Music: Syd Barrett

Shine on You crazy Diamond!

"It's awfully considerate of you to think of me here
And I'm most obliged to you for making it clear
That I'm not here"
- "Jugband Blues" - A Saucerful Of Secrets.

Roger Keith "Syd" Barrett (6 January 1946 - 7 July 2006) was the legendary front-man of Pink Floyd in their Psychedelic years. He recorded 3 singles and a now-classic album, The Piper At The Gates Of Dawn (writing nearly all the songs) with them, but his mental health started to decline considerably (brought on by excessive drug use. Though many believe his breakdown would have happened anyway), and as a result he was forced to leave at the start of 1968 during the making of their second album A Saucerful Of Secrets (with one song written by him), replaced by David Gilmour. The rest of the band to this day feel extreme guilt for not being able to help him properly, though there was really nothing they could do.

After his departure, Barrett would go on to creating two solo albums. The first, The Madcap Laughs was marred by poor production at certain songs (the ones produced by former band-mates Roger Waters and David Gilmour), and the second, Barrett, came off better (this time produced by Gilmour and with contributions by Richard Wright). He gave only one performance in that era - with Gilmour on bass and Jerry Shirley from Humble Pie on drums - only for Barrett to leave the stage after four songs. That performance has been bootlegged. He did perform for the BBC twice though, and those performances would eventually be officially released.

In January 1972, he performed in a band called "The Last Minute Put Together Boogie Band" which would go onto form the band called Stars with John "Twink" Alder note  on drums and Jack Monck on bass. Their performances ranged from brilliant to disastrous, and after reading a negative review the fragile Barrett quit immediately. The last time Barrett tried to record was in 1974, and that didn't go very well at all. After that, Barrett retired from the music industry for good. He would visit Pink Floyd one last time in 1975 - ironically just as they were completing their tribute to him, "Shine On You Crazy Diamond" off of Wish You Were Here - and his dramatically changed appearance and further mental decline reduced Waters and Wright to tears. Apart from a brief encounter with Waters at Harrods a few years later, he would never see Pink Floyd again. Eventually, he moved in his mother's house and became a full-on recluse. He approved of an odds and ends compilation album called Opel which is now part of his official discography, and continued to receive royalties from Gilmour for his work with Pink Floyd, which he lived on.

Barrett (who went back to using his original name Roger) would live as a recluse and was often annoyed by paparazzi and fans. Time did little to diminish interest in his work, and he had become a legendary figure. But he simply wanted to be left alone. His physical health started to decline in the 1990's due to diabetes and stomach ulcers. Barrett died in 2006 from pancreatic cancer. The rest of Pink Floyd were naturally devastated, but others who cited Barrett as a major influence, such as David Bowie, were also upset. But his work with Pink Floyd ensures his legacy, and Barrett remains fondly remembered to this day. His solo work is often seen as a prime example of Outsider Music.


Studio and Live Discography:

  • 1970 - The Madcap Laughs
  • 1970 - Barrett
  • 1987 - Peel Sessions note 
  • 2004 - The Radio One Sessions note 


"What Exactly is a Dream?":

  • Aroused by Their Voice: A good portion of Syd Fans (especially the squeeing ones) feel this way about his speaking voice.
  • Badass Beard: Barrett during his brief stint in Stars in 1972. It's also the only known photo of him during that period.
  • Boxed Set: The 1993 box set Crazy Diamond which includes The Madcap Laughs, Barrett and Opel as well as previously unreleased bonus tracks.
  • Bunny-Ears Lawyer: After being chucked from Pink Floyd, Barrett's two solo albums showed that - even after having gone crazy - he was still a capable, witty songwriter. Pink Floyd themselves were very worried about continuing without Syd, as he had been writing almost all of the band's songs at that point. Waters and Gilmour helped produce Syd's first album and Gilmour and Wright his second, wanting to help their friend.
    • One suggestion was that David would tour and record with the band, while Syd would keep writing their songs and sing on the albums, like Brian Wilson's relationship with The Beach Boys around the same time. The idea failed after Syd infamously taunted them with the unlearn-able "Have You Got It, Yet?". Waters noted that at the time Syd was kicked out of the band, "he was our friend, but most of the time we now wanted to strangle him."
  • Chick Magnet: And HOW! Also The Charmer, too. However, during his breakdown, his relations with women changed & he allegedly became abusive.
  • Cloud Cuckoolander: One of the very definitions of it.
  • Compilation Re-release: Syd Barrett from 1974 was a reissue of Barrett's two solo albums.
  • Creepy Crossdresser: The reason "Arnold Layne" was a Panty Thief (see below) in the first place.
  • The Dandy: In his prime.
  • Deadpan Snarker
  • Demoted to Extra: This happened with Barrett and Pink Floyd when his erratic behaviour and deteriorating mental health jeopardized the band and David Gilmour was brought in. He only appears on three songs on A Saucerful Of Secretsnote .
  • Do Not Call Me Paul: Inversion - Barrett, later in life, refused to answer to "Syd," preferring to be addressed by his birth name, Roger.
  • Epic Rocking: "Rhamadan" could be considered that, as well as Pink Floyd songs "Interstellar Overdrive" and "Nick's Boogie".
  • Even the Guys Want Him:
    Peter Jenner: Syd was a handsome boy, he was beautiful and one more part of the tragedy is that he became such a fat slob, he became ugly. He was true flower power. He came out in this outrageous gear, he had this permanent, which cost 20 pounds at the time, and he looked like a beautiful woman, all this Thea Porter stuff. He had a lovely girlfriend, Lindsay, she was the spitting image of Syd.
  • Gaslighting: Barrett's flatmates were apparently fond of spiking all his food and drink with LSD. While it may not have had anything to do with his mental problems, it certainly didn't help.
  • Getting Crap Past the Radar: On "Candy And A Currant Bun", Pink Floyd managed to get the line "Oh, please just fuck with me!" past the censors, and the line was only added to the song in the first place as revenge against the censoring of the original title ("Let's Roll Another One").
  • Growing Up Sucks: He was a proverbial "Peter Pan" who loved all things "childhood".
  • I Am the Band: During his time with Pink Floyd.
  • Instrumentals: "Rhamadan".
    • Also, "Interstellar Overdrive", the unreleased "Reaction In G", "Lanky (Part 2)" and the second, instrumental version of "Golden Hair".
  • Keet: Started life as this. Then came the mental breakdown & he made a complete 180, becoming a quiet, monosyllabic recluse. Basically he went from "Tigger" to "Eeyore".
  • Looks Like Cesare: in some photos. In fact, he may have been the style inspiration for musical artists such as Robert Smith & Siouxsie Sioux.
  • Looks Like Orlock: Not in a ghoulish sense or anything, but late in life, he looked like a much older Aleister Crowley.
  • Misunderstood Loner with a Heart of Gold: With shades of Loners Are Freaks. Both later in life.
  • Non-Appearing Title: "Terrapin", although the song does fit the song's mood of underwater fantasy.
  • Panty Thief: "Arnold Layne".
  • The Pig Pen: During his mental breakdown, Syd was, for a period, this (his apartment during 'The Madcap Laughs'/'Barrett' would border on Trash of the Titans, complete with cigarette butts & pet doo left on the floor). Later, old Roger Barrett was described as veering the opposite direction towards being a Neat Freak who bathed a lot and kept a decent home.
  • Porn Stache: Barrett very briefly wore a light, soft, fuzzy one circa early 1966.
  • Prettyboy: Oh yes!
  • Put on a Bus: During the sessions for A Saucerful Of Secrets.
    • The Bus Came Back: Barrett's two 1970 solo albums, which - despite his less than perfect mental state - contained some very well-received songs. Unfortunately by 1972, he'd completely lost even his ability to write a cracking song and back on the bus he went.
  • Self-Titled Album: Barrett, more or less.
  • Something Blues:
    • "Bob Dylan Blues".
    • The title to "Jugband Blues". Subverted in that the song involves neither Blues music or Jugbands (Barrett's feelings, however, could be 'the blues' in question. Poor guy).
  • Stage Names: "Syd" Barrett was born Roger Keith Barrett. He earned the nickname "Syd" when he was still a child, either after an old local jazz bassist called Sid Barrett or after he showed up at school wearing a flat cap. He went back to using his given name after leaving the music business.
  • The Stoner: Well, DUH!
  • What Beautiful Eyes: Barrett was famous for his large, often eyeliner-adorned, dramatic eyes.
  • You Keep Using That Word: His solo work is often called "outsider music," though he was already a professional musician who had been in one of the biggest rock bands of all time. The production on Barrett was actually quite polished. Granted, he could barely function at the time, due to his mental state.


"And What Exactly is a Joke?"