Adaptation Deviation

When a work is adapted (whether to another medium, another culture/demographic, or both), it's a safe bet that something from the original work will be changed in the process. Maybe characters are added, combined, or omitted; maybe someone lives who originally died or vice versa, or maybe the whole thing is set in a completely different city/country/planet. The reasons for these changes can be as varied as the changes themselves, ranging from Artistic Vision to Executive Meddling to the constraints of the medium. Whatever they may be, expect cries of "That's not right at all!" from rabid fans of the original whenever these crop up. Accumulating enough of these may result in Adaptation Decay, at which point the adaptation starts to lose its resemblance to the original altogether.

Super Trope to much, but not all, of the Media Adaptation Tropes index.

Please note that faithful adaptations can exist, or at least adaptations that don't directly contradict the source material in any way (e.g., by using Happily Ever Before on a work with a Downer Ending). Also, change is not necessarily a bad thing, and can make a work more accessible to other people or even iron out the kinks in the original work (such as an Adaptation Distillation, which seeks to make a more expansive/convoluted work easier to grasp).

See also the Sliding Scale of Adaptation Modification

Sub Tropes:

    open/close all folders 

     Changes to the Characters 

     Changes to the Plot 

     Changes to the Setting 
  • Recycled In Space: Changing the setting to someplace more exotic.
  • Ret Canon: Incorporating elements from a later adaptation into the original canon that it came from.
    • Canon Immigrant: A character specifically created for an adaptation that was later incorporated within the source material.
  • Setting Update: Changing the setting to someplace more familiar.

     Miscellaneous SubTropes 
  • Cultural Translation: Replacing a reference in the original with a local equivalent.
  • Dub-Induced Plot Hole: An error in translating a work into a foreign language that affects either or both the story consistency or/and the characters.
  • Woolseyism: Replacing a reference in the original with something else.


Examples Not Belonging to a Sub-Trope:

Anime and Manga

Art
  • Michelangelo's painting of Haman's death on the Sistine Chapel ceiling doesn't show him being hanged on his own gallows like in the Book of Esther, but instead shows the genocidal villain being crucified. This may have come about because the Latin Bible which Michelangelo would be familiar with describes the gallows as a "crux," although other parts of the text make it clear he was hanged. The scene is described similarly by Dante in The Divine Comedy.

Comic Books
  • Superman: The Movie gave Krypton a crystal motif, and also invented the idea of Superman's S being a family coat of arms. Before that, it really was an S.
  • The 1980s Supergirl movie changed Argo from surviving on a chunk of Krypton to surviving in another dimension.
  • One of the X-Men movies, X-Men Origins: Wolverine, infamously depicted Deadpool as not having a mouth. This is not a minor change, either, as one of Deadpool's nicknames in comics is "the merc with the mouth"note .

Literature
  • In The Secret Garden, Colin's father discovers him just as he's winning a footrace with Mary. The 1993 film adaptation changes this to a game of blind man's bluff, resulting in a somewhat more emotional moment.

Web Comic
  • While not a strict adaptation, Looking for Group got its start as a parody of World of Warcraft. The name comes from the MMO chat term for a player forming a party to tackle a difficult quest, and each of the original four main characters corresponded to one of the Horde races in the game. But as the series went on, it drew less and less inspiration from Warcraft and eventually just became a comedic fantasy series. We can pinpoint the exact moment the series stopped being a WoW parody: when the team encountered a group of trolls (including recurring character Tim) who looked nothing like Benny, whose appearance is based on the trolls from the game but her background turned out to be completely different.

Alternative Title(s): Adaptational Deviation, Adaptation Modification

http://tvtropes.org/pmwiki/pmwiki.php/Main/AdaptationDeviation