Small Reference Pools: Film

In general, when talking about film, people will always talk about actors first and foremost. Also expect a lot of people's admiration to be more for the characters they portray on the screen too. Directors may be referenced too if the movie was made by someone who has a very distinctive visual style and appears in the media a lot. Other people involved in the film process (script writers, cinematographers, camera men, visual effects artists, choreographers, composers, stuntmen, producers,...) will be usually only be discussed by film critics or hardcore cinephiles.

Film will usually be a synonym for Hollywood pictures only. And to the general audience preferably not works older than a mere thirty years and strictly box office blockbuster films. British films may get some attention, but film industries of other countries are already more a niche market.

When referring to film awards the only ones everybody knows are the Oscars. The Palme d'Or in Cannes is a close second. The BAFTA Awards in Britain, the Golden Bear of Berlin, the Golden Lion of Venice and the Césars in France are well known too.

When referring to film classics people usually think or black-and-white pictures from the The Golden Age of Hollywood. This will usually be either a Charlie Chaplin film, a Fred Astaire and Ginger Rogers picture, King Kong (1933), Citizen Kane and/or Casablanca. If you need an old color movie it will be Gone with the Wind and/or The Wizard of Oz.

Film Genres

Actors

Film Directors

By country

Targets for Parody or Reference

Notable exceptions of this trope from films and this trope Played With in film:

  • Quentin Tarantino's movies are full of shout outs and homage shots to movies most people do not even know exist, such as Goke, Body Snatcher From Hell, where he got the idea for the red background during the flight scene in Kill Bill Vol. 1.
  • The indie film Little Miss Sunshine features a Proust scholar as a main character. He talks about Proust during an important character moment.
  • Charlie Kaufman likes to include high-brow literary references in his films. In Being John Malkovich, John Cusack performs a puppet adaptation of Alexander Pope's Eloisa to Abelard. Pope's story also provided the title and theme for Eternal Sunshine of the Spotless Mind.
  • Parodied in the 1965 film version of The Loved One, in which Dennis Barlow romances Aimee Thanatogenous by quoting classic poetry to her and claiming it to be his own work.
  • In The Great Muppet Caper, Animal is described as being upset that he missed the Rembrandt exhibit at the National Gallery. Animal corrects him: "Renoir! Renoir!"
  • A rare humorous moment in Se7en, when Brad Pitt's character has never heard of the Marquis de Sade, and mispronounces his name "Shah-day", like the Nigerian singer Sade.
  • Lampshaded in Dogma with an appearance by the Metatron, the angel who speaks for God to humans who would be destroyed by the power of God's voice. The heroine attempts to make up for not knowing who he is by mentioning the Ten Plagues, to which the Metatron remarks "You people! If it's not in a Charlton Heston movie, it's not worth knowing, is it?"