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  • While not an "adaptation" of The Jungle Book per se, TaleSpin does this to some of its reinvented characters from the Disney film. In the latter Shere Khan, while Affably Evil, was a genuine force of evil and took sadistic pleasure in the idea of killing a man cub. In Tale Spin he is still sinister, but a businessman of neutral alliance, interested only in power and having a strong moral code (even siding with Baloo if someone risks offending it). Meanwhile King Louie is altered from a wily troublemaker to Baloo's best friend.
  • Similarly, Thomas the Tank Engine in The Railway Series, while still sympathetic, was much more of a self absorbed Bratty Half-Pint. While the show kept up this depiction for most episodes adapted from the books, its turn to original stories slowly made Thomas more altruistic and innocent. Some other engines such as Henry and Sir Handel took a similar direction.
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    • Bulgy in the original novels was a racist Jerkass who met his karmic fate by being turned into a chicken coop. While this plot is adapted into the show, he is later restored for vehicle purposes and becomes more benevolent.
  • DC Animated Universe:
    • Batman: The Animated Series:
      • Harvey Bullock used to take bribes in the comics. In this adaptation, Bullock claims he would never do that and he is a pure good guy along with a Sympathetic Inspector Antagonist who really wants to make Gotham a better place and just doesn't realize as yet that that's what Bats is doing too.
      • Gotham's Mayor Hill was also not corrupt like his comics counterpart (whom Bullock used to work for).
    • Justice League (Unlimited):
      • Huntress is a more heroic figure than she is in the comics, especially after she resolves her issues with Mandragora.
      • The Cheetah, Wonder Woman's arch-enemy, is instead a Tragic Villain who only desires to become normal again and desires no role in evil whatsoever.
      • Ultra-Humanite is an Affably Evil Anti-Villain who never hurts an innocent rather than the insane conqueror he's usually portrayed as.
      • Amanda Waller and Wade Eiling are still against people like the League, but the former isn't as much as a sociopath as her comics incarnation and the latter is interested in helping protect the country rather than serving himself. Likewise, albeit retroactively given his Face–Heel Turn was part of Infinite Crisis, Max Lord is less sleezy and evil.
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    • Static Shock: sees Rubberband Man, a one-shot villain from the comics, eventually reform and become a superhero.
  • Iron Man: Armored Adventures:
    • Andros Stark (the future Iron Man) was depicted as a futuristic superhero, and only battled Tony Stark in order to save the timeline, and knew if he succeeded, he himself would most likely vanish with the Bad Future he came from. In the comics, Andros is a psychotic supervillain who made a mockery of Tony's legacy.
    • Ghost is portrayed in this show as a Professional Killer and a Punch-Clock Villain who only cares about being paid. He still isn't exactly a nice guy, but that's definitely better than his Ax-Crazy comic book counterpart who had a severe Chronic Backstabbing Disorder.
    • Obadiah Stane, while still a villain and Jerkass that's willing to work with criminals, frequently shows he still has standards while his comic book incarnation was a straight up villain.
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    • The Mandarin in the comic is an Evil Overlord motivated by megalomania, as well as an Abusive Parent. This one is on the receiving end of the abuse, has redeeming qualities and genuinely believes he can make the world a better place by ruling it. That said, some of this is probably in part because this Mandarin is a Composite Character between the comics Mandarin and his son, Temugin.
    • The Living Laser has more sympathetic motives for his actions and even does a Heel–Face Turn; the one in the comics would eventually get some sympathy, but never completed his turn.
    • Howard Stark is a much warmer person than his comics counterpart, who was a straight-up Abusive Dad.
  • Spider-Man: The Animated Series:
    • The series actually rewrote Kraven the Hunter and Calypso entirely, with both becoming heroes once Spider-Man resolved the issues with their Psycho Serum-derived powers. (Kraven softens some and eventually makes a Heel–Face Turn, but Calypso is totally overhauled; from an evil sorceress to a friendly scientist who is only villainous in one Psycho Serum-involving episode.)
    • Similarly, minor villain the Spot was recast as a Punch-Clock Villain whose episode shows him going through a Heel–Face Turn after committing a few ill-advised bank robberies. The comics version, by contrast, is an unrepentant petty criminal with a sideline in contract killing.
    • There's also their version of Felicia Hardy aka the Black Cat. In the comics, she's Spider-Man's on again, off again lover who frequently alternates between antagonist and ally. The show's version only became a thief when her father was held hostage by The Kingpin and she becomes a hero once she and her father are both free from him.
    • Norman Osborn is much more sympathetic and less of a monster than he is in the comics, his becoming the Green Goblin more of an victim of circumstances and more preoccupied with work than being an outright Abusive Parent towards Harry in the comics.
  • Ultimate Spider-Man:
    • Though he's still a villain, the Rhino is made out to be a much more sympathetic character. In the show, he's a bullied teenager who sought out superpowers as a last resort against his tormentors, while in the comics, he's just a petty thug in a rhino suit. In Web Warriors, he even has a Heel–Face Turn and joins S.H.I.E.L.D. Academy.
    • While Skurge the Executioner's personality is more-or-less the same, here he's just hunting Spidey because of a misunderstanding caused by Loki, rather than a Mad Love for the Enchantress as in the comics.
    • Norman Osborn. While his comics version was played this way - a Psycho Serum-induced Jekyll & Hyde case - once upon a time, his portrayal for decades now has been that he's more Hyde A and Hyde B, a ruthless and amoral Corrupt Corporate Executive and Evil Genius who is the most dangerous man in the Marvel Universe before he loses his cool to the point of cackling crazily and throwing pumpkin bombs at you - if anything, he's worse when he's in control. In the show, however, his Heel–Face Turn is genuine and is only reversed by Doctor Octopus forcing more of the Psycho Serum on him. As the Iron Patriot, he is a genuine hero, and Norman's attempt to atone for his actions, both as a Corrupt Corporate Executive and as The Goblin, unlike in the comics, where he never reformed and his time as the Iron Patriot was an attempt to get the public on his side. He even plays a key role in the finale, where he helps restore Peter's abilities after Doc Ock neutralizes them.
    • In the comics, Blood Spider is an Evil Knock Off of Spider-Man trained by Taskmaster. In the show, he's an alternate version of Peter Parker from a world overrun by vampires.
  • The Spectacular Spider-Man: In the comics, Frederick Foswell was the crime boss known as The Big Man and after his release tried returning to crime before going up against the Kingpin, making a Heel–Face Turn, and ultimately sacrificing himself to save J. Jonah Jameson. In the show he's a reporter on the up and up from the beginning.
  • Marvel's Spider-Man:
    • The Sandman is a far more sympathetic character here, being a loving father who only broke the law to provide a better life for his daughter Keemia. In fact, in a major shift from tradition, Keemia is actually the far more overtly villainous one.
    • Also, before becoming the Rhino, this version of Aleksei Sytsevich is a nice guy and fun to be around. He's turned into the Rhino completely against his will, and is clearly not in control of his actions when he goes on his rampage.
    • Herman Schultz/The Shocker is also an eager high school student rather than a career criminal. Spider-Man only ends up trying to stop him after Norman Osborn manipulates Herman into getting into a fight with Clash, which causes a lot of collateral damage to the surrounding area.
    • Screwball becomes this as well by virtue of being a Composite Character. In the comics, Screwball is a criminal who posts her exploits online for hits, with Spider-Man referring to her as "The world's first live-streaming super-villain." In the cartoon, Screwball is actually Liz Allan, who creates the identity to help the community and prank big corporations who she thinks are getting away with unscrupulous activities. While she does begin veering away from that goal in order to prank Spider-Man, she gives up and reaches out to him for help after it becomes clear that her actions have endangered innocent people. The comic version of Screwball wouldn't have given a crap about putting innocent people in danger, and probably would have viewed that as a bonus.
    • Carolyn Trainer, aka Lady Octopus, also follows suit. She's introduced as a geeky, stalker with a crush who tries to impress Otto Octavius. She gives up villainy when she discovered he was just using her .
  • X-Men:
    • Magneto has always been a complex character, doing acts others consider villainy or heroism as needed to protect mutants, so the sight of him helping the X-Men and meaning it is not too surprising in any continuity. However, when he's bad, look out. His list of villainous exploits is impressive, and everyone's leery of him even when he's been playing nice for a while because they know that "what must be done to protect mutants" being helping old ladies cross the street now doesn't mean it won't be "showdown that could well start World War III" someday. In this series, he's only properly villainous in his introductory two-parter, and every appearance after that has him alongside the X-Men against common foes, and the one time he does fight them again he's being manipulated by Apocalypse.
    • Cable's son Tyler. In the comics he was an Antagonistic Offspring and eventually became a supervillain going so far as trying to follow in Apocalypse's steps. Here Tyler is a straight-up hero and he and Cable are very close. Probably justified via Stryfe, whose actions caused their relationship to go sour in the original comics, being Adapted Out.
    • Senator Robert Kelly. Like his comic counterpart, he starts off as anti-mutant politician in favor of laws to restrict the rights of mutants, and even after the X-Men save him, his views don't change. In the cartoon he does change and accepts that there are mutants who aren't a danger and shouldn't be alienated. One could argue that the change also stems from the X-Men saving him from the Sentinels which were built to protect humans from mutants but proved just as much a danger as rogue mutants.
    • Proteus. In the comics, he was an unrepentant killer and sociopath, and seemed to take pleasure in causing chaos and torment. In the show, he's genuinely misguided and confused, and doesn't kill anyone. Also, when he does hurt people, it's usually by accident or because he didn't realize what he was doing.
    • This extends to Proteus' absentee father, Joseph. While he's still a Jerk Ass and a lying opportunist, he does eventually come to accept his son and shows remorse over having abandoned him. While he was still a terrible husband, there's also no indication that he ever physically abused Moira, while in the comics, he beat and raped her, which is how Proteus was conceived in the first place.
  • Teenage Mutant Ninja Turtles:
    • The titular turtles are a lot more noble in the cartoons than the original comic. The original Mirage Turtles were assembled by Splinter purely to avenge Hamato Yoshi by killing the Shredder. Not that the Shredder isn't bad, but the Turtles were originally trained for the purpose of a revenge killing, whereas in the shows they are mostly fighting him because they're the good guys and he's actively doing something bad today. This even goes for the Darker and Edgier 2003 series where the backstory is taken practically word for word from the comics.
    • Downplayed with the 2012 incarnation of the Shredder, where his love for his daughter, Karai, is very genuine. The problem is that he has rooted himself so deep in his hatred toward the Hamato Clan, even his love for his daughter doesn't seem to matter, culminating in her mutation, which he still blames on the Hamato Clan despite him being the one using her as bait for the trap that did it.
    • Agent Bishop in the Teenage Mutant Ninja Turtles (2012) incarnation is much more heroic than his previous counterpart. In the 2003 series, Bishop was an immoral, alien-hating monster who was a part of the Big-Bad Ensemble. In the 2012 series, he's a member of the peaceful Utrom council and a faithful ally to the turtles, attempting to help them save Earth.
  • Garfield, while remaining largely the same character in all medias, is hit with this to some extent. The comic strips usually revolve around quick gags involving Garfield's snarkiness or cruel sense of humor. The Animated Adaptations however — likely due to their longer, more in-depth stories — keep most of Garfield's nastier qualities out but also more frequently show his redeeming side, turning him into more of a Jerk with a Heart of Gold. This is especially prominent in The Garfield Show where he is occasionally toned down to the point of being outright altruistic.
  • While Pete has traditionally been a truly evil villain, there are exceptions. In occasional Classic Disney Shorts such as "the Barnyard Dance", he would play a good or neutral figure, whilst usually retaining his gruff demeanor. In Mickey Mouse Clubhouse and, to a lesser extent, Goof Troop, he was played differently. In Goof Troop at least, he was a Jerkass, a Manipulative Bastard, and (as a result of the premise) an Abusive Parent, but he was also shown to have standards, fight against greater evils from time to time, and have a few Pet the Dog moments, making him more of an Unsympathetic Comedy Protagonist or Anti-Hero. In Mickey Mouse Clubhouse, he is played much more sympathetically due to the target audience being younger to the point where he's not even very mean and actually gets along with the other characters. One episode of DuckTales (1987) had a gruff but outright heroic Pete who was only positioned as a potential villain as a Red Herring.
  • Speaking of DuckTales (1987), Gladstone Gander is much nicer in the show than he is in the comics. This is averted in the reboot, where he's back to being a smug jerk.
  • Transformers Armada: The original Starscream was the Trope Namer for the treacherous lackey of the villain. This Starscream is driven by mistreatment rather than a lust for power to hate Megatron. He even temporarily defects to the Autobots, but even then, his experiences change him. He eventually gives his life to stop Unicron.
  • X-Men: Evolution:
    • In the Marvel Comics universe, Berzerker was a minor villain and member of the Morlocks. In Evolution, he's a teenager and member of the X-Men.
    • The Morlocks in general. In the comics, they're in the Heel–Face Revolving Door; their suffering from their odd appearances or Blessed with Suck powers is real, but attacking random humans to punish them for it is Not Cool. Sometimes they get better, and sometimes they get Aesop Amnesia. The Evolution version is not known to attack humans unprovoked, and the 90s 'toon version starts out villainous but cuts it out when Storm takes over, and there's no revolving door.
    • Arcade, in the comics, is an assassin who entraps victims in game-like deathtraps he calls "Murderworld". In Evolution, he is an ordinary high school gamer kid. He is manipulated by Mystique into hacking into the danger room computer in the belief that it's a sophisticated video game. He endangers the X-Men, whom he believes are game characters. Once he realized what he was doing, he regretted his actions and was forgiven by the X-Men.
  • Young Justice:
    • Artemis Crock in the comics is the child of Paula and Lawrence Crock, all three being unrepentant supervillains. In the show Artemis is ashamed of her criminal lineage and Paula does a Heel–Face Turn after being crippled and spending six years in prison. Cheshire, who is Artemis' sister on the show (but not the comics), is introduced as a villain and member of the League of Shadows, but evolves into an Anti-Villain or Anti-Hero by season two. In the comics she once nuked a country For the Evulz.
    • Neutron is a Psycho for Hire in the comics, but turned out to be Brainwashed and Crazy here.
    • The tie-in comic does this both to Gorilla Grodd and King Sha'ark. Both are borderline Token Evil Teammates for their respective groups but are set up as adversaries of greater villains.
    • In the comics, Mongul is an Evil Overlord with no real motivation other than being a sadistic bully and general douchebag. In the show, he's still definitely a dick, but his extreme hatred of the Reach and desire to eradicate them makes him a fair bit more sympathetic.
    • In Superboy comics Dr Amanda Spence is an Evilutionary Biologist who created Match, and killed Conner's girlfriend Tanya Moon For the Evulz. In the series, Conner accuses her of creating Match but it turns out this is unfounded, and she later helps create the anti-Starro technology.
    • The Aquaman villain Black Manta is reimagined as a sophisticated and somewhat noble villain who has numerous Pet the Dog moments with his subordinates, particularly his son. In the comics, he's an utterly heartless Sociopath and doesn't give a crap about his son, and even threatened to kill him just to torment Aquaman.
    • Vandal Savage in the comics is probably the single most thoroughly vile individual in The DCU with many thousands of years worth of absolutely horrific crimes to his name. In the show, he's still definitely not a nice guy, but he's a Knight Templar visionary whose acts are motivated by a desire to drive humanity to advance and make Earth a major universal power.
    • Rumaan Harjavti is depicted as a benevolent figure and the democratically elected president of Qurac. In the comics, he was the Bialyan Queen Bee's predecessor as the ruler of Bialya and like her was a foe of the Justice League, though he was less intelligent.
    • Major Force is implied to be a subversion. In the comics he's a violently sociopathic and blood-thirsty villain. In the comic tie-in to the show he's a hero sponsored by the government, whom the Justice League want to recruit. The reason he's not on the league is because Captain Atom shoots his suggestion down because of history he has with Force, his dialogue implying that Force isn't as heroic as he seems.
    • In the comics White Martians are evil with the sole exception of Miss Martian. In this continuity J'onn isn't the last Green Martian and White Martians are actually persecuted.
    • Amanda Waller. Typically presented as a Knight Templar who comes into conflict with the Justice League, in this series is never made out to be anything more than a harsh but honest prison warden.
    • Much like Neutron or even his own counterpart in the below mentioned Teen Titans, Plasmus isn't a willing villain. His comic counterpart was not only a willing villain, he expressed jealousy at Chemo being used to destroy Bludhaven in Infinite Crisis.
    • In the comics, Ma'alefa'ak is considerably more, well, malefic. While still villainous, this version is a Well-Intentioned Extremist who is angry about the persecution of his fellow White Martians, and there’s no level he won’t sink to in the name of, as he sees it, leveling the playing field. The comic version was a Green Martian who wiped out the other Green Martiansnote  in revenge for being justly punished for using his Psychic Powers for Mind Rape.
  • Teen Titans:
    • In the comics, Terra was The Mole from the very beginning, and horrified even Slade with her ruthlessness and manipulative sociopathy. The Terras of the 2003 series and the DCAMU, however, were Broken Birds who were Driven to Villainy by a desperate need to live a normal life. The former was even a genuine friend to the Titans before becoming a double agent for Slade. The animated versions are also remorseful for their actions, performing a Heel–Face Turn after some convincing by Beast Boy. Finally, both have their deaths framed as Heroic Sacrifices, though 2003 Terra secretly comes back from the dead to successfully gain that normal life at some point. In contrast, comic Terra's death was the result of an unfocused blind rage that made her lose total control of her powers, with the narration hammering home that she's an unrepentant monster.
    • Plasmus can't control his transformations into a mindless monster and willingly submits to being kept in stasis for most of his life. In the comics, he is in full control of himself and likes melting people.
    • While still a heroine, in the comics, Raven has a bad habit of frequently going through Heel–Face Revolving Door because of Trigon's influence. In the show, she does a much better job of not giving into her father's influence and the one time she does, it's done more as a reluctant pawn giving in than gleefully being Drunk on the Dark Side.
  • Wolverine and the X-Men:
    • Nitro releases giant explosions of energy whenever he's stressed, or just when enough energy is stored up. Like Plasmus above, he submits to confinement so he doesn't harm others, and is used by the villains as a blunt instrument against his will. In the comics, he's a killer for hire, and caused both the death of the Kree Captain Marvel and the Stamford Incident that killed about 700-ish people. (Interestingly, there was a one-shot child character in Uncanny X-Men who was like the animated Nitro but more adorable.)
    • Shows like Wolverine and the X-Men and the 2011 series portray Emma Frost in a more sympathetic light, completely turning her into a straight hero rather than a byronic one. Basically, if it was written before her comicverse Heel–Face Turn, she'll be completely evil with no sign she could ever be good; if it was written after, she'll be completely good with no sign she could ever be evil. That said, the Wolverine and the X-Men version of Frost also has Adaptational Villainy, as she's The Mole and still the White Queen of the Inner Circle (and even kicks off the events of the series as it's revealed she's the one who attacked Jean and Professor Xavier, which in turn ended up destroying the mansion—albeit with the intention of taking out the Phoenix before she could be a threat).
  • Beware the Batman:
    • While the comic version of Professor Pyg murders and mutilates people at random (with Mr. Toad being simply his lackey), the cartoon reinvents him as a dapper, sophisticated villain with a Victorian-era flair. Instead of being a serial killer or performing medical experiments on people, he and Toad are eco-terrorists who specifically target rich businessmen whose careless activities have harmed animals or the environment. That said, what they do with said businessmen is still pretty sick (hunting them down and killing them like animals), and Pyg himself still wields surgical equipment that he's all too eager to use. He ends up experimenting with innocent people in "Doopelganger", and he completely has fun terrorizing and punishing his victims.
    • Man-Bat is a full-fledged ally of Batman instead of an occasional foe. It helps that Kirk Langstrom can control himself as Man-Bat, and was only forced to attack Batman when he was drugged by Pyg. Guess who's a founding member of the Outsiders?
    • Daedalus Boch, who in the comics used the codename "Doodlebug", was merely a petty vandal on the show. In the comics, he was a demon-worshiping murderer who used the blood of the victims in his paint. He also doesn't kill Junkyard dog to unleash demons like in the comics.
  • The four ghosts from Pac-Man become allies of his in Pac-Man and the Ghostly Adventures.
  • Many villainous characters from TUGS became friends with the Star Tugs rather than enemies in the Cut-and-Paste Translation, Salty's Lighthouse. The Z-Stacks are a prime example.
  • The Super Hero Squad Show:
    • Songbird. In the comics, Melissa Gold started out as a criminal called "Screaming Mimi" and was a member of the Masters of Evil. During the Masters' scheme to pretend to be a hero team called the Thunderbolts, she's changed her codename to "Songbird" and found that she liked being a heroine and performed a Heel–Face Turn. After a few appearances in earlier episodes, "Deadly is the Black Widow's Bite!" revealed that Songbird was The Mole for S.H.I.E.L.D., spying on the Lethal Legion, and was a heroine from the start.
    • While the Squaddies initially assume them to be a threat, the Space Phantoms that appear in "Revenge of the Baby-Sat!" are depicted as benevolent, when in the comics they were minions of the villain Immortus.
  • The animated adaptation of Grandma Got Run Over by a Reindeer is a strange case where this Trope is used on a character usually thought of as a hero anyway - in this case, Santa Claus - but was a victim of Adaptational Villainy in the original work. In the original song, it's implied that Santa ran over grandma on purpose; in this version, it was a Frame-Up, where he manages to help grandma recover.
  • Avengers, Assemble!:
    • Princess Python starts off as a former member of the Circus of Crime, but reforms and joins S.H.I.E.L.D. by the end of the episode.
    • Both men to have operated under the name "Radioactive Man" were supervillains in the comics, but this version of Igor Stancheck is a member of the Winter Guard and helps to dissolve a destabilized facility that was falling towards a village to save said village. Similarly, despite being based on Ivan Vanko from Iron Man 2, the Crimson Dynamo here is a member of the Winter Guard and only stole a capsule because it contained Radioactive Man.
    • All Thunderbolts members rebel against Zemo (minus Zemo himself obviously) and perform a Heel–Face Turn in the adaptation of the Thunderbolts story arc. In the comic, Techno/Fixer actually stuck to Zemo's side and Moonstone remained a Token Evil Teammate who only joined in turning against Zemo for selfish reasons.
    • Like in the MCU section above, Steve's father is described as a kind, honorable man, rather than a wife-beating alcoholic. Steve trying to remember how his father looked like was a plot point in one episode.
  • In Lost In Oz, the apparent Wicked Witch, West, goes from being a villain to being Dorothy's friend with a dark side.
  • For Nick Jr.'s Peter Rabbit series. Peter Rabbit acts more heroic and less mischievous as he was in the original story. Benjamin Bunny gets this big time, since in The Tale of Benjamin Bunny he was mostly greedy. But in the Nick Jr. series, he's sensitive and more optimistic.
  • In the original Madeline books, the gypsies from Madeline and the Gypsies seem like kidnappers who take Madeline and Pepito into their circus, and eventually hide them in a lion's suit so that Miss Clavel can't find them. The TV special instead had the gypsies tell Madeline and Pepito to go home after they come down from being stuck on the Ferris Wheel, only for the two of them to express a desire to join their circus. They also don't make Madeline and Pepito wear the lion's suit until after their own lion becomes too sick to perform.
  • Green Lantern: The Animated Series: While not the first depiction of Carol Ferris to not be an enemy of Hal Jordan, this depiction is not even an enemy as Star Sapphire. She only attacks Hal because With Great Power Comes Great Insanity and snaps out of it.
  • The Looney Tunes Show: Yosemite Sam goes from mean in the original shorts to nicer in this show. Partially justified because he's no longer allowed to use his trademark pistols, so he can't intimidate and bully people as easily as before. He's still loud, rude and thoughtless, but when it occurs to him to be nice, he's pretty decent.
  • Beetlejuice. In the movie Beetlejuice was clearly a villain willing to kill human beings and forcefully married an underage girl in her early teens. In the series Beetlejuice is Lydia's platonic best friend and protector, and though mischievous and likes to scare people, never really harm anyone and even risk his… em… afterlife, to save Lydia’s parents and cat in different episodes.
  • A case Up to Eleven is The Mask animated adaptation. Not only was The Mask already downplayed in the movie from the serial killer it is in the comics, in the animated series he's the city's hero who (unlike his movie counterpart) does not commit robberies or any other crime.
  • Justice League Action:
    • Atrocitus is only after Lobo because the bounty hunter stole some Red Lantern rings.
    • While still a villain, Killer Frost is nicer than her other incarnations, especially compared to Justice League, Young Justice, and Batman: Assault on Arkham.
    • While John Constantine has his heroic moments, he was also a cynical​, alcoholic, self-centered con-man who couldn't care less about superheroes. While he's still smarmy, the John Constantine here is depiced as a more family-friendly version, as he's merely a deadpan and sarcastic paranormal investigator, even being a member of the Justice League.
  • In Voltron: Legendary Defender, while claiming to have been secretly working to bring peace to the galaxy the entire time, regardless of whether that's actually true or not, Lotor displays a kinder side that his original incarnation never had in addition to that unlike his original incarnation who was a Stalker with a Crush, he doesn't show any obsession towards Allura.
    • Not at the present with Emperor Zarkon, but as shown in the Whole Episode Flashback, King Zarkon was a far cry from the tyrant he was in his original GoLion and Voltron incarnations. It was through a combination of Love Makes You Evil and Came Back Wrong that he became the remorseless monster who would rule over the universe for ten thousand years.
  • Muskie Muskrat wasn't completely a bad guy in The Deputy Dawg Show, but he loved to play tricks on Deputy Dawg and outsmart him when the canine lawman tried to arrest him for causing trouble. In Curbside, he is Deputy Dawg's loyal sidekick with his only fault being that he's an idiot this time around.
  • Zodac in He-Man and the Masters of the Universe (1983). His action figure, already existent before the cartoon was made, was labelled as "Evil Cosmic Enforcer", not to mention he had the finned forearms and webbed feet common among the villains of the toyline. However, the cartoon recasts him as a supposedly neutral but mostly good overseeing character, who even delivers the closing lessons in two episodes. Re-releases of the action figure sort of retconned his original self by simply labelling him "Cosmic Enforcer".
  • Subverted by She-Ra and the Princesses of Power with Entrapta. The original 1985 series has her as an evil aristocratic hunter whose backstory had her as trapped in the Whispering Woods as punishment for her crimes before being found by Catra and convinced to be an inventor for the evil Horde. The 2018 series instead begins with her as a technology-obsessed princess firmly on the side of the Rebellion, albeit more concerned with experimentation and research than anything else. It's only a misunderstanding regarding her level of mortality that finds her in stuck in Horde territory, where she joins them after Catra is convinced she was abandoned and Entrapta realizes they're willing to support her more dangerous research.
  • The Carmen Sandiego franchise traditionally has the titular character as a master spy who pulled a Face–Heel Turn to become a world-renowned Gentlewoman Thief who steals world treasures just for kicks with her own organization called VILE. The 2019 animated series shifts her into an Anti-Hero Karmic Thief who used to work for VILE before pulling a Heel–Face Turn, now only stealing to protect items from her former colleagues and other villains.
  • Evoked with the Stay Puft Marshmallow Man in The Real Ghostbusters, who the busters have apparently been working with to rehabilitate him. They're ultimately forced to release him from the Containment Grid to face a gigantic ghastly preying mantis because, as Egon points out, the mantis is as powerful as Gozer and they don't otherwise stand a chance. He also pops up in a couple of later episodes on the side of the Ghostbusters, albeit not without some property damage.
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