Characters / The Chronicles of Narnia

    open/close all folders 

English Humans

     Peter Pevensie 
http://static.tvtropes.org/pmwiki/pub/images/800px-Peterprincecaspianmovie_5917.jpg
Played by: William Moseley

The oldest of the Pevensie siblings and the High King of Narnia. He tries his best to protect his other siblings and to act like a responsible young adult. In the book it is implied that he is more mature than his other siblings because, after their father was called out to fight in the war, it was left to Peter by his mother to support his three siblings though the ordeal of their father going away.

  • Expy: Of Saint Peter, but as High King instead of Pope.
  • Four-Philosophy Ensemble: The Cynic, and at times, The Realist. He and Susan often trade places.
  • Four-Temperament Ensemble: Choleric.
  • Genre Savvy: In The Lion, the Witch, and the Wardrobe, his familiarity with fantasy stories serves him fairly well, prompting him to, for example, trust the robin which leads the Pevensies to Mr. Beaver, because robins in stories are always good creatures.
  • Hot-Blooded: Especially in Prince Caspian.
  • I Call It "Vera": His sword Rhindon.
  • Killed Off for Real: In the Last Battle.
  • The Magnificent: Aslan calls him "King Peter the Magnificent".
  • Meaningful Name: In keeping with Aslan's role as an analogue of Jesus Christ, the Pevensie children are loose analogues of his Apostles. Fittingly, the firstborn child and the leader of the group is named "Peter", after Christ's right-hand Apostle who was appointed to lead his Church. Peter's eventual role as High King of Narnia parallels his namesake's role as Father of the Church.
  • Parental Favoritism: Or in this case brotherly favoritism, as Prince Caspian flat-out states that Lucy is his favorite sister.
  • Parental Substitute: He has to basically replace his father for the younger siblings (perhaps just Lucy) during World War II.
  • Red Oni, Blue Oni: Red Oni to Edmund and Susan's cold blue, in the movie. When compared to Edmund, he's definitely the vibrant, determined, impulsive one of the two, and he is, to an extent, more sensitive than Edmund who is logical, stoic and snarky even after his Heel–Face Turn. The books mention that King Peter was a brash man, less wise than the cold-thinking King Edmund who represented justice.
  • Red Baron: Sir Peter Wolfsbane.
  • Royals Who Actually Do Something: He's absent from the Horse and His Boy because he's off beating up a bunch of troublemaking giants.
  • Sibling Yin-Yang: With Edmund and Susan.
  • Team Dad: Team Older Brother, really, but he acts as this.
  • Took a Level in Badass: As depicted through the course of The Lion, the Witch, and the Wardrobe and especially the final chapter, in which he grows from a kid to a warrior king.

     Susan Pevensie 
http://static.tvtropes.org/pmwiki/pub/images/narnia2_5061.jpg
Played by: Anna Popplewell

The elder sister and the second eldest Pevensie child. She is crowned to the Radiant Southern Sun as Queen of Narnia by Aslan, and shares the monarchy with her brothers Peter and Edmund and her sister Lucy. She later becomes known as Queen Susan the Gentle.

  • Action Girl: In the movie, where she's depicted as just as competent a fighter as her brothers.
  • Actual Pacifist: In the books it is stated that Queen Susan hates violence and (unlike Lucy) avoids going to war.
  • Adaptational Badass: In the movies, which depicts her in the midst of the fighting on the front lines. In the books she never really fought very much, although she was a crack shot with a bow.
  • Agent Scully:
    • In The Last Battle, she's the only visitor to Narnia who now denies it ever happened. Some readers believe this and the ending indicate that she will not be allowed into Aslan's country when she dies; others say that this view misreads Lewis' intent.
    • In the movies, she's skeptical to almost every fantastic event that takes place at the beginning of the first film. When Edmund leads them to hide in the wardrobe, she says "You've got to be joking." There are also other similar lines:
      Susan: He's a beaver. He shouldn't be saying anything.
    • And:
      Susan: Logically, it's impossible.
  • Aloof Dark-Haired Girl: She has a cooler demeanour than her siblings, especially in comparison to Lucy.
  • Archer Archetype: She's the graceful, elegant, ladylike kind of archer. Her bow was a gift from Father Christmas, and she became a famously skilled archer as Queen, yet hated to fight or use her skill in battle. One of the ways the Pevensies prove their identities to Trumpkin in Prince Caspian is by Susan beating him in a target-shooting contest.
  • Blitz Evacuees: Evacuated to the countryside along with her siblings in The Lion, the Witch, and the Wardrobe.
  • Book Dumb: By The Voyage of the Dawn Treader, it is stated that she is not a particularly good student.
  • Brainy Brunette: Subverted. She may seem capable in The Lion, the Witch, and the Wardrobe and Prince Caspian (especially the movie adaptation). But by ''The Voyage of the Dawn Treader', it is stated that she is not a particularly good student and that she is regarded as the pretty one of the family.
  • Deadpan Snarker: In the movie.
    "He's a beaver. He shouldn't be saying anything!"
  • Demoted to Extra: Her role in later books is severely decreased, to the point that she doesn't even appear in the last book, despite the rest of her family playing roles. Of course, that's because she isn't dead.
  • Four-Philosophy Ensemble: The Realist, and at times, The Cynic. She and Peter often trade places.
  • Four-Temperament Ensemble: Primarily Melancholic, but very Choleric at times as well
  • The High Queen: Queen Susan the Gentle.
  • Informed Attractiveness: In at least two books, Susan is said to be beautiful, and her looks drive a couple of subplots. There's one very easy to miss reference to Susan's hair being black, and nothing else about her appearance is described anywhere.
  • Lady of War: In the movie.

     Edmund Pevensie 
http://static.tvtropes.org/pmwiki/pub/images/skandar_8505.jpg
Played by: Skandar Keynes

The second of the Pevensie children to go to Narnia. He betrays his siblings to the White Witch while under her influence, but as the story goes on he accepts the error of his ways. He is redeemed with the intervention of Aslan and joins the fight against the Witch. Fulfilling an ancient prophecy, he becomes King Edmund the Just, King of Narnia and, with sisters Susan and Lucy, co-ruler under High King Peter.

  • Adaptation Dye-Job: In the Pauline Baynes illustrations, he's blond. In the movie, he's black-haired.
  • Adaptational Badass: Much like Peter, Edmund is not wimp in the books. It's just that the movies depict him as a fighter a lot better.
  • Annoying Younger Sibling: For Peter and Susan, and an Annoying Older Sibling for Lucy, at least until Character Development sets in.
  • Anti-Hero: He's the darkest of the four siblings, initially being a traitor and a jerk. Even after his Heel–Face Turn, he's often the one arguing for practicality over chivalry, and it's telling that his Kingly title is "The Just".
  • Bad Liar: He's not particularly good at lying, but several times is shown lying for no particular reason other than he can. He grows out of this with Character Development.
  • Being Evil Sucks: He realizes this, after he is tricked by the White Witch, which brings his Heel Realization.
  • Berserk Button: Eustace constantly manages to piss him off in The Voyage Of The Dawn Treader.
  • Biblical Bad Guy: He was meant to represent Judas himself. Although, unlike Judas, he gets to atone for his sin and return to Aslan's good graces.
  • Big Brother Bully: He constantly bullies his sister Lucy, out of "spite" in The Lion, The Witch and the Wardrobe.
  • Big Brother Instinct: He develops this later for Lucy.
  • Black Sheep: In the first part.
  • Blitz Evacuees: Evacuated to the countryside along with his siblings in The Lion, the Witch, and the Wardrobe.
  • Call My Name: He and Lucy constantly call each other's name in The Voyage of the Dawn Treader, especially when they're separated from each other.
  • Character Depth: Edmund stands out as being the most complex character of the siblings and protagonists in general. Even though he redeems himself in the first part, he still has many traits that make him quite different from the typical hero. There is a full page dedicated to his personality.
  • Character Development: Over the course of the first two books, we see him move from a bullying jerk to an outright traitor to a much nicer person.
  • Deadpan Snarker: Perhaps the biggest one in the series prior to his Heel–Face Turn.
  • Does Not Like Shoes: Explores Narnia barefoot by preference in Prince Caspian.
  • Face–Heel Turn: In the first book, Edmund betrays his siblings. C.S.Lewis intentionally made Edmund to represent Judas Iscariot as Edmund betrays Aslan (who represents Jesus/God) and his siblings (The Apostles) to the White Witch (a Satanic Archetype) for Turkish Delight, which is a synonym for the silver that Judas betrayed Jesus for. Fortunately, Edmund doesn't end up like Judas.
  • Four-Philosophy Ensemble: The Apathetic
  • Four-Temperament Ensemble: Phlegmatic, even though you can't tell until the second half of the first movie.
  • Heel–Face Turn: Starting with realizing that Being Evil Sucks and that the White Witch is a sadistic Jerkass, he rebels against her and returns to his siblings' side.
  • Jerkass: In The Lion, The Witch and The Wardrobe, especially when he betrays Lucy by lying that he never was in Narnia.
  • Jerk with a Heart of Gold: After the first half of the first book.
  • Jerk With A Heart Of Jerk: In the first half of the first book.
  • Kids Are Cruel: He bullies Lucy in The Lion, The Witch and The Wardrobe.
  • Killed Off for Real: In The Last Battle.
  • Kubrick Stare: In the movie version.
  • Lovable Traitor: Though the loveble part only starts after his Heel–Face Turn.
  • Meaningful Name: A Shout-Out to Shakespeare. of all things. Like the character Edmund in King Lear, he betrays his brother and later redeems himself.
  • Middle Child Syndrome: One of his many issues in The Lion, the Witch and the Wardrobe. Peter and Susan are "the older ones" and Lucy is the baby of the family while he just gets in the way.
  • The Mole: In The Lion, the Witch, and the Wardrobe, Edmund listens in on his siblings' conversation with the Beavers, then goes to turn over all he learned to the White Witch.
  • The Not-Love Interest: He fulfills this role for Lucy in Voyage Of The Dawn Treader, as they have only each other when they are sent away to their ignorant, uncaring relatives. They depend on each other and constantly look one after the other, as they are practically alone in an unwelcoming place. Plus, during the entire book, they become the closest siblings of the main four, as Edmund's main and most important priority is to take care of Lucy and keep her safe, as well as for Lucy, who looks for her brother. So, basically, they are the most important persons to each other.
  • Perpetual Frowner: Mainly in the last movie.
  • Pet the Dog: In Prince Caspian, Edmund takes care to support Lucy's claims about seeing Aslan so he can make up for being mean to her in the previous book. Also, in the third part, he gets into the protective, older brother mode.
  • Pragmatic Hero: Especially when compared to the chivalrous, idealistic Peter. Edmund has a more cold-natured thinking, a sharp mind and logic. He is rarely driven by emotions and is mostly collected and down-to-earth, having an acute sense of justice, going to the point where he becomes unsympathetic towards enemies and downright cruel, as opposed to Peter, who is more impulsive and emotional. This is proven when Peter battles Miraz, because Edmund tells Peter not to be chivalrous and to strike Miraz. The scene suggests that, if Edmund had been in Peter's place, he would not have hesitated and would have killed Miraz in a heartbeat. This is one of the reasons he is considered an Anti-Hero.
    Edmund: Now is not the time for chivalry, Peter!

    • In the books he's portrayed as having a greater understanding of wickedness because of his own experiences. This makes him ferocious when evil must be defeated, but merciful once it's vanquished.
    Grown Edmund (advising clemency for Prince Rabadash): Even a traitor may mend. I have known one that did.

  • Red Oni, Blue Oni: Blue Oni to Peter and Lucy's red. The books say he was the silent, wise, cold-thinking king who represents justice, as opposed to Peter and Lucy, who are impulsive and extroverted.
  • Reformed, but Not Tamed: In the third movie, dur to his snarkiness to, death glares towards, and his temptation to beat the crap out of Eustace.
  • Savvy Guy, Energetic Girl: With Lucy, a brother-sister example. The book describes that the adult Edmund was a silent, wise, collected man who had a cold judgement, while Lucy was a wild, bright, tomboyish girl, driven by impulse. Their movie versions are close, since Edmund is a witty Deadpan Snarker while Lucy is a joyous Plucky Girl.
  • Sibling Rivalry: Between him and Lucy, The Lion, the Witch, and the Wardrobe, due to the fact that Edmund torments her. Fortunately they grow out of it.
  • Sibling Yin-Yang: With Peter and Lucy.
  • The Smart Guy: He is definitely more level-headed and logical than Peter and Caspian. He was also known as 'the wise king' during the Golden Age.
    • This shows especially in his Offscreen Moment of Awesome in in book version of The Lion, the Witch, and the Wardrobe. As Peter's recapping the battle to his sisters he explains how Edmund singlehandedly kept the battle from being lost until reinforcements arrived. Specifically, he fought his way to Jadis and instead of trying to attack her, the mistake every other fighter was making, he attacked her wand, shattering it and destroying her ability to turn people to stone, which gave the Peter's Narnians a fighting chance.
  • The Stoic: Most of the time in Prince Caspian, but he has his moments too.
  • Tall, Dark and Handsome: In the movie.

     Lucy Pevensie 
http://static.tvtropes.org/pmwiki/pub/images/large-georgie-henley_5136.jpg
Played by: Georgie Henley

The youngest of the four Pevensie children, and the first to find the Wardrobe entrance to Narnia in The Lion, the Witch and the Wardrobe. Of all the Pevensie children, Lucy is the closest to Aslan. Also, of all the humans who have visited Narnia, Lucy is perhaps the one that believes in Narnia the most. She is ultimately crowned Queen Lucy the Valiant, co-ruler of Narnia along with her two brothers and her sister. Lucy is the central character of the four siblings in the novels.

  • Does Not Like Shoes: Justified in Voyage of the Dawn Treader as she kicked off her shoes in the middle of ocean to be able to swim easier. She is shoeless for the first part of the book, which she "didn't mind" and found "no hardship" and "pleasant", until she gets a pair or so at the Lone Islands. In Prince Caspian, she'd rather abandon her shoes than miss a chance to go barefoot.
  • Four-Philosophy Ensemble: The Optimist.
  • Four-Temperament Ensemble: Sanguine.
  • Hair of Gold, Heart of Gold: In the books, Lucy is the youngest and most innocent of the Pevensie children. Her special relationship with Aslan can be seen for example in Prince Caspian when initially nobody but her believes enough to see him. Not so much in the films, because of Adaptation Dye-Job.
  • I Just Want to Be Beautiful: It is revealed in The Voyage of the Dawn Treader that Lucy envies Susan's beauty and popularity.
  • I Just Want to Be You: In the film version of The Voyage of the Dawn Treader she expresses this towards Susan.
  • Killed Off for Real: In The Last Battle.
  • Little Miss Badass: She is noted to have become quite the warrior in her years as Queen, fighting on the front lines of battle.
  • The Not-Love Interest: With Edmund in The Voyage of the Dawn Treader.
  • Outdoorsy Gal: She loves the trees (and their spirits), riding, feasting outdoors and so forth. Not much of a fan of hunting, though, because she's fond of animals.

     Eustace Scrubb 
http://static.tvtropes.org/pmwiki/pub/images/Eustace_dawntreader_945.jpg
Played by: Will Poulter

The Pevensies' annoying younger cousin. He first appears in The Voyage of the Dawn Treader. He fancies himself (not entirely without reason) to be rather intelligent, and considers this a valid reason for nurturing an arrogant attitude toward his cousins. He accompanies Lucy and Edmund on their third trip to Narnia. Upon learning that Narnia is real, his feelings toward it go from amused disdain to fear and outright hatred. It isn't until transforming into a dragon (long story) and having Aslan change him back by breaking the curse that his attitude towards Narnia and his cousins change for the better.

He later appears as the main character in The Silver Chair and as one of the main characters in The Last Battle. In these books, his adventuring companion is his friend Jill Pole instead of his cousins.

  • Anti-Hero: Once Character Development sets in and he stops being a complete Jerkass.
  • Ascended Extra: He's a major character, but not a main one, in Voyage of the Dawn Treader, and becomes one of the main characters in The Silver Chair and The Last Battle.
  • Baleful Polymorph: Gets turned into a dragon.
  • Beetle Maniac: "Eustace Clarence liked animals, especially beetles, if they were dead and pinned on a card."
  • Bratty Half-Pint: It's extraordinarily difficult not to hate him until his Character Development finally kicks in.
  • The Bully: Pre-development, it's hard to find him having a nice word for anyone.
  • Butt Monkey: Throughout most of Dawn Treader up till his Character Development.
  • Character Development: Like Edmund before him, Eustace becomes a much better person as his adventures in Narnia make him aware of his failings.
  • The Complainer Is Always Wrong: Eustace is way down on the cynical side of the idealist/cynic scale when he first enters Narnia. And in truth, even after he's matured, he still tends to take the gloomy view. (Not as gloomy as Puddleglum, of course.)
  • Diary: With entries chock-full of Self-Serving Memory.
  • Establishing Character Moment: Before he even does anything: "There was a boy named Eustace Clarence Scrubb, and he almost deserved it."
  • Fantastic Racism: Towards the animals, but especially Reepicheep: he thinks 'performing animals' are tasteless.
  • Flat-Earth Atheist: For the first half of Dawn Treader.
    • Amusingly quite literal in this case, since he's an (implied) atheist in a definitively flat world.
  • Four-Philosophy Ensemble: The Cynic.
  • Four-Temperament Ensemble: Melancholic.
  • Heel–Face Turn: Being turned into a dragon makes him a much nicer person.
  • Insufferable Genius: Except he's not as smart as he thinks he is.
  • Jerkass: A thoroughly cynical, bitter, self-centered little know-it-all. Fortunately, he improves.
    • Edmund is pretty tolerant of this attitude, because he remembers his own earliest days in Narnia.
  • Kids Are Cruel: Far moreso than even Edmund, prior to his character development. Though Edmund considers himself to have been more evil of the two: "You were only an ass. I was a traitor."
  • Killed Off for Real: In the Last Battle.
  • Narrator: In the Walden Media Adaptation.
  • Platonic Life Partners: With Jill.
  • Self-Serving Memory: Excerpts from his Diary in Dawn Treader portray him as tragically put-upon by arrogant prigs who willfully refuse to see him as the voice of reason in every situation. Of course.
  • Spoiled Brat: It's discussed that he's such a pill prior to his Heel–Face Turn because of vapid educational and parenting philosophies that over-indulged his sense of self-importance.
  • Took a Level in Badass: In The Silver Chair it's obvious that Eustace, both during the previous book and in the time between, has focused a lot more on practical skills and helping others. The film of The Voyage of The Drawn Treader takes this a little farther and lets him fight in dragon form.
  • Unfortunate Names: The Voyage of the Dawn Treader memorably begins, "There was a boy called Eustace Clarence Scrubb, and he almost deserved it." Later in The Silver Chair, he's introduced with, "His name unfortunately was Eustace Scrubb, but he wasn't a bad sort."
  • Unsympathetic Comedy Protagonist: Not a comedy, but he still fits.
  • Why Did It Have to Be Snakes?: It is mentioned in The Silver Chair that Eustace is afraid of heights, causing him to overreact when Jill goes too close to the edge of a cliff.

     Jill Pole 

Eustace's companion throughout The Silver Chair. Aslan gives her the task of remembering the Signs that lead them on their journey.

  • Action Girl: She doesn't hesitate to get in the midst of the fighting, though as an archer she does tend to keep back a bit.
  • Character Development: Develops a much better sense of direction in the last book, whereas she had previously been known for having a poor sense of direction.
  • Claustrophobia: It's mentioned briefly when the companions are trapped underground. She's really, really uncomfortable for a while.
  • Fire-Forged Friends: With Eustace.
  • Killed Off for Real: In the Last Battle.
  • Obfuscating Stupidity: Does it around the giants so they won't suspect anything.
  • Platonic Life Partners: With Eustace.
  • Scarily Competent Tracker: She is skilled in "woodcraft" (tracking and moving quietly through forested areas), as noted by King Tirian in The Last Battle; Eustace credits this to her time as a Girl Guide, but no doubt this was supplemented by her travels and experiences in The Silver Chair.
  • Scout Out: Averted; Jill is flat-out called a member of the Girl Guides and has various skills enhanced by her membership, namely tracking and archery.
  • Took a Level in Badass: Between The Silver Chair and The Last Battle.

     Diggory Kirke 

Played by: Jim Broadbent

Introduced in The Lion, The Witch And The Wardrobe as an old man ("the Professor"), with whom the Pevensies have been billeted. Eventually turns out to have a Backstory connected with that of the wardrobe, as revealed in The Magician's Nephew.

  • Absent-Minded Professor: In The Lion, the Witch and the Wardrobe and The Last Battle.
  • Author Avatar: C.S Lewis essentially wrote Diggory's journey to save his mother as a happier alternative to his own life.
  • Calling the Old Man Out: Digory to Uncle Andrew, throughout the entire book.
  • Catch Phrase: "What do they teach them in these schools?"
  • Cool Old Guy: A magical land in a wardrobe? Well, why not? (Of course, in The Magician's Nephew the reader learns he knew the truth all along, and was just pretending he didn't know about Narnia.)
  • Expy: Of Adam in The Bible, except Polly (Eve) is trying to stop him from ringing that bell.
  • Killed Off for Real: In The Last Battle.
  • Nice Job Breaking It, Hero: Responsible for awakening Jadis.
  • Platonic Life Partners: With Polly Plummer.
  • Reasonable Authority Figure: Asks Peter and Susan if Lucy is the sort of girl who makes up stories and, if not, why don't they believe her?
    The Professor: If she's not lying, and she's not mad, then she must be telling the truth. That's logic. (aside) What do they teach them in these schools?
  • Red Oni: Spends a lot of his time in The Magician's Nephew falling into scrapes and pulling Polly with him.

     Polly Plummer 

Introduced as Diggory's neighbour in The Magician's Nephew and is caught up in Uncle Andrew's plot and transported to The Wood Between the Worlds, starting the main adventure of the book. Returns in The Last Battle as a 'Friend of Narnia'.

  • Alliterative Name: Brought to you by the letter 'P'.
  • Blue Oni: Definitely more level headed than the impulsive Diggory.
  • Cool Old Lady: InThe Last Battle.
  • Girl Next Door: Not in the romantic sense but she does fit the characteristics of the type as a friendly, down to earth, childhood friend. Also lives over the wall to Digory. (It's even how they first meet.)
  • Fire-Forged Friends: Her and Diggory. The Last Battle reveals they remain in contact their whole lives.
  • Killed Off for Real: In The Last Battle.
  • Platonic Life Partners: With Diggory Kirke.
  • Plucky Girl: Doesn't bat an eye at the existence of different worlds and happily gives Jadis a piece of her mind throughout the book.
  • The Smart Girl: Frequently.
  • Women Are Wiser: While she has her faults, Polly is consistently more sensible and cautious than Diggory, particularly when she tries to stop him from ringing the bell that awakes Jadis.

Narnians

     Fledge / Strawberry 
A 19th-century draft horse who may be the only character from Earth to wind up in Narnia by accident. He is twice transformed by Aslan during The Magician's Nephew.

  • Pegasus: After his second transformation.
  • Talking Animal: After his first transformation.
  • What Happened to the Mouse?: Fledge becomes 'the father of all flying horses,' but none of his progeny appear in any subsequent book. Not necessarily sinister, since the world of Narnia is large and there are only seven books.

     Mr. Tumnus 
Played by: James McAvoy

A faun and typical citizen of Narnia in the age of the Hundred-Year Winter, Mr. Tumnus is the first Narnian to encounter a human being, at least since the last humans descended from King Frank and Queen Helen were driven out of Narnia at the beginning of the Witch's reign.

  • Bookworm: One of the things Lucy takes note of when she enters his house is the huge number of books lining his walls.
  • Don't Try This at Home: Under ordinary circumstances, it is not advisable for a little girl who is wandering alone to agree to go off to a total stranger's home.
    • And to be fair, it was very nearly a bad idea for Lucy to wander into his home.
  • Platonic Life Partners: With Lucy.
  • Reasonable Authority Figure: In The Horse And His Boy.
  • What Measure Is a Non-Human?: Lucy is more curious about him than frightened, and he goes on to become her closest Narnian friend.

     Bree 

A Talking Horse born in Narnia abducted and brought to Calormene, where he was treated as a normal horse.

  • Beast of Battle: He was a warhorse, though he's not quite as badass as he thinks he is.
  • Miles Gloriosus: He feels himself unusually brave. Eventually he breaks himself of this habit after a wiser character says he's been comparing himself to normal horses, "and you could hardly help being braver than them."
  • Old Soldier: During his time in Calormen he served as a war-horse in the Tisroc's army and apparently was the veteran of several campaigns.
  • Slave Mook: Well, kind of by definition being a warhorse. But on the other hand he was an aristocrat's warhorse so he was not just a mook.
  • Talking Animal: A significant plot point, since he's the brains behind the escape.

     Hwin 

Like Bree, Hwin was a Narnian Talking Horse who was abducted as a foal and lived most of her life in Calormen.

  • Closer to Earth: Much less self-absorbed than the other three, and probably the wisest member of the group.
    Bree: Is that how we want to arrive in Narnia?!
    Hwin: Well, the main thing is to get there.
  • Humble Goal: To go home.
  • Purple Prose: Not the real Hwin, but when Aravis is recounting their adventures she makes Hwin sound that way.
    Aravis (describing Hwin's dialogue): 'O my mistress, do not by any means destroy yourself, for if you live you may yet have good fortune but all the dead are dead alike!'
  • Static Character: She's quiet, reliable, and doesn't have any major personality issues to work out.
  • Talking Animal: As with Bree. By Contrived Coincidence, she talks her human into fleeing just a few days before Bree 'steals' Shasta.

     Caspian the Tenth 
http://static.tvtropes.org/pmwiki/pub/images/caspian12_8946.jpg
Played by: Ben Barnes

King of Narnia, Lord of Cair Paravel, and Emperor of the Lone Islands, also called Caspian the Seafarer and Caspian the Navigator (born 2290–died 2356, Narnian Time) was one of the greatest leaders of the Narnian Empire who took part in the successful Narnian Revolution and began the Age of Exploration. Caspian was descended from the Telmarine Dynasty, but unlike his ancestors he chose to ally with the indigenous Narnians (talking animals, satyrs, fauns, centaurs, etc.) instead of persecuting them. Succeeded by his son Rilian.

  • Adaptation Dye-Job: He is described as fair-haired in the books. However, since the Telmarines are descended from pirates and the native tribe of an uncharted island on Earth the choice to portray him as dark-haired and Hispanic stands to reason.
  • A Protagonist Shall Lead Them: Played with a bit - he's a Supporting Protagonist for the Pevensies, but still the person chosen by the Old Narnians to be their leader and champion.
  • The Call Knows Where You Live: Caspian is thrown into his adventures when his aunt has a baby, making him... redundant to his evil uncle.
  • Character Development: From a hesitant but trustworthy ruler-to-be, to a skilled Father to His Men seafaring captain to a just and noble king. Not bad Caspian, not bad at all.
  • Dashing Hispanic: In the movie, he comes off as this. Bonus points on Ben Barnes basing his characterization on Inigo Montoya, a Dashing Hispanic himself.
  • Distracted by the Sexy: In the movie version of The Voyage of the Dawn Treader, by Lilliandil, Ramandu’s daughter.
  • Mr. Fanservice: Especially in the movies.
  • The Hero: Caspian starts out as The Chosen One. In Prince Caspian he's almost acting as an understudy to Peter, but in Dawn Treader he's undertaking a heroic journey of his own volition. (In the film of Prince Caspian, Caspian is more confident and goes through More Hero Than Thou with Peter.)
  • Heroic Vow: Caspian made one at his coronation to search for the seven missing lords. The Voyage Of The Dawn Treader takes place during that journey.
  • It Has Been an Honor: Towards Edmund in The Voyage Of The Dawn Treader.
  • Reluctant Ruler: He was unsure he had any right to the Narnian throne, and didn't believe himself ready to take it when the time came. Aslan assures him that those very doubts prove that he has what it takes to be a good leader.
  • Royals Who Actually Do Something: An emphatic example. In Prince Caspian he leads a successful revolution against his wicked uncle. By the time of Voyage of the Dawn Treader - a matter of just two or three years - he's repaired the damage caused by the civil wars, brought peace between the remaining Telmarines and the formerly oppressed Old Narnians and is revitalizing Narnia's long-dormant seafaring traditions with an epic voyage of discovery. His brief cameo in The Silver Chair shows that he goes down in history as a soldier, sailor, lawmaker and administrator.
  • Secondary Character Title: In Prince Caspian.
  • Sheathe Your Sword: Used in the movie version of Prince Caspian, when Caspian, after seeing an entire squadron of Telmarine assassins downed by something underfoot, is himself tripped and set upon by the unseen assailant... Reepicheep the Mouse. Reepicheep orders Caspian to retrieve his sword and face him in honorable combat, as he refuses to kill an unarmed man. Caspian's reply: "Then I'll live longer if I don't." Reepicheep doesn't have infinite patience, though, so this tactic doesn't last Caspian forever.
  • Tall, Dark and Handsome: In the movies.
  • What the Hell, Hero?: Caspian in his pride wants to stay at the end of the world; the entire crew and even Aslan calls him out on abandoning his responsibilities and promises. In the film version, Caspian is very much tempted by the prospect of staying at the end of the world to the point of crying, but he realizes that his father wouldn't have wanted him to throw away the kingdom his father died for.
  • The Wise Prince: He does put an occasional foot wrong, but in general Caspian has good instincts and a kind heart.
  • Your Approval Fills Me with Shame: Towards Miraz.

     Dr. Cornelius 

A wise little old man who tutors Caspian... and in the process tells him things Miraz really didn't want him to know.

     Coriakin 

The wise old magician who was sent by Aslan to to govern the Duffers. The Duffers are fearful of him, and believe him to be an evil warlock (an obvious metaphor for the relationship between God and humanity).

  • Barefoot Sage/Does Not Like Shoes/Magical Barefooter: A wise old sorcerer who is perpetually barefoot (obviously by choice).
  • Celestial Body: A star in human form.
  • Eccentric Mentor: He has a quirky Dumbledore-esque sense of humor, as evidenced by the fact that he turned the Duffers into Monopods for disobedience, and put up a bearded mirror in his mansion (most likely to prank his guests). His penchant for going barefoot may be another one of his quirks... or it may be due to the fact that he is a star.

     Reepicheep 
Played by: Eddie Izzard (Prince Caspian), Simon Pegg (Voyage of the Dawn Treader)
The chief of his people, the Talking Mice, from late in the reign of Miraz til about three years into the reign of Caspian X. Reepicheep is dauntless and true, living every moment for honor, justice and the good of his people. His greatest shame is that he is Badass Adorable.

  • Ascended to a Higher Plane of Existence: It's revealed in the final book that he found his way to Aslan's Country without the usual prerequisite of dying first. In fact, he's at the door to greet the others as they arrive.
  • Badass Adorable: One of the reasons he's got such a short temper is that people persist in regarding him as adorable, and therefore harmless.
  • Badass Boast: But he's not boasting. He's in dead earnest.
    Reepicheep (to Something in the Darkness): Who calls? If you are a foe we do not fear you, and if you are a friend, we shall teach your enemies to fear us.
  • Blood Knight: He sure loves battle, and is eager to challenge anyone who would dare look down on him.
  • Boisterous Bruiser: A rather small one.
  • Bruiser with a Soft Center: Though he presents himself as a hardened knight, he does have a softer side. Notably seen with Eustace during the latter's stint as a dragon.
  • Comically Missing the Point: A frequent source of jokes, since he regards himself as a classic hero proving his worth, while his friends see him as a lovable Leeroy Jenkins.
  • Deadpan Snarker: Particularly in the movies.
    Pattertwig the Squirrel: We could collect nuts!
    Reepicheep: Yes! And then throw them at the Telmarines! *glaring* Shut up.
  • Determinator: “My own plans are made. While I can, I sail east in the Dawn Treader. When she fails me, I paddle east in my coracle. When she sinks, I shall swim east with my four paws. And when I can swim no longer, if I have not reached Aslan’s country, or shot over the edge of the world into some vast cataract, I shall sink with my nose to the sunrise…”
  • Famed In-Story: Of all the great kings and heroes of Narnia that Tirian meets in Aslan's Country in The Last Battle, the one he finds most legendary is Reepicheep.
  • Glory Seeker: His greatest wish to do great deeds that will have him remembered as an honorable knight.
  • Good Is Not Soft: Despite his violent aspects, Reepicheep holds himself to high standards of courtesy, courage, honor, charity and faith.
  • Heroic Sacrifice: He's carried from the battlefield at the Second Battle of Beruna covered with wounds and with a bloody stump where his tail was.
  • Heroic Vow: To find Aslan's country in The Voyage of the Dawn Treader.
  • Honor Before Reason: For example, his first instinct when hearing of a dragon nearby is to challenge it to single combat. Later in the book, he jumps into the ocean because he thought a Mer-king was challenging him.
  • Killer Rabbit: Or Killer Mouse at any rate; despite being a mouse, and the appropriate size therefore, he's no less a dedicated fighter.
  • Knight in Shining Armor: Obviously played for laughs, but he lives for honor and knows no fear.
    Caspian: You may say what you like, Reepicheep. There are some things no man can face.
    Reepicheep: It is, then, my good fortune not to be a Man.
  • Nice Hat: He wears a circlet of gold as a token of his rank. The red plume is just for flair.
  • Nice Mice: Talking Rats don't seem to even exist.note 
  • Pintsized Powerhouse: Talking mice are quite a bit larger than normal mice, but he's still barely the size of a cat.
  • Ridiculously Cute Critter: Lucy sees him as this. He isn't too amused.
    Lucy (in an undertone to Susan): He's so cute!
    Reepicheep: Who said that?!

     Trumpkin 

  • Break the Haughty: When the Pevensies appear to him, he's more than a little disgruntled that he got the child versions, not the age they were when they departed. He has to lose contests to Edmund and Susan before he acknowledges that 'the children' might be up to the job after all.
  • The Cynic: Very pessimistic and cynical.
  • Sour Supporter: Tends to be pessimistic, doesn't believe in the old legends or that some old horn can summon help, or that mythical kings can make a return, or even that the resistance can win, but is fiercely loyal to Caspian. When they need to send someone on a very dangerous scouting trip to the ruins of Cair Paravel, he insists on the job.
    Trumpkin: Crumbs and crumpets! Send me, Sire, I'll go.
    Caspian: I thought you didn't believe in the Kings and Queens?
    Trumpkin: No more I do. But I know the difference between giving advice and taking orders. I've given my advice, and now it's time for orders.

  • The Reliable One: Like his friend Trufflehunter. Caspian leaves Trumpkin in charge of Narnia while he goes on his great voyage, and assigns the (now very old and stone-deaf) Dwarf to the job again just before The Silver Chair begins.
  • Unusual Euphemism: All of his swearing is creative nonsense.

     Puddleglum 

A Marsh-Wiggle who lives in marshes and is perpetually gloomy and pessimistic. He guides Eustace and Jill in The Silver Chair.

  • The Call Knows Where You Live: He's assigned to Jill and Eustace rather than seeking out heroics on his own.
  • Deadpan Snarker: It's rare for the group to do anything without him muttering in an undertone that it's a foolish idea.
  • Determined Defeatist: Everything is going to turn out horribly. The prince is of course already dead, we're all going to die instead of finding him, that food was surely poisoned, we're out of water, and we're going to freeze to death out here tonight. Oh well, no point in delaying the inevitable: on we go.
  • The Eeyore: He's lugubrious to a preposterous degree, yet claims that other Marsh-Wiggles call him a hopeless optimist. We see more of this in Underland, where, the text notes, he proves a steady rock for the children to cling to in the face of crushing depression. Perhaps it's that he remains at a steady level of lugubriousness regardless of the circumstances?
  • Fish People: More froglike than fishlike, but still.
  • No Sense of Humor: Played with. He gets very giggly when he's drunk.
  • The Reliable One: The Parliament chose him not so much for his wilderness travel skills, but because he will do Aslan's bidding regardless of any personal cost to himself. Despite his droopiness and fatalism, he's vital to the success of the quest on several occasions.
  • Shut Up, Hannibal!: His reply to the blandishments of the Queen of Underland.

Calormenes

     Shasta 

Shasta grew up in poverty in some nameless fishing village in Calormen, the son of an abusive fisherman named Arsheesh. When his father decides to sell him into slavery, Shasta overhears that he was adopted and decides to run away. Over the course of The Horse and His Boy, he grows up (somewhat), teams up with runaway princess Aravis, and saves Archenland from the greatest danger it had ever faced. Only at the end does he learn that he's the long-lost Prince Cor, son of King Lune of Archenland. He was abducted as a baby and taken to Calormen in a (vain) attempt to avert the prophecy that he would save the country. He eventually married his one-time traveling companion Aravis, and the two ruled together once King Lune died. Their son was King Ram the Great.

  • Barefoot Poverty: To his suffering.
  • Belligerent Sexual Tension: With Aravis.
  • Big Damn Heroes: He pulls this twice. The first time when he rushes to protect Aravis and Hwin from what he believed was a hungry lion chasing after them. The second one was when he ran non-stop, after having been through almost a whole book's worth of shit -— most recently a potential suicide mission through a desert -— to warn King Lune about the impending invasion.
  • A Boy and His X: Inverted — Bree seems to regard Shasta as his pet.
  • Changeling Fantasy: Shasta, a peasant orphan, turns out to be the long-lost prince of Archenland. Atypically for the trope, Shasta is quite dismayed because, being the eldest twin, he'll be forced to rule as king, and his brother is only too happy to be relieved of the responsibility.
  • Exact Eaves Dropping: Hearing his adoptive father preparing to sell him into slavery is what prompts his escape.
  • A Friend in Need: When Shasta tells the horse that he really needs someone who could tell him whether the nobleman is evil, Bree reveals his ability to speak to tell Shasta exactly that. Which gives Bree the opening to suggest that they could run away together.
  • Hair of Gold, Heart of Gold: At least in the Pauline Baynes illustrations he is portrayed as having blond hair, and he had the wholesome and kind aspect down pat. He's described by the Tarkaan who tries to by him from Arsheesh as being "fair" (like the cursed barbarians of the North).
  • Happily Married: To Aravis, though they remain very hot-tempered about it.
  • Made a Slave: What Shasta is fleeing.
  • Moses in the Bulrushes: Shasta aka Prince Cor.
  • Slap-Slap-Kiss: With Aravis, and canonically no less.
  • True Companions: His devotion to his own is uncontested. Made all that much clearer when out of sheer loyalty he jumps off Bree’s back to face down a freakin' lion, who's actually Aslan, chasing Aravis and Hwin.

     Aravis 

A young Tarkheena, a female member of the ruling nobility of Calormen. She ran away from home with her talking horse, Hwin, in order to escape an Arranged Marriage to an old man.

  • Badass Princess: At the start of the story, she's clearly a much more dangerous fighter than Shasta.
  • Belligerent Sexual Tension: With Shasta.
  • Break the Haughty: Her personal character arc is much about her learning humility.
  • Defrosting Ice Queen: Towards Shasta.
  • A Friend in Need: Hwin reveals she can talk just when Aravis needs her the most.
  • Gilded Cage: This trope was the fate that Aravis was running from.
  • Happily Married: With Shasta, though they remain in Slap-Slap-Kiss mode.
  • Infallible Narrator: Aravis recounts her entire backstory like this, and Bree explains that Calormenes are taught story-telling in school. She isn't entirely infallible, either; by the standards of her culture, she colors her narrative with painful amounts of Purple Prose, even when recounting what another character, who is present, said - causing the said character to comment that she didn't say it in nearly as fancy words.
  • Interrupted Suicide: Aravis in her back story, contemplating forced childhood marriage to an old man. Hwin stops her and convinces her to run away instead.
  • Nice to the Waiter: Averted as part of Aravis's Character Development; she drugged one of her servants in order to escape. When Shasta asked what happened to the servant, Aravis casually speculated that she was whipped for it. Shasta pointed out that this was hardly fair to the servant, which Aravis coldly rebuffed by insisting that the servant in question was a lackey of her Wicked Stepmother. Aravis did get her just deserts when Aslan attacked the party as a lion and slashed her back, giving her the same wounds as the servant received.
  • Well, Excuse Me, Princess!: This defines her relationship with Shasta from the very beginning. Their first words to each other: "Why, you're only a girl." "And you're only a boy. A rude, common little boy. A slave probably who's stolen his master's horse!"
  • Wicked Stepmother: Aravis had one.

     Prince Rabadash 

The oldest son of the Tisroc (the Calormene king). A very impulsive and childish man who will stop at nothing to get what he wants. After Queen Susan refuses to marry him, he plans to conquer Narnia, but is defeated during an attempt to conquer Archenland.

  • Antagonistic Offspring: Is this to the Tisroc, who lets him chase after Susan to prevent him from attempting a coup.
  • Bitch in Sheep's Clothing: He was quite gallant while a guest in Narnia, hence why Susan considered marrying him in the first place, but seeing him in his home country was enough to convince her otherwise.
  • Game Face: Subverted — Rabadash rolls his eyes, sticks out his tongue, and wiggles his ears. It terrifies his underlings (who know he can have them boiled in oil at any minute), but it has no effect on the free Narnians.
  • Hot-Blooded: Possibly the best example in the series.
  • Humiliation Conga: A very good example that went on for the rest of his life. During the battle for Archenland, he gets stuck on a hook on a wall. He demands to be released in order to duel King Edmund, but is denounced as a traitor, due to attacking during peace time. After this, he was put on trial for his treachery and was given multiple opportunities to redeem himself, but kept threatening his captors. As punishment, Aslan temporarily turns him into a donkey, but tells him that if he went more than 10 miles from the temple, he will be permanently transformed into one. Since this prevents him from waging war, he is known as Rabadash the Peaceful during his rule as Tisroc. But after his death, he is known to history as Rabadash the Ridiculous and the expression 'Second Rabadash' is also used for students who act incredibly stupid.
  • I Have You Now, My Pretty: Plans to kidnap Queen Susan and force her to marry him.
  • Royal Brat: Textbook definition, given his attitude and his actions. The story indicates that Aslan's punishment did knock some sense into him and he became a decent enough ruler, but it wasn't enough to prevent him from being remembered as "Rabadash the Ridiculous".
  • Smug Snake: Keeps insulting the Archenlanders and Narnians despite being their prisoner.

Others

     Aslan 
Played by: Liam Neeson

The Great Lion, a talking lion, King of the Beasts, son of the Emperor-Over-the-Sea; a wise, compassionate, magical authority (both temporal and spiritual); mysterious and benevolent guide to the human children who visit; creator, guardian, and savior of Narnia. The author, C. S. Lewis, described Aslan as an alternate version of Christ—that is, as the form in which Christ might have appeared in a fantasy world.

  • Back from the Dead: After he's killed. Considering who he's supposed to be, it was inevitable.
  • Beware the Nice Ones: The most sure way of dealing with either a villain or a hero tempted to the dark side is for Aslan to give a show of force, which tends to terrify hero and villain alike... and He's more than willing to back it up with action if necessary (as the Witch found out).
  • Big Damn Heroes: Comes roaring (literally) to the rescue in the battle at the end of The Lion, the Witch, and the Wardrobe, with Lucy, Susan, and everybody they rescued from the Witch's castle. Lucy is very disappointed in Prince Caspian when he doesn't do the same.
  • Big Good: The biggest force for good seen in the series, though there is stated to be an even higher power behind him (The Emperor Beyond The Sea).
  • But Now I Must Go: It's noted that once he accomplishes what he needs to do, he tends to disappear without warning. The characters say he has other lands and other worlds he must attend to, and often reiterate that "he is not a tame lion".
  • The Chessmaster: Even when things don't go perfectly according to his plan (e.g. when Jill forgets the signs he had given her in The Silver Chair, he still manages to accomplish his goals.
  • The Chooser of The One: Aslan chooses who enters Narnia (and would be the kings and queens), and picked the children.
  • Crystal Dragon Jesus: Averted. Aslan is not merely a vague knockoff of Jesus, he is literally "Jesus if Jesus were a huge sodding lion".
  • Deus ex Machina: He spends the entire series behind the scenes, spinning the adventure and coming before them only when they need him most. He comes in during the last battle in Prince Caspian to help the Narnians win after they began to lose hope.

     Jadis, The White Witch 
http://static.tvtropes.org/pmwiki/pub/images/turkdel8.jpg
'Played by: Tilda Swinton

Jadis, commonly known as the White Witch, is the main villain of The Lion, the Witch and the Wardrobe. Jadis also appears at length in The Magician's Nephew, which concerns her origins and the origins of Narnia. She is the Witch who froze Narnia in the Hundred Years Winter.

  • Above Good and Evil: Jadis thinks she's exempt from morality just because she's magical and special. "Ours is a high and lonely destiny."
  • Adaptational Badass: The film adds a sword fight with Peter, where she parries all his strikes with contemptuous ease and seems to mostly be toying with him, until Aslan arrives and she starts to get desperate.
  • Adaptation Dye-Job: The original design for Jadis is pale skin and dark hair. However, the recent revamp for the film franchise has a blonde portraying her. Everything else about her (the red lips, the pale skin, and her outfit) are the same.
  • Big Bad: In Wardrobe and The Magician's Nephew, at least (arguably The Silver Chair, if the Lady of the Green Kirtle is indeed supposed to be a reincarnation of Jadis); after that, she is little more than a bad memory. However, the movies seem to be giving her a much greater presence post-mortem.
  • Blessed with Suck: After biting the Silver Apple, gains immortality but intensifies her misery.
  • Bread, Eggs, Milk, Squick: In "The Magician's Nephew," she points out torture chambers, dungeons, and locations of massacres in Charn as casually as if they were minor tourist sites.
  • Cain and Abel: Fought a long and bloody civil war against her sister for control of their kingdom that culminated in the destruction of their entire universe.
  • Composite Character: She is based on four characters in fiction: Satan from John Milton's Paradise Lost, Ayesha from She by Rhyder J. Haggard, the Snow Queen from Hans Christian Anderson's fantasy story of the same name, and the Queen of Babylon from the Story of the Amulet by Nesbit. The mythological character of Lilith was also an inspiration for her character and Jadis is said to be descended from her in the stories.
  • Crystal Dragon Jesus: The Satan version of this, though in The Last Battle Tash elbows her out of that role.
  • Dark Action Girl: In the movies, where she's shown to be just as good a fighter as a mage and schemer.
  • Does Not Like Shoes: The Magician's Nephew's illustrations shows her barefoot.
  • Dual Wielding: A wand and a sword in The Movie. She switches to two swords once her wand breaks.
  • Eerie Pale-Skinned Brunette: In the books, her hair is black and her skin is literally white "like snow, or paper, or icing sugar," clearly intended to look creepy and unhealthy. Not true in the movies, in which she is blonde and has a more or less natural skin tone.
  • Evil Is Deathly Cold: Plunges Narnia into an infinite winter in which neither spring nor Christmas ever occur.
  • Evil Overlord: First of Charn, although all rulers of Charn in her era were this. Then of Narnia.
  • Evil Sorcerer: Magic comes naturally to her species, namely her royal family. Even in Narnia she was able to re-master magic eventually.
  • Genocide from the Inside: When she ruled Charn, she learned a spell known as the Deplorable Word that would kill every living thing in the world except the speaker. When she lost the civil war, she used it.
  • God Save Us from the Queen!: Literally. She declares herself Queen of Narnia... and Aslan himself disposes of her.
  • Hoist By Her Own Petard: Her insistence on demanding Edmund's life, and her gleeful willingness to kill Aslan in Edmund's place, leads to her defeat thanks to her ignorance of the Deeper Magic beneath the Deep Magic she invokes.
  • Humanoid Abomination: She's an immortal monster who's destroyed an entire universe, turned Narnia into a frozen wasteland, appears human until you take a good look, and became Narnia's very own Satan in the end.
  • Ice Queen: About as literal as you can get without a Queen actually being made of ice. The movie has her wearing a crown made of ice as well.
  • In the Blood: She mentions that one of her ancestors has single-handely slaughtered over seventy nobles, because some of them had rebellious thoughts. Apparently it was normal thing in her family.
  • It's All About Me: In her mind, the whole Universe pretty much revolves around her.
  • Karmic Death: Oh so very much, especially in the film.
  • Lady of Black Magic: Elegant and merciless, she is an incredibly powerful sorceress who put Narnia in an eternal winter and could turn beings into stone with her wand.
  • Lady of War: In the film, she wields her swords with considerable grace.
  • Large Ham: In the BBC adaptation in the 80s.
  • Last of Her Kind: The sole survivor of the entire population of Charn, her home universe. She killed all the rest herself.
  • Light Is Not Good: Despite being the White Witch, she's very evil.
  • Magic Knight: In the film of The Lion, the Witch, and the Wardrobe, she went into battle with a sword and a wand of petrification. A pretty nasty combination by anyone's standards, and she put both to pretty good use.
  • Mysterious Past: The Beavers tell the Pevensies that she's some kind of djinn-giantess something, without explaining where she came from (presumably they don't know). The Magician's Nephew fleshes out her origin and past.
  • Omnicidal Maniac: Via Suicidal Cosmic Temper Tantrum, which she survived. She REALLY doesn't take defeat well. Charn is so utterly depopulated that when she, the last living being, is removed, the whole universe collapses into an existential hole.
  • Royal Blood: In her homeworld of Charn, she was a royal. She claims to be a Daughter of Eve in Narnia to justify her rule, but everyone knows she isn't.
  • Satanic Archetype: She is a representation of the Devil just like Aslan represents God/Jesus.
  • Sealed Evil in a Can: In The Magician's Nephew she put herself into suspended animation after destroying her world, and left a way for any visitors to wake her up, so that they’d take her to a new world.
  • The Sociopath: Let's see; Lackof Empathy, check, The Narcissist, check, no regard for others or remorse for any of her actions, check, It's All About Me, double check, see's others either tools to use, toys for amusement, or obsticles to crush, check. What else could she possibly be?
  • Statuesque Stunner: She's what, eight feet tall? Nine? And gorgeous, especially before eating that apple and turning paper-white.
  • Super Strength: Even without magic she's quite deadly, able to rip part of a lamp-post off with her bare hands and little apparent effort. This might have been where the Narnians got the idea that she was part giant.
  • Taken for Granite: Her main method of dealing with her enemies, using her magic wand. She even did it to herself in the film.
  • The Vamp: For Edmund and Digory. Uncle Andrew has just as strong an infatuation with her, though in his case the reason is not that Jadis is deliberately seducing him like a Vamp; he's attracted to her just because Evil Is Sexy, without any deliberate effort on Jadis's part.
  • Wax Museum Morgue: Her entire castle courtyard, filled with statues. Take a wild guess where she got them. Her hall in Charn resembles this, but the statues are actually just statues in this case — except Jadis herself.
  • Winter Royal Lady: Ironically the only she was real royalty before her reign in Narnia.
  • Witch Species: The House of Charn, of which she is the sole survivor. Magicians like Uncle Andrew that went by-the-book did exist in Charn, but were "inferior", and were wiped out long ago.
  • Woman in White: Not in a good sense.
  • Would Hurt a Child: No qualms whatsoever about fighting and killing children to get what she wants.
  • 0% Approval Rating: As the traditional Evil Sorceress, Jadis runs Narnia as she wishes. It does win her a few friends - Talking Wolves, Hags, and the People of the Toadstools, for example. Dwarves also seem to have done alright under her rule, though there were plenty of dwarves loyal to Narnia as well.

     Tash 

The primary god of the Calormenes, who unwittingly summoned him to Narnia during The Last Battle.

  • The Anti-God: As Aslan the lion (read: God the Son incognito) put it:
    ...we are opposites, I take to me the services which thou hast done to [Tash]. For I and he are of such different kinds that no service which is vile can be done to me, and none which is not vile can be done to him. Therefore if any man swear by Tash and keep his oath for the oath's sake, it is by me that he has truly sworn, though he know it not, and it is I who reward him. And if any man do a cruelty in my name, then, though he says the name Aslan, it is Tash whom he serves and by Tash his deed is accepted.
  • Death Glare: Gives an unsettling one to Tirian, his next target.
  • Eldritch Abomination: A shadowy bird-man appearing to be made of smoke.
  • Greater Scope Villain: As revealed in The Last Battle, he serves as this for the whole series.
  • Hell Is That Noise: That such a creature would even speak to a human, let alone question him.
  • Evil Is Not a Toy: Before he stepped up to the plate, many of the characters doubted his existence, even some of his supposed followers (we're looking at you, Rishda, Shift, and Ginger).
  • Sealed Evil in a Can: Most of the Calormenes didn't think he really existed when they prayed for him to appear before them. They got quite a nasty shock.
  • Speak of the Devil: Rishda and Ginger were in for a nasty surprise that literally left them speechless.
  • Touch of Death: He seems to represent death and decay, and everything that comes near him suffers for it.
  • You Will Be Spared: Curiously, he attacked everyone who encountered him in the stable but left the kowtowing sentry alone.

Alternative Title(s): Chronicles Of Narnia, Narnia

http://tvtropes.org/pmwiki/pmwiki.php/Characters/TheChroniclesOfNarnia