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Malicious Misnaming
Daxter: Um, excuse me Count Vulgar...

A person dislikes another person and repeatedly, intentionally calls them a name to rile them up, specifically a mutation of their own name.

It can range from a clever insult, like if Alice calls Bob "Becky" to imply he's a girl, to some embarrassingly juvenile, like if Bob calls Alice "Malice", "Callous", or something that's not even a word like "Smalice" ("Smelly Alice").

Another variation is when a person changes their name to reflect a change in their life but someone else refuses to acknowledge the change and keeps referring to them by their old name.

May be a form of Irritation Is the Sincerest Form of Flattery and Embarrassing Nickname. See also Hey, You!. Compare Accidental Misnaming, where the character simply can't remember the other character's name.

Examples:

    open/close all folders 

    Anime & Manga 
  • Hachikuji Mayoi of Bakemonogatari enjoys adding extra 'ra' syllables to Koyomi Araragi's name. Arararararagi-san! When confronted, she claims she stuttered. She's not being mean, though. The two simply have a very strange friendship.
  • In Basquash!, Dan twists Sela's nickname "Platinum Hurricane" into, among other things, "Platitude Hotpad" and "Plastic Candycane".
  • In the Digimon Adventure 02 dub, Davis calls TK "TE", "TJ", and pretty much every other combination. TK suspects he does it intentionally. In the original version, this was a none-too-translatable pronoun- and honorific-related matter that basically amounts to Daisuke calling Takeru "Hey, You!" with a bit of extra pointedness. In one instance where a flustered Davis calls him "TA", TK questions it, and Kari giggles, "He can't even spell TK!" Though it was definitely intentional when he called him "TP". And it's been confirmed that the script writers were brave enough to go through the whole alphabet.
  • Gintama: Gintoki often calls Katsura 'Zura', which means wig, even though they've known each other since childhood. This prompts Katsura to say "It's not Zura, it's Katsura!" Parodied so many times by Katsura himself. It's also known as his Catchphrase, but Gin still hasn't caught on.
  • The main character of Jinrui wa Suitai Shimashita doesn't like people calling her the granddaughter (her grandfather is rather important). What she does like being called isn't clear.
  • In his first appearance in Hatenkou Yuugi, Rayborn refuses to tell Rahzel his name, so she decides to call him Spicy Diamond, shortened to Spicy or Spi. Even after they become friends, she sometimes calls him Spi if she's in a bad mood.
  • InuYasha: The title character and his rival Kōga rarely call one another by name; Inu-Yasha calls Kōga "yasee ookami" (variously translated as "wimpy wolf", "wolf boy", and the like), and Kōga calls Inu-Yasha "inukkoro" (translated as "dogface", "pup", or "dog crap"). This starts out as a sign of their active dislike for one another but gets less malicious as their rivalry does.
  • In Jinki EXTEND, Aoba Tsuzaki is contemptuously given the nickname "Ahobaka" by Ryouhei (aho and baka both mean stupid). Later on, it becomes an affectionate nickname. In the English dub it is translated as "Aobimbo".
  • In JoJo's Bizarre Adventure, Joseph challenges D'Arby to a water tension match — a glass is filled to the rim with water, and they have to take turns dropping in a number of coins of their choice, with the loser being the one who causes the water to spill. Joseph intentionally gets D'Arby's name wrong ("Barby" and "Obby") in order to agitate him, which means he'd be less focused on keeping the water tension from breaking. It doesn't work — D'Arby had already set a cheat while setting up the glass.
  • Keroro Gunsou: Sgt. Keroro is forever known as "bokegaeru" (Stupid Frog) to Natsumi.
  • In Letter Bee, one older Letter Bee, Moc Sullivan, derides Lag for going beyond the call of duty, and calls him "Lang" and "Lob" before departing and ignoring Lag as he calls out his actual name.
  • Lupin III: The Columbus Files: Lupin aggravates his lookalike, Nazelhov, by mocking his chortle and calling him, "Nasal Cough".
  • In Mai-Otome, Sergey calls our lovely heroine Arika "arinko" ("ant girl") based on her name and how her hairstyle makes her braids look like antennae. It's fairly obvious the term is meant to be affectionately insulting, given his immaturity and his attraction to Arika because of his infatuation with her mother, Lena. Mahya also uses this nickname on Arika in Mai-Otome Zwei.
  • In Ouran High School Host Club, the members of the Host Club refer to Kasanoda as Casanova or Bossa-Nova in order to humiliate him.
  • In Sailor Moon Mamoru calls Usagi Odango-atama (literally, Dumpling Head — or, if you go by the DiC dub of the first anime, Meatball Head) based on her hairstyle. She hates it at first and throughout the first season insists that "They're not odangos!" Once she and Mamoru start dating, it becomes a pet name (though Usa-ko is used far more often) and other masculine (though not male) characters, namely Haruka and Seiya, start using it as well.
  • In Slayers, main character Lina does it frequently, to mock enemies she doesn't respect. She called Zolf only "third-rate wizard" and "mummy-man". And played it even further with Naga: she pretended to forget her name, then asked again right after Naga gave her name anew, then suddenly turned another way — "remembered" their last meeting and said she was joking and is not about to forget the name of a girl who managed to fry her own butt. Just to exploit every possible avenue of humiliation.
  • Barnaby from Tiger & Bunny is not happy about the Embarrassing Nickname his partner Kotetsu insists on calling him by. While he gives up on complaining around episode 5 or so, he still continues to dislike it enough to snap out of a brainwashed state of sorts just to inform Kotetsu that "[his] name is not Bunny! It's Barnaby!"
  • In The Twelve Kingdoms the maid Suzu is called "Mokurin" (which means "Fool" in the local language) by her Jerkass mistress Riyo. At some point, the poor girl has a breakdown and starts screaming, "I'm not Mokurin! My name is Suzu! SUZU!"
  • Tozuwa from Witchblade jokingly refers to Masane as Masamune (big chest) because of her large breasts. In the English dub he calls her "Melanie", because of her "melons". She really doesn't mind it though.
  • In Panty & Stocking with Garterbelt, Panty and Stocking Anarchy always call Brief "Geek Boy", because he's a geek and they think it's beneath them to remember his name. At one point, Brief is held hostage at gunpoint and begs them to address him by his name before he dies. They refuse, but save him. When Panty falls in love with him, she finally starts calling him by his name.
  • In Girls und Panzer, Sono Midoriko is often known as "Sodoko", particularly by Maho, whom she frequently lectures for being late, as well as the student council, and she often responds by telling people not to call her that. However, she and her friends on the disciplinary committee- Gomoyo and Pazomi- tend to call each other by their nicknames.
  • In Cardfight!! Vanguard, the resident Butt Monkey, Katsumi Morikawa, is often called "Make-mi (Lose-umi)" by various characters. This is actually meaningful, seeing as he lost all his fights on screen (Katsu means victory while Make means defeat), except in Episodes 51 and 52.
    Miwa/Kamui: Make-mi ("Lose-umi")!
  • In Great Teacher Onizuka, Tomoko was often called Toroko (or "Slomoko" in the English translation) due to her lack of intelligence. By her "friends".
  • In Fuuun Ishin Dai Shogun Ryouma repeatedly calls his associate Verbeck "Ver-bigdick".

    Comic Strips 
  • Dilbert has a newsletter written by Dogbert, that people can send questions to. Dogbert will invariably give an insulting answer, starting by punnily misstating their name.
  • In Retail, the original district manager, Jerry, would often refer to Marla as Darla. After Jerry got promoted to another part of the country the new D.M. revealed that Jerry knew Marla's real name, but pretended that he didn't. A year later Jerry returned to the strip and is now calling Marla by her correct name (probably because she knew the ruse now). He's still an asshole, though.

    Fan Works 

    Films — Animated 
  • Coraline: Wybie (real name "Wyborne") is referred to as "Why-were-you-born" by Coraline at least once.
  • In Despicable Me 2, Gru mocks the already-unfortunately-named Silas Ramsbottom by calling him "Sheepsbutt".

    Films — Live-Action 
  • Unforgiven's Little Bill, having beaten English Bob to a pulp and locked him behind bars, taunts him by reading aloud the dime novels in which he'd starred as "the Duke of Death," but insistently misreading the title as "the Duck of Death."
  • In Cube Zero, Jax keeps deliberately misnaming Dodd with names such as "Mr. Codd", "Mr. Clodd" and "Mr. Wad" to assert his authority and contempt for the 'button guy'. He only adressed him by his proper name when Dodd shows he's not entirely a coward and purposely sabotages his plans.
  • In The Matrix films, Agent Smith will only refer to Neo as "Mr. Anderson" — his name when he was still a slave of the Matrix.
    • The one time he calls him "Neo" turns out to be hugely important and leads immediately to Smith's defeat
  • In Fracture, the murderer and legal self-defender Ted Crawford repeatedly refers to his prosecutor William Beachum as "Billy" to mock him as a little boy trying to play games with an older genius such as him. Beachum tries to convince Crawford that he has no problem with it, but it's clear that he does.
  • In Chinatown, Noah Cross repeatedly calls Jake Gittes "Mr. Gitts" despite Jake constantly correcting him.

    Literature 
  • In Freaky Friday, Annabel calls her brother "Ape Face" to annoy him. It turns out that he likes it, and doesn't tell her because then she'd stop calling him it.
  • Percy Jackson and the Olympians
    • Mr. D (a.k.a. Dionysus) intentionally refuses to call Percy by name, usually calling him Peter Johnson, or some other similar name.
    • Annabeth also calls Percy "Seaweed Brain" for most of the first book, and continues to as an friendly/affectionate nickname for the remainder of the series.
  • In Kim Newman's Alternate History novella Teddy Bear's Picnic, film director Michael Powell makes a deliberate decision to refer to the government censor Putnam as "Putt-man", and instructs all of his staff to do the same.
  • In A Tree Grows in Brooklyn, Aunt Sissy has an affinity for the name "John" and addresses all her husbands and lovers to the point that her family doesn't always learn their real names. Her third husband asserts himself toward the end, insisting that Sissy and her family call him "Steve". Sissy's affectation was changed to "Bill" in the film version, for obvious reasons. Sissy is sexually liberated for her time, but she is not a prostitute.
  • In Ellen Conford's The Revenge of the Incredible Dr. Rancid and His Youthful Assistant, Jeffrey school bully Dewey Belasco frequently referred to title character Jeffrey Childs as "Childish."
  • In The Mortal Instruments, Magnus calls Simon a variety of names starting with S, and very rarely calls him by his name.
  • In the Amber Brown books, sometimes some kids tease Amber by calling her color names other than "Amber" or "Brown."

     Live Action Television 
  • On Parks and Recreation, it turns out Jerry's name is actually Garry and he never bothered to correct anybody, but after coming out of retirement, he insists people call him by his real name. April, on the spot, maliciously renames him Larry... and he's been known as that ever since.
  • Doctor Who:
    • The First Doctor had a habit of messing up Ian Chesterton's surname (stemming from Throw It In of William Hartnell's memory problems), calling him various things like "Chesterfield" or "Chesserman" or "Chatterton". This started out because he simply didn't care - as his character developed, he'd get Ian's name right most of the time but deliberately mess it up when trying to get a rise out of him (notably in "The Romans", where he's bored of living comfortably in a villa in the same time period for a few months and offended by how Ian seems to be enjoying it).
    • Ian manages to get a bit of crap past the radar when misnaming the alien Coquillion 'Cocky-licking' for the amusement of the human girl who is being terrorised by him.
    • The First Doctor likes to call Dodo "Dorothea", her real name which she detests. This is done less to annoy her and more because he thinks it's helping bring her up into being a Proper Lady.
    • The Ninth Doctor used to call Mickey "Ricky," clearly to irritate him. It took over a season for him to warm up enough to use the poor bloke's real name. It turns out Ricky is the name of Mickey's alternate universe counterpart.
    • Oswin Oswald refers to Rory by a girl's name, "Nina", though the name was the name of the first person she fancied, suggesting she intends it as negging rather than as an insult.
    • The Sixth Doctor contemptously calls the Valeyard various '-yard' cognates, like "the Boneyard", "the Backyard", "the Scrapyard", "the Brickyard", "the Graveyard", "the Farmyard", "the Knacker's-yard"...
  • In season 4 of Blackadder Captain Flashheart uses this derisive nickname for the eponymous character:
    Flashheart: Well, well, well, well, well, if it isn't old captain Slackbladder.
  • Scrubs
    • Dr. Cox does this to people. He has a tendency to call J.D. either girls names or "Newbie" even when he's been at the hospital for several years, he calls Elliot "Barbie", and Turk "Gandhi", "Turtlehead" and "Scalpel Jockey". Dr. Kelso also seems to think Chris Turk's name is "Turk Turkleton". When Turk calls Dr. Kelso on this, pointing out his name is "Chris Turk", Kelso looks at him for a moment, then rallies by claiming he's fully aware of the fact, he just likes "Turkelton" better. He also calls Turk "Turkleberry" and "Turkledawg" at least once. It should be noted that he never calls Carla anything other than her name (Nurse Espinosa), which proves his respect for her and Dr. Cox always calls her Carla. When he does call J.D., Turk, or Elliot by their real names, he's probably trying to be less of a jerk and more serious. This is very rare, incidentally.
    • Doctor Beardfacé is another constant victim of this trope, referred to as "Doctor Beardface" by pretty much everyone at Sacred Heart.
    • Snoop Dogg Intern/Resident/Attending presumably has a real name that no one ever uses. Unlike all the other nicknames people on the show have, he doesn't seem to mind being called Snoop Dogg, as long as you get his title right. Although in "Their Story", it's revealed via inner monologue he'd like to be called by his name, Ronald.
    • The Janitor has been called names such as Lurch and Sasquatch for two reasons: One is his imposing height and the other is that his name is guarded (by the character and the writers) like the gold at Fort Knox.
    • JD calls Elliot "Smelliot" in one episode; when she reveals she wasn't that bothered by it, The Todd complains that she got mad at him for calling her "Vagina Face".
  • In Bewitched, Endora would constantly diss Darrin by calling him things like "Durwood", "What's-his-name," "Darwin," "Dum-Dum," etc.
  • Gilmore Girls: Lorelai apparently called Luke 'Duke' for a year after they met, although they later became best friends. Given their Will They or Won't They? relationship, it was probably a case of Irritation Is the Sincerest Form of Flattery.
  • Rumpole of the Bailey frequently addresses his obnoxious Head of Chambers, 'Soapy' Sam Ballard QC, as "Bollard".
  • On Arrested Development, this is Gob's plan for dealing with his soon-to-be-ex-wife. ("For example, if her name's Amy, I'll call her Blamey.") This would probably work a lot better if he could actually remember her name.
  • Throughout the first season of Remington Steele, Steele invariably calls Bernice Fox (Laura Holt's secretary) "Miss Wolfe".
  • The season 3 premiere of How I Met Your Mother introduces Robin's new love interest, Gael (pronounced Guy-El). Ted, who is recently broken up with Robin, keeps pretending to mishear the name, and Ted's friends Marshall and Barney join in out of solidarity, calling him "Kyle", "Gail", and "Girl."
  • In George and Mildred, George's mate Jerry constantly refers to Mildred and 'Mildew'.
  • Doc Martin: Martin's mother insists on calling Louisa "Louise" despite being corrected multiple times.
  • On Seinfeld, George Costanza's high school gym teacher was a Sadist Teacher who loved to torment George in particular, and always called him "Can't-stand-ya".

     Myth & Legends 
  • In The Bible, the goddess Astarte is referred to as "Ashtoreth". The latter notably more resembles the word "bosheth" meaning abomination. It's also theorized that Baal is such a name as well.

     Other 
  • Eliezer Ben-Yehuda, the man who almost single-handedly made Hebrew a living language again, often mocked the famous poet Khayim Nakhman Bialiknote  this way, opposing his status as Israel’s national poet.note 

     Professional Wrestling 
  • This was stock-in-trade for Chris Jericho, who regularly misnamed the people he was addressing("Kirk Angel", "Mitchell Cole", "Bill Greenberg", "Hoot-'n-Toot Guerrera", "Chris Ben-Oyt", "Bore-Us Malenko", "Stinko Malenko", or "Raisin" about that one) A long, time ago, back when Santino Marella decided to interrupt Chris Jericho's second day back in the WWE, Chris Jericho proceeded to get his name wrong so many times in so many different ways that Santino exploded into a torrent of Italian for a few seconds.
  • Lay Cool sometimes did this as part of their 'mean girl' schtick, to the likes of "Piggie James" and "Smelly Kelly".

     Radio 
  • In Absolute Power, Charles Prentiss always called the French waiter, Maurice, "Morris". When Maurice corrected this ("Maur-ees"), Charles would launch a more devastating putdown.
  • On Hello Cheeky, John Junkin casually addressed Barry Cryer as "Fatty". On one occassion, Barry calls him out on it with the reasoning that he's no longer fat. John complies — and refers to him as "Skinny" for the rest of the episode.
  • There was an instance on True Capitalist Radio during Twitter shout outs where someone tweeted with the name "Adolf Ghostler". Ghost reacted as you'd expect, and since then it became a common and effective trolling tactic to intentionally refer to him as "Ghostler" (though the effectiveness started to wane over time, but never completely disappeared).

     Sports 
  • Sports reporter Jim Rome called football player Jim Everett "Chris" for years (a reference to the female tennis player, Chris Evert, so it was a stab at his manhood). They finally met on the TV show, Talk2, and Everett warned him not to do it again. Rome did, and Everett flipped over the table and knocked Rome out of his chair, as seen in this video. Many Rome detractors regard this as a Crowning Moment of Awesome. Since that incident, Rome regularly disconnects callers on his radio show who do the same thing to other male athletes.
  • For years after Muhammad Ali changed his name from Cassius Clay, many people still refused to call him by his new name.
    • Ernie Terrell was one of them, and in 1967 in the fight known as the "What's My Name?" fight Ali made him pay for it. Ali pummeled Terrell mercilessly while repeatedly screaming "WHAT'S MY NAME?" at Terrell. It is regarded as one of the few times Ali actually cut loose and showed unbridled ferocity in the ring.
    • Oscar Bonavena got the same treatment for the same reason.
  • Fans of Michigan State University Spartans sports tend to refer to their arch-rivals, the University of Michigan Wolverines, as "the scUM."

    Video Games 
  • In Final Fantasy VI, Gau is highly amused by Cyan's Ye Olde Butcherede Englishe dialect. In the conversation that follows, he starts referring to Sabin as "Mr. Thou", to Sabin's annoyance.
  • When Karin recruits Eyrios in Fire Emblem: Thracia 776, she decides that he would not be so stuck-up if his name was more ordinary-sounding, and thus calls him Olson (much to his displeasure).
  • In Mystical Ninja: Starring Goemon, the Big Bad is a theatrical man who repeatedly calls Goemon Fernandez despite Goemon's objections. According to one of his flunkies, he tends to give people the name he thinks they deserve. He even calls Ebisumaru Antonio once.
  • JumpStart Adventures 3rd Grade: Mystery Mountain has Polly, the bratty child villainess, repeatedly referring to the robot Botley (the game's Exposition Fairy) with insulting rhymes of his name, such as "Snotley" and "Potley".
  • Linebeck, of The Legend of Zelda: Phantom Hourglass, calls Link and Ciela by any number of degrading nicknames (rarely the same one twice) right up until they head into the Very Definitely Final Dungeon — whereupon he admits that he envies Link's heroic resolve. After a moment, Ciela realizes he's finally used her name.
  • In The Nameless Mod, Scara B. King pronounces the protagonist's name in a new way every time he says it. A conversation with NV Shacker reveals he does this with everyone (and notes that because he pronounced it right 1 in 3 times, he thought he was on a fast track to a promotion). Scara seems to do it out of mockery. It is definitely deliberate. Trestkon calls him out on it when he uses the correct name when stressed or uses a wrong name he has used before, to which Scara responds with a new one.
  • Coach Oleander uses this to mock Razputin in Psychonauts.
    Oleander: Is your name Joey?
    Raz: No.
    Oleander: Cause I'm gonna call you Slowy Joey.
    Raz: That's not my name.
    Oleander: What's that, Slowy? I can't hear you, you're talking too slow.
  • A running gag in the Sam & Max: Freelance Police games is how Girl Stinky always get the eponymous duo's names wrong. She remembers their names just fine, but chooses to call them completely random names just to piss them off.
    • In "The Devil's Playhouse" the two always mispronounce main bad guy Skunkape's (Pronounced Skoon-KAH-Peh) as just "Skunkape". At first it might seem unintentional, but the fact that they're the only characters who don't pronounce it correctly, it soon becomes clear that they're doing it just to be obnoxious.
  • In Sonic the Hedgehog, Sonic often calls Knuckles "Knucklehead" after the latter does something particularly unintelligent.
  • In Alan Wake, Agent Nightingale calls Alan by a different author's name pretty much every time he opens his mouth. Not all of them are male authors, either.
  • In Interstate '82, Rank Dick takes great pleasure in addressing Taurus as "Mr. Tortoise", emphasizing the "toise" part. He later finds out it's not a good idea to do this to someone holding you at gunpoint.
  • In The Secret of Monkey Island, Sheriff Shinetop (who is the series' main villain LeChuck in disguise), constantly mispronounces Guybrush Threepwood's name. In one instance, his mispronunciations are completely randomized, and many of them bear no resemblance to his actual name ("Droopface," "Nosehair," "Spicecake"). When LeChuck is talking with his first mate shortly later, he pronounces Guybrush's name perfectly, strongly implying that he was employing this trope the entire time.
  • Daxter does this to Count Veger twice in Jak 3 to annoy him out of spite for banishing Jak to the desert at the beginning of the game.

    Visual Novels 
  • Okabe in Steins;Gate loves to call Kurisu "Christina" (probably due to the fact that "Kurisu" is exactly how one would render the name "Chris" in Japanese, albeit in katakana instead of kanji) much to her annoyance. So much so that she's pleasantly surprised when he doesn't. He also does this occasionally with Daru, calling him a "suupaa hakaa" (usually rendered in subtitles as "Super Haker") instead of a "suupaa hakkaa" ("Super Hacker"), which Daru is always quick to correct. It's a very subtle difference, with only a glottal stop separating the (intentionally) incorrect pronunciation from the correct one.
  • Umineko: When They Cry has the rather unusual case of Yasu in Episode 7, a servant scorned and mocked by his/her older fellow servants due to his/her young age and inexperience and thus given this nickname. The last name is "Yasuda", but we never learn the given name, so the fandom only knows this character as "Yasu", even though s/he hates being called that. Well, the fandom also knows him/her as "Shannon", "Kanon" or "Beatrice".
    Benon: We're leaving. Take care of yourself, alright? Ya. Su.
  • In Phoenix Wright: Ace Attorney: Trials and Tribulations, rival prosecutor Godot frequently mispronounces Phoenix's last name, addressing him only as "Trite" instead of "Wright". He does this out of contempt, believing Phoenix responsible for Mia Fey's death earlier in the series.
  • In Borderlands 2, An ECHO log of Handsome Jack has him repeatedly screwing up the first name of his Vice President, even after Mr. Blake tells him that his first name is Jeffery, not Jimmy.

    Web Animation 

    Web Comics 
  • In El Goonish Shive, Diane does this to Justin, calling him Jason. This same mistake has occurred on the boards amusingly enough unintentionally.
  • Cinna Grossul of Pacificators have a history with Muneca Powell and Kathy Lee, and it certainly shows.
    • Cinna calls Muneca "Doll" and every thinkable variable of this - idiot doll, berserk doll, Doll-Rex, and so on. Muneca is Spanish for doll, and Cinna knows this. It's intentional.
    • Cinna calls Kathy, who has a really bad case of acne and big teeth, "Miss Pimples," "Miss Bucktooth," and "Pimpleface." Yes, Cinna is a mature woman.
  • In Webcomic/Shortpacked, Ken was often called by various other names Street Fighter characters (the joke being that he is somewhat of a forgettable Wall Flower). This carried over to the comments section, where he is ALWAYS referred to by another SF character name.
  • In 8-Bit Theatre, Black Mage refers to Warmech (who's a bit slow) as 'Boremech' and 'Warblech'. The robot eventually catches on, though it continues to be startlingly ineffectual at killing anything whatsoever.

    Western Animation 
  • In the Batman Beyond episode "Out of the Past", Terry persistently mispronounces Ra's Al Ghul as RAUZ (the same pronunciation used in Batman Begins) instead of the "proper" DCAU pronunciation, RAYSH. Talia constantly corrects him, getting more and more annoyed when Terry never tries to get it right. It may look accidental, but Word of God says this was Terry's subtle way of dissing the criminal mastermind by not even getting his name right.
  • On Hey Arnold! Helga does this to insult Harold in the episode "Beaned" where she fools Arnold (and the rest) into thinking she's got amnesia.
    Harold: "HELLO HELGA. MY NAME IS HAR-OOOLD! DO YOU REMEMBER ME?"
    Helga: "Why, of course I remember you, Cheryl."
    Arnold: "Come on, I'll help you find your locker."
    Helga: "What is 'locker'?"
    Stinky: "I reckon' that's the most pathetic thing I've ever seen..."
    Rhonda: "She's turned into a total freak!"
  • On ReBoot, Enzo often calls the viruses insulting nicknames, such as Megabreath and Hexadismal. Also, only Dot seems to pronounce Cecil's name correctly (Ceh-cil, not Cee-cil).
  • In the South Park episode spoofing competition movies, Stan Marsh's self-proclaimed rival takes to calling him "Stan Darsh," which he seems to think is a clever put-down. A Woolseyism in the German Dub has him use the name "Stan Arsch," meaning "Stan Ass," which actually is an insult.
  • A Beavis And Butthead episode spoofing Leave It to Beaver has Beavis as "The Beavis" and Todd as Eddie.
    Todd: So... Beaver.
    Beavis: Um, the name's "Beavis", sir.
    Todd: Oh, well excuse me... Beaver.
  • In a flashback episode of The Simpsons, Homer and Marge are trying to think of names for Bart (who Marge was pregnant with at the time). Homer shot down several names Marge suggested in order to avoid this trope.
    Marge: If the baby is a boy what do think about Larry for a name?
    Homer: Marge, we can't do that. The kids will call him "Larry Fairy!"
    Marge: What about Louie?
    Homer: They'll call him "Screwy Louie."
    Marge: Bob?
    Homer: Flob.
    Marge: Marcus?
    Homer: Mucus.
    Marge: What about Bart?
    Marge: Let's see... Bart, cart, dart, ee-art... nope, nothing wrong with that.
  • In Teenage Mutant Ninja Turtles (2012), Baxter Stockman is constantly misnamed by the Turtles, much to his frustration.
  • The Tick did this during his encounter with Thrakkorzog. His first attempt may have been Accidental Misnaming. The subsequent ones weren't. Thrakkorzog responds in kind later when he has the upper hand.


Lame ComebackInsult TropesMediation Backfire
Luke NounverberNaming ConventionsThe Master
Magma ManAdded Alliterative AppealMagnificent Moustaches of Mexico

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