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Mage in Manhattan
Well, technically, a Mage-God-Prince in Germany, but close enough. note 

Not involving J-Lo in any way, unless she's playing the person doing it, a Mage in Manhattan situation is where an evil character from a Magical Land enters our own with the intent of causing destruction. Hilarity ensues. Villains Blend in Better, but they do still want to Take Over the World, so such an appearance has a tendency to blast any masquerade to pieces.

When the "Mage" first arrives in "Manhattan", you can expect Mugging the Monster to ensue. If it works though, expect that Muggles Do It Better.

Compare Welcome to the Real World, Refugee from TV Land. Usually involves Save Both Worlds. Not to be confused with Urban Fantasy.


Examples:

    open/close all folders 

    Anime & Manga 

    Comic Books 
  • Inverted in Bill Willingham's Fables, in which fairy tale characters have fled from their magical homelands, which were conquered by the evil Adversary, to the mundane world, with most settling in New York. Eventually played straight when the Adversary sends the witch Baba Yaga leading an army of wooden soldiers to New York to conquer Fabletown. The Mundies never notice, because they think they are marching young Republicans.
  • The DCU
  • Red Sonja's enemy, the evil wizard Kulan Gath, attempted to conquer Marvel Comics version of New York City in an issue of Marvel Team-Up in the 1970s. Spider-Man and Red Sonja (in Mary Jane Watson's body) managed to drive him back. He tried again in 2007, brainwashing the population and remaking the city as a bronze-age nightmare.
  • In Don Rosa's Scrooge McDuck story The Quest for Kalevala, the witch Louhi and the sea monster Iku-Turso from Finnish mythology wreak havoc in 20th century Helsinki.

    Films — Live-Action 

    Literature 
  • The climactic, gives-you-chills-every-time end battle from So You Want to Be a Wizard. To elaborate and oversimplify, the Lone Power comes to New York and tries to turn it evil. When they try to stop It, It puts out the Sun. It helps that they have the canonical copy of reality in book form as their weapon.
  • Older than Television: Occurs in Chapter 8 of the early Time Travel children's novel The Story Of The Amulet (1902) by E Nesbit: A queen from ancient Babylon (who doesn't have magical powers, though they do exist in the novel) ends up in "modern" (1900s) London.
  • A lift of this occurs in the Narnia prequel, The Magician's Nephew when the wicked Jadis (a.k.a. the White Witch) invades London (of roughly the same time period as The Story of the Amulet). Or at least she tries. Magic is inherent to a dimension here, and so she has no power in our world, but does have Super Strength. She threatens to invade our world in The Lion, The Witch and the Wardrobe, but that's a clear bluff.
  • Mercedes Lackey's modern fantasies usually involve some version of this, with the monster usually being one of the Unseleighe Sidhe (Dark Court Elves). Most representative of this trope is Mad Maudlin, in which Aerune, self-styled Lord of Death and Pain, tries to open a Nexus to Underhill in Central Park and a Sidhe driven mad by the presence of cold iron turns into a literal Bloody Mary, murdering people left and right.
  • The climax of Blood & Iron by Elizabeth Bear.
  • The Fair Folk in The Science of Discworld II: The Globe and the Auditors in The Science of Discworld III: Darwin's Watch. Both set to slow down human progress so that we can't create a colony ship before the world becomes a giant snowball again.
  • A large part of the series Everworld: Loki's dream is to use Senna's powers to transport himself and the other gods back to this world to escape from Ka Anor. Given gods like Huitzilopoctli, who eats thousands of human hearts in a sitting, horror may ensue. Of course, this is inverted with Senna's own plan — to conquer Everworld by bringing modern humans there with guns and other weapons.
  • In Phenomena evil wizards travel back and forth between Trondheim and Aldra. In the 3rd book our heroes are going to Trondheim too.
  • Queen Redd arrives on Earth in Seeing Redd, the sequel to The Looking-Glass Wars.
  • Bluebeard (Caster) from Fate/Zero, so much so that the supervisor temporarily put the war on hold and offered a reward of an extra command seal to whoever killed him. Then he summoned a giant monster made of slugs and the JSDF called in some F-15Js'. One gets eaten by supersonic tentacles, the other gets hijacked by an epic hero summoned from beyond the grave, and proceeds to have an aerial dogfight against another epic hero flying a magitech airplane. Somehow The Masquerade survived.

    Live-Action TV 
  • The 10th Kingdom: The first nine kingdoms are all typical fairy tale places, while the legendary "Tenth Kingdom" is New York.
  • In the famous Czech fairy tale TV series Arabela (1979-81) (Western Germany title: "Arabella, die Märchenbraut", Eastern Germany title: "Die schöne Arabella und der Zauberer"), not only do characters and villains from the Fairy Tale reality enter the Real World and spread chaos there with their magic and strange ways, the sorcerous villains even take modern inventions (and ideas), like cars, back into their own reality which runs on fairy tale tropes, install themselves as new rulers, and start a reign of tyranny by banning, on pain of death, all things magical, including racism against non-human "magical" races. With hilarious results.
  • Ace Lightning, although the villains in question come from a video game rather than a fantasy dimension.
  • Charmed has an example in the "Evil Enchantress" clone of Paige from the S4 episode, appropriately titled "Paige from the Past."
  • Subverted on Buffy the Vampire Slayer. One would assume this is why Glory came to this world from her original Hell dimension, but actually she's been exiled and just wants to return home. Though, this would probably destroy this and many other worlds in the process...
  • The sorceress Morgaine and her son Mordred from Arthurian legend arrive here from their Magical Land in the Doctor Who story "Battlefield". ("Battlefield" takes place entirely in the countryside, though, rather the city.)

    Video Games 
  • At the climax of Viewtiful Joe 2, the villain Jet Black escapes from Movie Land with the power of the Rainbow Oscars, resulting in a final showdown at an awards ceremony. Subverted in that Jet Black was from the real world in the first place.
  • Inverted and played literally in Dungeon Fighter Online. The Mage class's backstory starts her off being chased down by evil acolytes in Brooklyn, leading to Central Park, where the Mage eventually finds her way into the world that the game takes place in.

    Web Original 
  • Extremely commonplace in the first book of Dimension Heroes, with evil Dark Overlord Clonar and his various brainwashed minions crossing over from Creturia to Earth in order to conquer it.
  • The base premise of this blog

    Western Animation 
  • Debatably, King Koopa from The Super Mario Bros. Super Show. His intent wasn't to destroy Brooklyn, though. Just simply conquer it.
  • Semi interestingly done in Scooby-Doo and the Cyber Chase, where the evil character who enters the 'real world' is a computer virus. Who then chases the characters into another game, and then proceeds to cause havoc in each level of the video game world.
  • Though it featured dimension hopping villains quite prominently, it was never more so than in the season 2 finale of W.I.T.C.H., when a super sized Cedric invades Heatherfield with the intent of conquering earth. The Masquerade was preserved, mostly, through the use of some reality warping powers.


Lost WorldOtherworld TropesMagical Land
Made of EvilEvil TropesMagic is Evil
Lowest Cosmic DenominatorJust for PunMagical Mystery Doors
Comic Book Movies Don't Use CodenamesImageSource/Live-Action FilmsShut Up, Hannibal!

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