Muggle-Mage Romance

"If we hadn't married Muggles we'd've died out."
Ron Weasley, Harry Potter

A romance, sexual or otherwise, between a Muggle and a magic user.

The Muggle doesn't necessarily have to know about it. If they do, reactions could vary from Understanding Boyfriend to Fantastic Racism.

This kind of romance could be portrayed any number of ways in media. If it is normal for one half of a couple to just have magic and the other to not, it signals to viewers that the setting is Mundane Fantastic. If society loathes this kind of romance, it could lead to Star-Crossed Lovers while signalling to viewers that there is Fantastic Racism in the setting.

The couple may also have to deal with issues that may arise where one half of the couple is just that much more powerful. If the Muggle is rather tolerant and understanding though, the issue could be smoothed over. If the power balance issue could not be resolved adequately, it could lead to an end in the relationship.

Factors that affect how the society views this sort of romance depends on the nature of magical society, mundane society, any sort of Masquerade, how magic is acquired (learned vs. inherent gift), other intrinsic differences between muggles and mages, etc.

Do note that since it is often played the same way, romances between superheroes who are not Badass Normals and ordinary people, Badass Normal or not, can also fall under this trope.

If a relationship of this sort exists within the setting, odds are that there may be an aesop about tolerance.

The Masquerade Will Kill Your Dating Life can negatively impact on this kind of romance. If the Mage also has a longer lifespan, it may also result in a Mayfly–December Romance.

It is the Super Trope to Magical Girlfriend & Muggle-and-Magical Love Triangle, and a Sister Trope to Boy Meets Ghoul.

See also Interspecies Romance, where there is a lot of overlap in terms of themes and portrayals.


Examples

    open/close all folders 

    Anime and Manga 
  • Haku from Naruto is the result of one of these. His mother had ninja powers, while his dad hated ninjas. When the dad discovered his wife and son had ninja powers, he killed his wife and tried to kill Haku. Haku ended up becoming a Self-Made Orphan when he protected himself.
  • Louise and Saito from The Familiar of Zero, a summoner and a normal person respectively, have this sort of relationship, and eventually get married.
  • Raki, an ordinary human, and Claire, a warrior with Yoma-related powers, are heavily implied to have become an Official Couple at the end of Claymore.
  • In Karin, Karin, a vampire, and Kenta, an ordinary human, develop a relationship over the course of the manga.
  • Kiki's Delivery Service has Kiki's parents (her mom is a witch and her dad isn't). Kiki and Tombo have some romantic tension, although it doesn't resolve into anything definite. Witch/muggle relationships are kind of inevitable since witches are a One-Gender Race.

    Comic Books 

    Film 

    Literature 
  • Many examples in Discworld:
    • Carrot, an ordinary human, has a Will They or Won't They? version of this with Angua, a werewolf. Sally, a vampire, also showed interest before backing off due to not wanting to get into a fight with Angua.
    • Not uncommon among witches: Magrat Garlick marries the muggle King of Lancre, while Nanny Ogg has outlived three husbands, dated vastly more, and raised a sprawling extended family.
    • Wizards are contractually required to avoid this, since they have a small chance of fathering the living embodiment of With Great Power Comes Great Insanity. There's mention of retired wizards pursuing romance, albeit quite carefully.
  • In Harry Potter, it is reasonably common for Wizards and Witches to marry Muggles. The resulting children tend to be called Half-Bloods. The Big Bad is the result of one particularly disastrous example.
  • Harry Dresden of The Dresden Files stories had a (ultimately tragic) relationship with tabloid reporter Susan Rodriguez, and has had a star-crossed will-they-or-wont-they with Karrin Murphy for some time.
  • In Bras and Broomsticks, Rachel, a witch, has a human boyfriend named Raf. He turns out to be an Understanding Boyfriend after being told about it.
  • In The Two Princesses of Bamarre, Princess Addie develops a crush on her father's new court sorceror, Rhys. Rhys is friendly and helpful to her (especially after she makes the decision to set out on a quest for the cure) and does things that make her wonder whether the attraction might be reciprocated. It is, and they marry at the end of the book. In this case, it doubles as Interspecies Romance, because sorcerors are a different sort of being from humans.

     Live Action TV 
  • Wizards of Waverly Place: Because it is illegal for wizards to marry non-wizards, Jerry gave up his powers to be with Theresa.
  • In Ghost Whisperer, Melinda can see ghosts, while Jim has no known power whatsoever. They're married.
  • Harvey and Sabrina have this type of relationship in Sabrina the Teenage Witch. At one point, he leaves her, but that was because he learned she was using magic to mess with his life for years. To Harvey, Sabrina being a witch was not by itself a dealbreaker. Sabrina herself is the result of a union between a warlock and an ordinary woman.
  • In H2O: Just Add Water, the main characters are mermaids and over the course of the show, they had relationships with ordinary men. This has caused problems, but one of them at least was a trusted Secret Keeper who was very helpful to them.
  • Bewitched is a sitcom about a muggle-mage marriage between Darrin and Samantha, respectively. It's complicated by Sam's family being a long-lived Witch Species with a general Screw the Rules, I Have Supernatural Powers! attitude to modern society, Darrin's superpowered Obnoxious In-Laws, and Darrin himself being a stolid type who Does Not Like Magic and treats his devoted wife's powers as an inconvenience.
  • Comedy series I Dream of Jeannie runs in a vein similar to that of Bewitched: Major Nelson is a normal human American astronaut who encountered an ornate bottle upon returning to Earth. The bottle contains the lovely Jeannie, a Sealed Good in a Can genie, who once loosed, becomes smitten with Major Nelson, whom she calls "Master." Though Nelson appreciates Jeannie and all she can do, his position necessitates maintaining The Masquerade that Jeannie is a normal fiancee, which gets complicated by her unfamiliarity with modern devices and social customs, as well as being a Clingy Jealous Girl.
  • In Medium, Allison, the titular medium, is married to a normal man named Joe.
  • Charmed, the main characters are witches who had many relationships with ordinary men. They weren't always successful, but Paige and Henry are doing fine.

    Tabletop Game 
  • Discouraged in Warhammer 40,000, as the Navigator gene essential for FTL Travel can only be found in the offspring of two-Navigator pairings.

     Video Games 
  • Hawke from Dragon Age II is a child of Leandra Amell, a muggle, and Malcolm Hawke, a renegade mage, who eloped with her to Ferelden. Mage-muggle romances are actually quite common in the Dragon Age series, despite a heavy social stigma on dallying with mages (magic is viewed as evil by the dominant religious groups and children of mages are more likely to develop magical abilities themselves), although most end in a lot more tragedy than Malcolm and Leandra's (he died of natural causes after raising three kids with her).
  • In several Harvest Moon games, such as Harvest Moon DS and Harvest Moon: Animal Parade, the normal human farmer protagonist can woo and marry a witch or wizard.

    Webcomic 
  • El Goonish Shive had, at least for a while, Elliot and Sarah in a relationship. Sarah had no magic, while Elliot can shapeshift and uses martial arts styled after anime and manga.
  • In The Order of the Stick, the Insufferable Genius wizard Vaarsuvius is married to a baker, though the relationship suffers from Vaarsuvius being much more invested in their pursuit of arcane power than in their spouse. Ultimately, the baker files for divorce.

    Western Animation 
  • In Avatar: The Last Airbender and its sequel, The Legend of Korra, there are a lot of romances between benders and non-benders:
    • In the original series, there's Zuko & Mai on the main cast.
    • In the sequel, there's Tenzin and Pema, and as of the finale Korra and Asami.
http://tvtropes.org/pmwiki/pmwiki.php/Main/MuggleMageRomance