troperville

tools

toys

Wiki Headlines
It's time for the second TV Tropes Halloween Avatar Contest, theme: cute monsters! Details and voting here.

main index

Narrative

Genre

Media

Topical Tropes

Other Categories

TV Tropes Org
random
Kubrick Stare
Evil face is evil.note 

"In that showdown, and at several other times in the film, Kubrick indulges his favorite closeup, a shot of a man glowering up at the camera from beneath lowered brows. This was the trademark visual in A Clockwork Orange, and Jack Nicholson practiced it in The Shining. What does it mean? That Kubrick thinks it's an interesting angle from which to shoot the face, I think."
Roger Ebert, review of Full Metal Jacket

  1. Tilt head down
  2. Look up beneath eyebrows

Named for the film director Stanley Kubrick, who made at least eight movies where a major character has this facial expression. When some other show or film uses it, it's frequently a homage to Kubrick. Generally it symbolizes that the character in question is either really, really pissed or really becoming deranged, and the person they're looking at is really, really screwed. Other times—usually when combined with a smile—it means they're feeling really, really clever.

Either way, it's really creepy and ominous. Although depending on the context, it can also be very Badass.

Often accompanied by Creepy Shadowed Undereyes, Red Eyes, Take Warning, a Psychotic Smirk or a Slasher Smile, and also a reveal matched with Scary Shiny Glasses. If a character combines this with Clasp Your Hands If You Deceive, odds are, he's a Magnificent Bastard. Heroic examples often are used for Staring Down Cthulhu. See also: Hidden Eyes, Death Glare, and Disapproving Look. Compare Primal Stance and Limp and Livid.


Examples

    open/close all folders 

    Anime & Manga 
  • Dragon Ball characters do this quite a lot, usually right before Kicking it Up to Eleven but most notably Goku first goes Super Saiyan 3. This tends to be Frieza's default expression.
  • Almost every character in Katekyo Hitman Reborn! does this when fighting at least once.
  • Dr. Hell from Mazinger Z displays this expression quite frequently, usually when mad or after thinking of some devilish scheme.
  • Light Yagami gets a few of these in Death Note. Notice how devilish he looks especially when it is combined with those glowy red eye effects. Near and Mello as well.
  • Used in the first episode of Darker Than Black. When the viewpoint character of the episode meets Lee/Hiei, he is stargazing and has a very normal conversation with her, and helps her escape her pursuers even. When she leaves, his expression slowly changes to this as he stares at her back, lending hint to the fact that he is chasing her himself, only much more subtly.
  • Lelouch from Code Geass commonly does this while his plans go as expected. When they fail... he does all sorts of different gestures.
  • Ophelia of Claymore does this a few times, as if we need any more reminders that she's psychotic.
  • It may be the shape of his eyes, but Noble Demon Hiei in YuYu Hakusho seems to perpetually wear this expression.
  • Neon Genesis Evangelion:
  • Kyon does one in the Haruhi Suzumiya anime, when the plot just screws with the viewer's head in "Remote Island Syndrome Part 2".
  • Berserk:
    • Guts does this from time to time.
    • Femto's Kubrick Stare during The Eclipse is terrifying, since although he's raping Casca, Guts' love interest purely out of spite, he's also staring at Guts the entire time.
    • What's even more creepy: We saw some warning signs before the Eclipse when Griffith was giving them the SAME STARE when it became clear to him that Guts and Casca were a couple who were in love, and not just the blind admiration that people gave to him, which probably helped to set him off.
  • Naruto:
    • Naruto generally precedes asskicking with taking enough damage to kill a small town before pulling an incredibly bloodied one of these.
    • Madara pulls a couple of these.
  • Higurashi no Naku Koro ni elevates the Kubrick Stare and the Slasher Smile to an art form.
  • Bleach: Kubo plays with this trope a lot for many of his characters.
  • The protagonist of Gamble Fish uses these in particularly dramatic moments.
  • Gundam Wing:
  • Several yakuza mermen stare down Nagasumi during the second episode of Seto no Hanayome to intimidate him.
  • One Piece
    • Luffy pulls this at least once, perhaps most memorably at Sabody Archipelago, looking at a Celestial Dragon after Charloss shot Hachi.
    • Zoro does this. It's usually combined with Let's Get Dangerous.
  • Akuha of Rosario + Vampire often does this to hint at her unstable Yandere side.
  • Yuno of Mirai Nikki does this through Yuki's letterbox - while wishing him a good night after he discovers the room in her house that contains the corpses of her parents, and her second self who she murdered.
  • Buruge from Ginga Densetsu Weed does this when part of his army is ready to intercept the incoming Ohu soldiers.
  • Robotech: The Robotech Masters do this occasionally. In the episode "A False Start", Captain Komodo does this before his decision to disregard orders and open fire on the Masters' Bioroid dropships. During the opening credits montage, Rand is seen doing this (actually taken from the opening credits for Genesis Climber MOSPEADA, one of Robotech's root anime shows).
  • Commonly done by Mewtwo in Pokémon: The First Movie, though his most famous is arguably the one right before he proceeds to reduce the lab he's in and everyone in it to rubble.
  • An (intentionally) hilarious one is pulled off in the blooper reel of Fullmetal Alchemist: Brotherhood. Alex Louis Armstrong pulls one on Ling Yao at a normally serious moment when the heroes are discussing the homunculi. However, by messing around with the script, Greed instead says "You could say he's used its energy to claim the power of God for himself. Now will you please put on a fucking shirt?" What was a Kubrick Stare suddenly became a look of shame. [[It has to be seen to be believed.
  • Hellsing: Many examples.
  • The Flowers of Evil: In her introductory scene, after a teacher also tries to hit Nakamura for calling him a "shitbug," she does this to him. It works, as he's freaked out, stops his action, and just tells her to see him after class.

    Comics 

    Films — Animation 
  • The Incredibles
    • Syndrome uses it multiple times, including:
      • When he reveals his identity to Mr. Incredible.
      • When he walks away from Mr. Incredible in a later scene in the movie, grumbling an Ironic Echo.
    • Bob uses it a couple times too: during the scene where his boss is chewing him out and forbidding him from trying to stop a mugging, and later, after Syndrome mocks him, immediately after everyone thinks Bob's family has died. He gives Syndrome the stare as he lunges in for an (attempted) kill.
  • In Disney's The Hunchback of Notre Dame:
    • When Quasimodo is finally pushed over the edge by the gargoyles, he looks down into the street, grimacing for one of the few times in the film as the chorus begins to break out in Latin chants.
    • There is an instance where Esmerelda gives Frollo one when he essentially offers to save her from being burned at the stake if she sleeps with him. Just before the stare, she spits in his face.
  • In Ratatouille, Anton Ego somehow manages to do this to Linguini when the two first meet, even though Anton's standing—looming, really—over a seated Linguini.
  • Deluded Buzz in Toy Story 3. It's even mentioned by name in the DVD Commentary.
  • Tangled's Rapunzel and Flynn, at least in this poster. See also Dreamworks Face.
  • Snow White and the Seven Dwarfs:
    • The Queen when she orders the huntsman to kill Snow White.
    • The monster trees' look and the evil glowing eyes in the darkness during the spooky forest scene, although it's just Snow White's imagination.
  • In Tim Burton's Corpse Bride, the titular character Emily pulls one off late in the movie.

    Films — Live Action 
  • Lolita, Dr. Strangelove, 2001: A Space Odyssey, A Clockwork Orange, Barry Lyndon, The Shining, Full Metal Jacket and Eyes Wide Shut are the trope namers: all of them are Kubrick films where someone wears this expression. According to stories, the stare was often worn by Kubrick himself when he wanted to look gruff and intimidating on set.
  • Used in The Third Man, making this trope Older Than They Think.
  • Hannibal Lecter gives a cold, emotionless one in The Silence of the Lambs with an emphasis on creepy because he doesn't blink.
  • Kevin, the sociopathic cannibal (no, not the one above) from Sin City, gives an indescribably creepy Kubrick Stare right before he ambushes the protagonist Marv. Marv does one right back upon overhearing the cannibal's name from his prison. "See you later, Kevin."
  • Another Kevin, Kevin Katchadourian from We Need to Talk About Kevin usually gives one of these before a Breaking Speech.
  • Norman Bates at the end of Psycho, made in 1960.
  • The Crow: Post-mortem Eric Draven is quite fond of this.
  • Terminator series:
    • Sarah Connor in the hospital in Terminator 2.
    • Robert Patrick's T-1000, throughout the entirety of the second movie, is a prime example.
    • Terminator's face in the opening credits, even though it lacks eyebrows, is permanently grinning a skull grin.
  • The Joker in The Dark Knight, as his posture is often slightly hunched over, is practically built to give these stares. Perhaps this is most noticeable when he's sitting in the holding cell, even more so when he joins in the clapping for Gordon's promotion. As it happened, Gary Oldman told Heath Ledger after this was shot that his performance was reminding him of Alex in A Clockwork Orange; Ledger admitted he had just been watching that film in his trailer.
  • Star Wars: When Anakin Skywalker turns evil, he gets yellow eyes that he always displays by using one of these.
  • Sir John Gielgud gives one of these in the movie Arthur, although it looks more disapproving than scary.
  • The Defence Secretary gives such a stare to M when he levels various complaints against her and her agency in Quantum of Solace.
  • Naomi Watts, of all people, gives a chilling glare near the end of the film Mulholland Dr..
  • One of the new Star Trek movie posters has Chris Pine in this pose, which unfortunately makes Captain Kirk look like a dead ringer for Dexter.
  • Hugh Jackman in the X-Men films deliberately adopted a subtle version of this, but he came upon the idea independently. In an interview he said something about always trying to keep his head just slightly bowed, to imitate the way a wolf looks at you over its nose.
  • Evil from Time Bandits does this a few times while apparently trying to cast a spell. He lifts his arms up and his face glows red, but he's interrupted before he can finish what he's doing. In the end, it turns him into a crumbling statue, and the Surpreme Being appears to clean things up.
  • Virtually every shot of Jake Gyllenhaal in Donnie Darko is a Kubrick Stare. Apparently, it runs in the family; Maggie Gyllenhaal does an oddly sexy Kubrick stare in a few of her movies, particularly Secretary.
  • Keanu Reeves gives us one after blowing up Smith in The Matrix.
  • James Van Der Beek gives this look in an early scene from The Rules of Attraction, in the scene featuring Kate Bosworth.
  • The Cabinet of Dr. Caligari might be the first example of this trope in film. The actor doing the stare is Rudolf Klein-Rogge, who also popularized Milking the Giant Cow in Metropolis.
  • Played for sexy by Lauren Bacall in To Have and Have Not, reportedly because Bacall was nervous about working with Bogey and was trying to keep from shaking. Considering that they later got married, that's adorable.
  • In The Transporter, the villain manages to do this off camera. That is to say, he stares villainously into the camera for his driver's license photo. He insured that every cop who pulled him over would realize he was evil. He also pulled it off several times on camera, but the driver's license deserves special mention.
  • American Beauty: by Jane in the very first scene.
  • Capote: Perry Smith does one later in the film when he confronts Truman about his book's title.
  • Tommy Wiseau does this in the poster for The Room (link).
  • John Murdoch does this in Dark City after getting a lifetime's worth of training in Tuning injected into his brain. Roger Ebert even points out the Kubrick connection in his audio commentary on the DVD.
  • The Thing (1982) (1982). Used as a Red Herring when Windows is receiving the blood test; he's shown staring at Mac in this fashion as if he's about to attack him, but as soon as the test proves negative Windows visibly relaxes.
  • Lord of the Rings:
    • Frodo does one in Return of the King for just an instant, when he claims the Ring for himself in Mount Doom.
    • Merry gets the effect when he's yelling at the Ents for refusing to fight, though it's actually incidental due to him having to look up at them.
    • Gandalf also has this effect when he faces the Balrog, again it's incidental due to The Balrog being 35 feet taller than him.
  • Try to find a photo of James Cagney where he's in character and isn't doing this. (No surprise that he was one of Kubrick's favorite actors). See Gary Oldman's Tonight Show appearance below for a description of the Cagney version of the Kubrick Stare.
  • Loki does this throughout The Avengers. It's especially terrifying in his first appearance.
  • Connor Macleod gives one of these in Highlander (the first film), when The Kurgan reveals he raped Heather. (She never told Connor, likely fearing he'd go after The Kurgan and get killed.)
  • Edmund Pevensie in The Chronicles of Narnia: The Voyage of the Dawn Treader, when he is tempted by evil again.
  • Some freak kid does it in The Box.
  • Thorin Oakenshield is much given to these in The Hobbit. When you're a dwarf you don't have much choice but to glare up at people.
  • Ms. Appleyard at the end of in Picnic at Hanging Rock - an especially disturbing example.
  • Stane's expression in the poster for Iron Man 1. Kind of odd - Obie's actually a pretty nice guy.
  • In Star Trek Into Darkness, Harrison tilts his head down and to the right, and then angrily stares up at Kirk while delivering his Hannibal Lecture about the failures of Starfleet.
  • Black Narcissus: Sister Ruth.
  • Kill Bill Volume 1: Gogo Yubari, O-Ren Ishii's chief bodyguard, gives Kubrick stares in most of her scenes, including her flail-wielding confrontation with The Bride.
  • The default expression of the Mad Scientist villain in Runaway. Of course it only helps when your name is Luther and you're played by Gene Simmons.
  • Kenneth Branagh's Frankenstein gives this stare to John Cleese as Professor Waldman in Mary Shelley's Frankenstein. The intention is not so much to intimidate as to impress Waldman with Frankenstein's knowledge and dead seriousness about resurrecting the dead.

    Literature 
  • Employed by Krook, the unpleasant rag-merchant in Bleak House:
    His watchfulness of [Jarndyce] was incessant... he got opposite to him, and drawing his hand across and across his open mouth with a curious expression of a sense of power, and turning up his eyes, and lowering his grey eyebrows until they appeared to be shut, seemed to scan every lineament of his face.
  • The Harry Potter series refers to this as well; in Order of the Phoenix, Bellatrix Lestrange's mugshot apparently shows her with a Kubrick Stare (judging by its description).
  • The cover of Vision of the Future has this.
  • The main cover of Poison by Chris Wooding features the eponymous character doing one, complete with noir-style coloring.
  • In Perelandra, the Un-Man gives Ransom an extraordinarily creepy one, judging from the description and the effect it has on Ransom.

    Live Action TV 
  • Jekyll in Jekyll usually combines this with a Slasher Smile for pure terror.
  • The look Sansa Stark often manages to give Joffrey Baratheon in Game of Thrones. She does it after having to watch her father's decapitated head on a spike, and when Joffrey acts as her "father" giving her away at her wedding to Tyrion.
    • After spending two seasons as the stoic and a serious supporter of Robb's regime, Roose Bolton puts out a flat out disturbing one after he's revealed to Catelyn that he's wearing chainmail and is about to betray Robb along with the Freys thus starting the Red Wedding, one that quickly turns into a subtle but noticeable Psychotic Smirk.
  • Xena: Warrior Princess does this a lot when she goes into Badass Normal mode.
  • Judge Judy.
  • Firefly's River has also been known to do this, particularly in Serenity.
  • Buffy the Vampire Slayer in the first season opening (and the episode that scene was taken from).
  • Adrian Pasdar uses the Kubrick Stare both in Heroes and Profit.... It's very, VERY creepy.
  • Greg House from House almost always wears a Kubrick Stare, as shown in many publicity shots. It works to make him look like a strung-out crazy asshole. Which isn't far from the truth.
  • The League of Gentlemen's Papa Lazarou does this from time to time. It's incredibly frightening.
  • Patrick McGoohan is seen with a Kubrick Stare at least once in the opening credits of The Prisoner.
  • Dallas. J.R. Ewing has done this....
  • Frasier and his brother Niles do this quite a bit when driven to a near breaking point.
  • Cheers. Diane does this a lot when speaking/listening intently to someone—and as such, it's usually played for cute (and sometimes for sexy, a la Lauren Bacall). There are moments, however, when she really is ticked off when giving the Stare—though it's usually just a quick flash of one, in those instances.
  • NCIS. Gibbs is comforting a crying woman whose deceased husband was a cannibalistic Serial Killer... until he's informed that some of the bodies buried in her backyard had been buried after the husband died. Cue instant Kubrick Stare from the woman, revealing her true evil self.
  • Dexter.
  • Of all people on Lie to Me to give this look, we get it from Loker in an episode where he's pretending to be a mobster. It actually is fairly creepy.
  • Claire in LOST has come down with this.
  • iCarly: Freddie of all people, in iWin A Date. They are trying to comfort Gibby, who's crazy for a girl named Shannon who actually likes Freddie. After Gibby runs off, Carly comments on how sad it is to be in love with someone who won't love you back. Freddie gives her a well-deserved stare, and Carly goes 'Sorry'.
  • The Sarah Connor Chronicles has Cameron apt at doing this. Given it's Summer Glau it doubles as Head-Tiltingly Kinky.
  • In Power Rangers S.P.D., Sky (the Blue Ranger) gets bodyjacked by an alien, and starts doing this a lot. It worked a little too well on the fandom.
  • In United States Of Tara, Bryce uses this often.
  • Alias: Allison Doren delivers one during the epic fight scene in the second season finale.
  • One example in Stargate SG-1 is a genetically modified human called Khalek who upon the protagonists realizing his true nature, gives this look. The main light in the room is above him, which enhances the look.
  • Gary Oldman taught Conan O'Brian how to do something like this during an interview near the end of Conan's run on The Tonight Show (Oldman also related a story how he used it to scare off a paparazzi reporter). Seeing the normally upbeat Conan do this was unnerving.
    • Oldman credited this version to James Cagney. Step one: turn your head to face the opponent, keeping your eyes glued elsewhere. Step two: the eyes follow.
  • In Once Upon a Time, after Henry eats the poisoned turnover and is in a coma, Emma gives one when Regina, who gave her the turnover for Emma to eat and fall into a coma arrives at the the hospital, and beats Regina up.
  • Babylon 5:
    • Mr. Morden flashes one of these at the brig's security camera at the end of the episode "In the Shadow of Z'ha'Dum", right at the point where Sheridan is looking at him in the monitor and sees the two Shadows among him detectable at different wavelengths—it is almost like Morden knows exactly when Sheridan was looking at him, and what he saw.
    • Sheridan also gives a haggard but defiant Kubrick Stare a couple of times while under Earth Government interrogation in the episode "Intersections in Real Time".
  • Moriarty does this at least once in Sherlock. He really doesn't need to look more frightening than he already is.
    • In "A Scandal in Belgravia" Sherlock deduces that Mrs Hudson has been attacked. In a few seconds his expression moves from "Bad stuff happened" to "Oh God, he's actually going to kill someone". It's chilling to see.
    • He also does this when trying to solve a crime in "The Sign of Three". Probably not at the best time though; he does it in the middle of his best man speech at John's wedding.
  • Gaius Baltar combines this with a Death Glare to rival Adama's. When he's not crying that is.
  • Angel: Wesley is impersonating the titular hero and gets cornered by two threatening goons. Since he isn't actually supernaturally strong or fast like Angel, he has to bluff them by playing on Angel's reputation and tries a standard death glare on them, hoping to look scary and demonic. He fails. Then he uses the Kubrick Stare instead, and suddenly he really does look scary and demonic, even though the difference in expression is quite subtle. (This is, in fact, the story that marks the beginning of his transformation from comic relief to tragic hero.)
  • Horatio Hornblower, "The Even Chance": Jack Simpson, a depraved tormentor of his fellow midshipmen, has this disturbing and ominous look when he comes aboard the Indefatigable and confronts poor Archie Kennedy. Horatio, the only one who stood up to him back on their old ship, makes it clear to him that these are new times and that he's not going to bother them any more. Simpson then makes a swinging move, tilts his head down and looks up beneath eyebrows, being half-hidden in a shadow. During his next scenes, he tries to murder both Archie Kennedy and Horatio when they take part in a covert night raid and Boarding Party of a French ship.
  • In The Walking Dead, you can tell Shane's gone off the deep end when he starts using the stare near the end of the second season.
  • In Coronation Street, whenever David Platt gets this look, you know he's planning something and things aren't going to end well.
  • Doctor Who:
    • Our first glimpse of the Twelfth Doctor in Doctor Who is an Eyed Screen of him doing one.
    • The Cheshire Cat Grin variant is one of the main expressions in the Fourth Doctor's repertoire, with the brim of his hat substituting for eyebrows. He does this when he's being particularly creepy.
  • Edward James Olmos as Lieutenant Castillo on Miami Vice does this so frequently and well that it's been nicknamed "the Castillo staredown".

    Music 
  • This, combined with a Slasher Smile, has become the trademark pose for the electronic artist Aphex Twin, first featured on his "Richard D. James Album".
  • Featured heavily in EPICA's "unleashed" music video, mostly coming from Simone Simons, but also the rest of the band at the end of the video.
  • Cobra Starship frontman Gabe Saporta has become famed for leveling "The Psycho Stare" at any camera in his vicinity. This has done nothing to quell the rumors about his basement of unspecified horrors.
  • Oomph!'s singer Dero Goi does this at the end of the music video of Labyrinth.
    • Also worth noting that for the majority of the video, he looks like a cross between Alex DeLarge and the Mad Hatter.
  • They Might Be Giants singer John Linnell is made for this with his crazy sparkly eyes and slightly ridiculous forehead.
  • Chester Bennington and Mike Shinoda of Linkin Park have used this quite a bit, especially earlier in the group's career, namely the latter vocalist three minutes and fourteen seconds into the video for Crawling.
  • blur's video for "The Universal" contains several references to 'Clockwork Orange', so Damon Albarn does one or two of these, as well as a rare side-angle version.
  • Hatsune Miku in the beginning of the High Definition PV of Nebula, especially in this preview.
  • Jay Reatard gives a creepy Kubrick stare on the cover of his album 'Watch Me Fall' in what is clearly an homage to Nicholson in The Shining. Can be seen here
  • Rob Zombie does his own imitation of Alex's stare in the music video for Never Gonna Stop (The Red Red Kroovy) which itself is based on A Clockwork Orange.
  • The art on the CD of Jerry Cantrell's Boggy Depot features him giving such a smile.
  • David Bowie does this throughout the video for "Valentine's Day", a sweet-sounding tune about mass murder.

    Pinball 

    Pro Wrestling 
  • This is one of Triple H's signature poses.

    Video Games 

    Web Animation 

    Web Comics 

    Web Original 

    Western Animation 
  • Slade from Teen Titans somehow pulls this off with his entire face covered aside from his right eye.
  • Hama on Avatar: The Last Airbender gets treated to this once her intentions are revealed.
    • Appropriately enough, Katara does this when she threatens to "end" Zuko, "permanently", if he hurts Aang.
    • Zuko does this the best during The Boiling Rock part 1.
    • Azula does this too, right after she fires her Dai Li agents in Sozin's Comet.
    • Sokka gets one as well in the four-part finale. Wind and everything!
    • Amon of The Legend of Korra does this to help highlight that he's a bad guy.
      • But the fiercest one of all is Lin's in Turning the Tides.
  • Nearly every villain from "TRON: Uprising" does this at one point or another, but Dyson seems to be especially fond of it.
  • Samurai Jack sometimes does this when he's ready to get dangerous, especially in the pilot.
  • Robot Chicken parodies this in their "Just The Good Parts" sketch: a segment of that dealing with The Shining consists near-entirely of the Kubrick Stares from the film.
  • In The Simpsons episode "Treehouse of Horror V", Homer does this during a Shining parody. The creators mention in DVD commentary that they made Dan Castellaneta do this while recording those lines. "Tilt your head forward and look up, you'll look like a lunatic."
  • In Code Lyoko, William Dunbar performs one of these just after (faking) escaping from XANA's possession for a moment. The screenshot has reached Memetic Mutation as his "rape face."
  • In the episode "Party Of One" in My Little Pony: Friendship Is Magic, usual Genki Girl Pinkie Pie, delivers one to the mane cast after being dragged to her surprise party. It Makes Sense in Context.
  • Aqualad has a very epic one in the Young Justice episode "Depths"
  • In the South Park episode "A Nightmare on Face Time" Randy does this twice in the Shining parody subplot.
  • The Lich does a very menacing one in a flashback in Adventure Time.

    Real Life 
  • Lord Byron (yes, it's very old) called this the 'under look'.
  • Maggie Gyllenhaal.
  • Alan Moore.
  • None other than Stanley Kubrick himself, allthefreakin'time.
  • Skandar Keynes, the actor who played Edmund Pevensie in The Chronicles of Narnia, does it a lot. A few examples are on his page.
  • Also of the NewsRadio alumni, Dave Foley
  • Many animals will express their aggression by taking this position. If an animal flattens their ears back while giving a Kubrick Stare, they may be planning to attack.
  • Anthony Kiedis of Red Hot Chili Peppers describes his "seductive stare" as the "Classic Kiedis Chin Tilt". Needless to say, it is very much a Kubrick Stare.
  • Often used by fashion models as a stock pose of seduction.
  • Christian Weston Chandler does this pretty often, naturally. His fans have even dubbed it "The Creepy Stare". An example.
  • Lee Unkrich's cat is pretty good at it.
  • Check out the stare on Perry Smith in his mugshots. How did Truman Capote ever fall for that guy?
  • Oddly, a benign version of this: Princess Diana had a habit of adopting this posture.
  • Adolf Hitler had quite the impressive one in some pictures.


Knockback SlideStock Poses'Last Supper" Steal
Knuckle TattoosShout-Outs IndexThe Ludovico Technique
Invisible Means UndodgeableImageSource/Star WarsLove Makes You Evil
Good Scars, Evil ScarsImageSource/Live-Action FilmsMalevolent Masked Men
Jackie Robinson StoryImageSource/PhotographyLanguage Equals Thought
Kaleidoscope EyesEye TropesLightning Glare

random
TV Tropes by TV Tropes Foundation, LLC is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike 3.0 Unported License.
Permissions beyond the scope of this license may be available from thestaff@tvtropes.org.
Privacy Policy
118724
0