Composite Character

http://static.tvtropes.org/pmwiki/pub/images/composite_character_image_1038.jpg
Let's combine the paint job of the left one with the door wings of the right onenote 

Certain media, including Real Life, tend to have the time and space to utilize Loads and Loads of Characters, a large number of individuals with significant and/or necessary contributions to the storyline. But in an adaptation it can be difficult to offer adequate time and space so that each and every character gets their just due for how they impact the story. To be faithful to these characters may, at worst, make them come across as a living Plot Device, existing only for the sake of the plot and not a fleshed out character of their own with individual talents, interests and backstory.

A solution is to invoke artistic license and compress two or more such figures into a single character with traits drawn from all of them. For the sake of telling a proper story those contributions are relegated to the actions of only a few. Instead of showing the legwork of an entire team of intelligence officers to decipher important information, it's rolled up into one person putting it together. Instead of having three different smart guys on the team divided up into distinct fields, you make one of them an Omnidisciplinary Scientist and discard the others. It's a method of streamlining both the plot and the character interactions; there are fewer people to follow and everyone who is still around has more to contribute to the story.

This is frequently done in works Based on a True Story, since no medium can compete with the Loads and Loads of Characters featured in Real Life. Whereas most of humanity's most interesting achievements have involved lots of people with different motivations, it suits the Rule of Drama to simplify things to a handful of characters with well-defined objectives. Though there may be nameless individuals wandering around with their own story to tell, the core plot is dictated by the people with names. Some might object to removing an important character and his or her contribution to the story, but on the other hand it means the story has a chance to be told.

This can sometimes get complicated, as the removed character may have his or her personality split up among the remaining characters (Deadpan Snarker given to character A, TV Genius attributes given to character B), or it is something as simple as someone actually having the removed character's appearance and personality but given a different name. In some extreme cases with certain stories that have regular adaptations every few years, an Era-Specific Personality gives them the opportunity to fuse specific versions of the SAME character in different adaptations, making someone a composite character of him- or herself.

A Massive Multiplayer Crossover might do this to tie the continuities together, by revealing Character A from Series 1 is "really" the same person as the similar Character B from Series 2.

Commonly involved in Adaptation Distillation and Adaptation Decay. Adaptation Origin Connection is a subtrope wherein a character important to the series that wasn't involved in the Hero's Origin Story in the original is in the adaptation, replacing a character who usually either got Demoted to Extra or was just a Starter Villain. See also Economy Cast. Sometimes a cause of an Adaptation Personality Change.

The inversion, where an adaptation divides a single character's attributes among multiple characters, is Decomposite Character.


Examples:

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    Literature 
  • 1066 and All That has "the memorable Dutch King Williamanmary."
  • Many adaptations of Alice in Wonderland conflate the Queen of Hearts with the Red Queen. The first is from "Adventures in Wonderland" and is a playing card; the second is from "Through the looking glass" and is a chess piece.
  • In the Anno Dracula short story "Castles in the Air", the vampire hippy guru Khorda from the 1973 film Deathmaster turns out to be one of Dracula's hangers-on from the earlier books, General Iorga. This is a gag on the fact that Robert Quarry, who played Khorda, had previously played the title character in Count Yorga, Vampire and The Return of Count Yorga, and many people consider Deathmaster to be a Spiritual Successor.
    • "Flattop" in the James Bond pastiche sections of Dracula Cha-Cha-Cha is a composite of the Dick Tracy villain of the same name, Frankenstein's Monster, and Bond Dragons Oddjob and Jaws.
    • Dracula himself, constantly reinventing himself and shapeshifting to match, is a composite of every portrayal of the Count.
    • Kit and Holly in "You'll Never Drink Blood in This Town Again" are the main characters of the film Badlands, but have a string of aliases suggesting they're every Outlaw Couple in 20th century fiction.
    • Simuilar to Dracula, Hamish Bond in Cha-Cha-Cha is a composite of Ian Fleming's James Bond and Sean Connery's James Bond, before Mother Roma's influence turns him into Roger Moore's Bond.
  • The title character in Carrie was based on two different girls whom Stephen King went to school with growing up, both of whom had difficult lives and died young.
  • In Arthur Miller's The Crucible, the utterly vile Danforth stands for several different judges who presided over the witch trials. Miller initially worried that he had made Danforth too one-dimensional ... only to find that the real judges were even worse.
  • Joseph Conrad's Under Western Eyes begins with the assassination of a Tsarist official, de P___, who is a composite of Konstantin Pobedonstev and another P-named official who really was assassinated. The implication was that Conrad hoped that the fate of the latter would happen to the former.
    • Also by Conrad, Kurtz of Heart of Darkness is a combination of a number of sadistic Evil Colonialist types in the Belgian Congo, although his name in particular references Georges Antoine Klein (Kurtz is German for short and Klein is German for small) who had just died when Conrad was in the Congo.
  • Sultan Mehmed of Count and Countess is a mix of the real-life Sultan Mehmed and his father.
  • Darkness at Noon:
    "The life of the man N. S. Rubashov is a synthesis of the lives of a number of men who were victims of the so-called Moscow Trials. Several of them were personally known to this author. This book is dedicated to their memory."
  • Doctor Who Expanded Universe
    • The novelisation of the Doctor Who serial The Invasion of Time combines the characters of Jasko and Ablif into a single character. The character in the book is named, appropriately enough, "Jablif".
    • The New Series Adventures novel The Ressurection Casket is Treasure Island Recycled In Space. The character of Kevin is Ben Gunn, and the parrot, and the Black Spot — It Makes Sense in Context.
  • Dame Alice from ''The Gallows in the Greenwood" by Phyllis Ann Karr is a composite of three different characters from the Robin Hood stories and ballads. She starts off as the Sheriff's Wife (a minor character in some ballads), takes her husband's place when Robin and his outlaws murder him (becoming the Sheriff for the events of several famous stories) and finally retires to a convent, becoming the Prioress who ultimately kills Robin Hood in some versions.
  • In the Dramatic Audio version of the Left Behind book Armageddon, GC officer Anita Sanchez is one for two female officers (a Hispanic and an African-American) working in the San Diego headquarters where Chloe Williams was incarcerated.
  • Nellie Oleson in the Little House on the Prairie books was a composite of three different girls Laura Ingalls Wilder knew growing up: Nellie Owens, Genevieve Masters and Stella Gilbert. There is some speculation that Mr. Edwards was a composite, as well, since pinning down his historical personage has proved confusing.
  • DI Jack Spratt in the Nursery Crime books by Jasper Fforde is every fairy tale Jack. Although he insists he didn't kill many giants.
  • From the preface to Tom Sawyer:
    "Huck Finn is drawn from life; Tom Sawyer also, but not from an individual—he is a combination of the characteristics of three boys whom I knew, and therefore belongs to the composite order of architecture."
  • Elenn in Jo Walton's Sulien series is a composite of Guinevere from the King Arthur mythos and Fionnbharr from the Táin Bó Cúailnge.
  • In Philip José Farmer's Wold Newton family, he sometimes does this to tie characters together. Most notably, the Duke of Holdernesse and his illigitimate son James Wilder, from the Sherlock Holmes story "The Adventure of the Priory Road School", are combined with John Clayton, Earl of Greystoke and Clark Savage Sr, to make Tarzan and Doc Savage cousins.
  • In A.C. Gaughen's retelling of Robin Hood Scarlet, the titular character is a combination of Will Scarlet and Maid Marian
  • The protagonist of Dorothy Dunnett's King Hereafter is a combination of the historical Macbeth with a contemporary ruler, Thorfinn Sigurdsson.
    • Similarly, his wife, Groa, is both Thorfinn's wife Ingibjorg and Macbeth's wife Gruoch.
  • In-Universe examples: in the kid's book I Funny TV, the protagonist, Jamie, is making a sitcom pilot based on his own life. The writers decide to simplify things by fusing his best friends, Teen Genius Pierce and cool-guy Gaylor, into one character named Bob. (Subverted when stage fright keeps Bob's actor from going on, so his real friends are Pushed in Front of the Audience). Likewise, in his real life Jamie deals with two bullies, his cousin Stevie and another boy named Lars; the writers like Lars better, so they make him Jamie's cousin in the show.
  • The Discworld novel Wyrd Sisters parodies Hamlet and Macbeth simultaneously. Duke Felmet is Macbeth and Claudius; King Verence is Hamlet's father, King Duncan and Banquo; and Tomjon is Hamlet and Malcom. (And then the Fool turns out to be Fortinbras and actually Malcom.)
  • In-universe in Wolf Hall, when Henry VIII tells Thomas Cromwell and the Archbishop of Canturbury, Dr. Thomas Cranmer, that the French have taken to referring to them as the single entity "Dr. Cranmuel." Then the narration shortly thereafter says "Dr. Cranmuel left the room."

    Music 
  • The Bangles created "Anna Lee" as a composite character on their 2011 album Sweetheart of the Sun, for the song "Anna Lee (Sweetheart of the Sun)":
    Susanna Hoffs: Interestingly, a character sort of developed in the song. We had all just read Girls Like Us, the book about Carly Simon, Carole King and Joni Mitchell, and we were inspired by it. We sort of made up a portrait of a person based around those women — it's kind of mythical.
  • Jesus Christ Superstar has Mary Magdalene combine elements of herself with those of the unnamed woman whose "waste" of costly perfume on Jesus in Bethany was condemned by the disciples in the New Testament, but just by Judas Iscariot in the rock opera. However, Mary Magdalene has been traditionally identified with the unnamed woman of Bethany for centuries, so this wasn't the first time it happened.
  • !HERO: The Rock Opera's Maggie is Mary Magdalene combined with the Samaritan woman at the well.
  • In Pink Floyd's The Wall, Pink is based on Roger Waters, with a bit of Syd Barrett.

     Mythology, Folklore and Religion 
  • This is done often in mythology and its various adaptations as a result of both time constraints and general mixing of the stories.
  • Older Than Print: In Arthurian Literature, the role of the mother of Mordred (who may or may not be Arthur's son) is frequently given to Morgan Le Fay; the original mother (Morgause) is either absent or given a different role.
  • In the Robin Hood legends and ballads, there's about a half dozen Merry Men all named "Will;" most adaptations boil them down to one.
  • The American Santa Claus is a composite of several European myths and folk lore.
  • In Christian traditions going back at least to the middle ages, Mary Magdelene was identified both with the nameless adulteress brought before Jesus (who then said: "Let him who is without sin cast the first stone") and the nameless woman of Bethany who perfumed him.
  • Medieval legends about saints occasionally mixed up saints bearing the same name, e. g. Dionysius (Dénis), martyred bishop of Paris (3rd century), with the Dionyisius the Areopagite (converted by St. Paul).
  • In Norse Mythology the trickster god Loki and the fire giant Logi are often thought of as the same character, such as in the Ring Cycle where they are merged into Loge.
  • Combined with Adapted Out, almost every film version of Exodus from The Bible removes Aaron completely and gives all his meetings with Pharoah and the miracles performed by him to Moses.
  • In The Qur'an's story about the Virgin Mary, named "Maryam" in Arabic, she has a brother named Harun ("Aaron") and a father named Imram ("Amram")...just like the Old Testament's Miriam, who would also be called "Maryam" in Arabic. Of course, a Muslim would argue that this is a coincidence or the case of purposefully naming one's kids after revered historical figures, while non-Muslims generally argue that Muhammad heard the stories of both "Maryams," mistakenly thought they were the same person and then re-separated the stories later when he realized his error.
  • In folklore and demonology, Satan, Lucifer, Beelzebub, and such are all originally separate demons. They are however often combined into the same being with the various different names becoming simply aliases.
  • The popular conception of The Antichrist is a merger of three prophetic figures in the Bible, none of whom are referred to by that name. The three are the "Little Horn" in the Book of Daniel, the "Man of Sin" in the Epistle to the Thessalonians, who proclaims himself as God and defiles the Temple of Jerusalem, and "The Beast" in the Book of Revelation. While many Christians, especially Evangelicals, believe all of these figures refer to the same person or being, a demonically-backed dictator who will appear at the end of the world, some scholars believe they each referred to a different historical ruler: the Little Horn was Antiochus IV, a Greek king known for his brutal persecutions of Jews around the time Daniel was written; the Man of Sin was Emperor Caligula, who attempted to erect a statue of himself in the Temple; and the Beast was Emperor Nero, as the Beast's famous number, 666 corresponds in Jewish numerology to "Neron Kaisar," the Greek form of his name.

    Professional Wrestling 
  • WWE's Randy Orton is a strange example. He has the snake motif of "Stone Cold" Steve Austin, with a similar fighting style and devil-may-care whoop-your-ass attitude, but he's also the youngest world champion in WWE history and a third-generation superstar. Sound familiar?
  • Trish Stratus started out as something of a hodgepodge of Sunny (hot manager of a Tag Team that stood no chance of getting over), Sable as a heel (only about a couple of weeks into her run and she was already talking about suing for sexual harassment and she'd barely done anything yet) and Terri Runnels' more heelish tendencies.
  • Cheerleader Melissa still dressed like a cheerleader but had not done anything related to her name sake for years. Alissa Flash debuted on TNA Impact paying tribute to Sensational Sherri Martel in addition to being a zipper happy tease. As Flash's TNA career wound down though, she started wearing new, zipper less gear and using Cheerleader Melissa's moves, and stopped using Sherri makeup. In post TNA appearances Melissa would wear that same gear and openly refer to Flash's actions as her own.
  • ERLL had a luchador known as Alberto Dos Rios, a composite of El Patron Alberto's former gimmicks Alberto Del Rio and Dos Caras.
  • Due to CMLL owning the Místico gimmick, the luchador with the most success using said gimmick wrestled in Lucha Libre Elite as Carístico, a combination of his Místico gimmick and his much less successful but still well known Sin Cara gimmick.

    Puppet Shows 

    Radio 
  • In the Quintessential Stage of The Hitchhiker's Guide to the Galaxy, Van Harl, the Vogon who's taken over the Guide in Mostly Harmless, is combined with Zarniwoop, who was the editor-in-chief in the Secondary Phase and The Restaurant at the End of the Universe. This does not appear to have been done to simplify the story (it doesn't); they simply liked Jonathan Pryce's portrayal of Zarniwoop and wanted him back.
  • In the Finnish version of The Men from the Ministry the characters Mr. "Whizzer" Wilkins and Mr. "Creepy" Crawley (two civil servants of neighbor offices who were pretty much the same one already, never appearing together and both voiced by John Graham) into "Vinku" Wilkins, taking the former's name, stuttering and absent-mindedness and the latter's Verbal Tic.

    Tabletop Games 
  • Done in Victory In The Pacific with locales instead of people. To keep the game manageable, a lot of island bases of World War II are combined. E.g. Lae represents multiple bases on the northern half of New Guinea, Saipan also represents Guam & Tinian, Pearl Harbor & Yokosuka Naval Yard stand-in for all of Hawaii & Japan respectively, etc.
  • Yu-Gi-Oh! TCG
    • Kozmo Goodwitch is a composite of the good witches from Oz and Obi-Wan from Star Wars, with elements of Qui-Gon Jinn from the latter (her lightsword is green like Qui-Gon's, and her robes take some inspiration from his).
    • Similarly, Kozmoll Wickedwitch combines elements of the wicked witches with Darth Maul (using his distinctive dual-bladed lightsaber) and Darth Vader (she appears at least partially cybernetic).
    • Kozmo Farmgirl is a more straightforward fusion of Dorothy and Luke Skywalker.
  • Dungeons & Dragons had a couple of Composite Species:
    • Second edition had the Greyhawk dragon, which was unique to the Greyhawk setting, and the steel dragon (sometimes the Waterdeep dragon) from Forgotten Realms. Both were metallic-grey dragons with a fondness for human society and the ability to take humanoid form to join it. When the Greyhawk dragon was updated to 3.5 edition in Dragon magazine, there was a note that some members of the race had ventured beyond Oerth, where they were known as steel dragons.
    • Harpies in the game combine the mythological harpy with the siren. They resemble the mythical harpies in appearance (ugly hag-like women with the legs and wings of a vulture) but they had powers and an MO similar to sirens, using entrancing song to lure victims to them.
  • According to the 1985 Doctor Who RPG, the Meddling Monk was a previous incarnation of the Master. This does not appear to be the case in any other version of the Doctor Who Expanded Universe.

    Theatre 
  • Billy Flynn, "the silver-tongued prince of the courtroom" of Chicago, was a composite of William Scott Stewart and W. W. O'Brien, the real life attorneys of Belva Gaertner and Beulah Annan (the real life Velma Kelly and Roxie Hart).
  • Cirque du Soleil's Japan-only tour Fascination combined acts from Le Cirque Réinventé and Nouvelle Experience; appropriately, the Ringmaster here was a composite of the Reinvente Ringmaster and the Great Chamberlain of Nouvelle, who served similar emcee functions. This Ringmaster had the Reinvente costume and backstory of a transformed "Ordinary Person", but was played by Nouvelle's actor (Brian Dewhurst) and from there participated in the latter show's slackwire act.
  • Anthony Burgess combines Cyrano's best friend Le Bret with his Captain Carbon de Jaloux in his adaptation of Cyrano de Bergerac.
  • In Der Ring des Nibelungen Hagen is a merging of several versions of the same character. Like in Literature/Nibelungenlied he is a grim figure, like Nibelungenlied and Thidreks Saga he kills Siegfried, like Thidreks Saga his father is an elf and like Saga of the Volsungs he is Gunther's brother (though the Nibelungenlied calls him a kinsman the relation is not clear). He also seems to have some merging with Bastard Bastards like Edmund from King Lear.
    • Wagner also conflated Loki, Norse god of mischief, with Logi, a god of fire. He may have done this mistakenly, or based his characterisation on a previous scholar who made the mistake.
  • In Dreamgirls, Effie White is not only patterned primarily after "third Supreme" Florence Ballard, but also after Etta James and Aretha Franklin.
  • In Bernard Pomerance's The Elephant Man, Ross is a composite of Tom Norman (Merrick's manager when Treves met him, and a fairly decent guy as far as P.T. Barnum types go) and the Belgian showman who abandoned him and robbed him of his life's savings.
  • Pseudolus from A Funny Thing Happened on the Way to the Forum, an amalgam of various trickster servant characters from the works of Roman playwright Plautus.
  • Mimi and Rodolfo in La Bohème merge the original novel Scenes de la Vie de Boheme's characters of Mimi and Rodolphe with another couple from the novel, Francine and Jacques, whose romance also ends with the girl dying of tuberculosis. Details the opera borrows from the latter couple include the way they meet, the operatic Mimi's sweeter personality, and her romantic death scene, as opposed to the original Mimi's Dying Alone.
  • Joanne in La Bohème's Setting Update, RENT, is a female version of Alcindoro, but also inherits some traits from Marcello (the Mark character).
  • In Les Misérables, Thenardier's henchman Brujon takes his name from a minor criminal who only associated with Thenardier. His status as The Brute comes from the novel's Gueulemer. The musical also does away with the Thenardiers' second daughter, Azelma, giving her plot points to Madame Thenardier (which is not difficult, since the point of the character was that she was growing up just like her mother).
  • In most productions of the opera The Magic Flute, the role of the Speaker, a dialogue-only character who guides Tamino and Papageno through their second act trials, is merged with that of the old priest Tamino encounters in the first act finale. This has been standard practice for so long that few people know that they originally may not have been the same character.
  • The stage version of Newsies replaces reporter Brian Denton and Jack's love interest Sarah with Katharine Plumber, a reporter who becomes Jack's love interest.
  • Almost every adaptation of The Phantom of the Opera transplants most aspects of the Daroga's character into Madame Giry.
    • In the original novel, Raoul is a bit of an Upper-Class Twit who relies on the Daroga's know-how to survive Erik's machinations. In the musical, the Daroga is omitted, and Raoul becomes much more competent as a result.
  • In Pokémon Live!, MechaMew2 is primarily based on Mewtwo, but also has Mew's unique feature of knowing every Pokemon move.
  • In the musical version of Reefer Madness, Jimmy Harper is a composite of the original film's protagonist Bill Harper and his girlfriend Mary's kid brother Jimmy.
  • In Frank Wildhorn's musical of The Scarlet Pimpernel, Percy's eighteen strong League of The Scarlet Pimpernel (aside from Percy himself and brother-in-law Armand), was folded up into nine men: Dewhurst note , Elton, Farleigh, Ben, Hal, Ozzy, Hastings, Neville, and Leggett. Later revisions cut the later three men out and give their lines to the first six.
  • In 1776, John Adams is somewhat combined with his cousin Sam Adams, who doesn't appear in the play. Many people now associate the quote about how there would be trouble "a hundred years hence" if slavery was allowed to continue to John when it was really Sam who said it. (Incidentally, they had to take out the "hundred years" bit because they thought the audience would never believe it.)
  • Happens too often to count in Shakespeare's history plays, and not just characters, but also with battles and other events.
  • Shadowlands combines Joy Gresham's two sons into one. This is also done for the film version; the original teleplay kept both sons.
  • The musical Show Boat combined two characters from Edna Ferber's novel, the heavy Frank and the juvenile lead and Elly's husband Schultzy, into Frank Schultz. Ike Keener, the sheriff of Lemonye, and Vallon, the police chief of New Orleans, were similarly combined into Ike Vallon. The 1929 film version of Show Boat made Hetty Chilson, a character from Ferber's novel that was eliminated from the musical, an alternate identity of Julie.
  • Part of the reason that The Threepenny Opera is Darker and Edgier than the original Beggars Opera is because of this trope. In the original, Macheath is a fairly sympathetic (if lecherous) example of The Highwayman, and Peachum is a corrupt thief-taker (he works both sides of the law- he conspires with criminals, but also turns those criminals in for a reward when they're outlived their usefulness to him). In Brecht's version, Peachum, while still corrupt, is the head of a beggar's guild, and Macheath is a much more unpleasant gangster. This version of Macheath is a "grass" and he gets the lines of the original Peachum when he treacherously plots to turn the loyal members of his gang to save his own skin.
  • Some productions of Twelfth Night cut Fabian and give his role in Act II, Scene V to Feste. In fairness, it's almost too easy to do this, since Maria earlier tells Toby, Andrew and Feste to show up for the said scene, and Fabian never appears until that moment, when he's introduced as a whole new character who has inexplicably been invited to join the fun, while Feste is nowhere to be found. Some analysts have speculated that Fabian was invented for some practical reason or other, and that Feste was originally supposed to appear in the scene.
  • In Wicked, Fiyero and Boq, via spells by Elphaba and Nessarose, are transformed into the Scarecrow and the Tinman. In the original novel, they were all separate characters.
    • Fiyero's musical counterpart is also a composite of the original Fiyero (Elphaba's love interest and a prince) and minor character from the book named Avaric (most of his personality traits). Meanwhile the name "Avaric" was given to a retainer of Fiyero who is only seen onstage breifly.
  • In the Opera of All the King's Men, entitled Willie Stark, Stark's aide Jack Burden supplants his love interest Anne's brother, Adam, in ultimately killing Stark.
  • You're a Good Man, Charlie Brown has Patty, whose lines and scenes come not only from the original comic strip's Patty (not to be confused with the later Peppermint Patty), but also Violet, Frieda, and Sally (enough of Sally, in fact, that the Broadway revival went ahead and re-identified the character).
  • Merrily We Roll Along: Joe Josephson, Gussie Carnegie's producer and husband whom she divorces for Frank in the musical, is a composite of two characters from the original play, a producer named P. J. Morton and an actor husband named Harry Nixon (who is Spared by the Adaptation).
  • In Elf: The Musical, Walter's boss Mr. Greenway is a combination of Mr. Greenway and Miles Finch from the movie.
  • In the Reduced Shakespeare Company's Shakespeare's Long-Lost First Play (abridged), the conceit is that this massive tome (a "quarto-pounder") contains elements and characters from all Shakespeare's later plays. In addition to characters gaining elements of another character because of who they're playing off (such as Lady Macbeth encouraging her fiance Hamlet to be more Macbethy) there are a few explicit composites: Dromeo is Launce from Two Gentlemen of Verona with Romeo elements; Richard III turns into Richard II when his hunchback is removed; and Lear's daughters are the three witches.

    Toys 
  • The Doctor Who promotion for Walls' Sky Ray ice lollies meant you got printed cards featuring stories about the Doctor on them. The company didn't have the rights to use the likenesses of either of the actors who had played the character at that point, and so the artwork featured a Doctor based on a fusion between William Hartnell and Patrick Troughton.

    Web Comics 
  • Something*Positive does this with its Life Embellished cast, featuring at least a few people who are based off of various people the author has met, merged into one person.
  • El Goonish Shive merged a background character unofficially called Shy Girl with a minor character named Rhoda who then became more of a supporting character.
  • Arthur, King of Time and Space
    • The final strip of the Buffy the Vampire Slayer-pastiche arc had the revelation that Arthur (who up til then had been Xander) was a werewolf, and Guenevere realising this was also a Twilight pastiche. So..
      • Guenevere = Buffy Summers/Bella Swan
      • Lancelot = Angel/Edward Cullen
      • Arthur = Xander Harris/Jacob Black/Probably "Oz" Osbourne
    • Come to that, all the pastiche arcs make the characters into composites of the AKOTAS characters and the characters from the work being pastiched.
    • In the strip's take on the hunt where Arthur's horse dies under him and he then meets King Pellinore, the yeoman who brings Arthur a fresh horse is the same as the prophetic young boy who appears after Pellinore takes the horse and turns out to be Merlin.

    Web Original 
  • Being an adaptation of TTA TOME has a bunch of these.
    • Nylocke seems to be a mash-up of Nailock and Kirbopher 15 from the original. Justified, because Kirbopher and Zetto are the same character in this new incarnation, any conflict between Kirbopher 15 and Zetto from the original would no longer work. As a result, Nylcoke is the one who imprisions the Forbidden Power into the drain edge/sword instead of Kirbopher and also tried to convince him to not take the game so seriously during the Gemini Tournament.
    • And then there's Kizuna, who combines Ruri and Voltarius from the original. She's still Zetto's partner, but in this version, Kizuna is the leader of the hackers while Zetto (who kind of acts like a second-in-command here) doubles as Kirbopher instead.
    • And don't even get started on Swordicon, who might've inspired the idea that Kirbopher and Zetto are the same person.
  • A variation occurred in There Will Be Brawl: While fans were still awaiting Young Link and Toon Link to finally show up or be mentioned, like every other character in Super Smash Bros., it's eventually revealed that Link also is Young Link and Toon Link. They were compressed into one character. Link looks at a photo of his younger self. This photo includes both, Young Link/Toon Link, implying that they are both the same guy during the same period of time. Link is just their grown-up version.
  • Crinoverse The Crinoverse, existing as it does as a combination of multiple superhero universes, has a few of these. There's the Justice Avengers, a combination of the JLA and the Avengers, and a few others-Psimon is a combination of the Champions character and the DC character of the same name.
  • Present on This Very Wiki - Trope Pantheons have Hercules, who is composite of Hercules from Hercules: The Legendary Journeys, Disney Hercules, Hercules from God of War, Berserker from Fate/stay night and The Incredible Hercules. And probably all other versions of the character.
  • The Lizzie Bennet Diaries, a present-day adaptation of Pride and Prejudice, has several changes:
    • The Bennet family has three daughters instead of five: Jane, Lizzie and Lydia. Lydia has shades of Kitty (she's not as insufferable as Lydia in the books and, in a sense, has a happier ending). Mary Bennet is present as the girls' cousin.
    • Bing Lee, the adaptation's version of Mr. Bingley, only has one sister instead of two, Caroline Lee. She also fulfills the role of Anne de Bourgh as a girl who Catherine de Bourgh sees as Darcy's girlfriend and at the end, Caroline's part corresponds to Lady Catherine as someone who unintentionally brings the main couple together when she tries to separate them.
  • Emma Approved takes place in the same verse as The Lizzie Bennet Diaries. The latter's Caroline Lee is a verse-spanning Composite Character by taking the place of Emma's Augusta Elton.
  • University Ever After combines several characters:
  • In general, if a fighter tends to have multiple sources of canon, Death Battle will often take information from most, if not all of them (as long as they don't directly contradict with the original or most accepted source material) in order to give that fighter a good round-out of abilities. Examples of this include Batman using shock gloves against Captain America and RoboCop not only employing the weapons he used in the films, but also the tactical discs and rambot devices he used in The Series against The Terminator. Even hallucinations seem to be fair game as even though The Joker has used a Jokermobile before, the Joker vs. Sweet Tooth episode features the Joker employing the vandalized Batmobile version of the Jokermobile in the last Scarecrow hallucination in Batman: Arkham Knight.

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