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  • Adaptation Displacement: While Devilman is very well known in Japan and a Cult Classic outside of it among the manga/anime fandom, Crybaby burst into the mainstream thanks to being a "Netflix Original" and getting plenty of buzz, leading to a Newbie Boom of people who had never heard of Go Nagai before. Thus it has become the most prominent version as far as most people are concerned. Tellingly, Crybaby's Miko is a completely different character from the original Miko — the girl Devilman with acid-spraying breasts who is reduced to a cameo here — but guess who dominates the Internet.
  • Angel/Devil Shipping: Akira/Ryo, though Akira's the angel in the relationship since while he's a Devilman and looks demonic in said form, his personality and goals are nothing short of heroic, whereas Ryo is literally an angel, though his lack of morality and his status as the Big Bad makes him the devil instead.
  • Base-Breaking Character: Crybaby's version of Ryo leaves the entire fanbase divided — and this includes both the fans who haven't read the manga and those who were already familiar with the source material. The latter type of fans see the portrayal of Ryo in Crybaby as either an interesting and equally fleshed-out take on the character or a complete disservice instead due to the many personality changes involved (particularly on him being a lot more cruel and unsympathetic); and the former type of fans either love Ryo, hate him, or Love to Hate him. Yep, it's that complicated.
  • Better Than Canon:
    • While the manga's depiction of Akira is well-liked, many fans love the way Akira is portrayed in Crybaby even more, due to him being both sensitive and strong, a trait rarely seen in seinen or shonen protagonists nowadays.
    • How some people feel about Miki's character in this series. She is fleshed out a lot more than she was in the manga, and her tendency to get on Akira's case for being sensitive was thankfully removed. She also put up a decent fight against the lynch mob, making her death seem less like a case of Stuffed in the Fridge and more like a Dying Moment of Awesome.
    • Also, Miko is so popular amongst viewers that some would wish Go Nagai would have added her in the original manga much earlier.
    • Despite the divided opinion on the series' pacing, the final battle between Akira and Ryo is expanded in comparison to the manga, where many saw it as extremely anti-climactic. The same goes for Akira's relationship with Ryo and Miki, and most importantly, there's also Miki's death, Akira's death, and Ryo's reaction to the latter, which many agree have much greater emotional impact than how they were depicted in the manga.
  • Big-Lipped Alligator Moment:
    • In Episode 2, when Akira returns to school in his newly enhanced body, there's a cut to two girls trying to get into a classroom, when out of nowhere, one of them humps the other. This is never brought up again at all.
    • Akira's wet dream and its spectacular consequences are never brought up after they happen (which some people actually are glad about; see Squick below), and it's never explained how Akira even managed to clean up the mess.
    • Depending on who you're asking, Akira roughing up Sirene (yes, in that way) while they're fighting may also be seen as this. While their fight plays out much like in the original manga and OVA (albeit doesn't take as long), there is no such instance where Akira rapes Sirene, which makes the whole scene feel disconcerting.
    • The teacher on a wheelchair who extends his tongue to catch and eat an insect at the beginning of the series seems like one, but the final episode reveals him as a dragon-like Devilman, so it's more of a Brick Joke.
  • Broken Base:
    • While most Devilman fans celebrated finally receiving a complete anime adaptation after so many years (the 1987 and 1990 OVAs only got up to Sirene, and the 2000 Amon: Apocalypse of Devilman OVA by a different team jumps ahead to the final, climactic chapters with plenty of Adaptation Expansion, meaning a decent chunk got skipped), its nature and quality have become pretty divisive. Is Devilman Crybaby a nicely modernized yet still reasonably faithful take on the story, or a shallow adaptation with too many liberties and none of the spirit of the original?
    • The series's animation style, although generally viewed as quite artistic, is another point of division. Is it a beautiful touch that reflects the style of the series, or an ugly production eccentricity that hinders the entire show? Not to mention it's pretty un-Nagai unlike the original OVAs and even the toned-down TV series.
    • Due to having all of its episodes released at once in Netflix, many viewers are unsure on whether Crybaby is officially part of the Winter 2018 anime lineup or not.
  • Cargo Ship: If not with Akira, Ryo tends to get shipped either with his guns or his camera.
  • Counterpart Comparison: Being an adaptation of a classic that has, in one way or another, inspired several anime, this is inevitable. See here.
  • Crosses the Line Twice: A man holds Miko at gunpoint to rape her? Disturbing. Miko smashes his head off while they're doing it? Disturbing, but satisfying. Miko continuing to screw the man she just killed? Disturbingly hilarious.
  • Cry for the Devil: No matter what you think of Ryo by the end of the series, it's hard to not feel sorry for him when he grieves Akira's death, even though (or because) he's the one who killed him in the first place.
  • Darkness-Induced Audience Apathy: From the very first episode, the anime reveals just how much grittier it will be compared to the source material (which itself is already pretty dark to begin with), and with each episode it just gets darker and darker, which makes it hard for some viewers to completely get invested in the characters and the plot. On the other hand, one of the main draws of the series is the fact that the anime doesn't pull any punches.
  • Ear Worm:
    • The instant you start listening to the anime's rendition of "Devilman no Uta", you won't be able to stop replaying it.
    • "MAN HUMAN", the opening of the anime, may be nowhere near as catchy as "Devilman no Uta", but it's still a haunting and groovy theme that slowly grows onto you the more you listen to it.
  • Ensemble Darkhorse:
    • Wam and Kukun get a lot of love, the former for his True Companions mentality and the latter for his memorable rap love confession. It also helps they were based off of Dosu-Roku and Masa from the original manga, who were dark horses in their own right.
    • Don't forget about Miko as well, for being an Amazonian Beauty with Boobs of Steel when it comes being a Devilman and her Love Confession to Miki despite her jealousy of being better than her.
  • Epileptic Trees: Putting aside the Setting Update and some other changes, a few fans have theorized that the events of Crybaby is the very first timeline of the "Groundhog Day" Loop that God has forced Satan to relive, since it could explain the vast difference between Ryo's personality in both the anime and the manga, as further elaborated in this post.
  • Evil Is Sexy:
    • Ryo, following his Face–Heel Turn.
    • There's also Sirene, and Miko following her transformation into a Devilman ( which is subverted as her disappearing humanity restores in time for her to confess her love for Miki).
  • Fanon Discontinuity: Fans would like to pretend that the whole part where Akira sexually assaulted Sirene while they were fighting never happened.
  • Fan-Preferred Couple: Unsurprisingly, Akira/Ryo, in spite of Akira's affections for Miki, and the fact that he ends up deeply hating Ryo specifically for getting Miki killed. And on the Yuri end, Miki/Miko.
  • Fashion-Victim Villain: Downplayed, but a lot of people like to poke fun at Ryo's white overcoat and drop-crotch trousers.
  • Fridge Brilliance: The constant references to the original Devilman anime as a Show Within a Show. It makes a lot more sense when you consider that the anime was so different from the manga, it may as well be considered as such in-universe.
  • Genius Bonus: In the opening, there's a segment where Akira is embracing Miki before completely wrapping both her and himself with his wings, forming a vertical almond shape. In religion, this is known as the mandorla, which is normally associated with Christ, and Akira himself is a Messianic Archetype note .
  • Germans Love David Hasselhoff: Crybaby arguably has a larger fanbase in the West than in the East. This is in contrast to the original manga, which was extremely popular in Japan but was very obscure among Western audiences.
  • He Really Can Act:
    • This isn't the first time Kouki Uchiyama voiced a character who's violent, temperamental, or both (e.g. Meruem, Tomura Shigaraki, Soul Eater Evans, Yuri Plisetsky). While he played those roles very well, he manages to outshine them with his role as Akira as it's his gutsiest role to date, with the topper of his performance being his enraged cry at the end of Episode 9.
    • Ayumu Murase has already shown that despite his younger-sounding voice he has quite the range, and has voiced other sinister characters like Joseph and Yuuto Ijika, but the voice he uses for them makes them veer on the Cute But Psycho territory. He uses a far more masculine voice in Crybaby, and his performance leaves a lot of fans both amazed and in disbelief that he can also play this type of character.
    • Almost every fan who watched the English dub immediately singled out Griffin Burns' performance as Akira, praising how he perfectly portrayed the character's wide range of emotions, especially at the scene where he confronts Ryo in the finale.
    • In a case of "He Really Can Sing", we have the English language rap performed by Keith Silverstein, who demonstrates exceptional talent when performing Kukun's freestyle rap.
    • Much like Kevin Conroy's iconic portrayal of Batman/Bruce Wayne, both Ami Koshimizu and Cherami Leigh in their roles as Miko managed to blow audiences with their performances; being able to give Miko two distinctive voices to distinguish the difference in her personality before and after becoming a Devilman, much like how Conroy portrayed Bruce/Batman with two different voices.
    • Kyle McCarley already showed he's got voice acting chops in NieR: Automata, but he outdid himself again in Crybaby with a more subdued but equally masterful performance.
  • He's Just Hiding!: Due to death not ending demons, but rather demonic and angelic beings live on as souls, including Devilmen, some viewers who like Miko refused to accept her being gone for good despite having shot herself and dismembered along with Miki, theorizing that Miko would likely regenerate or reincarnate somehow in the future once Earth restores itself.
  • LGBT Fanbase: While a bit more subtle than most examples, there's quite a lot of LGBT representation in the anime, and this has not gone unnoticed by the LGBT community itself.
  • Magnificent Bastard: Ryo Asuka, in truth the fallen angel Satan, is the one who connives to have Akira Fudo become Devilman by tricking him into being possessed by the demon Amon. Upon regaining his memories as Satan, Ryo exposes the existence of demons and sets the world into a full-blown panic to make humanity turn on itself while he sweeps in with his demons to eliminate them, eventually facing and killing Akira himself to his great sorrow. Even after God resets the world, forcing Ryo to relive losing Akira over and over, Ryo shows hints of subtly altering things to eventually change the fate forced on him, showing why he is both Akira's greatest friend and deadliest enemy.
  • Memetic Mutation:
    • The way some of the Devilmen run when on track-and-field is already getting as famous as the Naruto run and the Scooby-Doo run.
    • Comparing the show to Devil May Cry due to the series' similar names. It got to the point where many would refer to the show as Devil May Crybaby instead.
    • Revelations that the viewer and/or Ryo was the actual crybaby all along (hence the show's title).
    • The series' version of “Devilman No Uta” being edited to clips of people dancing either in real life or from other forms of media, and somehow fitting the scene in question.
    • Ryo's "Why are you crying? You knew it was gonna die," line as a reaction image to the emotional devastation of Devilman fans who already knew what the ending was going to be.
    • "Ryo did nothing wrong," — a phrase that alludes to how Griffith from Berserk is greatly inspired from Ryo, and Griffith loyalists tend to defend him with the phrase "Griffith did nothing wrong". In Ryo's case however, the phrase is used mainly as a joke since unlike with Griffith, everyone acknowledges Ryo's villainy whether they like him or not.
    • Comparing Ryo to a marshmallow due to his overcoat being rather puffy.
    • It's common to switch up the words in the series' title, like "Devilcry Manbaby".
  • Memetic Psychopath: There are dozens of posts that have Ryo pulling a gun on Akira for hanging out with Miki, or him just generally being psychopathic, which isn't exactly inaccurate.
  • Moe:
    • Akira, mostly before his Devilman transformation, but even post-transformation he can fall into this territory occasionally.
    • Some fans consider Ryo to be adorable as well, at least when he was still a child.
  • Moral Event Horizon:
    • Ryo's a complicated character with several possible crossings.
      • First was his actions at the first Sabbath rave when he get's impatient and starts killing random party-goers with a broken bottle to draw out the demons.
      • If not then, there were his actions at the televised meet where he set Koda loose on the athletes. Only after Koda had slaughtered most of the people did Ryo think to let him out.
      • And finally there was his final broadcast where he outs Akira as Devilman, thus painting a target on his friend's head, and sends the humanity on a paranoid spiral that ultimately leads to their extinction.
    • Hie and Babu cross this in Episode 9 when they turn on their friends; the former helping kill Miko and the latter helping kill Gabi.
  • Narm:
    • One scene has Ryo and Akira enter somebody's house, and that somebody's mother stays downstairs wondering what the hell is going on. What makes it unintentionally hilarious is that nobody has a face — this scene also lasts about a minute.
    • The fact that the series colors Mikiko Kawamoto's acid spurts white in her cameo is suggestive as it is ridiculous, especially considering her unique body configuration means it looks more like breastmilk or semen than acid.
    • To some fans, the Gratuitous English in the Japanese dub. There's no denying that the English you hear is far more fluent than in most other anime, but it's clear that there's a bit of trouble with the pronunciation at times, which can make the dialogue a little funny to hear.
    • The reused scene of Akira and the other Devilmen running on all fours can easily draw laughs for how choppy and weird it looks, appearing like out of a cheap animation instead of an elaborated adaptation of a beloved manga.
    • Episode 8 ends on a very intense scene when Ryo outs Akira as a Devilman in live television. What ruins an otherwise very impactful moment is Ryo's over-the-top antics towards the end when he suddenly climbs over his desk and starts shouting over to the camera... While surrounded by government officials who are completely blase about the way he acts. Though depending on the viewer, it can also come across as Narm Charm, given the genuinely creepy performances of Ryo's Japanese and English VAs and the fact that the other officials are nonchalant about the whole thing because they're demons in disguise.
    • The English dub has Akira repeatedly shouted "He's lying!" when Ryo exposes him to the public, which unfortunately isn't able to properly convey Akira's shock and panic like in the Japanese dub, where his lines aren't as loud but much more effective in portraying how unnerved he is. Additionally, when Akira shouts that he's not a demon at the rapper gang, it sounds kind of squawky in the dub.
    • Miko braying like a donkey during her masturbation scene, though this may have been intentional.
    • People really can't stand Emilio Treviño as Akira Fudo in the Latin-American Spanish dub, or more accurately can't take him seriously. While Emilio is 18, he still sounds really young; and while it sounds suitable for pre-transformation Akira, after the events of Episode 1 it just sounds outright jarring.
  • Narm Charm: The Devil Dash. As goofy as Akira's new run as after he gains his Devilman powers, it also perfectly encapsulates how animalistic his powers are. The fact that the run takes a darker turn in Episode 9 where Akira resorts to running on all fours in a mad dash to save Miki from being lynched adds on to that effect.
  • Older Than They Think:
    • Some fans tend to poke fun at either Akira's cleft chin or Ryo's wardrobe being all white... except that Akira was also portrayed with a cleft chin in Devilman Saga (though only whenever he's wearing Amon's armor), and Ryo was completely dressed in white in the Devilman pachinko game.
    • Jinmen eating Akira's mother to ignite his rage was done before in the OVA.
  • Rewatch Bonus:
    • The series opens with a short monologue about love, but it's only after the ending it becomes apparent that its meaning is Ryo/Satan expressing his feelings for Akira and his death.
    • The opening may seem simplistic at first, especially with its mostly monochromatic color scheme, but if you look really closely, the opening actually spoils the entire plot, and there's a lot of meanings and symbolism behind every frame, as explained by Mother's Basement.
    • There's also the entire opening scene in Episode 1, from the Earth's destruction to Akira and Ryo in their childhood, which is far more meaningful and symbolic than it seems, as shown in this meta post. It should also be noted that the same post was retweeted by Masaaki Yuasa himself, which basically establishes the whole analysis as canon.
  • The Scrappy: While Wam, Gabi, and Kukun were well-liked characters, the other two members of their gang (Babu and Hie) get a lot of hate for how quick they were to turn on their friends and their role in the deaths of Miki, Miko, Gabi, and Wam. Predictably, they get their comeuppances not long after.
  • Ship-to-Ship Combat: The Devilman fandom has always had one or another discussion about the nature of Akira's feelings for Ryo and Miki, but Crybaby has brought them to the internet surface.
    • As mentioned, the biggest scuffle is between the Akira/Miki and Akira/Ryo fandom corners. Akira/Miki fans tend to dismiss Akira's canonical Homoerotic Subtext with Ryo and prop up solely his (admittedly powerful and just as canon as the subtext) feelings for Miki, often accusing Akira/Ryo shippers of fetishizing homosexuality (possibly as a reaction to the unhealthiness of their relationship). On the other hand, Akira/Ryo shippers might simplify Akira and Ryo's complex relationship and downplay Miki's importance to Akira, while ignoring Ryo's perennial evil, and the fact that his ultimate goals are completely incompatible with Akira's. Though there are fans who are aware of it, but love the pairing anyway as they believe that the various differences between Akira and Ryo provide greater depth to their relationship.
    • As a bonus... Does anyone ship Miko with Kukun or with Miki? It doesn't get as heated as the example above though, likely due to Kukun being quite popular and Miki being too much of a Nice Girl to hate; meaning you can choose either ship and not get that much flak for it.
    • There's also the question of who you ship Miki with: Akira or Miko? While a bit more heated compared to the second example, this doesn't really turn into a full-blown war, especially since both of them have a different but equally deep and meaningful relationship with Miki. It helps that Akira is a highly sympathetic protagonist and Miko's really popular with fans.
  • Shipping Goggles: There is some discussion among fans over whether or not Miko/Miki is a product of people wearing this.
  • Ship Mates: Many Ryo/Akira shippers also like Miki/Miko.
  • Signature Scene:
    • The Sabbath party-turned-demon orgy/massacre in Episode 1, both as a jaw-dropping animation showcase and a very strong indicator that the TV-MA rating isn't just for show.
    • The Devilman no Uta montage.
    • Kukun's love confession rap as well as the rap scenes in general.
    • The baton passing scene.
  • Spiritual Adaptation:
  • Squick: Mixed with Nausea Fuel, Akira's wet dream with Miki and its... consequences. On the ceiling.
  • Superlative Dubbing: Crybaby is one of the few series where both the Japanese and English dub are equally good, especially when it comes to the voices of Akira, Ryo, Miki, and Miko.
  • Take That, Scrappy!: Babu and Hie getting incinerated by Akira for their gleeful treachery is very satisfying considering what they had done to their friends.
  • They Changed It, Now It Sucks!:
    • Some people think this of Akira and Ryo's new character designs. They're not particularly happy about both characters losing their signature sideburns, despite the style having fallen out of fashion some thirty-odd years ago.
    • While the ending plays out more or less like in the manga, some fans weren't pleased that the part where Ryo/Satan explains why he hates God and humankind before realizing he's no better than God was left out. Though most do appreciate the trade-off, which is Ryo's reaction to Akira's death being a lot more emotional than in the original story.
    • Most of the fans love the changes made to Akira's characterization. With Ryo however, it's a bit of a mixed bag.
    • Like with Ryo, Miki also gets this treatment, albeit to a lesser extent since no one denies that her role in the anime holds a lot more impact on the plot. Generally, she has more people who like her for being different from her manga incarnation even when they prefer the original — though the main criticism is how her Action Girl aspects were heavily diluted.
  • They Wasted a Perfectly Good Character:
    • While Jinmen's fight with Akira is as heart-wrenching and nightmarish as it was in manga, Jinmen himself doesn't have much of a chance to show his creepy personality and twisted philosophy that made him so popular among manga fans.
    • Many fans were disappointed with how Xenon's role in the plot was heavily reduced, especially with his change from an imposing and threatening demon (who's also a bit of a Servile Snarker) to a one-note backstabbing villain.
  • They Wasted a Perfectly Good Plot: There are a few who complain that while the anime didn't leave any plot point unresolved, there were some crucial parts of the plot that weren't explored enough — particularly with the world falling into destruction after the truth about demons is revealed and the final battle — and the series could have used another episode or two to expand on them.
  • Too Cool to Live: Kukun, Wam, Gabi, Miki, Miko and finally Akira himself, not to mentioned the Badass Army of Devilmen that came to his aid at the Grand Finale who perishes at the hands of Satan's demon army.
  • Unfortunate Names: The title of the series is not really that silly and has a certain charm to it, especially when you know its meaning. What makes the title unfortunate is that it often gets misread/misheard as Devil May Cry, to the point that it becomes a running joke.
  • Visual Effects of Awesome: Whatever you may think of the adaptation, there's no denying that the animation is astonishingly vivid and colorful from start to finish, especially when you remember that the whole series makes use of a relatively basic system like Flash animation.
  • What Do You Mean, It's Not Political?:
    • The growing Witch Hunt against demons eventually spreads to social dissidents thanks to lies and propaganda spread by Ryo that they have the potential to become demons as well, similar to how many real-life ideological and political Witch Hunts start out with a clear enemy to persecute, and then eventually spread to anyone who isn't part of the ideological collective.
    • During the second half of the series, the US government assumed that the existence of demons originated from various Russian biological weapons experiments, hinting at political distrust toward the Russian government. Then we remember that the original Devilman series was made during the Cold War era (during the last years of the Vietnam War, which influenced Go Nagai, Devilman's creator), which was marked by heavy political tensions between the US and the Soviet Union, and judging on how in many aspects both US and Russia still compete politically even to this day after the Cold War ended (and how the original Devilman series was an allegory for the Cold War), this allegory still stands.
    • Wam and his gang almost getting gunned down by a trigger-happy cop after being falsely accused of shoplifting. This came out a time where relations between the black community and law enforcement in the US is incredibly strained. The fact that Wam and his friends emulate hip-hop culture made the scene stand out more.
  • What Do You Mean, It Wasn't Made on Drugs?: Maasaki Yuasa's M.O. as a director. Thanks to the financial backing of Netflix, it may well be his trippiest project yet.
  • Win Back the Crowd: Crybaby led fans to be more optimistic about Netflix being a proper platform for anime (especially after Neo Yokio), and not just simply a licenser.
  • The Woobie: Akira, Miki, Miko, and Taro, oh so much.


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