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  • Composers: There have been numerous composers who have worked on the Looney Tunes series.
    • Frank Marsales: The original composer, who worked from 1930-1933. His final score (in terms of release dates) was "We're in the Money".
    • Norman Spencer: 1933-1936. The first released cartoon to use his score was 1933's "Buddy's Day Out", while his final cartoon was 1936's "At Your Service Madame".
    • Bernard Brown: Also composed during the 1933-1936 period, sometimes sharing credits with Spencer. His first cartoon was 1933's "Buddy's Day Out" and his final was 1936's "Let it Be Me". Went on to work in live action films.
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    • Carl Stalling: The most famous of the Looney Tunes composers, and arguably the man to give the cartoons their distinctive musical style. His first cartoon was 1936's "Porkys Poultry Plant" (which was also Frank Tashlin's first cartoon as director), and he stayed with WB for over twenty years, retiring after scoring 1958's "To Itch His Own".
    • Eugene Poddany: Arguably more famous for his work at Sib Tower 12, Eugene composed for five shorts in 1951 ("Lovelorn Leghorn", "Room and Bird", "French Rarebit", "The Wearing of the Grin", and "Leghorn Swoggled") while Stalling was recovering from a mild head injury.
    • Milt Franklyn: Franklyn began as Stalling's arranger/orchestrator in the late '30s and co-composed a few shorts with Stalling in the early '50s, but didn't begin composing on his own until 1954's "Bugs and Thugs". During the mid-50s, Franklyn was composing more than Stalling, and after Stalling's retirement in 1958, Franklyn became the sole composer for WB cartoons, including the wraparound footage for "The Bugs Bunny Show" series. His scores sounded very similar to Stalling's, though to the careful listener, he had his own unique style. He died in 1962 while composing for the cartoon "The Jet Cage". The last released cartoon to feature his music was 1962's "Mother Was a Rooster" (also two Road Runner shorts in 1965, though those were merely trimmed down from The Adventures of the Road Runner pilot).
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    • Shorty Rogers: Composed 1956's "Three Little Bops".
    • John Seely: Not an actual composer per se, but a stock music arranger who was hired to provide music for six cartoons during a musicians' strike in 1958, which prevented Milt Franklyn from working (the shorts being "Gopher Broke", "Weasel While You Work", "A Bird in a Bonnet", "Pre-Hysterical Hare", "Hook, Line, and Stinker", and "Hip Hip-Hurry!"). Most of the stock tracks he selected were by William Loose, Philip Green, and Spencer Moore.
    • William Lava: He finished the music to "The Jet Cage" (roughly the last three minutes of that cartoon was Lava's work) and became the sole composer for WB cartoons starting with 1962's "Good Noose". He stayed with the studio until it closed in 1969, with the exception of a period in 1966—67 where Walter Greene took over the role. Unlike his predecessors, Lava's music tended to be more atonal and dissonant, and rarely utilized popular song cues. His Seven Arts-era scores represented a distinct change in composition; they were more funky (perhaps trying to sound contemporary) and utilized recurring catchy melodies. On the down side, this often meant his scores during this era didn't follow the on-screen action as closely.
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    • Walter Greene: More famous for his The Pink Panther shorts, Walter Greene composed six Looney Tunes shorts from 1966 to 1967: "A Squeak in the Deep", "Feather Finger", "Swing Ding Amigo", "Sugar and Spies", "A Taste of Catnip", and "Daffy's Diner". All of his scores had a distinctive "twangy" sound to them, making it obvious in which era these shorts were made. On the plus side, the music was generally more upbeat and comedic than Lava's.
    • Herman Stein: Composed only for 1966's "Muchos Locos".
    • Irving Gertz: Composed only for 1966's "Daffy Rents".
    • Frank Perkins: Composed only for 1967's "Quacker Tracker". (Bill Lava supervised)
    • Doug Goodwin: Composed for 1977's "Bugs Bunny's Easter Special" and 1979's "Bugs Bunny's Christmas Tales" TV special.
    • Dean Elliott: Composed for 1977's "A Connecticut Rabbit in King Arthur's Court", 1979's "The Great American Chase" film, 1980's "Bugs Bunny's Bustin' Out All Over" TV special, and 1980's "Duck Dodgers and the Return of the 24½th Century", supervised the music for 1976's "Bugs and Daffy in Carnival of the Animals".
    • Harper MacKay: Composed for a few television specials in the late '70s and early '80s.
    • Robert J. Walsh: Composed for 1981's "The Looney, Looney, Looney Bugs Bunny Movie" and "Bugs Bunny: All American Hero", 1982's "1001 Rabbit Tales", and 1983's "Daffy Duck's Fantastic Island".
    • Hal Willner: Coordinated the music for 1987's "The Duxorcist" and "The Night of the Living Duck" from 1988's "Daffy Duck's Quackbusters", composed "Monsters Lead Such Interesting Lives" for the latter.
    • Hummie Mann: Composed for 1990's "Box Office Bunny".
    • Virg Dzurinko: Composed for 1991's "Invasion Of The Bunny Snatchers".
    • Nomi Rosen: Composed for 1991's "Invasion of the Bunny Snatchers".
    • George Daugherty and Cameron Patrick: Often worked together when composing for many shorts in the '90s. Shorts worked on include "Blooper Bunny", "Chariots of Fur", "Marvin the Martian in the 3rd Dimension", "Father of the Bird", "From Hare to Eternity", "Superior Duck", "Pullet Surprise", and "Another Froggy Evening".
    • Richard Stone: Composed for 1995's "Carrotblanca" and 2000's "Little Go Beep".
    • James Newton Howard: Composed for 1996's "Space Jam".
    • J. Eric Schmidt: Composed for 2000's "Tweety's High Flying Adventure".
    • Cameron Patrick: Composed additional music for 2000's "Tweety's High Flying Adventure".
    • Randy Rogel: Composed and wrote songs for 2000's "Tweety's High Flying Adventure".
    • Walter Murphy: Composed for five of the six aborted 2003-2004 Larry Doyle shorts.
    • Jerry Goldsmith: Composed for "Looney Tunes: Back in Action"
    • John Debney: Composed additional music for "Looney Tunes: Back in Action", even after Goldsmith died during production.
    • John Frizzell: Composed for 2003's "The Whizzard of Ow".
    • Christopher Lennertz: Composed for the three CGI Road Runner shorts from 2010.
  • Creator Backlash:
    • Chuck Jones disowned almost all of his pre-1948 shorts; it was claimed that if he had the chance, he would have burned the negatives to all of them.
    • Friz Freleng, who animated on the Bosko cartoons before becoming the main director of Looney Tunes, said years later that he didn't think much of the cartoons in hindsight, feeling that Bosko had no personality and that Harman-Ising were more concerned with polishing their art instead of making interesting characters. And apparently, none of the original animators liked working on the Buddy cartoons.
    • Tex Avery and Friz Freleng also hated having to deal with Warner Bros. mandate of including a song number in every Merrie Melodies short, which they felt got in the way of their story ideas and undermined the gags, and felt their cartoons significantly improved once the mandate was dropped in the late 30's.
    Tex: "We were forced to use a song, which would just ruin the cartoon. You'd try like a fool to get funny (during the song), but it was seldom you did....Finally, when Schlesinger let us get by (without using the songs), the cartoons started picking up."
    • Additionally, Frank Tashlin strongly disliked making shorts of Porky Pig, due to having less flexibility and humor value compared to characters such as Bugs Bunny.
    • Similarly, Friz Freleng disliked pitting Bugs Bunny against Elmer Fudd, stating Elmer was so pitiful and unthreatening an antagonist that Bugs looked unheroic duping him. He created other more vicious adversaries such as Yosemite Sam so he wouldn't have to deal with their feud and could give Bugs a more Worthy Opponent.
    • Bob Bergen, the current voice of Porky Pig, admitted on the Toonzone Forums (now the Anime Superhero Forums) that he does NOT think highly of the Larry Doyle-produced shorts made in the 2000s and that he had an awful time working on them before being fired and replaced with Billy West as the voices of Porky and Tweety. For one thing, the shorts originally had a LOT of adult humor that didn't belong in a Looney Tune - he specifically mentioned a lot of jokes about sex and bodily functions. While Bob is aware that the original Looney Tunes shorts were never intended to be exclusively for kids, as he pointed out they were CLASSY, not crude. Thus, he let Larry know that he wasn't comfortable with the adult humor, but it didn't do any good (ironically, the higher-ups at Warner Bros. took out all the adult humor in the shorts after Larry was fired). As if that wasn't enough, Larry wanted Bob to change the way he played Porky - he slowed down a bunch of old Porky shorts to how Mel sounded before they sped him up, then told Bob to "do" Mel, then they would speed him up to the same percentage. Despite the fact that Bob does Porky fine naturally and has done it that way for years. In addition, as Bob pointed out his voice is much higher than Mel's was - and the microphones used in those days were much different than the ones they were using on these shorts... and on top of that, Larry slowed down those original Porky shorts too much. When Bob attempted to do Porky the way Larry wanted and was sped-up, the result sounded like a stuttering Alvin the Chipmunk. Bob finally decided to call up his agent and quit the project - a very difficult decision for him, as he's wanted to voice Porky since he was a kid, but if this was the direction that they were going to take the characters in he wanted no part in it. However, when he told his agent that he wanted off the project, his agent informed him that he'd actually just been fired. Fortunately, it didn't take long for him to get the role of Porky back, just not in the shorts.
    • The esoteric director Norm McCabe grew to despise every short he directed, dismissing them all as terrible (though a lot of his shorts aren't seen much today, as they're all very dated — particularly his World War II-era shorts like The Ducktators and Tokio Jokio which are seen more as historical artifacts rather than cartoons you can watch for funnote ). According to this, McCabe liked the shorts he did with Daffy Duck.
    • According to Mark Kausler's commentary on The Daffy Doc, both Bob Clampett and Chuck Jones (the former being the director, Jones being an animator at the time) grew to hate that short, not because they thought it was a bad cartoon, but because it used an iron lung for a gag prop, which they felt was in bad taste to those who suffered from polio.
  • Crossdressing Voices: Many young boy characters were voiced by women in the early years, most noticeably Bernice Hansen and Sara Berner as Sniffles. Occasionally, Mel Blanc would voice a minor or one-off female character when Bea Benaderet and June Foray were unavailable, and it would often sound very much like one of Mel's male Looney Tunes characters was Disguised in Drag (most notably Bugs Bunny.)
  • Dawson Casting: Many children characters in the original cartoons were voiced by adults. A notable example is Tweety, voiced by Mel Blanc with his voiced pitch-shifted to sound more childlike. In the early days, many young boys were voiced by women, as mentioned above. And Dick Beals, whom had a hormonal condition that prevented his voice from deepening during adolescence (not unlike Gary Coleman), voiced Ralph Phillips.
  • Directors: It's worth noting that all of the classic directors (i.e. those who worked in the original studio) are now deceased. The last one remaining was Rudy Larriva, who passed away in 2010 (though the last one who died that was considered very popular was Chuck Jones).
    • Hugh Harman and Rudolph Ising: 1929-1933. They directed the first 67 shorts in the franchise, their last short being "Bosko's Picture Show". After the first 12 shorts, they split directing shorts between Hugh directing Looney Tunes, and Rudy directing Merrie Melodies.
    • Tom Palmer: Extremely short-lived tenure; only directed two cartoons in 1933 ("I've Got to Sing a Torch Song" and "Buddy's Day Out") before being fired and replaced by Friz Freleng.
    • Earl Duvall: 1933-1934; he got five shorts, starting with "Buddy's Beer Garden" and ending with "Buddy's Garage" when he was abruptly fired.
    • Friz Freleng: 1934-1938; 1940-1965; He directed 266 shorts total, over 1/4th of the entire series filmography; the most of any director at the studio. He also directed a few TV specials, "The Looney Looney Looney Bugs Bunny Movie", "1001 Rabbit Tales", and "Daffy Duck's Fantastic Island". His (credited) debut was "Buddy the Gob", while his last-released theatrical short was "The Wild Chase" (co-directed with Hawley Pratt).
    • Bernard Brown: 1934. Credited on "Pettin' in the Park" and "Those Were Wonderful Days".
    • Ben Hardaway: 1934-1935; 1938-1940. His debut was "Buddy of the Apes", while his last released cartoon was "Busy Bakers". He directed 21 shorts, 12 of which were co-directed with Cal Dalton.
    • Jack King: 1934-1936. His debut was "Buddy's Beercats", while his last released cartoon was "Porky's Moving Day". He directed 20 shorts total.
    • Tex Avery: 1935-1942. His debut was "Gold Diggers of '49", while his last released cartoon was "Crazy Cruise" (which was finished by Bob Clampett). He directed 61 shorts total, some of which he never completed, but were finished by Clampett in his stead.
    • Frank Tashlin: 1936-1938; 1943-1946. His debut was "Porky's Poultry Plant", while his last released cartoon was "Hare Remover," of which he was uncredited. He directed 39 shorts total, including the Private Snafu shorts he directed.
    • Bob Clampett: 1937-1946. His debut was "Porky's Badtime Story", while his last released cartoon was "The Big Snooze". He directed 84 shorts—four of which were unfinished Tex Avery shorts.
    • Ub Iwerks: Allegedly directed two shorts in 1937: "Porky and Gabby" and "Porky's Super Service", but Chuck Jones claimed that he and Bob Clampett actually co-directed the shorts, interpreting Ub's layouts into the Looney Tunes house style—Clampett, however, denied this in his own account. These two cartoons plus two others ("Porky's Badtime Story" and "Get Rich Quick Porky") were farmed out to Iwerks' studio, where Clampett and Jones were sent to work on them.
    • Cal Dalton: 1938-1940. Always shared directing duties with someone else, whether it be Ben Hardaway or Cal Howard. His debut was "Porky's Phoney Express" (co-directed with Cal Howard), while his last cartoon was "Busy Bakers" (co-directed with Ben Hardaway).
    • Cal Howard: Directed two cartoons in 1938: "Porky's Phoney Express" (co-directed with Cal Dalton) and "A-Lad-In Bagdad". He later returned to the series in the late 1960s, as the main story artist for the Warner Bros.-Seven Arts studio.
    • Chuck Jones: 1938-1964; also directed a few TV specials, "The Great American Chase", and a few shorts in the '90s. His debut was "The Night Watchman", while his last Looney Tunes short in the original studio was 1964's "War and Pieces". His final short in general was 1997's "From Hare to Eternity". He directed 207 classic shorts (220 if you count his Private Snafu shorts, several of which were never released), directed four Looney Tunes TV specials, The Bugs Bunny/Road Runner Movie, and seven modern shorts. Next to Friz, Chuck had the second most directorial credits to his name at the studio, making up 1/5th of the series filmography.
    • Norm McCabe: 1940-1943. His debut was "The Timid Toreador" (co-directed by Bob Clampett), while his last released cartoon was the shockingly un-PC wartime cartoon "Tokio Jokio". He later showed up again as an animator in the DePatie-Freleng and Warner Bros.-Seven Arts eras. He was also sheet timer on several Warner Bros. Animation TV series in the 1990s.
    • Arthur Davis: 1946-1949; also 1962's "Quackodile Tears" (his final cartoon), using Friz Freleng's unit. His debut was "Mouse Menace". After his initial stint as a director, his unit was abruptly laid off, but he was quickly hired back as one of Freleng's main animators. Also co-directed 1980's "Daffy Duck's Easter Show" and 1982's "Bugs Bunny's 3rd Movie: 1001 Rabbit Tales".
    • Robert McKimson: 1946-1967; 1969. His debut was the wartime short "The Return of Mr. Hook" (while his main series debut as "Daffy Doodles"), while his last cartoon was "Injun Trouble", which was also the last cartoon in the original studio. Was the only director to work for the original, DePatie-Freleng and Warner Bros.-Seven Arts studios. He directed 141 shorts total, the third most of all the original directors. He also co-directed 1977's "Bugs Bunny's Easter Special" (with Gerry Chiniquy).
    • Abe Levitow: Directed four cartoons in 1959: "Baton Bunny" (with Chuck Jones), "Really Scent", "A Witchs Tangled Hare", and "Unnatural History". Co-directed three cartoons with Chuck Jones from 1961-1962: "Lickety Splat", "Nelly's Folly", and "Martian Through Georgia". (the latter two also co-directed by Maurice Noble)
    • Ken Harris: Only directed 1959's "Hare Abian Nights".
    • Maurice Noble: Starting with 1961's "The Abominable Snow Rabbit", Noble began to receive co-director status in his work with Chuck Jones.
    • Tom Ray: Co-directed 1962's "The Adventures of the Road-Runner" with Chuck Jones and Maurice Noble.
    • Ted Bonnicksen: Co-directed 1963's "Fast Buck Duck" with Robert McKimson. Alongside Norm McCabe, he's also one of only two people to work as an animator during the original, DePatie-Freleng and Warner Bros.-Seven Arts eras.
    • Phil Monroe: Directed 1963's "Woolen Under Where" (with Richard Thompson) and 1964's "The Iceman Ducketh"; the latter was started by Chuck Jones, but finished by Monroe after Jones got kicked out of the studio (Monroe and the remaining Jones staffers all got fired themselves once "The Iceman Ducketh" was completed). He also co-directed with Chuck Jones for 1979's "The Great American Chase", 1980's "Bugs Bunny's Bustin' Out All Over" and "Daffy Duck's Thanks-for-Giving Special" and with Friz Freleng and David Detiege for 1983's "Daffy Duck's Movie: Fantastic Island".
    • Richard Thompson: Co-directed 1963's "Woolen Under Where" (with Phil Monroe).
    • Gerry Chiniquy: Directed two cartoons in 1964: "Dumb Patrol" and "Hawaiian Aye Aye". Also co-directed 1977's "Bugs Bunny's Easter Special", 1980's "Daffy Duck's Easter Show" and "The Bugs Bunny Mystery Special", and 1981's "Friz Freleng's Looney Looney Looney Bugs Bunny Movie".
    • Hawley Pratt: Co-directed all of Freleng's cartoons starting with "The Pied Piper Of Guadalupe," continuing through to the DePatie-Freleng era film "The Wild Chase" (starring the Road Runner, Speedy Gonzales, the Coyote, and Sylvester). Was also the sole director of "Senorella and the Glass Huarache", the last cartoon released by the original studio. Directed "Hollywood Daffy" uncredited after Friz Freleng was suspended for a month following a set-to about directing it.
    • Irv Spector: Only directed 1965's "Corn on the Cop".
    • Rudy Larriva: 1965-1967. His debut was "Run Run, Sweet Road Runner", while his last released cartoon was "The Spy Swatter".
    • Alex Lovy: 1967-1968. His debut was "Speedy Ghost to Town", while his last released cartoon was "Chimp and Zee".
    • David Detiege: Directed 1977's "Bugs Bunny's Howl-Oween Special", 1979's "Bugs Bunny's Thanksgiving Diet" and "Bugs Bunny's Looney Christmas Tales", 1980's "Daffy Duck's Easter Show", 1981's "Bugs Bunny: All American Hero" (with Friz Freleng) and "Friz Freleng's Looney Looney Looney Bugs Bunny Movie", 1982's "Bugs Bunny's Mad World of Television" and "Bugs Bunny's 3rd Movie: 1001 Rabbit Tales", and 1983's "Daffy Duck's Movie: Fantastic Island".
    • Jim Davis: Co-directed 1978's "How Bugs Bunny Won the West" and 1979's "Bugs Bunny's Valentine" with Hal Geer. His solo directorial work was 1979's "The Bugs Bunny Mother's Day Special".
    • Hal Geer: Co-directed 1978's "How Bugs Bunny Won the West" and 1979's "Bugs Bunny's Valentine" with Jim Davis.
    • Tony Benedict: Co-directed 1979's "Bugs Bunny's Looney Christmas Tales" and 1980's "Daffy Duck's Easter Show".
    • Bill Perez: Co-directed 1979's "Bugs Bunny's Looney Christmas Tales" and 1983's "Daffy Duck's Movie: Fantastic Island".
    • Art Vitello: Co-directed 1979's "Bugs Bunny's Looney Christmas Tales". He would also later direct "Tiny Toon Adventures" and "Taz-Mania", (the latter had Vitello also producing the show and directing the voices).
    • Greg Ford and Terry Lennon: Directed 1988's "Daffy Duck's Quackbusters" (including two new shorts that made it up: "The Duxorcist" and "Night of the Living Duck"), a bunch of late '80s/early '90s TV specials, 1991's "Blooper Bunny" and "Invasion of the Bunny Snatchers".
    • Darrell Van Citters: Directed 1990's "Box Office Bunny" and 1997's "Pullet Surprise".
    • Dan Haskett: Only directed the scene where Daffy and Porky perform the William Tell Overture in 1991's "Bugs Bunny's Overtures to Disaster".
    • Nancy Beiman: Only directed 1991's "Bugs Bunny's Lunar Tunes".
    • Douglas McCarthy: Only directed 1995's "Carrotblanca".
    • James Tim Walker: Directed select episodes of 1995's "The Sylvester & Tweety Mysteries" and co-directed 2000's "Tweety's High-Flying Adventure" with Charles Visser and Karl Toerge.
    • Francesca Allen: Co-directed the animation for 1996's "Space Jam".
    • Tony Cervone: Co-directed the animation for 1996's "Space Jam" with Uli Meyer and Bruce W. Smith. Also co-directed 2003's "Duck Dodgers" TV series, 2004's "Daffy Duck For President", and select episodes of 2011's "The Looney Tunes Show" with Spike Brandt.
    • Karl Toerge: Directed select episodes of 1995's "The Sylvester & Tweety Mysteries" and co-directed 2000's "Tweety's High-Flying Adventure" with Charles Visser and James Tim Walker.
    • Uli Meyer: Co-directed the animation for 1996's "Space Jam" with Tony Cervone and Bruce W. Smith.
    • Bruce W. Smith: Co-directed the animation for 1996's "Space Jam" with Tony Cervone and Uli Meyer.
    • Stephen Fossatti: Only directed 1997's "Father of the Bird".
    • Charles Visser: Directed select episodes of 1995's "The Sylvester & Tweety Mysteries", 2000's "Tweety's High-Flying Adventure" (with Karl Toerge and James Tim Walker) and 2006's "Bah Humduck! A Looney Tunes Christmas".
    • Spike Brandt: Directed 2000's "Little Go Beep", co-directed 2003's "Duck Dodgers" TV series, 2004's "Daffy Duck For President" and select episodes of 2011's "The Looney Tunes Show" with Tony Cervone.
    • Eric Goldberg: Directed the animation for 2003's "Looney Tunes: Back in Action".
    • Bret Haaland: Only directed 2003's "The Whizzard of Ow".
    • Dan Povenmire: Directed 2004's "Museum Scream" and "My Generation G-G-Gap".
    • Bill Kopp: Co-directed 2004's "Hare and Loathing in Las Vegas" with Peter Shin.
    • Peter Shin: Co-directed 2004's "Hare and Loathing in Las Vegas" with Bill Kopp. Also directed "Cock-a-Doodle Duel".
    • Rich Moore: Only directed 2004's "Attack of the Drones".
    • Matthew O'Callaghan: Directed the three CG Road Runner shorts as well as "I Tawt I Taw a Puddy Tat" and "Daffy's Rhapsody".
    • Jeff Siergey: Directed select episodes of 2011's "The Looney Tunes Show" and 2015's "Looney Tunes: Rabbits Run" DTV movie.
  • Doing It for the Art: As Chuck Jones himself said, "We didn't make them for anybody, we made them for ourselves, which was probably the most sensible way to do it anyway."
    • To put things in perspective, the animators were grossly underpaid, especially considering some of the things they ended up turning out, but knew that asking for a raise would mean giving up their creative control.
  • Enforced Method Acting: This happened in the Japanese-dubbed version, when it was dubbed for first time: According to an American Warner Bros. employee sent to Japan to supervise the dub, Mugihito (Taz's Japanese VA and its current one) had too many problems at first with dubbing Taz right, since Taz barely spoke any reasonable lines and adapting his Hulk Speak to Japanese was becoming a pain for him and he was starting to get frustrated. Since Mugihito didn't speak English nor the American supervisor spoke Japanese to help him, the American employee decided to enter into Mugihito's recording booth and started to imitate Taz as best he could, so the Japanese voice actor could be able to understand how to dub Taz right. After laughing really hard after that stunt, Mugihito got the message quickly and managed to solve the issue right away.
  • Executive Meddling: Happened on occasion, especially after Eddie Selzer took over the studio.
    • Perhaps the most infamous example is the ending of "The Heckling Hare", originally it ended with Bugs Bunny and the dog falling off a cliff three times(as opposed to just one in the released version) for whatever reason Jack Warner did not like the ending(speculated reasons why range from Jack not liking the implication of Bugs falling to his death to not being comfortable with the line "Hold on to your hats folks here we go again!" which was a well-known risque joke at the time) and Leon Schlesinger didn't like to argue with his boss so he demanded Avery change the ending and as a result the final 40 feet of the cartoon was trimmed, which made Avery furious. The original ending alas seems to be Lost Forever.
    • When Bob Clampett started out as a director, he was only allowed to make black-and-white Porky Pig cartoons. Tellingly, more than half of his filmography (44 black-and-white cartoons, and four color shorts) is made up of appearances of the character. Fortunately, Bob was allowed to use Daffy Duck alongside Porky in those shorts, and he did not take that for granted. Also of note is that, while Porky was mandated to appear in every early short he made, it was never stipulated how much he had to appear—Bob took advantage of this in the later black-and-white shorts by demoting Porky to fairly minor roles in favor of his own custom cast of characters (i.e. Porky is a narrator in "We, The Animals Squeak"). By 1941, Bob inherited Tex Avery's unit after he quit the studio, allowing to experiment with more shorts starring Bugs and Daffy, in addition to creating his own characters such as Tweety Bird. Tellingly, Porky only appeared in six of his color cartoons, two of which were remakes of previous Porky shorts (1944's Tick Tock Tuckered and 1945's Wagon Heels), and one of them was only a very brief cameo in The Great Piggy Bank Robbery.
    • Executive Veto: One particularly mad producer would routinely tell the animators what they couldn't do cartoons about. This backfired considerably, as a) the cartoons got made anyway, and b) the five Oscars won over the years (e.g. For Scent-imental Reasons) were won by cartoons they were specifically told not to make.
    • The reason you wont be seeing any more milestone anniversaries or official filmographies for them is because Warner Bros. has a strict "No dates." policy, because they fear audiences won't care about the characters if they knew how old they are. It's also to ward off people who want to find out which of their cartoons are Public Domain or not (even though that info can easily be found online). This was also given as a reason why they would not release chronological DVD sets of the various Looney Tunes characters, but they eventually changed their minds with the release of the Porky Pig 101 DVD set.
  • Exiled from Continuity:
    • Foxy and Roxy the Foxes, who were a blatant attempt at ripping off Mickey Mouse and Minnie Mouse, were barred from appearing again after their three appearances in the Merrie Melodies series, due to Walt Disney ordering then-co director of the series, Rudy Ising, to stop using the character under the threat of a lawsuit. The characters would only resurface decades later in an episode of Tiny Toon Adventures, and even then they had to be completely redesigned so they didn't resemble Mickey or Minnie.
    • According to one of the Looney Tunes comic artists, celebrity caricatures are OK with them unless noted otherwise, even for ones long forgotten such as Edna Mae Oliver, but there is one egregious exception—anything caricaturing actor Peter Lorre, who was a fairly common sight in the older Looney Tunes. When the artist attempted to have him appear in the Mad Scientist role he played in Hair Raising Hare for a story, it was shot down due to legal issues with Lorre's estate, who have said they will no longer authorize using caricatures of him in that context. So the scientist from Water, Water Every Hare was added to substitute for him.
    • The Gremlin from Falling Hare is not allowed to make appearances in modern Looney Tunes works due to a legal snafu regarding him. Apparently, the character is public domain due to him appearing in a wartime cartoon produced for the government, but the Gremlin Fine Arts Gallery took advantage of this and claimed a trademark on the characters name and likeness, meaning Warner Bros. would have to pay royalties to them to use their own character. note 
  • Keep Circulating the Tapes: While a large chunk of the filmography is on VHS, laserdisc, DVD and Blu-Ray (627 of the original 1000 shorts are available on DVD and Blu-Ray, and if you count all home video releases, there are well over 750 available) there are still a large number of the shorts that either haven't seen a home video release or have never been aired on TV (be it in a long time or never). The Censored Eleven films are the most infamous shorts in regards to this.
    • The Bugs Bunny Show is arguably the worst case of all. Only one complete episode was released on DVD Note  and only a handful of bridging sequences were featured as extras on the first five Golden Collection sets. Other than that, bupkis. Part of this is because the original film elements are hard to come by, either because of tape re-use or just badly damaged prints in general.
  • Meme Acknowledgement: Warner Bros seems to acknowledge the "Big Chungus" meme that they posted a snippet of the original short "Wabbit Twouble" on their Kids YouTube channel. Adding to that is the thumbnail includes the chubby Bugs Bunny. Even better, when the moment in question happens, an annotation straight up asks "Are you here for this?", solidifying that WB knows the meme.
  • Money, Dear Boy: The whole reason Warner Bros. started their own animation unit was to cash in on the recent success of Disney and the Fleischers and the studio heads really didn't care what the cartoon was about or how good it was, so long as it could make them some extra money. This was good for the artists, however, who were inadvertently given carte blanche over anything they created.
    • The reason Mel Blanc's name is the only one seen in the voice credits for most of the cartoons, even the ones where there are obviously other actors, was because he was denied a raise.
  • Name's the Same: Years later the name "Cool Cat" would be used by a band member on Pee-wee's Playhouse and also by a cat mascot who loves kids.
  • No Budget: The black-and-white Looney Tunes directed by Tex Avery and Bob Clampett had very small budgets of $3,000 (around $50,000 in 2016 money) and strict deadlines of four weeks to slam together each cartoon!
  • Old Shame: Warner Bros. tends to act this way about the Buddy and Seven Arts eras, along with Loonatics Unleashed...
  • The Other Darrin: Quite a few examples, actually:
    • The first example came after only three cartoons, when the original voice of Bosko, Max Maxwell was replaced by John Murray.
    • Mel Blanc replaced Joe Daugherty as the voice of Porky Pig starting in 1937.
    • June Foray replaced Bea Benaderet as the voice of many female characters, including Granny, starting around 1955.
      • Speaking of Granny, she was voiced by Joan Gerber in "Corn on the Cop" and by GeGe Pearson in "It's Nice to Have a Mouse Around the House".
    • Julie Bennett replaced Bea Benaderet as the voice of Miss Prissy in 1961's "Strangled Eggs".
    • Kent Rogers originally voiced Beaky Buzzard and Junior Bear. After his death, Beaky was voiced by Mel Blanc and Junior was voiced by Stan Freberg.
    • Billy Bletcher usually played Henry Bear, but Mel Blanc filled in for "What's Brewin', Bruin?".
    • Dave Barry took over the role of Elmer Fudd for one cartoon (1958's "Pre-Hysterical Hare") after regular actor Arthur Q. Bryan joined in that year's musicians' strike and refused to work.
    • Hal Smith briefly replaced Arthur Q. Bryan (who passed away) as Elmer Fudd from 1960 to 1961 Note , and in the '70s and '80s television specials and movies, Mel Blanc replaced Hal Smith in the role. Note 
    • In "Good Night, Elmer" and "The Scarlet Pumpernickel", Elmer Fudd is voiced by Mel Blanc rather than Arthur Q. Bryan. Justified in the latter cartoon, since he's acting out a role in Daffy's Fantasy Sequence.
    • Larry Storch replaced Daws Butler as the voices of Merlin the Magic Mouse and Second Banana after their initial appearance.
    • After Mel Blanc died, numerous other voice artists filled in for his various characters, including Jeff Bergman, Greg Burson, Bob Bergen, Joe Alaskey, Billy West, Noel Blanc (Mel Blanc's son who does have some of his old man's talent for doing voices, but hasn't really followed in his footsteps), Frank Gorshin, Bill Farmer, and Jeff Bennett. And that's not even counting voice actors for Looney Tunes-based video games.
  • Pop Culture Urban Legends: For years, there has been a rumor that Noel Blanc, Mel's son, briefly filled in for Mel after his near-fatal car accident in 1961. Noel more or less debunked this in a radio interview and clarified that he merely did "ghost tracks", and then his father re-recorded everything after he recovered.
  • Reality Subtext: You Ought To Be In Pictures is arguably one of Friz Freleng's most personal films, because it's essentially a cartoon re-telling of Friz's experiences quitting WB to work for MGM, then being dissatisfied and returning to WB only a couple years later.
  • Recycled Script: Several early black-and-white shorts were later remade in color:
    • Porky's Badtime Story (1937 with Gabby Goat) as Tick Tock Tuckered (1944 with Daffy Duck)
    • Injun Trouble (1938) as Wagon Heels (1945)
    • Scalp Trouble (1938) as Slightly Daffy (1944)
    • Notes To You (1941 with Porky and unnamed cat) as Back Alley Oproar (1947 with Elmer and Sylvester)
    • Porky's Pooch (1941) as Little Orphan Airedale (1947)
    • Porky in Wackyland (1938) as Dough For The Do-Do (1949)
      • Friz Freleng's cartoons are notorious for recycling scripts from earlier cartoons (and recycling scenes).
  • Relationship Voice Actor: The Japanese dub shares almost the entire cast with One Piece, something that is not very difficult to do, due of the animated adaptation's very large cast. The interesting part is, most of the cast are voiced by One Piece's regular or important characters: Bugs is Ussop, Daffy is Bellamy, Elmer is Brook, Yosemite Sam was Jinbei and his replacement (Kouji Ishii) is Fisher Tiger, Sylvester is Raizo of the Mist, Willie E. Coyote and the male Narrator (Hideyuki Umezu) is Diamante, while his female counterpart in narrating duties (Akemi Okamura) voices Nami, Speedy Gonzales is Pica, Foghorn is Kaido, Taz is Baron Tamago and Porky Pig (Naoki Tatsuta) is Capone Bege. And, if we include spin-offs and films, we have Michael Jordan (Kōichi Yamadera) as Corazon and Hector (the late Ginzo Matsuo) as Smoker.
  • Talking to Himself:
    • Mel Blanc frequently did this, as he did the majority of the voices in the series. During the Seven Arts era, Larry Storch did the same thing.
    • Daws Butler talked to himself in the three Honey-Mousers shorts, as he played both Ralph and Ned.
  • Trope Namer: For...
  • Uncredited Role: For many years, Mel Blanc received no onscreen credit for all the voices he did. He only was given a credit after asking for a raise. His bosses refused to give him one but grudgingly agreed to put his name in the credits.
    • The most notorious example was Arthur Q. Bryan, who voiced Elmer Fudd in over fifty cartoons but was never given on-screen credit.
  • Unintentional Period Piece: A lot of the original shorts were very heavy on gags and references that were relevant for the 40s and 50s, but have long lost their cultural context with the passage of time. The 1930's shorts in particular suffer this the hardest.
  • What Could Have Been:
    • The Looney Tunes and Merrie Melodies short format was planned to be permanently revived in the early 2000s to coincide with the release of Looney Tunes: Back in Action, produced by Larry Doyle. Shorts planned for the series included "The Pig Stays in the Picture" (Porky tries to find a movie that his whole family can enjoy), "Dancing Pepe" (a chipmunk with a head cold falls for Pepe Le Pew on the dance floor), "A Very Daffy Christmas" (Daffy winds up at Santa's workshop while flying south for the winter) and "Guess Who's Coming to Meet the Parents" (Bugs brings a squirrel home to meet his mother). Six shorts were completed, but once the higher-ups at Warner Bros. saw them, they were so appalled by them that they fired Larry Doyle and cancelled the shorts still in-production. After tinkering with the shorts, they still planned on releasing them in theaters, but after Back In Action fared badly in box office they decided against it, with one of the shorts, "The Whizzard of Ow", having been included on the movie's DVD release, Eventually, "Hare and Loathing in Las Vegas" and "Attack of the Drones" were released on DVD collections for Bugs Bunny and Daffy Duck (respectively), "Museum Scream" was included on the Looney Tunes Platinum Collection Volume 1 Blu-ray, and all six of the cartoons were included on the Blu-ray release of Back in Action in 2014.
    • Foxy was originally planned to make a fourth appearance in "You Don't Know What You're Doin!" (1931) and the soundtrack had already been recorded with him in mind, but when Walt Disney ordered Rudy Ising to scrap Foxy for being a blatant plagiarism of Mickey Mouse, he was replaced with an eleventh hour ersatz named Piggy.
    • The storyboards for "Porky's Party" show that Gabby Goat was also planned to make a fourth appearance, but was replaced with an unnamed bit player (a penguin with a very similar personality) in the final film. The same storyboards show that Petunia Pig was also set to appear.
    • Mike Maltese originally considered calling Yosemite Sam "Texas Tiny", "Wyoming Willie", or "Denver Dan", but then settled on the final name.
    • There was a short planned for the mid-50's that was a parody of Snow White (which would feature a take-off of Marilyn Monroe). It was going to be directed by Friz Freleng, but it was shelved before any animation was made.
    • Another unmade cartoon was For He's a Jolly Good Fala, based around Franklin Roosevelt's pet dog. The cartoon was scrapped following Roosevelt's death.
    • Milt Franklyn had written two new arrangements for "Merrily We Roll Along" in the early '60s, but they were never used for some reason. Theme 1, theme 2.
    • Rapid Rabbit and Quick Brown Fox, the stars of 1969's Rabbit Stew and Rabbits Too, were to appear in more cartoons, but only got to star in one before Warner Bros. Animation closed that year. Similarly, Warner Bros. Animation was developing additional characters such as detective Super Snooper (no relation to Hanna-Barbera's character of the same name and a Yosemite Sam-esque pirate Jolly Roger, along with an Animated Adaptation of the Keystone Kops.
    • Had Tex Avery stayed with the studio instead of quitting after he butted heads with Leon Schlesinger over the ending of "The Heckling Hare". Speaking of, the ending to that cartoon if it wasn't cut also counts, with Bugs and Willoughby falling off three really high cliffs instead of just one.
  • The Wiki Rule: The Looney Tunes Wiki, another Looney Tunes Wiki, another Looney Tunes Wiki, the Warner Bros. Cartoon Wiki, and the Warner Bros. Animation Wiki.
  • Writer Revolt: Leon Scheslinger's replacement, Eddie Selzer, had a lot of issues with some of the cartoons being turned out in the late 1940s/early 1950s, citing some of the ideas as not being funny enough for a general audience — the ones Selzer really had issues with were the Pepe Le Pew cartoons and the idea of having Bugs square off against a bull during a bullfight ("Bully for Bugs"). "Bully for Bugs" has become one of many classic cartoon shorts Looney Tunes fans remember from beginning to end, and the 1949 Pepé Le Pew cartoon "For Scent-imental Reasons" won an Oscar (which — ironically, and rather hypocritically — Selzer accepted).

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