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  • Alternate Character Interpretation:
    • Owen. He's extremely concerned about the raptors being used as attack dogs, immediately trying to think of a way to keep the boys safe (they're in the middle of the park complex with armed men at the time) and assaulting Hoskins. Based on his prior work and statements, he expects them to kill humans who aren't him without hesitation. For all of this, he is remarkably deadpan when the raptor pack goes rogue in a dark jungle, only telling Hoskins's troops to watch out because "raptors have a new alpha." Though at this point, if the raptors want to kill then they're screwed anyway, perhaps Owen's kind nature doesn't want to scare the troops too much or doesn't want them to be so concerned about the raptors that they lose focus on I. Rex.
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    • Hoskins. Is he a concerned Well-Intentioned Extremist who genuinely believes that training and weaponizing dangerous dinosaurs has a lot of benefits and can really change the face of modern warfare for the better? The film itself even demonstrate many times about how effective they are in the field, going all the way to too effective for his own good. Or is Hoskins just another greedy warmonger who sees dinosaurs as nothing more than his property and wants to make a fortune out of it no matter what it takes, and Jumps Off The Slippery Slope by purposefully creating and letting the dinosaur equivalent of Frankenstein's monster escapes captivity and loose on the park just to pit Owen's raptors against it as a field test? He says he had a wolf that he raised from a cub that saved his life once, which further muddies the waters.
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    • Claire. Designated Hero who was negligent towards her nephews and should be held responsible for not properly overseeing the Indominus project? Or a sympathetic woman who was too overworked to spend time with her family, on top of being innocent due to being deceived by the film's villains?
    • Zara is supposed to be an unlikable and aloof person, hence her horrific death scene, but she goes above and beyond her actual job description to babysit kids who are consistently trying to make it hard for her, doesn't complain about it except a single deserved eye roll at her boss for lumping her as a "nanny", and is actually very concerned for the boys' wellbeing (even at risk of her own) while also juggling her actual job and what seems to be a demanding family/fiancé.
    • Henry Wu. Did he agree to deal with Hoskins and InGen just so his work would survive the park's imminent closure? Did he take a level in cynicism after Hammond's failure in the first movie, and jump ship when it became clear that the idealistic Masrani would go down the same path? Or was he a greedy, thoroughly amoral Mad Scientist from the jump?
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    • How responsible is the I. rex for her actions? Considering that she was deliberately engineered to be hyper-aggressive, is she truly sadistic or simply following the instincts that were programmed into her? Is she truly killing for sport, or just confused about other life, since she's never seen anything outside those walls and attacking out of fear and instinct? Or perhaps curiosity?
    • Claire's extended family. Her sister's insistence on how "she'll totally want kids one day" and forcing her to take care of her own kids makes it look like she barely respects how Claire is a top-level executive in a major corporation (especially with how male-dominated the business world is) and plays a hand in running the most unique theme parks in the whole world. Nor does she consider the fact that Claire just does not want kids. The whole example of the divorce is suspect too: was it her or her husband who drove the marriage to dissolution? And adding the fact that Zach finds no problem in leering at other girls in the park (while having a girlfriend) it could be that one or both of his parents unintentionally taught him this.
  • Angst? What Angst?: Zach is remarkably accepting of the fact that his parents will in all likelihood get divorced after finding out about it for the first time, even pointing out how a lot of his friends' parents were divorced. It is entirely possible so many of his friends parents' being divorced his why he is so accepting of it, actually.
  • Anvilicious: Subtlety is not this film's strong point. Claire's flaw being that she's a workaholic is really hammered in, with her sister insisting that motherhood is great and that kids are great, and she'll totally have kids one day.
  • Ass Pull: The Indominus rex can inexplicably and automatically speak raptor language just by virtue of [[spoiler:being part raptor.
  • Author's Saving Throw:
    • The reviews section of official park website notes that the featherless dinosaurs were just one of the many errors that resulted from using frog DNA. (Frog DNA was also one of the primary causes of the park failing in the original film and novel by allowing the dinosaurs to change sex, like some frogs and reptiles do, and breed uncontrollably.) Double subverted with revelations made later by the staff; the raptors at least have no amphibian DNA and plenty of bird DNA ... but they also have lizard DNA in there, making the lack of feathers somewhat more excusable. In the film, Dr. Wu also goes on a rant about how he and his team specifically engineered the dinosaurs to look like what the public generally perceived them to be, rather than what they really looked like.
    • The latest trailer is attempting to emphasize that the raptors are not being controlled or tamed, rather forming a relationship with Owen and indeed one raptor is seen killing someone to counter the uncertainty about the prospect of taming raptors. The movie itself takes it a step further by demonstrating and reinforcing the raptors will attack anyone but Owen, as shown by their reaction to the worker who fell in their pen and Blue's demeanor around Hoskins. They are even shown trying to attack Owen himself when he runs from their pen, demonstrating the bond between him and them has limits.
    • A major complaint of the third movie was how the T. rex was rather easily beaten by the Spinosaurus in a rather blatant example of The Worf Effect. This movie firmly re-establishes the T. rex as the dominant dinosaur. Despite the I. rex being built up as more dangerous, intelligent, powerful, and sadistic, it's Rexy who ultimately comes out on top. Sure the I. rex kicks her ass at first, but unlike the Spinosaurus, the Indominus has properly established as essentially a Super Velociraptor rex. So the beatdown made sense. Plus, it allowed for the scene where Blue the Velociraptor and Rexy the T. rex team up to take down the I. rex.
    • As a nod to the above Worf Effect, the film has the T. rex smash through a Spinosaurus skeleton on display before she confronts the I. rex, firmly establishing her as the superior predator in the film's eyes.
    • Similar to Eric from Jurassic Park III, Zach and Gray are actually very helpful Tag Along Kids and use their talents (Gray's vast knowledge of dinosaurs and Zach's ability to fix and drive an old park jeep) throughout the movie instead of waiting to use them towards the climax.
    • Even the toys had one, as Hasbro took some heat for the box descriptions of their dinosaur toys using male pronouns despite the film making clear that the dinosaurs are still being bred to all be female. They didn't take long to correct the mistake on future printings.
    • When the sequel was announced, Bryce Dallas Howard made sure to say right off the bat that she would not be wearing heels this time.
  • Award Snub: It was on the shortlist for the Academy Award for Best Visual Effects, but didn't become a nominee.
    • As a general snub, Jurassic World is the highest-grossing film to not have any Oscar nominations.
  • Awesome Music:
  • Broken Base:
    • The very concept of the Indominus rex. Some view her as a potentially interesting angle, and as a more developed way of portraying the unethical methods of cloning these animals that have been present since the original. Others think that genetically creating a completely new species from scratch sounds more like something from a lesser science-fiction series. And then there are those who think the I. rex isn't cool enough, with paleoartists taking it upon themselves to "build a better fake theropod".
    • Don't talk about feathers, or scientific accuracy in general if you don't enjoy the heat of Flame War. One side says that the Grandfather Clause and/or the genetically engineered nature of the Isla Nublar animals excuse the inaccuracy and that paying homage to the film's original dinosaurs is most important. The other side argues that they could have been "updated" for accuracy through that same genetic engineering, and that since the original film portrayed dinosaurs according to current knowledge at the time, this movie is a step backward.
    • The taming of the Velociraptors. Opinion is split between A) those who think it is a neat twist on their roles in the series that also provides Chris Pratt's character the opportunity to be a badass, and B) those who think it will lead to Badass Decay for one of the Jurassic Park franchise's most central dinosaur species (and arguably one of the most iconic movie monsters) by turning them into scaly attack dogs... possibly to easily/cheaply cement Owen's status as a "badass" early on. This has mostly calmed down after the Author's Saving Throw above showing that Owen had to raise them from birth for them to even consider following his directions.
    • The lack of any of the original cast members besides B.D. Wong. Especially the lack of Sam Neill's Alan Grant and Jeff Goldblum's Ian Malcolm. While many fans are fine with this as they find the idea of the same characters wanting to encounter the dinosaurs again after their previous experiences to be ridiculous, but others feel that the original characters are iconic and them not returning almost makes this not feel like a proper Jurassic Park film. Many were expecting at least a cameo or small appearance that show them giving their thoughts on the new park. At most, a Freeze-Frame Bonus shows a character reading Malcolm's book.
    • Zara's death. The director may have intended it as a Subverted Trope of the Asshole Victim, but many see it as an overtly mean-spirited and too long Cruel and Unusual Death of a character who had little to no characterization or screentime, with no one in the movie seeming to care afterwards, that made the whole scene seem callous. Others saw it as a pretty standard (if still brutal) death for a Jurassic Park film and didn't think it was that big of a deal as a result, and still others even saw it as darkly humorous.
    • Whether Claire's characterization is that of Unfortunate Implications, or that of something more positive than at-first-glance (this article, for instance)
  • Captain Obvious Reveal:
    • The Indominus rex being revealed as being part raptor comes off as less of a surprise than intended given that its already a hybrid comprised of other species and its intelligence and habitat likely tipped off many as to what the "classified" aspect of that genetic makeup referred to.
    • In a film with a character constantly imagining the military applications of dinosaurs, is it really a surprise the the highly intelligent, very strong and durable hybrid with several special abilities turns out to have secretly been designed as a living weapon disguised as a tourist attraction?
  • Contested Sequel: The majority received the movie well, finding it a Surprisingly Improved Sequel after two letdowns. Others were negative, criticizing the Idiot Plot and considering it unoriginal.
  • Crack Pairing: All over Tumblr (as always). From Claire X Zara to Blue x Owen. Yes, seriously.
  • Creepy Awesome: The threateningly intelligent Indominus rex, the territorial swarming pterosaurs and the ginormous Mosasaurus.
  • Critical Dissonance: The movie was a box office smash, broke several records and most critics liked it. However, some critics didn't and the movie has some detractors. The thing most people (including several critics that didn't like it) seem to agree on is that it's the best of the sequels, with most of the critics' complains being that it couldn't match the original.
  • Ensemble Dark Horse:
  • Evil Is Cool: The I. rex was designed to be the biggest, baddest, coolest dinosaur in the park in-universe, and it shows.
  • Fanfic Fuel: Blue, Rexy, a flock of Pteranodons and who knows how many other animals are now allowed to roam freely through the now abandoned park. This lends itself to so many stories of what Rexy and/or Blue may be doing now that they're both free.
  • Fandom Rivalry: A very small one with Avengers: Age of Ultron, as some fans of that film weren't too happy about it losing out to Jurassic World for highest opening weekend of all time. Exacerbated by Joss Whedon criticizing World as sexist based on a pre-release clip, which in turn got turned around when people brought up the sexism controversies surrounding his own film. However, most fans enjoy both equally and won't argue.
  • Harsher in Hindsight: The first time Owen does the famous "Prattkeeping" pose, there are only three raptors, because Charlie was offscreen eating the bait pig. However, the second time he does it to regain the raptors' trust from the I. rex, there are again only three raptors...because Charlie had already been killed beforehand by a rocket launcher.
  • He's Just Hiding!:
    • Some believe that Delta survived the battle against the Indominus rex, merely knocked unconscious instead. Evidence supporting this include the fact that Delta was thrown off-screen as opposed to having an explicit death like Echo or Charlie, that Blue was able to survive being thrown by the Indominus rex and that in the aftermath, Blue was last seen running to the location where Delta likely landed. Others however have noted that the I. rex only took a swipe at Blue with the back of her hand whereas with Delta, she grabbed her with her jaws and teeth.
    • Some fans defend that none of the raptors are dead, claiming that this franchise is not shy about dealing out death, either dino or human, yet the bodies of the raptors are never shown. Jossed by the sequel, which conclusively shows that Blue is the last surviving raptor.
    • There are some that half-jokingly speculate that the I. rex somehow survived on account that we don't technically see her death. Though it's ultimately confirmed in the sequel, as her decomposing skeleton is seen at the bottom of the Mosasaur's lagoon.
    • A more tongue-in-cheek example, fans sometimes come up with convoluted ways of which Zara could have escaped her fate. Magic is occasionally involved. Or maybe Supergirl saved her.
  • Hilarious in Hindsight: Nick Robinson, playing one of Claire's nephews in this film, is the main star in the 2018 teen-romance Love, Simon, where he online-dates someone under the pseudonym "Blue". Naturally, Tumblr ate it all up, joking that maybe it was in fact Blue the Velociraptor.
  • "Holy Shit!" Quotient:
    • Longtime Jurassic Park fans had some rather surprised reactions upon first seeing the part of the first trailer where Owen is shown riding his motorcycle in the midst of a pack of Velociraptors.
    • In the movie itself, the climax! A constantly escalating final battle with the Indominus rex that brings in all the leads, Owen's raptor squad making a Heel–Face Turn to fight the hybrid, followed by the Tyrannosaurus rex and Mosasaurus joining the brawl to bring the monstrosity down.
  • Ho Yay: Considering that the two of them are the parents to the raptors, Barry and Owen are treated as a couple by fans.
  • Idiot Plot: The only reason the film happens at all is that nobody learned a thing from the events of the previous three. When there already has been trouble in the past trying to control normal dinosaurs, bringing in genetically-engineered hybrids certainly doesn't seem like the brightest of ideas. At the very least, it's heavily lampshaded by Owen that the Indominus has not been raised well at all, being treated as a revenue-generating attraction rather than an actual animal, so it should be no surprise that it decides to escape the moment it gets the chance, proving once again that dinosaurs and capitalism don't mix well.
  • Iron Woobie:
    • Lowery. You will want to hug him when he shuts off the control room lights at the end, especially seeing as he's an Audience Surrogate.
    • Masrani is this for the same reason John Hammond was. Masrani wanted to make people happy, but not only was his dream dashed, he dies horribly while desperately trying to save the park.
  • Jerkass Woobie:
    • Claire may be a bit antisocial and neglectful over the whereabouts of her nephews and over the feelings of the dinosaurs (at first), but she is clearly devoted to keeping Jurassic World a success and she is obviously heartbroken when Jurassic World has to be shut down just like how Hammond was upset about closing Jurassic Park.
  • Just Here for Godzilla:
    • The dinosaurs, obviously, but a few people had openly admitted to wanting to see the movie because Chris Pratt is the main character.
    • The people who have always wished Jurassic Park was real and open to the public get the next best thing in the brief scenes featuring a fully functioning Jurassic World and its attractions. Hell, the teaser trailer had virtually nothing but such scenes, suggesting the filmmakers were well aware of this trope.
    • When Mercedes-Benz premiered footage of their new vehicles being featured in the film, even fans who couldn't care less about cars watched it avidly because it featured new chunks of clips from Jurassic World.
  • Memetic Bystander: That one tourist (played by Jimmy Buffett) briefly seen running from a swarm of aerial death with a margarita in each hand.
  • Memetic Mutation:
  • Misaimed Marketing: Hybrid dinosaurs are among the main selling points for the film's merchandising. This is despite the film's general idea that making hybrids is a bad thing.
  • Moe: Gray. He's too adorable for words.
  • Moral Event Horizon:
    • Hoskins intentionally making the I. rex a Living Weapon and a Sociopath, hoping she'd break loose and give him a chance to test the Raptors and her for potential military applications. Every bad thing that happens in the film is his fault.
    • The Indominus brutally murdering the gentle Apatosaurus and leaving them to die in agony simply for sport.
  • Most Wonderful Sound:
    • After all these years, hearing the T. rex roar again. Hail to the king.
    • Any and all appearances of the old theme song.
  • Narm:
    • Blue coming to the rescue at the end of the movie — in slow motion — comes across as being a little less dramatic than intended.
    • The Dimorphodons may be a real species, but seeing what looks like a Pteranodon with a T. rex head still looks goofy.
    • This exchange between Owen and Claire from the very end of the film, which even Chris Pratt can't stop from sounding hilariously forced:
      Claire: So what do we do now?
      Owen: Stick together I guess. [DRAMATIC PAUSE] For survival.
    • Hoskins's reaction to the I. rex breaking into the aviary. It almost sounds like he's aroused by it.
    • The death of Echo. While fighting the Indominus rex, she is flung into a gas grill, which suddenly ignites and burns her to cinders as soon as she hits it. On top of that, the grill had not been shown in any previous scene, making it unexpected and almost cartoonish that she would hit one of all things.
    • The goofy little "OOoo!" (or "Wooohhh!") noise Nick makes when Indominus rex overturns the pickup truck. It almost undermines the intended horror of the scene.
    • The very name of the film, being a combination of the first two film titles rather than something new.
    • Woman in high heels outruns dinosaur. Eyes are rolled.
    • The scene with the dying Apatosaurus might come off as overly dramatic to some.
    • Some of the Product Placement is pretty forced and awkward, especially the loving shot of Owen taking a long pull from a Coca Cola bottle.
    • Many have pointed out how playing the Jurassic Park music theme as the movie pans over the buildings of the Jurassic World park was somewhat cringe-worthy, since it was missing the primary thing that made the original moment special, the actual dinosaurs.
    • According to the script, Masrani Flies Like Crazy to the point where Claire is begging him to concentrate on his piloting while riding with him and his instructor throws up after they land. The shots of the helicopter flying in a perfectly unremakable manner and the calm interior scenes make it look like everyone is childishly overreacting.
    • The It Can Think moments from the Indominus Rex really stretch the suspension of disbelief for some people. It's one thing to have her figure out she is help captive and ambush her captors to escape. It's another when she is implied to have figured out she was being watched by thermal cameras, changed her body temperature to fool them and later removed her implant before figuring out it was allowing to track her- all things even a human in this situation would have a hard time figuring out.
  • Narm Charm: Depending on who you talk to, several of the concepts and scenes in the film make it fun to watch but too cheesy to take seriously.
  • Never Live It Down: The movie as a whole is known as that film where a woman in high-heels outruns a T. rex.
  • Older Than They Think:
    • One new dinosaur hybrid originating from the toyline but not present in the film itself is a "Stegoceratops", a mix between a Triceratops and a Stegosaurus. That exact same concept had already been used in Yor: The Hunter from the Future back in 1983.
    • The idea of the park as artificial simulacra, with creatures genetically engineered to be entertaining instead of realistic, was lifted directly from the original book (indeed, the foolishness of the notion was rather Crichton's point, cf. Westworld). Dr. Wu's comments are even paraphrased from his book counterpart.
    • Even the name of the movie isn't all that new; shortly after The Lost World: Jurassic Park was released, an omnibus containing both books was published titled Michael Crichton's Jurassic World.
    • The idea of dinosaurs being trained for military use and the setting of Isla Nublar being revisited were both elements of John Sayles' unused Jurassic Park IV script from the mid-2000s.
    • This is not the first time a mosasaur has shown up in Jurassic Park-related media, seeing as Telltale Games' Jurassic Park: The Game also featured one, albeit looking quite different compared to the one in this movie.
  • One-Scene Wonder: Aside from a glance from the start the T. rex AKA Rexy, the same one from the first movie, is let out for about four minutes for the climatic battle.
  • Paranoia Fuel:
    • The I. rex can camouflage herself and change her body temperature to avoid detection by thermal sensors. She can hide anywhere, completely undetected, yet thanks to her infrared vision, she has no problem spotting her prey.
    • Just how long has Dr. Henry Wu been planning to make hybrid abominations built for war purposes?
  • Signature Scene:
    • The scene where Claire asks Lowery to release Rexy from her paddock and lures her to fight the I. rex using a flare, thus leading to the climactic final battle.
    • The Main Street attack and Zara's death are fairly memorable; the former due to the number of humans and dinos involved, and the latter because it was the longest and most drawn out human death in the franchise so far.
    • Owen riding through the jungle on a motorcycle with his four Velociraptors flanking him. It became the primary advertising scene for the film and made it on the Blu-Ray case.
    • Owen holding off the Raptors from mauling the poor schmuck who fell into the cage. Several zookeepers and other animal handlers have had fun reenacting that scene.
    • The Mosasaurus feeding, which was the other primary advertising scene for the film.
  • So Okay, It's Average: The general opinion on the film. Critics found it entertaining enough, but too clichéd and cheesy to take seriously.
  • Special Effects Failure:
    • The CGI is actually quite good despite complaints from fans, but there's still a few hiccups here and there. In particular, there's a split second scene just before Masrani's death wherein a Pteranodon seems to just phase through the Aviary's wall.
    • While not incredibly obvious, its still clear that Charlie completely vanishes right before being blown up by a security trooper.
    • Ironically, the bird who appears at the very start of the film looks more fake than any of the other dinosaurs.
  • Spiritual Licensee: The movie is the closest thing to have the X-Men and Spider-Gwen part of the Marvel Universe, with the Savage Land and such.
  • Stoic Woobie: Owen after his raptors die and he sets Blue free. And Blue herself, since all her sisters are dead and she no longer has her father/alpha by her side.
  • Surprisingly Improved Sequel: The general consensus is that after two disappointing sequels, the fourth movie is an effective action flick that manages to recover most of the original movie's spirit.
  • Take That, Scrappy!:
    • A subtle example; Spinosaurus, the Big Bad of the very unpopular Jurassic Park III is not on the list of the dinosaurs in the park, and so far the only sign of its existence is a skeleton propped up in Jurassic World's main street. Said skeleton later gets destroyed, by Tyrannosaurus rex herself, no less!
    • Another one for Jurassic Park III is when Claire called out her nephews' name so loudly like Amanda Kirby did in the third movie; so Owen immediately told her to shut up.
  • They Changed It, Now It Sucks!:
    • The new design of the Stegosaurus wasn't very well-received due to having an inaccurate droopy tail, especially when the previous films gave it the accurate posture. note  Lack of feathers is one thing, but a reversion to a design that is more reminiscent of portrayals from the 1960s-70s is unacceptable.
    • Likewise, the re-designed Pteranodons also got a lot of flack due to looking ugly, despite ironically being the most accurately portrayed in the franchise. (To be fair, they do lack the pterosaur fluff that real Pteranodon would have posessed in life, and such just look like wrinkly plucked vultures.)
  • They Wasted a Perfectly Good Plot:
    • The main driving point of the film is that, in the ten years since the park opened, people have actually started to take dinosaurs for granted, which as critics were quick to point out is a nice piece of meta commentary on the CGI movement, started by the first Jurassic Park no longer being the instant sell-out that it once was. The main problem is that there's never any on-screen evidence of this: people seem to be genuinely enjoying themselves just fine, and even Zach, the more cynical of the brothers, is seen whooping during the Mosasaurus scene. We're only really supposed to take Claire's word for it that interest is waning, which makes the decision to make hybrids more reactionary than informed.
    • Nothing creative is done with the massive amounts of civilian survivors that were herded into one location towards the end, despite it being a perfect opportunity for the I. rex or another dinosaur to unleash utter carnage.
    • While it does help the brothers' relationship develop and grow, their parents getting divorced is almost entirely irrelevant to the plot, just eating up a bit of screentime that could have been put to better use.
    • The whole point of the entire series is that revival and use of the dinosaurs were testaments to hubris; Hammond (and later other CEO's of InGen) was convinced that they knew better than God and/or nature on what species should live and die, and that the dinos attacking was Gaia's Vengeance. They even have the head scientist give a "The Reason You Suck" Speech about the higher-ups not caring how it is done, but that it is done. Then they ruin this message by admitting that the I. rex was designed with military application in mind, completely changing the tone of the film.
    • So InGen returned to Nublar after the first park went to the dinos, learned from their mistakes and actually made it a functional tourist attraction. Yet, InGen also preferred to wall off a good 20% of the island's northern section rather than dealing with it. Why? What hitherto unknown dangers are crawling in that part of the island to elicit such response, and how many of them are there after 20 years in completely unsupervised conditions? GASP! And now Zack and Gray are heading straight there so we are finally going to find out that... oh, it's just the old park's visitors centre.
  • Too Cool to Live:
    • Charlie is blown to bits by a trooper long before she could have the opportunity to join her sisters and Owen in the final battle against the Indominus.
    • Echo and Delta are killed in rather gruesome ways by the hybrid, so that Rexy, Blue and the Mosasaurus can steal the scene during the final battle.
  • Ugly Cute:
    • Several of the animals, especially the baby dinosaurs in the petting zoo and the small but deadly Dimorphodons.
    • All of the members of the Raptor Squad. Especially Blue.
    • The baby Indominus rex, or at least what little we see of her.
    • The bizarre hybrid animals Owen, Claire and the boys meet in Henry Wu's lab, including a feathered lizard, an axolotl with a Dimetrodon-esque fin on its back, a strangely intelligent chameleon and a two-headed snake.
  • Unfortunate Implications:
    • The film has been criticized by some for its characterization of Claire, making her look like a frigid woman whom her sister believes is in the wrong for not wanting or having any children as explained here and here.
    • Another criticism of the film is the subject of Gray's autism being dropped from the film. What makes this particularly upsetting is the fact that if they had only included it, the Unfortunate Implications would actually be avoided this time around. The depiction was accurate to the point that removing the explanatory scene doesn't remove it from the story.
  • Unintentionally Sympathetic:
    • Zara, Claire's PA, doesn't get a huge amount of screentime but is presumably intended to come across as cold and aloof making her a Red Shirt the audience won't be bothered to see eaten. However a combination of the pre-existing fanbase for Katie McGrath, the fact that she is so clearly harried babysitting kids who almost immediately run off on her, her being a bride to be (she mentions an upcoming wedding in a phone call), her desperate attempts to save Zach and Gray during the Pterosaur attack, and above all her spectacular but drawn out and traumatizing death that seems much more fitted to an Asshole Victim have made her this to a significant portion of the fanbase.
    • The pterosaurs themselves. One minute, they're safe, secure, and enjoying life in their aviary. The next, some giant predator crashes into their home, threatening and terrorizing them and forcing them to abandon their territory in sheer panic. Their attacks on Zara and the tourists weren't borne of malice or hunger. It was redirected aggression at being forced into a situation they had no control over. Lots of animals and even people would respond the same way under similar circumstances.
    • The Indominus rex. She didn't choose to become what she is, but the isolation and cruel treatment by her creators drove her mad. Her bloody rampage is a product of the miserable life she's had up until that point, as she doesn't understand how to interact with anything or anyone in a non-violent way.
  • What an Idiot!:
    • Masrani's reason for not wanting to kill the I. rex is that it was a $25 million investment, which may sound like a lot, but it is also mentioned that he is the 8th richest person on the planet. This puts him right in the middle of the Wal-Mart owners at $40 BILLION in wealth. $25 million would have been nothing. Especially seeing as that was to develop the new species, they still have that DNA set to create new ones. Additionally, the lawsuits and loss of income from shutting down the park even for a day would have cost even more than that.
    • Owen sees first-hand in the surveillance room how the I. rex rather effortlessly shrugs off weaponry specifically designed to combat and subdue Dinosaurs, including some rather heavy gear. So, when he prepares to confront the beast, he arms himself with... a generic Winchester gun?
    • The I. rex camouflages herself to evade her paddock's surveillance system and claws the walls to trick the protagonists into thinking she has managed to escape. It would be expected for Claire to immediately contact Vivian so that they could track down the hybrid's location, but instead she only does so several minutes later, after she had already left the Indominus' site and when Owen was inside the cage investigating it. As a result, she is too late to warn him that the I. rex was still there, leading to the events that culminate in the creature being unleashed upon the park.
  • What Do You Mean, It's Not for Kids?: It is easy to assume that this movie would be for kids with its bright colors, beautiful scenery of the park, two main Kid Appeal Characters, and having a lot of its merchandise aimed at kids, but the film can actually get pretty dark much of the time after the I. rex is introduced. This shouldn't be a surprise to anyone who saw the previous films however as they could all get rather dark and violent, especially the first two.
  • The Woobie:
    • Gray. All the poor kid wanted was to see real live dinosaurs and spend time with his aunt. But he's figured out the trip is a distraction from his parents getting a divorce, his brother picks on him, he's stuck on the island with a horrible rampaging monster that nearly kills him multiple times, he gets to witness several dinosaurs and people (including his babysitter) die horribly and he narrowly avoids death by rogue raptor and panicked Pteranodon.
    • Zara, due to suffering a horrible demise (before her wedding no less) simply because she was in the wrong place at the wrong time.
    • Nick, both because of his truly horrifying Oh, Crap! moment right before he dies and the fact he actually dies after already having narrowly escaped death moments earlier.
    • Even some of the animals in the park go through this. A herd of Apatosaurus are left to die slow, painful deaths, an Ankylosaurus is brutally torn apart, the pterosaurs are essentially driven out of their home and killed by the Mosasaurus/InGen mercenaries, and three of the raptors die horrible, bloody/fiery deaths with one being left as the Sole Survivor, all thanks to the I. rex.

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