Shame If Something Happened: The mission in Chapter 5 is undeniably a bit on the skeevy side, and William is not above obliquely threatening to ruin your life if you don't play ball, forcing you to go through with it.
  • Standard Fantasy Setting: Young adventurers go out slaying dragons for gold and glory, using swords and spells. It's a very self-aware one, though.

    Choice of the Petal Throne 
  • Adorably Precocious Child: You first meet Rayána, a low-clan cobbler's daughter who nevertheless eagerly applies herself to studying military strategy and who as an adult becomes a potential second-in-command and potential love interest, as a little girl while you are being grilled on how to resist an enemy's "crab" strategy during an exercise.
  • Ambition Is Evil: Inverted if your patron deity is Hrü'ü, for Hrü'ü encourages you to be ambitious and avoid complacency.
  • Back from the Dead: If you choose to let one of your soldiers face the soldier insulting your legion instread of either ignoring him or facing him yourself, Rayána will face the soldier in a duel and fall in battle. However, it is later possible to get a priest to bring Rayána back to life in a ritual, although since the priest is taking a heavy risk, you are asked to pay a lot of money for the resurrection. You even get an achievement for this resurrection.
  • Battle Harem: It's possible to end up romantically involved and married to all of your love interests who love you very dearly and who each have deadly combat knowledge.
  • Blood Knight: If your patron deity is Vimúhla, you're encouraged to act like this.
    • Noble Demon: However, if your patron deity is Karakán, while you're still encouraged to be a warrior, more emphasis is placed on being honorable.
  • But for Me, It Was Tuesday: When asked why an assassin's coming after you, you can reply that you "don't have time to enumerate every grievance brought against me by lesser men." This isn't even a sign of ignoble character - Tsolyáni nobility are pretty much expected to act like this.
  • Combat by Champion: Downplayed. At the beginning of the battle, if you're fighting in the line or on the platform, an enemy insults your legion as a means of delivering a challenge, and you or Rayána can accept. However, this doesn't decide the battle, it's just a chance to show off and collect a worthy prisoner before the real fighting starts.
  • Country Mouse: Rayána is a low-clan cobbler's daughter who is ecstatic to be part of the military she admires. She beams at the chance to play the folkloric hero if you win the battle and then choose to restore order instead of allowing your soldiers to take loot, says her prayers to herself at one point during the investigation of the catacombs (Wave mockingly thinks of her as a "country bumpkin" for this), if she's promoted the officers wince at her forthright ways, and if you marry her, she's nervous at the wedding due to being more familiar with battlefield courage than with social graces.
  • Gambit Pileup: The mission into the Underworld ruins involves three separate agendas. Your mission is to get the artifact deep in the ruins and bring it back to your Prince. Wave, however, is a spy for Emperor Eternal Splendor, and wants to bring the artifact back to him instead. And then Nirun is under orders to kill you over the vendetta that was mentioned at the beginning of the game, and make sure you don't come out of the ruins with the artifact and the glory that comes with it. You can lampshade this if you want.
    Seriously? Is anyone else actually trying to accomplish this mission?
  • Gender-Blender Name: Your character always begins the game with the name of "Tiúni", regardless of whether you're male or female, but you're given a different, gender-specific name later on during the naming ceremony.
  • Green-Eyed Monster: Jealousy is one of the few traits that are considered ignoble no matter who your patron deity is; you can raise the Noble Action meter early on by not responding jealously to Wave's description of Mottán.
  • The Hedonist: If your patron deity is Dlamélish, you're encouraged to act like this.
  • Just Following Orders: Encouraged if your patron deity is Hnálla, as Hnálla is considered the supreme deity of stability and values order and conformity.
  • Karma Meter: This game has an unusual variant, as there is a stat called "Noble Action", which increases every time you do something your clan considers noble. The twist is that there are some behaviors that all clans consider noble or ignoble, while other behaviors differ from clan to clan. Jealousy, for example, is considered "ignoble" no matter what clan you're a part of, while some clans will consider conformity to be noble, others consider independence to be noble, etc.
  • Meaningful Rename: In this game's world, when young people reach the age of majority, they undergo a "naming ceremony" where they are given both adult names and adult rights and responsibilities to go with them. This applies to your player character as well, who always starts the game as Tiúni but is given a different name later in their naming ceremony.
  • No Good Deed Goes Unpunished: If you're commanding from the platform, winning the battle does not excuse disobeying orders to do so; the chain of command and the status of your commander are more important than something as trivial as saving the battle and capturing the city.
  • Sliding Scale of Gender Inequality: In general, a "more traditional role for women" still exists, that of the "good clan girl", but a woman can take up the rights and responsibilities of men if she declares herself aridáni at her naming ceremony. Your own player character's two mother figures exemplify both choices: Mama Halé chose the route of the "good clan girl", although she still has a formidable personality, while Dzái named herself aridáni.
  • Starter Villain: Your first major obstacle in Choice of the Petal Throne (other than the assassin you face in the tutorial, who you always defeat eventually regardless of choices) is an older youth named Mottán, who's partially responsible for Wave getting himself/herself into debt. Mottán is also a Skippable Boss if, instead of choosing to confront him, you choose to either tell the elders about the debt, or to confront the head of the gambling establishment instead.
  • Stay in the Kitchen: Inverted if you're playing a female character, as you're made to stay out of the kitchen rather than in, as it was clear from birth that Dzái expected you to name yourself aridáni, take up the rights and responsibilities of men, and follow her into the army. When given a choice of what to think about this, you can either be pleased at the opportunity for glory, that you would've preferred being a good clan girl, or that you're happy not to be stifled as a good clan girl but aren't so sure about the soldier part.
  • Team Mom: If your patron deity is Avánthe, you're encouraged to act like this, with a commitment to justice and a slight dash of Old-School Chivalry and Nature Hero.
  • Trying to Catch Me Fighting Dirty: A sneak attack to capture the city while the legions are fighting is seen as a dirty move, and damages your Karma Meter if you're not a follower of Hrü'ü, Lord of Confusion. Rayána in particular doesn't like it, though she can be convinced that defeating the Usurper is more important than any one soldier's honor.
  • Victorious Childhood Friend: Your "clan-cousin" Wave (whose gender you can pick, along with your own) can be this if you romance Wave (it should be noted that "clan-cousins" in this game refers to "other children of the clan", so you and Wave are not actually related).

    Hollywood Visionary 
  • Adorably Precocious Child: Your niece. When she first appears on the studio lot, your character expects her to ask about the movie stars, but she surprises your character by being an expert in filmmaking lingo and technical jargon as well as the more obscure parts of the movie industry, and she spends time trying to be useful and helpful to those around her. Also, if you have a good relationship with her, she'll spy on Croghan for you to find out if his picture is a rip-off of yours or not.
    • However, there's one subversion near the end: if you spend enough time with your niece, and you promise her that you can keep a secret, she tells you that she doesn't think she's as precocious and smart as others think she is, since she can't read unless she really forces herself, and in fact she's only been able to turn in homework because she's been paying a boy in her class to write down what she says (but just writing it down; she still comes up with the answers herself).
  • Allohistorical Allusion: Several achievements are awarded for re-creating Real Life films, such as "Master of Suspense" (get Alfred Hitchcock to direct a horror or suspense film with a celebrity lead), "Like It Hot" (get Billy Wilder to direct a comedy with a cross-dressing lead) and "Commanding" (get Cecil B. DeMille to direct a widescreen religious epic in color).
  • Always Female: Your sister Romana, and your niece (the only character whose name is customizable but whose gender is not).
  • Always Male: Fish Grundy, Lloyd Croghan, Rep. Jonathan Creed, and Prince Faisal Raqim.
  • Anachronism Stew: The game is set in The Fifties. Most of the background fluff (The Korean War is ongoing, The Hollywood Blacklist is at its height, a Congressional committee is actively rooting out Communist agents, the Paramount Decision has opened the door for independent filmmakers to reach a wide audience of theater-goers) implies a setting in the early fifties, but several of the movies listed in the dossiers of actors and directors were released later in the decade, and your niece at one point makes a reference to Leave It to Beaver, considered emblematic of The Fifties but not actually broadcast until 1957.
    • That said, most hints indicate the game takes place in 1952-53. "Eisenhower's America" is mentioned in such a way as to imply it's a new thing (he was elected on November 4, 1952, and inaugurated on January 20, 1953), the Korean War ended in mid-1953, and the Academy Awards ceremony in one of the game's possible endings is explicitly said to be the first broadcast on television - which historically was the 25th Academy Awards ceremony, held on March 19, 1953. Oddly, Spencer Tracy, who presents you with your award, was not a presenter at that ceremony in Real Life. The Army-McCarthy hearings of 1954 would precipitate the decline of Communist witch-hunts, making a setting after that point unlikely.
  • Arab Oil Sheikh: Prince Faisal Raqim is an oil sheikh from a small (and unnamed) country somewhere on the Arabian peninsula. Despite being heir to the throne, he's far more interested in the Hollywood social scene, and has made a name for himself as an investor in several film productions.
  • Bad Boss: Lloyd Croghan, who's callous and inflexible, but also competent and ultimately fair-minded.
    • You can become one of these if you mistreat your crew (leading to a strike action).
  • Bi the Way: You can choose to seduce two of your three potential backersnote , Prince Faisal and Greta Garbo, regardless of your own gender - the latter is the only historical figure you can seduce. (Garbo is widely believed to have been bisexual.)
  • Black Best Friend: Fish Grundy.
  • Book Dumb:
    • Your niece, who hates school and would rather spend time on the studio lot. It's later revealed that this is because she's dyslexic.
    • The Grip is also this - a genius film technician who didn't graduate high school.
  • Cool Uncle: You can be one, for your niece.
  • Distant Finale: Two of the game's five endings take place decades after the rest of the game.
  • Fall of the Studio System: The era in which the game takes place, but fairly early on - all of the Golden Age studios (including RKO, which folded in 1957) are still going concerns, and you can poach their talent.
  • First Girl Wins: The first character whose gender you can select (usually an indication of a Love Interest in the Choice games) is the assistant, but the game instead focuses on a Love Triangle with the Actor and the Grip, keeping your relationship with the assistant platonic. However, if you don't end up with either the Actor or the Grip at the premiere, you are presented with an opportunity to start dating the assistant. The achievement for this is even called "You All Along".
  • Giftedly Bad: You, if you choose to work in the field where your skills are lacking.
  • Greta Garbo: An old friend of your character. You once did her a favor and you have the opportunity to call it in when your studio needs money. As is prominently featured in the game's advertising, one of the ways you can sweet-talk her into giving you more money is to seduce her.
  • Hypercompetent Sidekick: The assistant, who was your personal assistant at Croghan's studio and followed you after you quit. At numerous points in the game, your character makes clear that the assistant's help is basically the only thing allowing the movie to happen.
  • Lowest Common Denominator: You can choose for your movie to appeal to these sorts of people. The game's stats counter diplomatically describes such films as "accessible" (in contrast to "intellectual"). However, if you do, you'll lose points with the critics, who aren't afraid to call it lowbrow (or worse). invoked
  • No Celebrities Were Harmed: Averted, for the most part - real Hollywood celebrities of the era are featured in the game, and you can even cast them in your movie.
  • Only One Name: Your assistant is the only character with a customizable name who doesn't have a last name. You can assign first and last names to yourself, the Actor, and the Grip, but not the assistant. (You can choose your niece's first name, but her last name is always Frazier.)
  • Seriously Scruffy: The assistant.
  • Shout-Out: To Ed Wood - there's a scene where Orson Welles gives you a pep talk very similar to the one he gives Ed Wood in the film.
  • Smoking Gun: The fire investigation discovers a piece of evidence that the conflagration which nearly brought down your studio was, in fact, arson. It was a Diego cigar - Croghan's brand - leading you to believe he tried to sabotage your studio, but it turns out he stopped smoking cigars some time before.
  • Start My Own: The game opens with you leaving Lloyd Croghan's studio to start your own, in order to bring your dream project to life.
  • Title Drop: One of the default choices for the name of your studio is "Hollywood Visionary".
  • Type Casting: Indulging in this does wonders for the quality of your film's acting. This doesn't work for directors, though - A-list directors will excel at making pretty much any kind of movie, even if you have Alfred Hitchcock direct a romantic comedy or Billy Wilder direct an epic adventure film. invoked
  • Red Scare: One of the game's overarching plotlines. You can play as a staunch anti-communist or an unapologetic Red - or anywhere in between. If you're unapologetic or uncooperative enough, you will be blacklisted.
  • What Happened to the Mouse?: Although Croghan is exonerated from arson and industrial sabotage, it's ultimately never revealed who tried to burn down your studio.
  • Workaholic: You can be one. Work too hard and you'll end up having a heart attack.
  • You Get What You Pay For: Across the board, "budget" talent is inferior to A-list talent, though usually their weaknesses can be overcome if you make the right choices during production. But don't scrimp on the film editing - the cheaper the editor, the fewer opportunities you have to alter the film and the more likely an alteration can backfire.

     It's Killing Time 
  • Big Bad: Jenkin Yoshinobu, the father of the woman who killed herself after you killed her boyfriend in Beijing. It was his idea for the Phoenix to hire Boris to destroy his own crew. Depending on your previous choices, after taking revenge on or forgiving Boris, you may or may not have an opportunity to travel to Japan and decapitate Yoshinobu.
  • The Chessmaster: If you play an assassin with a high Intelligence stat, your character specializes in coming up with clever strategies to pull off your assassinations.
  • Cold Sniper: You can play as this if you have a high Ranged Weapons stat and a high Ruthlessness or high Discipline stat.
  • Cultured Badass: You can play as this if you have a high Intelligence stat, since increasing your intelligence requires a lot of reading of literature, or if you take special enjoyment in the sights and culture of the places you visit.
  • Good Old Fisticuffs: If you have a high Strength/Hand-to-Hand stat, your character is better at close-range fighting.
  • The Handler: Usually your boss, Boris, but sometimes it'll be one of your teammates.
  • Hired Guns: Your player character, and everyone in The Syndicate.
  • Hitman with a Heart: You can play as this if you have a high Righteousness stat.
  • Holy Hitman: You can play as this if your assassin player character frequently attends church.
  • The Mole: Later, it becomes clear that someone in your organization is working against you. There are several clues that the mole is Miller, but it turns out this is a Red Herring. The mole actually turns out to be your handler Boris, who was hired by the Phoenix to destroy his own crew, an offer he accepted both because of the enormous amount of money and because standing up to the Fallen Angels would've been suicide.
  • Murder, Inc.: The Syndicate, the group your character works for.
  • My Greatest Failure: Your player character eventually has a dream flashback to a previous mission in Beijing (you can resist having this dream the first time, but the second time you have no choice but to dream about it). Played with, as your character did successfully complete the mission and kill your target; the "failure" was completely accidental collateral damage, as once the target's girlfriend walked in and saw that her boyfriend was dead, she threw herself out the window and killed herself in despair.
  • Only in It for the Money: A possible motivation for your player character if he/she doesn't care who he/she kills, as long as the money is good.
  • Professional Killer: Your player character, and everyone in The Syndicate.
  • Psycho for Hire: You can play as this if you have a high Psychotic level, and also to an extent if you have a high Ruthlessness level.
  • Red Herring: There are a few clues pointing to the idea that Miller is working against you. Miller refuses to talk about his past, you find grenades and a Fallen Angels headband in his bag, and he conveniently shows up late after an attack kills many of your teammates citing the reason as needing to check on his niece. As it turns out, while he used to be a member of the Fallen Angels, he left them when they became too sadistic. Also, while some hoodlums show up late in the story looking for Miller, it's due to an unrelated matter, and Miller has been genuinely on your side the whole time. There is a traitor in your organization, but it isn't Miller.
  • Romance Sidequest: A Choice of Games staple. Here, you can potentially pursue a relationship with one of three assassins from a different group, and their names and genders are determined by the gender your character is interested in (however, only one of them will agree to a relationship, depending on which of them you impressed the most when all of you were talking about yourselves, since each has different tastes). Alternatively, if your player character is attracted to women, it's possible to display interest in Marie, a fellow assassin from your own group, or if your player character is attracted to men, you can express interest in Dante, another fellow assassin from your own group. The leader of the Fallen Angels, the Phoenix, may also try to tempt you into a relationship depending on your choices.
  • Shout-Out: While in the prologue, your character spots a snake lying nearby. If you opt to cover it, you first lay hands on a beat-up fedora.
  • Talking Your Way Out: Your character is good at this if you have a high Improvisation stat, although there are a few bluffs that may require Intelligence as well such as convincing the man with the harpoon gun during the Bora Bora mission to take only some of your money, thinking he's taking all of it.
  • We Help the Helpless: Your player character can have this as his/her motivation if your player character's motivations center around ridding the world of corrupt bad guys and giving the justice the law sometimes can't provide.

     Champion of the Gods 
  • Action Girl: Many, if you play as female. The Lieutenant will also be one if you state you're attracted to women.
  • Because Destiny Says So: In Argossa, destiny is quite real, as people's destinies are controlled by the Weavers. Your character can agree with this state of affairs if you have a high Faithful stat, and there is an argument to be made that in the First Age, before destiny, people like you ran amok, only contained when destiny began to tie them down.
  • Beware the Superman: The vestiges of the First Age you encounter are all incredibly deadly and morally-warped beings who have long since lost their humanity to their lust for power and immortal life.
  • Brutal Honesty: Your character can be this if you have a high Brutal stat and a high Integrity stat. However, if you're playing a character who despises the gods and destiny, this isn't a good trait to have: if you openly tell the gods your real feelings too much, then near the end they'll use a control-device around your head to force you to kill their enemy, even if you wish to help their enemy destroy destiny.
  • Call to Adventure: The first sign of your player character's future greatness is when your village is attacked by a boar, and your character is able to defeat the boar by either great strength, great speed, or great endurance.
  • The Chief's Daughter: An inverted example of the usual connotations of this trope, as rather than the child of the chief being a romance option for the protagonist, you're playing as the chief's son or daughter yourself, as your father is the Archon of your village.
  • Competitive Balance: During the tutorial fight against the boar that attacks your village, you will be asked to choose your character's greatest trait, either in strength, speed, or endurance. Later, you will be asked to choose something you're also slightly good at, which will lead to your remaining stat being your weakest.
  • Divine Parentage: Demigods exist, but they're actually weaker than "champions" like the Player Character, and suffer because they're Immune to Fate, and need to find a great destiny to tie themselves to in order to ever do anything of note. The player's trainer and faithful sidekick is one.
  • Dying Curse: The second major Vestige of the First Age does this after the player destroys him, summoning a terrible plague over the player's adoptive city and kicking off the hunt for the final one.
  • The Evils of Free Will: One of the themes of the game is whether free will is worth the risks that comes with it. The gods created destiny to keep humanity in check, because they feared they would destroy themselves and the world if allowed free will, while Daggoras believes that everybody should have the ability to control their fate.
  • Fantasy Counterpart Culture: The story takes place in Argossa, a fantasy counterpart of ancient Greece. The gods and goddesses of the setting are also based off the Greek gods and goddesses, though here they have different names and, in many cases, genders.
  • Farm Boy: Chara/Chiron, the shepherd's daughter/son, whose name and gender are determined by the gender your character is interested in. They are the first person you can pursue a relationship with, although when your character is informed of your great destiny, you have to leave them with full knowledge that leaving them will mean the end of the relationship unless you are adamant and insistent enough about not following the gods' will, in which case you can take Chara/Chiron with you on your journey. But doing so will end in him/her being put in terrible peril by your possessed father, and the fallout will ensure they don't accompany you.
  • Fragile Speedster: If your greatest skill is speed, and your weakest is endurance.
  • Glass Cannon: If your greatest skill is strength, and your weakest is endurance.
  • Gray and Grey Morality: Ultimately, both the gods and the villain claim to want what's best for humanity—the gods created destiny to prevent another First Age from rising, but at the cost of humans being at the whims of the sometimes cruel Weavers, while Daggoras wants to free humanity from destiny, but at the cost of potentially allowing them do great evil. However, both sides could also be seen as having selfish motivations—the gods wanting to remain in control, Daggoras wanting to increase his own power—and in the end there is no definitive "right".
  • Honesty Is the Best Policy: Played straight if you sincerely follow the gods, but averted if you despise the gods: if you tell them so too many times, then near the end of the game they'll force you to obey their will at a crucial moment using a control device around your head. If you're playing a character who wants to destroy destiny, you'll only be able to do so successfully if you carefully deceive the gods about your true motives.
  • Humble Hero: If the player leans toward the Humility pole, many NP Cs will admire their down-to-earth approach to their supernatural powers.
  • I Can Rule Alone: It's possible to help Daggoras destroy destiny then immediately kill him, ensuring that he's not present to benefit from the resulting chaos.
  • Love Interest: There are three in the game, though the original draft only included one and thus one is a bit more-obvious than the others. Chara/Chiron is potentially one to begin with though pursuing that romance leads to potentially-deadly consequences at the start of the adventure, the prince/princess is the second and, as part of the plot, the one you are "destined" to fall in love with, to ensure that you will take certain actions later for his/her sake, and, finally, the player's faithful sidekick, who is a demigod.
  • Mighty Glacier: If your greatest skill is strength, and your weakest is speed.
  • Necromancer: All three Vestiges absorb the life force of other humans to remain immortal, but the first one fits the best, because her "family" of bone-monsters are fueled by the drained souls of her victims.
  • Older Sidekick: The player character gets one early on, in the form of a local wiseperson who is accused of being a witch/sorcerer by the superstitious children, but is actually more of a clever mentor figure. They go a bit Out of Focus later on, but stay a part of the narrative to the end, and potentially put themselves into exile by killing the protagonist's possessed father to save them.
  • Pair the Spares: If the player doesn't attempt to woo the heir, they start dating the demigod.
  • Pride: A low or high amount of pride is represented in this game by Humility and Haughtiness stats.
  • Rasputinian Death: Because of their tremendous vitality, all of the Vestiges will take a lot of killing to make it stick for good.
  • Royals Who Actually Do Something: Potentially. The PC's main Love Interest, the heir to the throne, is either an iron-willed politician, a warrior and general, or a sensitive artist.
  • Screw Destiny: Your character can believe in doing this if you have a high Heathen stat.
  • Stone Wall: If your greatest skill is endurance, and your weakest is strength.
  • Story Branch Favoritism: Thanks to the way the original title was constructed, the prince/princess's Romance Sidequest is much better-developed than the other two. It is also the easiest to get an unambiguously happy ending with, considering that it is impossible to go for the demigod sidekick without one of the two of you cheating on a romantic partner and having a very dark Bittersweet Ending.
  • Taken for Granite: The second Vestige does this to sailors he lures to his island with his Compelling Voice. It's reversible for the fresher ones, but those that have lingered too long and been drained too dry, or just shattered, cannot recover.
  • Well-Intentioned Extremist: The god of chaos seeks to destroy destiny so that mortals can again reach their full potential, no matter how much suffering or collateral damage results. He does seem genuinely sorry whenever you meet him in person, though it's all mixed up in his desire to again be free and allow true chaos and freedom in the world. Arguably, the other gods, who created destiny in the first place, and punish the king's hubris if the player decides to date their demigod sidekick by destroying his kingdom. At the very least, the game refuses to pass judgement on their actions in that first matter, instead leaving it up to the player to decide for themselves how justified it was, and in the latter the goddess responsible is trying to look out for her child.

    A Wise Use Of Time 

  • Absent-Minded Professor: Dr Oden has elements of this, such as turning up to a meeting with you in her yoga gear.
  • Action Girl: If you play as a female character and have a high Fortitude stat, you can be this. Alisha proves to be this if you convince her to help you fight Barnabas: she'll brandish a sword and possibly kill him with it.
  • And I Must Scream: Fail to defeat Barnabas in the final battle and he'll permanently freeze you in time, conscious and able to think but completely immobile.
  • Bank Robbery: You find yourself caught up in one. You can use your power to disarm the robbers, steal some things yourself so the robbers will be blamed for the missing items, or simply leave unnoticed.
  • Bi the Way: You, if you so choose, as well as all of the potential love interests.
  • Big Bad: Barnabas, a fellow time controller who believes that killing other time controllers lets him absorb their powers. He's wrong, but that doesn't stop him.
  • Captured Super-Entity: You, if you're exposed and reluctantly agree to submit to the authorities.
  • Descent into Addiction: Raj begins the story as a gambling addict, and only gets worse as the story continues. Without your interference he will spiral further and further into debt, with a gang threatening his life and livelihood if he doesn't pay up. Refuse to help him and he will eventually disappear without a trace, meaning that he either fled to start a new life or was killed by the debt hunters.
  • Disappeared Dad: Near the beginning of the game, it's revealed that the player character's dad went missing. You can decide whether or not you find out what happens to him.
  • Driven to Suicide: Partway through the game you'll come across a distraught man called Jeremy, whose time controlling powers have only just developed. Unfortunately, he's terrified of them and believes that he's incurably ill. You find him sitting on the edge of a bridge, contemplating whether to jump or not. You can convince him not to, or push him off yourself.
    • If you investigate enough information on your father's disappearance and interrogate Barnabas during the final battle, he'll reveal that your father killed himself out of shame for being conned.
  • Face–Heel Turn: Dr Oden will sell you out to the government if you don't keep your abilities quiet.
  • Fan Convention: Olivia takes you to a tattoo convention in New York. There you'll meet her idol, Malaya Mercado, a famous tattoo artist and fellow time controller.
  • False Friend: Dr Oden can possibly be this if you're too visible, seeming helpful and enthusiastic throughout the game and helping you develop your powers, only to sell you out to the authorities at the end.
  • For Science!: The main reason Dr Camilla Oden is helping you.
  • The Gambling Addict: Your friend (and possible lover) Raj is a gambling addict who finds himself in massive debt because of it. You can help him pay his debts, advise him to get therapy or leave him to it. The latter results in him disappearing without a trace, and it is implied that the gang threatening him finished him off.
  • Ill Girl: Olivia is revealed to have a painful liver condition that puts her life at risk. Fail to get her the funds for a replacement organ and she will die.
  • Jerk with a Heart of Gold: Raj and Kyle.
  • Kick the Dog: You first meet Barnabas in a busy subway station, where he pushes an old man in front of a oncoming train and stops time to get your attention. After you have spoken, he offers you the chance to save the man. Try to do so and Barnabas restarts time just as you're about to pull the man to safety, meaning that the man is hit and killed by the train. The only reason Barnabas does this is to intimidate and upset you, as he usually only kills other time controllers in the hopes of absorbing their powers.
  • Older Than They Look: Thanks to her ability to slow time around herself only, the ninety-seven year old Malaya Mercado looks no older than thirty.
  • Pair the Spares: If you don't romance Olivia or Kate, you can introduce the two to each other and, when Kate displays interest in Olivia, encourage them to hook up. If you later ask Kate how it went, she'll coyly reply that Olivia is "a good kisser" and imply that the two are going to get together.
  • Parental Abandonment: Prior to the start of the game your father disappeared without a trace. No one knows where he is or even if he's still alive.
  • Purely Aesthetic Gender
  • The Professor: Dr Oden.
  • Romance Sidequest: A staple of Choice Of Games. You can romance both male and female love interests and choose to be straight, gay or bisexual.
  • There Can Be Only One: It's possible to kill off all the other time stoppers. The game awards you with the Highlander quote if you do.
  • Time Stands Still: The main focus of the game is you developing the ability to freeze time. It is not just you who has this power: you meet at least four other time controllers throughout the game, though it is implied that they are very rare.
    • It turns out that you're not actually stopping time, simply slowing it down to a near frozen state. Your character continues to call it 'stopping time' for the sake of convenience.
  • Video Game Caring Potential: You can use your power to save people from burning buildings, catch a child failing from a climbing frame, prevent a man from commiting suicide, stop a robbery...
  • Video Game Cruelty Potential: ...Or use it to steal, cheat at casino games, backstab your friends, frame people for crimes they didn't do, pull off cruel pranks, pry into people's private files and even straight up murder.

     Ratings War 

  • Asshole Victim: Although it's up to your player character whether or not your character actually had a negative opinion about this person, but Tasha, the woman who knocks you out with a pipe in the prologue, is later murdered, and as your next scoop you have to investigate Tasha's murder. There are a couple of opportunities for your player character to voice whether they believe Tasha deserved what she got, or whether they believe it's a senseless waste of life.
  • Fission Mailed: Regardless of your choices in the prologue, you will receive a beating from Tasha, receive an Infraction for using a forged press pass to access the crime scene, and be let go from your original company. However, you recover in the hospital, and the company that hires you wipes your infraction clean, giving you a new start, and the game continues.
  • Gender-Blender Name: In most Choice of Games games, potential love interests have their names and genders determined by the gender your character is interested in, but in this game, while Tracey Bellamy's gender is determined by the gender your character is interested in, their first name will always be "Tracey" regardless of whether they're a man or a woman.
  • Glory Hound: You can play as this if you primarily make choices around advancing your character's career and making yourself a star.
  • Going for the Big Scoop
  • Honesty Is the Best Policy: You can play as this if you consistently choose to pursue the truth above all else.
  • Intrepid Reporter: You can play as this if you have high Integrity and/or Factual stats.
  • Karma Meter: In this game, it takes the form of "Infractions": you receive an infraction when you do something unprofessional or unethical. There's one plot-mandated infraction in the prologue, but this infraction is eventually wiped clean for a fresh slate.
  • Paparazzi: You can play as this if you have high Ambition and/or Flamboyant stats.
  • The Rival: Early Roberts, short for Erlendur Robertsson, a reporter from Iceland who is significantly more experienced than the player character, though it's possible for the player character to either be cordial to him or to maintain the rivalry.
  • Romance Sidequest: A Choice of Games staple. In this game, it is possible to strike up a relationship with Tracey Bellamy, your player character's editor, whose gender is determined by the gender your character is interested in. If you don't romance Tracey, and if your character is attracted to men, you can also flirt with your rival Early Roberts, but in the epilogue, after dating for a few weeks, the "spark" fades and you amicably break things off, though Early says it was fun while it lasted.
  • Take That: At the beginning of chapter seven, during an especially freezing night, your character briefly fantasizes about going back in time, finding whoever said climate change was a myth, and punching them in the mouth.
  • Twenty Minutes into the Future: Portable devices have become ubiquitous, and as a result the privacy laws surrounding them have turned draconian, so the only people allowed to save video captured by camera are people with licenses.

     Diabolical 

  • Ambiguous Gender: You're not given an option to be male or female in this game, and the other characters never refer to you by gender.
  • Anti-Villain: You can play a villain as this.
  • Armies Are Evil: If you play a villain that uses a soldier's tactics.
  • Back from the Dead: By the end of the game, you have the option to revive one of your dead friends.
  • Big Bad: Dr. Arachnus
  • Bittersweet Ending: Dr. Arachnus is defeated and the world is saved, but most (if not all) of your friends have died, and depending on your actions, Earth is in a far worse condition than it's ever been before.
  • The Brute: Slog if chosen as your sidekick.
  • Card-Carrying Villain: It is very easy to play a villain like this.
  • Calling Card: You can choose to leave one of these behind. Your options are a single feather, a confetti cannon, a riddle, or a card with your initial on it.
  • Deadpan Snarker: The player character.
  • The Dragon: There's a part that requires you to choose one for your operation.
  • The Dreaded: If you play a villain that strikes terror into the hearts of others.
    • Dr. Arachnus as well.
  • Even Evil Has Standards: In this game, it turns out even the villain community has one villainous act that is explicitly forbidden: killing children. Therefore, when your player character attempts to rob gold bars and finds children on a field trip, your character has to come up with a creative solution, as harming the children is not an option. Threatening the children is an option, but it's a bluff.
  • Evil Genius: Hackmaster, and if you play a villain that specializes in technology, the player character as well.
  • Face–Heel Turn: If chosen as your sidekick, Hackmaster will attempt to betray you and join Dr. Arachnus. It doesn't go well for her.
  • Fallen Hero: The Star was originally the most renowned hero of all before being believed to have been killed years ago by Dr. Arachnus. If chosen as your sidekick, you'll find out that The Star's gone insane and grew to be more violent, and is perfectly willing to commit evil.
  • Fission Mailed: When your character undertakes a mission to commit a crime in a rural area, whether you go after the largest ball of twine, the corn maze, or the rural bank, you will always eventually be foiled by the local Sheriff. However, the game continues regardless, as this failed mission motivates your player character to choose a sidekick.
  • For the Evulz: You can choose to play a villain who commits evil for its own sake.
  • Harmless Villain: Nautilus is a Mad Artist who doesn't kill and just wants to make the world a wackier, more wonderful place. Downplayed for a player that tries to keep their Lethality down, since they'll still be stealing stuff and knocking people out.
  • Hero Antagonist: Agent Steelheart acts as one in most playthroughs. They are also a love interest.
  • Large Ham: When you get a chance to speak there's usually one option that let's you ham it up. This goes right from Incoming Ham all the way to jumping out of the window to make your exit bellowing This Cannot Be!
  • Supervillain: You play as this.
  • The Syndicate: Minotaur is this game's equivalent to SPECTRE, complete with an underling called "The Countess."
  • Well-Intentioned Extremist: You can choose to play as a villain who wants to change the world.

     Pendragon Rising 

  • Action Girl: Should you play as Arta, all the women in Gwynedd are this.
  • Artificial Limbs: Bedwyr/Blodwyn is maimed at one point in the game, preventing them from becoming Monarch because a maimed ruler must step aside. You can give them a metal arm; while it isn't actually an effective limb, it symbolically means that they're not maimed, and can contend for the throne.
  • Bad Dreams: Towards the middle of the game, Arthur/Arta meet a young girl who claims to have had dreams of wolves. She's accused of being a witch and depending on your choices, you're able to save her from being killed by an extremely religious follower or watch helplessly as the follower kills the girl.
  • Deadpan Snarker: Morgan, at times. After the feast in the first chapter, he/she asks if you've "had your fill of warriors boasting and farting at you?"
  • Gay Option: Gawain/Yvaine.
  • Handicapped Badass: Near the end of the game, Bedwyr/Blodwyn gets injured and loses his/her hand. Should you not become the Pendragon, Bedwyr/Blodwyn goes into the last big battle with a metal hand fashioned to fit him/her in the place of his/her real one.
  • Happily Adopted: Cai/Gaia
  • Medieval European Fantasy: The setting of Pendragon Rising is a land called "Gwynedd", and it borrows heavily from Arthurian lore, right down to the player character being Arthur/Arta himself/herself (depending on the gender you select).
  • Pregnant Badass: If you choose to sleep with Morgan in the beginning of the game as Arta, later on you find out that you became pregnant (if you're female and Morgan is male) or that Morgan became pregnant (if you're male and Morgan is female). This doesn't stop you from the going into the hardest battles of the game, though. A few extra scenes pop up regarding the situation, but it doesn't dramatically change the gameplay at all.
  • Purely Aesthetic Gender: Inverted. This game is one of the few Choice of Games where you have to choose to be one gender or the other, and whether you're a male or a female decides if you're the bastard son or daughter of the current ruler of the land, if men or women in the world will be the fighters or not, and more.
  • The Rival: The heir to the throne, either Bedwyr/Blodwyn depending on your gender. You two are half related by your father or mother, and constantly bicker with one another and your parent has times where they favor you over your sibling and vice versa. If you become the new Pendragon, they begrudgingly start to listen to you and do what you order them to do.
  • Religion Is Magic: The rites of the druidic faith of Britain have magical powers. Christian prayers, by and large, don't. Except in the Battle of Badon, where a proper recitation of the Trinitarian formula can dispel Saxon mind control.
  • Royals Who Actually Do Something: Utta/Uther deserve a special mention, as they continue to rule and even fight despite getting incredibly injured during the first few minutes of the game. Arthur/Arta and Bedwyr/Blodwyn count as well, along with the other kingdoms, so long as you manage to persuade them to join you for the final battle against the Saxons.
  • Surprise Incest: Should you have sex with Morgan, it'll later be revealed that you two are half-siblings after you become pregnant (if you're Arta and Morgan is male) or after Morgan becomes pregnant (if you're Arthur and Morgan is female).
  • The Unfavorite: You.
  • World of Action Girls: When playing as Arta, the women are the ones that fight in all the wars, while the men take a step back are more involved in religious and mystic like activities.

     Meta Human Inc. 

  • Aerith and Bob: There's character names like Winston Q and Anaru Katariki, and then there are names like Robert Leach and Philip Mace.
  • And I Must Scream: Don't tick off the board of directors. Just...don't.
  • Bittersweet Ending: If you fail to stop the invasion of the Surgeons but end up getting approval from the executives on how good of a job you did over the course of a year as a CEO. Knowing the certain future really puts a damper on the praise...
  • Cut Lex Luthor a Check: Interestingly, the premise of Meta Human Inc. is about avoiding this trope—the company that unexpectedly appoints you as CEO has access to supernatural wizardry and super-science technology, and the company is pragmatic enough to sell these superpowers off to the highest bidder.
  • Deal with the Devil: For you, taking the powers offered by MetaHuman is this, binding you to the will of the Board of Directors. If you don't take any enhancements, then if they decide to eliminate you in the ending, they have to back down and let you go free.
  • Downer Ending: Dying in the Surgeons' world either protecting Katariki or fighting along side him as the Surgeons close in due to not having what you needed to stop them. Being trapped in a picture by the board also counts.
  • The Dreaded: The exec board to you and possibly the media, if you're on their bad side. Also, if you rule the company with an iron fist without caring about your employees, this is you to them.
  • Happy Ending: Saving the world from the Surgeons' invasion and getting praised for doing such a good job as a CEO. You're even offered to continue working as a CEO. Plus, getting your preferred love interest.
  • Heroic Sacrifice: You, possibly, if you choose to stay behind and cause a distraction with the Surgeons for Katariki so he can close the portal from their world to Earth's world. However, if you go close the portal and Katariki stays behind, he becomes this trope.
  • Honesty Is the Best Policy: How you can choose to run Meta Human Inc. and be as a CEO.
  • Intrepid Reporter: Robyn Goodchild
  • Mercy Kill: When you travel into a future Seattle in a world taken over by Surgeons, you come upon a human transforming into a Surgeon. He pleads with you to kill him before he turns completely. It's your choice whether you do it or not.
  • Naďve Newcomer: You. You're thrust into a CEO position when the former CEO has suddenly disappeared with no former training and without warning.
  • Not Quite Dead: Anaru Katariki
  • The Professor: Professor Nemesis
  • Purely Aesthetic Gender
  • The Rival: Aaron Salt, the CEO of your rival corporation, Psion Industries.
  • Second-Person Narration
  • You Can't Thwart Stage One: You'll always be accused of stealing from Meta Human Inc. in order to get railroaded into becoming the new CEO of the company.

     Sixth Grade Detective 

  • Alpha Bitch: Vitessa.
  • Anti-Villain: In the second case, which has you attempting to find out who stole Shanti's gamebook, it turns out that the person only stole it because the person accidentally ruined the book by knocking it into a mud puddle, and even bought Shanti a replacement book in secret. You can either choose to keep this secret, or to tell Shanti who stole the book.
  • Captain Obvious Reveal: A.J. can try to play the part of your "secret" admirer even after you've been dating for months.
  • Childhood Friend Romance: Your best friend A.J., whose gender you select, is a possible romantic interest.
  • Cloud Cuckoolander: Shanti is a very mild example of this trope; she's described as sometimes being dreamy and off in her own world.
  • Dark Secret: In one of the cases, your classmate Finnegan asks you to uncover the reason behind what Finnegan feels is suspicious behavior coming from Evan, for the sake of the newspaper club. Subverted, Evan's secret is that he's a talented makeup artist.
  • Gang of Bullies: A gang of bullies is involved in one of the cases.
  • Honesty Is the Best Policy: There's an achievement for finishing the game having told no lies. Also, if Corley is your date at the dance at the very end of the game, Corley will tell you that the fact that you never lie has inspired Corley to be more honest.
  • Insufferable Genius: The other characters consider Finnegan to be this. Your player character can either choose to agree with this assessment, or be nice to Finnegan and genuinely share his interests, even asking him to tell you more about ornithology.
  • Kid Detective: You play as this.
  • Nice Job Breaking It, Hero: If you persuade Evan to tell his secret to the school by saying that he's got to be Evan, Evan will reappear later with food and drinks in his hair from being picked on for his talent, and he'll be miffed at your advice.
  • Poisonous Friend: Your best friend A.J., whose gender you can select. A.J. is mostly a good person who has your back, but A.J. will also usually favor less honest solutions to mysteries. If you keep A.J.'s secret in the first case, and then say that you kept the secret because A.J. is important to you, you can start a romance with A.J. early. Otherwise, you have to wait until before the dance, like the other potential romances.
  • Real Men Wear Pink: He keeps it secret, but Evan is a talented makeup artist.
  • Secret Admirer: The summary of Sixth Grade Detective on the website hints that one of the cases will be figuring out your secret admirer. It's the very last case; just before the dance, someone sends you a love note. However, unlike the culprits of the previous cases, the identity of the "culprit" in this case can vary; the love note will usually be from the student you have the highest relationship with.
  • Shrinking Violet: Corley.
  • Starter Villain: Your first case has you track down whoever stole A.J.'s second bike, the Great Brown Ugly, which A.J.'s mother bought as a replacement for the also-stolen first bike, the Red Lightning. Subverted, A.J. himself/herself arranged for his/her uncle to sell the bike without telling A.J.'s mother.
  • Sweet and Sour Grapes: Your player character's parents finally buy you a brand-new bike near the end of the game, but they didn't know that the bike is really the Red Lightning, the first bike that was stolen from A.J. Your parents give you the choice of either keeping the bike or returning it to A.J. If you return A.J.'s Red Lightning, your parents are so impressed with your honesty and character that as a reward, they buy you another bike—the Green Tornado.

     The Daring Mermaid Expedition 

  • Bold Explorer: You can play as an adventure-seeker.
  • Determinator: You can play as this if you have a high Persistence or Passion stat.
  • Karma Meter: In this game, you have a "Credibility" stat that tracks how likely you are to be believed by the Society you seek to join.
  • Our Mermaids Are Different: In this game, the mermaids call themselves the Meramaida, according to the man who interrupts your hearing just before the "free" portion of the game ends.

     The Sea Eternal 

  • Amicable Exes: You and your ex-human lover, though you can get back together if you want.
  • The Atoner: The PC has some guilt over bringing their human lover beneath the waves, since doing so trapped them there forever and brought about the ruin of their relationship.
  • Deal with the Devil: The whales are willing to use their magical abilities, but you always have to give them something in turn. They're more Ambiguously Evil than truely evil, though. Except no, they really are evil.
  • Gilded Cage: The mermaid city ended up being this for your human ex. Sure, they'll live forever, and sure, it's underwater and that's very neat, and sure, there's lots of neat activities and parties...but they can never return to the human world, and they can't leave without being escorted by mermaids.
  • Hive Mind: The squids belong to one.
  • I Just Want to Be Free: Some mermaids are of the opinion they should break free from service to the whales, potentially including you.
  • Immortality Hurts: The only way to kill a mermaid is to starve them to death, which takes centuries. Anything else—being stabbed, shocked, eaten alive—won't do the trick. Since mermaids are embroiled in an eternal war against squids on the whales' behalf, it kind of sucks since there's no hope of escape.
  • It Can Think: The injured squid you discover is capable of talking independent from the squid hive mind.
  • Laser-Guided Amnesia: The entire race of mermaids is under this.
  • Manipulative Bastard: The whales. They approached humans and made them tempting bargains, but left out the tiny little detail that accepting it would cost them there memories. When the humans accepted and were transformed into mermaids, their lost memories were replaced with memories of eternally promising to serve the whales, effectively becoming a race of slaves.
  • Our Mermaids Are Different: They're immortal, have no actual genders (just picking one to identify by) and look nothing like the beautiful sirens of lore, having blue skin, green or purple hair, black eyes, and sharp teeth.
  • Sapient Cetaceans: The whales are somehow able to communicate with humans, and have magical abilities that can do almost anything.
  • Transgender: Finn actually considers himself a transgender woman named Faye, and came below the service because she hoped the whales would change her physiology. They can, but it will cost her her memories of her life as a human.
  • Who Wants to Live Forever?: A very prominent theme of the game is whether the costs of the mermaids' eternity—having to live in service to the whales, having to follow a very strict set of rules, slowly losing your memories due to natural decay—are worth the benefits.

     Choice of the Pirate 

  • Badass In Charge: You will become this, eventually.
  • The Big Guy: Caesar Lord
  • Big Bad: The Lusca
  • Boarding Party: Occurs a few times throughout the game.
  • The Captain: Captain Blackguard in the beginning, but eventually you can become a captain yourself. Anne Read counts as well. There are also many other captains throughout this story.
  • Deal with the Devil: If you die at sea, you can make a deal with Davy Jones for an extra seven years of life serving him as captain of a ghost ship.
  • Dressed to Plunder: As to be expected in a pirate game. As your fame grows, you can choose to have a piece of signature clothing that varies from a coat to a hat and more. Other NPCs are decked out in nearly all of the typical pirate gear.
  • Ghost Pirate: Granny, who will become a useful ally throughout the rest of the game if you manage to defeat her (or convince her to join forces with you) and capture her ship for your fleet.
  • Ghost Ship: The Sea Queen is a ship haunted by a cantankerous ghost called Granny. A more malevolent example shows up later.
  • Hook Hand: After a battle towards the middle of the game, the decisions that you made during it can cause you to lose a hand. It will get replaced with this. You can even get your Moniker changed to Hook to accompany the new change.
  • Improvised Weapon: Making weapons out of things that are around you is something you will rely on if your Skullduggery stat is high.
  • La Résistance: How you and your crew can be against the Crown.
  • Master Swordsman: If your Pistols & Swords stat is quite high.
  • The Pirates Who Don't Do Anything: If you treat your crew terribly, they will become this.
  • Privateer: You can choose to be this for the Crown.
  • Port Town: San Alfonso
  • Scary Black Man: How Caesar can come across during battle.
  • Shout-Out: If you get a hook hand, your moniker is changed to Captain Hook.
  • The Starscream: You can backstab Captain Blackguard at the beginning of the game to become a Captain, and at the end of the game you can kill the Pirate King to take his place.
  • Talk Like a Pirate: Captain Blackguard.
  • World of Action Girls: Many of the fights in the game are being fought by female captains. You included, if you're playing as a woman.


Alternative Title(s): Choice Of Games

http://tvtropes.org/pmwiki/pmwiki.php/VideoGame/ChoiceOfGames