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Seen It All
Batman had seen it all fifty years ago.

Bruce Wayne: These people believe anything they can't explain is magic.
Terry McGinnis: Naturally, you don't believe in those kind of things.
Bruce Wayne: Of course I do. I've seen it all: demons, witch boys, immortals, zombies...
Batman Beyond, "Revenant"

A cat chasing a car? They've seen it. People playing card games for the fate of the world? They've seen it. They've explained the Noodle Incident twice. They even know what the Cow Tools are for. Yes, these characters have Seen It All.

They usually come in three types:
  1. Completely Deadpan. They may not even crack a smile because they've heard every joke before. They're usually already this type when they're first introduced, and their experience is implied rather than witnessed. They're not Deadpan Snarkers; they have the deadpan, but their wording is completely serious.
  2. Weary Traveler. We've seen this character go through hell and back, and can understand their sigh of boredom when the most bizarre things happen. This character may be a Deadpan Snarker, and mildly Genre Savvy. It may be a defense mechanism to deal with all the weird crap they keep going through.
  3. Smug Know-it-all. Take the Weary Traveler, but instead of a tired and deadpan reaction to repeat weirdness, they'll smugly say that they knew it would happen, and are disappointed that the event was so predictable. This type is generally reserved for wisecracking heroes (or their sidekicks) or Large Ham type villains who disdain the hero's predictable motivations.

Most Men in Black are type 1. If it is a protagonist, they are usually a type 2. Villains and tricksters tend to type 3.

When the bored residents in an urban center have seen it all, the trope is City of Weirdos.

Compare Fantastically Indifferent, Prescience Is Predictable, The Anticipator & Seen It a Million Times. See also Seen-It-All Suicide & Nothing Left to Do but Die. Not to be confused with Wake Up, Go to School, Save the World.


Examples

    open/close all folders 

    Anime & Manga 

    Card Games 

    Comic Books 
  • One of the funnier works to come out of the Civil War storyline was the Fantastic Four's Ben Grimm going to Paris. When The Heroes of Paris urgently enlist his aid, he quips in a weary type 2 tone (paraphrased) "What is it? Skrull impostors? A Super Registration Act? A mind controlled clone army?" The French heroes just look at each other in confusion and say no, it's the "Underground Emperor" who wants to collapse Paris by tunneling beneath it. His only response is a teary-eyed "I love Paris".
  • A lot of modern versions of Batman go this way. Specifically Grant Morrison, Warren Ellis, and Kevin Smith.
    Batman: Not a murder method I've seen. And I've seen most of them.
  • Spider-Man is a combination of Type 3 of this and Deadpan Snarker.
    Spider-Man: All the crazy wamajama I've seen in my life I am whatever the opposite of a skeptic is.
  • The citizens of Metropolis and Central City tend to be this. The citizens of Gotham, on the other hand, are much less savvy than would be expected, although the police force falls closer to this trope.
  • Rick Jones, all the way.
  • Nick Fury is nearly a hundred years old, has been through three wars (World War II, Korea, and Vietnam), been through paratrooper school, demolition training, trained with the Army rangers and the Green Berets and worked for the CIA. This was all before he joined S.H.I.E.L.D.
  • The pre-Flashpoint Jaime Raynes run as the Blue Beetle has Peacemaker, survivor of a thousand Noodle Incidents throughout The DCU.
    Peacemaker: Hey, any alien encounter where you don't end up dead or probed is a good one. Especially probed.
    Jaime: Your stories are getting weirder. You know that, right?
  • His organization, SHIELD cultivates a similar mindset. See Survival Tips For SHIELD Recruits in "Web Original."
  • Every senior agent of the B.P.R.D., but Hellboy takes the cake. Not surprising, as he's been a paranormal investigator and monster hunter since the early fifties.
  • Judge Dredd. He's been an active street judge for over half a century and the strip averts Comic Book Time.

    Films — Animation 

    Films — Live-Action 
  • Forrest Gump: After a while, Forrest finds it hard to work up enthusiasm for meeting Presidents after meeting virtually each one during his life.
  • Men In Black
    • Agent K is the primary example of the type 1 version. He monitors and fights aliens from around the universe; what we consider weird, he considers just another day on the job.
    • J turned into a type 2 in the second film. By this point he's no longer a rookie and the flashy thing is no longer a novelty.
    • Z is also a type 1, possibly even more than K.
  • Agent Simmons from the Transformers movie. Optimus Prime even noted that they weren't surprised to see the Autobots, they just didn't expect them to show up. He does seem to be surprised at one thing in the sequel though; that Wheelie has been somehow "tamed" by Mikaela.
    Simmons: All my life I've been searching for aliens. And you've got one tied on a leash like a little Chihuahua.
  • The Curious George movie features a cab driver who claims to have seen it all in New York, even a giant monkey wreaking havoc in the streets. At the end he sees a giant jungle idol in the museum and says, "I haven't seen that before... and now I have."
  • In the Signature Scene of the 1980's blockbuster film Crocodile Dundee, the titular character and his love interest are held up at knife point by some New York City thugs wielding switchblades; instead of being frightened and bartering for their lives to be spared, he simply pulls out a Bowie knife and calmly proclaims, "That's not a knife. Now, that's a knife." Then the thugs run away in terror.
  • Groundhog Day uses the Weary Traveler to great effect. Phil Connors finds himself stuck in Punxsutawney, Pennsylvania and reliving Groundhog Day every single time he wakes up. He kills himself multiple times, but each time he wakes up at 6:00 am like nothing happened. Eventually, he decides to use his situation for good and he takes to memorizing the events of the day and getting to know everyone in the town. This eventually leads to him obtaining a vast knowledge of everything that happens and everyone in the town.
  • Invoked in The Hangover II:
    "I'm Mike Tyson. What haven't I seen?"
  • Marvel Cinematic Universe
    • Agent Coulson, a top agent for S.H.I.E.L.D., appears to have this experience. He's very calm and flat in his demeanor around others, even if they happen to be demigods or monsters of science gone wrong. When he has to call one of his agents, who is currently playing possum in order to get some info from some criminals, she audibly cleans house on her captors over the phone while he nonchalantly waits for her to finish, as if on hold and listening to filler music. Notably, this trait is a case of Character Development throughout the entire Marvel cinematic universe. In his first apperance in Iron Man, he was rather nervous and unsure of himself. Each subsequent film added more and more to his confidence until he's killed by Loki in The Avengers. Though he does get off a very nice Pre-Mortem One-Liner before he goes.
    • Captain America thinks he's this. Nick Fury is happy to show him otherwise.
      Cap: At this point, I doubt anything would surprise me.
      Nick Fury: Ten bucks says you're wrong.
      • Cap witnesses an entire aircraft carrier sprout propellers and take to the skies. Fury wins the bet.

    Literature 
  • The Hitchhiker's Guide to the Galaxy
    • Wowbagger the Infinitely Prolonged from Life, the Universe and Everything, who was cursed with eternal life. He's watched every single movie in existence thousands of times, and has grown so bored he's resolved to insult every single person in the universe — in alphabetical order.
    • There's also a scene in The Restaurant at the End of the Universe where Zaphod tells a Megadodo Publications desk clerk, "Don't you try to outweird me, three-eyes, I get stranger things than you free with my breakfast cereal."
    • And of course Arthur Dent himself eventually becomes this.
  • Detective Inspector Jack Spratt of Jasper Fforde's Nursery Crime series. Years of dealing with crime among Reading's population of Nursery Rhyme characters means that he hardly bats an eyelid over prosecuting the Three Little Pigs for killing the "Big Bad" Wolf, or investigating who killed Humpty Dumpty.
  • Miracle Max from The Princess Bride, on being given a corpse to revive.
    Max: I've seen worse.
  • G. K. Chesterton's Father Brown, a little round priest who has seen it all, and somehow forgiven everyone. In his first story, "The Blue Cross," when the great thief Flambeau waylays him, Father Brown has seen it coming, and has already outsmarted Flambeau before the finale. He has planned out counters for techniques so criminal and horrific that even Flambeau is shocked. The man is Crazy-Prepared.

    The man, as he points out himself, sits in the confessional, and listens to people telling him about the horrible things they do. He's not likely to be naive. (Indeed, Chesterton was inspired to create the character after overhearing two Cambridge students commenting on the "innocent and ignorant" life of a priest — who happened to be Chesterton's friend and earlier that day had been talking with him about the horrors of crime.)
  • Robert E. Howard's Conan has traveled from the frozen wastes of Asgard and Vanaheim to the southern jungles, from beyond the Barachan isles in the west to Vendhya in the east, has been a thief, a mercenary, a pirate, a tribal chieftain (of four different tribes in four different parts of the world) and a general all around adventurer before becoming king by his own hand and has fought sorcerers, demons, apemen and giants and discovered lost cities.
  • Lucy from Someone Else's War has this attitude, along with an air of general defeat, a direct result from having spent her entire life with the Lord's Resistance Army as an unwilling captive.
  • The Dresden Files
    • Wizards eventually develop into this. Harry faster than others — but that's because he's on the frontline more. It's remarked that (in his 40s-50s, barely a child by wizard standards) he's seen as much as people several times his age. A wizard's Sight not only lets him see the truer nature of things, but never lets him forget it. They will always have the memory, perfectly clear, and even thinking about the subject can trigger a re-viewing.
    • At one point, Harry encounters a true Eldritch Abomination that preys on fear. When he gets to safety, he meditates and reviews all of the myriad horribly ugly and terribly beautiful things he's seen with his Sight, reminding himself that he fits this trope so that he can return to the fight. Later, he muses that he's seen so much that even remembering seeing that monster with his Sight only gives him slight pause now.
    • At one point, an Entropy Curse guided by someone with a really twisted imagination and ham-fisted flair for the dramatic tried to kill someone with a frozen turkey falling from an airplane and spearing the target. The target, Harry, and a bunch of Black Court Vampires were brawling it out, and when the turkey hit, the whole fight stop. As Harry pointed it out, even the nigh-immortal supernatural world can't have truly seen it all.
    • A variation of this leads to a CMOA: Harry is able to utterly pwn Nicodemus and almost strangle him to death because he went through so many hard beatings that in their struggle Nick, with all his experience, cannot hurt him enough to make him let go.
  • One section of The Bible, which is believed to be from the third or fourth century BC, makes it almost Older Than Dirt:
    What has been will be again,
    what has been done will be done again;
    there is nothing new under the sun.
  • Due to having forty million years of recorded history and an enforced technological stasis, the humans of the Homecoming Saga have a collective seen-it-all attitude. In a brief scene in Earthfall, someone witnesses a starship taking off and give thanks that they've seen something that no one else has ever seen.

    Live-Action TV 
  • The Brady Bunch: Peter, in "The Personality Kid," throws a party and – digging into a new joke book he just purchased – tries to impress his friends by becoming a comedian. Trouble is, all of his friends heard these cliched jokes before … multiple times.
  • Breaking Bad: Mike Ehrmantraut has been involved in the life of organized crime for so long that almost nothing fazes him. At one point, a chunk of his ear is shot off and his response is mild annoyance.
  • Burn Notice: Michael Weston is type 2. He always knows what to do when things go wrong, he just doesn't know when they'll go wrong.
  • CSI: Miami: Horatio Caine.
  • Dead Like Me: The reapers are, unsurprisingly, not fazed in the least by the deaths they witness every day, and don't even react to the many Necro Non Sequiturs with any more than a deadpanned "damn."
  • Doctor Who:
    • The Doctor has spent the last 900+ years of his life travelling anywhere in space and time, and has been to (and saved) possibly billions of planets. He swings between a Type 2 and 3, Depending on the Writer and the incarnation.
      Amy: Why am I here?
      The Doctor: Because... I can't see it anymore. I'm 907, and after a while you just can't... see it.
      Amy: See what?
      The Doctor: Anything. I look at a star, and all I see is a big ball of burning gas. And I know how it began and how it will end. And I was probably there both times. And after a while everything is just stuff. And that is the problem: You make all of space and time into your back yard, and what do you have? A back yard! But you, you can see it. And when you see it, I see it.
      Amy: And that was the only reason you took me with you?
      The Doctor: ...There are worse reasons.
    • Ten and Eleven turn into Doctor-y balls of squee when something they haven't seen before pops up.
  • Farscape: The crew of Moya are firmly in Type 2 territory. Crichton even lampshades it in one episode when he refers to aliens messing with their minds as "pulling a T'raltixx," in reference to a previous mindscrew. Scorpius is somewhere between a Type 1 and Type 3. Nothing fazes him. Ever.
  • Heroes: Claude Rains, the invisible man, is a type 2 version of this. He's a former Company Man in Black, invisible, and he has alluded to a hobby of randomly following people around, so he's seen a lot.
    Claude: People suck, friend! Never forget that!

    Claude: Everyone's like the rest — that's why they're the rest!
  • Revolution: Miles Matheson, of the Weary Traveller variety. Being a marine sergeant before the blackout and being the number two man in the Monroe Republic for years after the blackout would do that to him ("No Quarter").
  • Stargate SG-1: Everybody in the later seasons, possibly the most Genre Savvy group of heroes this side of the Discworld. At one point, General Hammond believes Daniel's claim that he has intelligence information from a dream he had, and explains his credulity with, "The things I've heard sitting in this chair..." Keep in mind he's talking to someone who's died, Ascended to a Higher Plane of Existence, and then came Back from the Dead, twice. This trope is nicely lampshaded when the other team members express surprise at Daniel's immediate belief in a teenager who claims to be their teammate Jack, somehow youthened about 30 years in his sleep for no apparent reason, in "Fragile Balance."
    Daniel: Stranger things have happened.
    Teal'c: Name but one.
    Daniel Jackson: Well, there was the time he got really old; the time he became a caveman; the time we all swapped bodies....
  • Star Trek: Sometimes happens in later seasons of the series. When something odd happens, they promptly check for everything odd that's happened before, up to and including parallel universes and time travel. "This is Starfleet. Weird is part of the job."
  • Supernatural:
    • The writers like to lampshade the main characters' casual professionalism every now and then.
    • One example is the fourth season episode "Death takes a Holiday", where the Winchesters discuss what they know of their latest case (an Adventure Town where everyone is suddenly immortal):
      Sam: It seems like the last person to actually die around here was this boy a couple of months ago; we should probably start by contacting him.
      [beat]
      Dean: ...I love how matter-of-factly you just said that. Our lives are weird.
    • Another example is when they travel back in time to the 1800s because they need the help of veteran hunter Samuel Colt (yes that Samuel Colt). Upon Sam meeting him, and proving who he is with his cell phone, Colt is completely unfazed; when questioned on it, he says "When you've done this job as long as I have, a giant from the future with some magic brick doesn't exactly give you the vapours."
  • Tales of the Gold Monkey: Then there's Bon-Chance Louis of this short lived and much regretted show who owed his name to having overslept his appointment with the guillotine and dropped little remarks implying he'd been everywhere and done everything.
  • The Upright Citizens Brigade: Played with. One episode featured an ongoing thread in which various couples keep looking at a great house for sale, only to be driven mad after looking into the bucket!!. Another plot thread involved a grizzled Defective Detective. When his case eventually brings him to the house he looks in the bucket, looks up at the sky and yells "Don't you think I know that!"

    Music 
  • The song "I've Seen It All" from Dancer in the Dark, sung by the main character, who's going blind.

    New Media 

    Tabletop Games 
  • Dwarf Longbeards in Warhammer Fantasy Battles are immune to Panic due to this.
  • Sadly, a recurring problem is challenging PCs these players, especially if the Game Master hasn't.
  • The GURPS advantage Unfazeable tends to turn you into this, especially when combined with Weirdness Magnet.

    Video Games 
  • In Knights of the Old Republic, Canderous Ordo, after The Reveal, makes a comment that, "Remember, we're talking about the Force here. At any moment, Malak could fall from the sky and I wouldn't bat an eyelash."
  • Happens a lot to anyone playing any MMORPG, due to the anonymous nature of the users. Anyone can say anything they want, and do, e.g. "I hope your (loved one) gets (expletive) and (action) down the (undesirable region)". Hence being called anything in the real world would perhaps earn an lol from any experienced MMO veteran.
  • Mass Effect
    • In the DLC for Mass Effect 2, Shepard and Liara have become Type 2s.
      Shepard: Be ready. I wouldn't be surprised if this summoned a Reaper.
      Liara: How many guards does the Shadow Broker have?
      Shepard: Told ya.
    • By Mass Effect 3 Shepard is a combination of a Type 1 and Type 2. Barely anything fazes him/her anymore. Even finding out that Cerberus made a clone of him/her seems to annoy Shepard, more than genuinely shock him/her.
    • In Mass Effect 3, Mordin is a former special forces soldier and one of the galaxies leading bio-engineers in the field of advanced bioweapons, was a member of a theatre group that played old human musicals, and ran a free hospital in the worst slum of a backwater pirate haven after retirement, which he left behind to fight million year old cybernetic abominations in the galactic core. There really isn't much that he has not seen or done. His completely deadpan response to seeing Javik, who comes from a long extinct race, says it all:
      Mordin: A Prothean. Excellent.
  • Resident Evil
    • Leon Kennedy in Resident Evil 4 has a Type 2 moment partway through the game. After one of the villains undergoes a dramatic One-Winged Angel transformation and emerges as an enormous monster, Leon scoffs "Monsters. At least after this, there'll be one less to worry about." He's also surprised that the very first Mook he kills isn't a zombie, but doesn't seem to react at all when he learns they're being controlled by parasites. He also calls the Big Bad "small time" which would imply he doesn't think much of the mission at hand.
    • Especially in Resident Evil 6. Just before he, Helena, Jake and Sherry fight the Ustanak, he takes one look at the 12-foot, claw-handed humanoid, mentally files it under "Implacable Men", and tells them, "Welcome to the club. You get used to it."
  • All four of the characters in Left 4 Dead are like this, which is shown in detail in the comic, where they constantly have to explain things to the (in theory better trained) CEDA officers. Left 4 Dead 2 shows the new characters gradually becoming this.
  • The immortal Little Miss Snarker Rachel Alucard from BlazBlue begins the series with a serious case of seen it all-inspired boredom, owing partially to her age and partially to the fact that she has literally seen it all before, and she may well be subjected to it all again if you select "Continue" one more time, you sadist.
  • In Dragon Age: Origins, the Warden can end up becoming a mix between Type 2 and 3 by Awakening, lampshading that people tend to need their help everywhere they go and that fighting Dragons, Demons and Darkspawn has become very much routine for them.
  • In Dragon Age II, most of the characters show signs of being Type 3's, Hawke and Varric in particular.
  • Most of the characters in Persona 4 Arena display this, and for good Reason. Though it stands out more for the P4 cast due to the action taking place in their old stomping grounds.
  • Dawn of War: Zigzagged with the Kasrkins. Hailing from a planet that is literally next door to hell and where there are more soldiers than civilians (enrollment rate is well above 70% and all civilians have serious military training), they have seen the worst of combat and are basically just below Space Marines in all-around toughness, and most of their lines tell you that they've already done what you're telling them to do. However, they aren't immune to morale damage, and one of their lines in case this happens is "In all my years I have never seen them do that!".
  • In Dishonored, the Outsider just seems very bored throughout the entire game, with a few rare exceptions. Considering he's at least several thousand years old and can see all possible futures, you can understand why he acts like he's seen literally everything.

    Web Comics 
  • Girl Genius
    • The former seneschal of Mechanicsburg in is type 1. "Don't try to boggle me, Mr Talking Cat. This is MECHANICSBURG. You are by no means the strangest thing in this town!"
    • Dr. Sun too.
    • Higgs as well. He's looked worried exactly twice: When he accidentally insulted Zeetha, and when two sparks are getting waaaay too excited about their "experiments".
    • Moloch isn't phased by the mass destruction going on around him, but by the shocked appearance on everyone else's face when they see Agatha's new lightning gun in action.
  • Gunnerkrigg Court
    • Antimony was practically raised by The Guides, so she's almost completely unfazed by the supernatural. For example, compare Kat's reaction to Ketrak with Annie's complete lack of a reaction.
    • Jones, also. Apparently the fact that she has only seen something similar is greatly disturbing.
    • While he didn't start off as this, there's Jack. His only response to a really pissed-off Reynardine is "Oh... you have a, uh, large wolf with you. Okay. Cool. Nice flowers." He was visibly startled, but he took it in stride.
  • In The Order of the Stick, Xykon is a type 3. He does it while having difficulty remembering which guy named Fyron he killed in Cliffport.
  • 8-Bit Theater
    • Sarda is a type 2. He has literally seen everything that ever happened or ever will happen. He has learned every bit of magic ever. You can't beat him, though you can (very rarely) surprise him with extreme stupidity.
    • By the end of the comic, Black Mage, Thief and Red Mage had become type 2s. They had even become aware of the basic jokes of the comic and could see them coming.
  • Sha'sana of Drowtales is one of the few surviving Dark Elves and combines several different types, showing very little expression, weariness at what the drow have become, and a certain smugness about the impending disaster of nearly every tainted drow in Chel losing control of her seeds while keeping Sharess' body in the Ninth Tower that made many fans dislike her.
  • The Inexplicable Adventures of Bob!: Bob has reached this point. Jean is getting there.
  • El Goonish Shive shows that being an old friend of a fledgling Mad Scientist is enough:
    Sarah: You don't consider goo coming to life news?!
    Elliot: Not after some of the stuff I've seen at Tedd's house...
  • Ida, the Mayor's assistant from The Word Weary, doesn't bat an eyelash when her boss trashes his office and throws his phone out the window.
  • In Rusty and Co., the hipster vampires. Been there, done that.

    Web Original 
  • Survival Tips For SHIELD Recruits: Just a natural effect of joining SHIELD.
    • Tip #500: Monumental occasions are near-daily occurrences. Get used to them, but try to retain a sense of wonder anyway.
    • Tip #451: Always remember that even when things seem dire, sometimes having faith in the impossible is exactly what works. In this job, the impossible happens all the time.
  • Shadowside: Few of the students of the Twin Campus would be surprised that the new guy is an anthropomorphic platypus or what have you.
  • Losing the ability to be surprised by entertainment is one of Cracked's 5 Warning Signs That You're Finally Getting Older. Entertainment will ruin your life with or without TV Tropes.

    Western Animation 
  • Jonah Hex is portrayed this way in Justice League Unlimited, where he not only isn't surprised by a group of time traveling superheroes from the future, but he instantly figures it out. To a lesser extent, a bit earlier in Batman: The Animated Series. This bit of dialogue highlights it:
    Jonah Hex: Fancy gun belts you've got there. I'm thinking you folks are time travellers.
    Batman: Where would you get a crazy idea like that?
    Jonah Hex: Experience. I've had an interesting life.
In the same episode, Green Lantern thinks he is, but gets proven wrong.
Smith: Be careful — there are some of the strangest things down at that ranch.
Green Lantern: Don't worry, we've got a lot of experi... (pterodactyl screeches overhead) I'm sorry, what were you saying?
  • Jonah's no more fazed in Batman: The Brave and the Bold, where being in the future on an alien world, being forced to track down various species to fight, doesn't warrant much surprise. Batman's no stranger either, and seems to take time travel, galactic teleportation and mystic outer planes in his stride.
  • Kup from Transformers: The Movie and G1 TV series is a bit like this. He's always telling war stories of times that were like times like this (to Hot Rod's increasing irritation during the film)... until he sees Unicron. Justified in that Kup's an ancient veteran of the Cybertronian wars — he's been all over the galaxy doing all kinds of stuff for at least 9-12 million years. That's about 4 times longer than humanity has walked the Earth.
  • The Grim Adventures of Billy & Mandy
    • Grimm seems to be a great example of this. There's the way he defeated Horror's Hand in one of the movies, and this quote:
    Billy: This is scary! Let's watch something else! (turns off the TV)
    Grimm: Aw, come on! I've seen scarier stuff in your toilet!
    • Mandy is this in spades, and is even immune to irritation (as revealed in the episode with the invisible duck) due to being constantly exposed to Billy's pure stupidity infused antics, which drove the goddess of chaos (Eris) insane.
  • The Venture Bros.
    • Most of the characters are this, with Dr Venture being a very tired type 2; Brock alternating between type 1 and type 2 depending on his mood; Hank bragging about his experiences putting him into type 3; and Dean growing from an enthusiastic type 3 into a very scared type 2.
    • On the villain side of things, The Monarch is a type 2, Dr Girlfriend is a rare type 1, Phantom Limb is a type 3, #21 is a type 2 and #24 is a wannabe type 3. Honestly, Jonas Jr. sticks out because he's one of the few characters who isn't Genre Savvy enough to be this at all.
  • Skips in Regular Show says "(yeah,) I've seen this before" in response to anything.
  • South Park sees so many strange things that nobody bats an eye at anything short of the entire town being destroyed.
    • "Mr. Garrison's Fancy New Vagina":
      Officer: So let me get this straight. That woman over there was trying to get to her balls which were in the knees of a black child whose father is a dolphin.
      Stan: Yeah, that's basically it.
      Officer: Sounds like an open and shut case. All right, let's head 'em out!
    • "Pinewood Derby" involves a Secret Test of Character where the supposed alien criminal "Baby Fark McGee-zax" wants Randy to give him warp travel after doing so with Stan's pinewood derby car. He tells Randy to get rid of space cops who suddenly arrived, leading to this dialogue.
      Officer: You're absolutely sure you didn't see an alien land here?
      Randy: No, we're sure.
      Officer: So then... we're the first aliens you've ever seen?
      Randy: That's right, yep, you're the first ones.
      Officer: You don't seem that excited about your first contact with alien life.
      Randy: ...Uh. That's r-. That's right! [faking surprise] Oh, oh my God! Hey everybody, we just made first contact!
  • Slappy Squirrel from Animaniacs is a combination of type 1 and a highly sarcastic type 2. She's seen so much that's she Genre Savvy nearly to the point of being all-knowing, and practically no-one she's pitted against has a chance of posing her a serious problem.
  • According to Word of God, Timmy Turner's new magical dog Sparky is this.
  • Rick from Rick And Morty has dimension-hopped so many times that practically nothing fazes him.

    Real Life 
  • There is absolutely nothing you can confess to an experienced priest that they haven't heard before (with "experienced" meaning "has been in the Church for several decades"). The guidelines for conduct of Mass say that, during a specific part of the Communion, stopping is not allowed. Thus, there is a manual required to be read prior to ordination. It includes everything from a fly landing on the Host to gunmen taking hostages. It's mostly drawn from experience.
  • Some people who've worked in tech support have heard it all.
    • Work in any kind of customer service position for long enough and you'll get a worrying look at the human race.
  • Master chess players are so good primarily because they have seen everything that could come up in a chess game.
  • Medical professionals as well. They've heard all the weird explanations concocted by embarrassed patients hoping to avoid confessing to what happened, ranging from cutting oneself shaving to falling off of a ladder onto a lamp (because he was dusting a ceiling fan while not wearing pants).
  • This answer to an FAQ by the US National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration's Hurricane Research Division:
    "During each hurricane season, there always appear suggestions that one should simply use nuclear weapons to try and destroy the storms. Apart from the fact that this might not even alter the storm, this approach neglects the problem that the released radioactive fallout would fairly quickly move with the tradewinds to affect land areas and cause devastating environmental problems. Needless to say, this is not a good idea."
  • More experienced college professors are very strict in their approach and their syllabi, with some going as far as to request that students not glue their document pages together.

Safety In IndifferenceApathy IndexSame Story, Different Names
Seemingly Profound FoolCharacters as DeviceSelf-Propelled Barrier of Stupidity
Not Good with PeopleYou Hate What You AreWho Wants to Live Forever?
Rogues GalleryImageSource/Comic BooksServile Snarker

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