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  • Author's Saving Throw:
    • The first patch of 2019 added in the option to adjust the notoriously aggressive enemy level scaling. It can't be turned off entirely, but the lowest setting is 4 levels below the player; at that point enemies are much easier and a much lower threat, without being COMPLETE pushovers, so the player gets to feel their increase in power, but the combat never gets so easy that it becomes dull.
    • Another saving throw going on is to change the ending of the second episode of "Legacy of the First Blade," "Shadow Heritage," to make the forced heterosexual pairing explicitly non-romantic, primarily by adding a heart prompt to the option of telling Natakas/Neema to stay as well as removing the scene of them kissing during the ending montage.
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    • A two-for-one with the addition of the "A Friend Worth Dying For" quest chain: The final reward is the Hero Sword, a weapon which was seen during the E3 2018 gameplay demo (but was not available in the game when it was released). The engraving which the sword unlocks increases the damage done by the Critical Assassination skill, which goes some way towards addressing complaints that the game makes it difficult for the player to assassinate important / elite characters.
  • Awesome Art: What did you expect from an Assassin's Creed game? This game can give the player a great view of Ancient Greece. In particular, the sync points at the Parthenon and the Olympia provide gorgeous views.
  • Broken Base:
    • Kassandra being the canonical protagonist. Some are happy that a strong female character is given the spotlight, and find Kassandra a more interesting character than Alexios. Others are unhappy that she's been given the role, given that it isn't historically accurate (a woman like Kassandra would not nearly have had the freedom or respect she has in the game, not to mention she would have been killed just for trying to get into the Olympics, much less compete), as well as for her voice acting being perceived as inferior to Alexios'. The game's producer Marc-Alexis Côté admitted in a June 2019 interview at Kotaku that two-thirds of their entire player base chose Alexios over Kassandra as the Player Character, which means that the majority of gamers who finished the game didn't play the canonical version that Ubisoft settled on after the game's release.
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    • The fact that mythical creatures are fought in the game, which arguably renders the whole "historical accuracy" debate pointless.
    • Ubisoft banning all player-made missions that only exist to give players lots of XP for little work. One side thinks the missions are banned because they interfere with the sale of microtransactions, while others agree with the decision as all player-made content that is actually worth playing is buried under thousands of XP grinding missions and such low-effort missions can be considered as cheating.
  • Catharsis Factor: Finally getting to beat the everloving shit out of Otso Berg at the end of the Fate of Atlantis DLC feels immensely satisfying. The smug bastard is so full of himself that he actually comes alone, armed with nothing but a sword and no special abilities whatsoever, and he's about as resilient as you can expect a human to be when up against a fully trained Assassin (read: Layla) wielding the Staff of Hermes Trismegistus. Curb-Stomp Battle doesn't begin to describe it, and he deserves every millisecond of it. The fact that he survives, ends up paralyzed from the waist down and at the mercy of his worst enemies makes it even sweeter.
  • Complacent Gaming Syndrome: Several skills and engravings are considered essential to certain builds:
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    • Universally, the skills which grant healing, slows down time when detected and refill for partial adrenaline segments are almost always taken. For engravings, "Chance to reduce damage taken by 50%" is considered a must-have at higher difficulties.
    • Non-Hunter builds should invest in Heroic Strike - even if you focus on Assassins, it's a great move to interrupt special attacks and take out those enemies that can't be Assassinated - like Mercenaries.
    • For Hunter builds, Devastating Shot (for its massive damage and bonus to status effect buildup), Rain of Destruction (high-damage aoe that can benefit from Trick Arrows at higher levels, letting you wreak havok amongst whole crowds at once), and Ghost Arrows (infinite range, can pierce shields and cover, can hit through walls for an unlimited distance, and it's also an A.I. Breaker so the enemies won't effectively search for you); all three are invaluable for their sheer destructive potential.
    • Assassins will enjoy Rush Assassinate as it's the only skill which allows Assassin Damage to be dealt at range AND is the only assassin skill you can use while sneaking up on animals. It also ensures that for two enemies with high hitpoints who are near each other, both will be severely injured or dead after the ability. Critical Assassinate is also vital, as it's the only way to effectively assassinate tougher enemies. Equipment-wise, assassins will very likely use the Pilgrim's Set as a crutch as it offers great freedom of movement, making it easier to set up ambushes or assassinations and escaping after the deed is done.
    • One of the later Elite Mercenaries (released as post-launch weekly content) dropped a helmet that let players become completely immune to melee damage.
  • Complete Monster: Even in the monstrous world of Ancient Greece, a cultist who Would Hurt a Child and a member of the Order of the Ancients manage to stand out:
    • Chrysis is a priestess of Hera who forbade medical treatment in Argolis, believing it to be sacrilege. She has also kidnapped the Eagle Bearer's younger sibling and turned him and numerous others into human weapons for the Cult of Kosmos by torturing them when they were infants. Chrysis would have a fellow priest's tongue ripped out and ordered a landlord to kill her own son, Dolops, when they witness Chrysis kidnapping the children. When confronted by the Eagle Bearer, Chrysis has the house with a baby inside burned, forcing the Eagle Bearer to choose between saving the baby and chasing Chrysis; should the Eagle Bearer chose the former, Chrysis would later ambush the Eagle Bearer, killing an innocent man along the way.
    • Legacy of the First Blade DLC: Pactyas the Huntsman leads the Order of Hunters to pursue Darius, killing his wife and children, with only one surviving. Tracking Darius and his remaining child in Makedonia, Pactyas would massacre numerous villages there, including ordering one's water supply poisoned, and would brainwash wolves to attack people in his efforts to lure Darius out of hiding and kill those Pactyas deems "tainted". Learning about the Eagle Bearer's whereabouts in Makedonia, Pactyas would gather all the victims he mutilated and killed, displaying the corpses hanging from a tree to trick the innocent villagers into attacking the Eagle Bearer; should the Eagle Bearer refuse to kill said villagers, Pactyas would kill them himself. Battling the Eagle Bearer, Pactyas would use psychological torment to break them before attempting to kill them.
  • Contested Sequel: Critical reception was even more positive than that of Assassin's Creed Origins, which was hailed as a turnaround for the franchise after years of Sequelitis. In particular, many critics praised Odyssey's expansion of the RPG mechanics introduced in Origins. However, many also criticized the increased reliance on microtransactions to skip the grinding that pads the game out for non-paying customers, the story, and some felt that even with the new changes and additions, it still feels too similar to past games. Later patches eased the difficulty and grind, somewhat alleviating those concerns, but the game still bears a lot of similarities to previous games, especially Origins.
  • Crosses the Line Twice:
    • Testikles' death. After traveling across Sparta to get him, and taking him to the Olympics, he falls into the water just after docking as he runs at the Eagle Bearer, wanting to give them a hug. As the Eagle Bearer looks on, they comment "Surely, he can swim." Cut to a shark swimming away, showing that while he can swim, he's no better at fighting sharks than you are. At this point Alkabiades tells the Eagle Bearer that it seems they've gotten promoted to Olympic Athlete. Cruel, but also funny.
    • "One Really, Really, Really Bad Day." Finagle would have a field day with this one. The sheer Up to Eleven nature of how much simple tasks keep going horribly wrong is so absurd it crosses over and becomes hilarious - and it just keeps happening! For example, the death of the horse-breeder in "A Horse, Of Course." Having fallen hook, line and sinker for some obvious Schmuck Bait, she's convinced that the horse you just had to rescue from bandits is now a Pegasus, and tries to make it fly. By riding it off a cliff, complete with a big, wide shot of her and the horse falling silently to their death. While all the Eagle Bearer can do is watch.
  • Critical Dissonance: Go to Metacritic and look up the reviews. The metascore is very good. The userscore on the other hand, is more negative, mostly due to the presence of microtransactions, which some believe are responsible for slowing down the natural character progression.
  • Demonic Spiders:
    • Wild Boars are just the worst. They hit for similar damage as bears, and are much faster and more agile. They're easier to miss because they're smaller and quieter, their attacks are less telegraphed, they attack in twos and threes, and have slightly less health but not enough to take out in a single flurry, so you have to waste a Heroic Strike or you'll lose half your energy. The sole saving grace is that their head hitbox is rather large for the avenue of killing them via marksmanship.
    • Lynxes, mostly thanks to their devastating grab attack that deals horrendous DoT very quickly and also leaves you open to other enemies while you're busy getting the raging cat off your back. The fact that, for some reason, melee attacks on lynxes very often simply don't hit although they should just makes them all the more groan-inducing. They're also the most relentless Super-Persistent Predator in the game, and they're fast, so escaping from them is damn near impossible unless you find something to climb on. Their relatively small size also means they have a tendency to show up out of nowhere and announce their presence with said grab attack. It's enough to give one Red Dead Redemption flashbacks.
    • Sharks. They are the default enemy for any shipwreck or submerged temple and they are horribly hard to hit because they're so fast. Plus you're underwater. You could stay up top and hope your bow is good enough (they're also immune to poison and burning), but sooner or later you'll have to go down there, and if they get their teeth into you, it's perfectly possible to drown before you're eaten. That said, the long reach of a Spear can do wonders against sharks, as it's swung around orbitally around the player character (which isn't really like how spears work when on land).
    • Among the Elysian soldiers, the ones wielding spears are easily the most annoying because they're basically a caster-type of enemy that tends to hang back while utterly spamming the Eagle Bearer with abilities that either deal damage in a small area and freeze their adrenaline bar, or deal a crapton of damage in a huge area. Their cooldown hovers somewhere around five seconds, and multiple spear carriers work in tandem to blanket the battlefield in explosive discharges while the Eagle Bearer can't escape because they're locked in close combat with other Elysians. To make matters even worse, these girls are anything but squishy, and they certainly know how to use those spears of theirs, so even if you manage to get to them, getting rid of them is a totally different matter.
  • Designated Villain: The Pythia, the famous Oracle of Apollo, is actually a puppet being controlled by the Cult of Kosmos to spread chaos and ensure events happen as the Cult wishes. She is portrayed as being just as responsible, reprehensible and receives just as much vitriol from the Eagle Bearer as the Cult themselves for all of the bad things that happen as a result, despite the fact that the Cult almost literally has her at spear-point (in fact, when infiltrating the Cult's hideout, you can find her being tortured for the mere possibility that she told you something actually usefulnote ). There's also a sidequest where you can find the son of the previous Pythia who was in the same situation, and the quest's resolution boils down to either "let the son kill his mother to ease his shame", "kill her yourself", or "let her live with the guilt of what she's done." Never once is "she was being coerced and it wasn't her fault" brought up as a possible point.
  • Ear Worm: The shanties the Adrestia crew sings. Whether the fact there's only 10 of them makes this better or worse is up to the individual.
  • Ensemble Dark Horse: Barnabas, your ship captain. Keeping up the series tradition, Barnabas is a salty, spirited old sea dog who soon establishes Undying Loyalty to the Eagle Bearer, and his mannerisms and unbridled support of you, no matter what you do, make him hard not to like. Acknowledged by Ubisoft themselves, as there are a handful of post-release sidequests specifically giving him the spotlight.
  • Fake Difficulty: For whatever reason, assassination is limited if enemies are searching for you, and the game doesn't really explain why. For example, if you are spotted but manage to escape and hide, you can't take out the guy who ran after you for a while because the button prompt to assassinate them just won't appear regardless of where you try it.
    • Gang Up on the Human and Can't Get Away with Nuthin' are in full effect here, to frustrating degree. If there's any conflict that breaks out and the Eagle Bearer is involved in any way, expect everyone to immediately target them. This can result in situations such as Spartan soldiers teaming up with a pack of wolves and boars to kill you because you had the audacity to defend yourself against a wolf attack in their line of sight, or a Mercenary taking a swing at you in a crowded street (without you retaliating!) and clipping a civilian, resulting in every guard, wild animal, and civilian in earshot to immediately team up with the Mercenary to kill you. This makes any fights in a city a dangerous affair, as even carefully taking out a Merc with well-aimed shots can still lead to hordes of peasants with swords trying to take you out, and your bounty skyrocketing as a result.
  • Game-Breaker: Has its own page.
  • Goddamned Bats: Cultist soldiers. While they're not as dangerous as Mercenaries, Polemarchs, and Cultist leaders, they're still annoying to fight; the rank-and-file have heavy shields that resist even Heavy Attacks (which normally overpower them) and Abilities (which normally go right through them), meaning that, unless you have the upgraded Shield Breaker, your only option is to dodge and counter their attacks. Scions are worse, as they're very fast, will dodge arrows, can easily avoid your attacks if you swing at them recklessly, and their flurries of quick attacks are hard to dodge, can't be broken out of if they hit you, and do a lot of damage. Their archers are just as bad as the factions' Marksmen, with the added perk of making heavy use of Poison or Fire arrows to further erode your health. While none of these are especially dangerous on their own, you'll almost always encounter these guys in packs, and if you can't stealthily assassinate a majority of them, can be in for a long, annoying battle.
    • Civilians. Thanks to the bastard combination of Gang Up on the Human and Can't Get Away with Nuthin', civilians who witness you in combat, regardless of circumstances, are like as not to grab weapons and start swinging at you themselves. While they don't do much damage and are easily killed, the game still counts it as murdering innocents, and will sharply raise your bounty. They love to blindside you while you're fighting Mercenaries, Spartan/Athenian soldiers, or wild animals, and if the fight drags on more and more will just keep joining in. It can lead to frustration as you either send your bounty to unreasonably-high levels, or else are forced to run away and abandon the Mercenary/treasure/leather you were after.
    • Mercenaries. When your bounty gets high enough, Mercenaries will simply spawn into the region you're in, and then will aggressively pursue you everywhere you go. While they won't follow you step-for-step, they'll always gravitate towards the general area you're in, and will follow you anywhere; middle of a Fort infiltration in the middle of the night? Middle of a rebel base underground, surrounded by your allies? Romantic, playful one-on-one duel with your Love Interest? Deep underground in a secret volcano base on a remote island, surrounded by active lava floes?! Doesn't matter; they'll show up and attack you on sight, and will even stand around in the background during cutscenes to attack the moment it ends. While they aren't a huge threat to a skilled and/or well equipped player, the buggers are persistent and ever-present, and at higher bounty levels, not only will they attack in groups, they'll start getting level bonuses on top of that! The only reprieve is that you can pay off your bounty at literally any time by going to the map screen, which is all well and good - except there are two instances in the game where your bounty is locked, meaning you'll be pursued no matter what!
  • Good Bad Bugs: Killing a mercenary onboard their ship and letting the ship sail off spawns a featureless white mannequin as a replacement captain. These mannequins can be recruited as lieutenants, though they have no weapons except for bombs.
  • Hilarious in Hindsight: Long before release, there was a leak about a man named Testikles. It turns out he's actually in the game.
  • Informed Wrongness: At the end of Fate of Atlantis, Layla skewering Berg is played as a dark moment of her going over the line... except this guy's the leader of Abstergo's black-ops team, who has tried to kill the Assassins repeatedly, actually did kill Layla's best friend, and has been following Layla since the game began with the intention of either killing her as well or dragging her back to the Templars. Killing him (or trying to) isn't an unforgivable act, it's just basic common sense.
  • It's Easy, So It Sucks!: One criticism some fans have with Odyssey's parkour system is that it's far too forgiving, allowing the player character to climb practically any surface with zero limitation. This essentially makes scaling large structures less memorable and infiltrating secure areas much simpler. An automatic upgrade even removes all fall damage, meaning you don't have to scale down walls and cliffs either.
    • The game itself can reach this point, too. While combat can be somewhat unforgiving, the level scaling can still screw the player over if they don't tone it down, and certain enemies are very dangerous, it's easily-possible to stack equipment bonuses, abilities, upgrades, and engravings to end up with completely overpowered combinations that can trivialize the game.
  • LGBT Fanbase: Play as Male or Female, with little to no difference in story and exactly the same practical/impractical armour models? No gender restrictions for Love Interests, and can romance several or ALL of them in the course of a single playthrough, with two of them being a huge focus of pre-release content? Incredibly muscular and powerful men and women who are treated as equals? It's no surprise that LGBT fans latched onto this game, and happily.
  • Les Yay: Myrrine and her female general Timo seem to have a very close relationship. Myrrine refers to her as "my sweet" early on, and Timo is notably present by her side during the symposium even though the other generals are nowhere to be seen. Before the Eagle Bearer and Timo leave to fight through Paros' blockade, Myrrine and Timo share a moment, and Timo tells Myrrine, "With your shield, or on it," which is very reminiscent of how Spartan wives would tell their husbands to only return home with their shields or on them (i.e. to only return victorious or having died heroically) before they left for battle. When Myrrine and the Eagle Bearer discuss returning to Sparta to begin hunting down the rest of the Cult of Kosmos, Myrrine looks sadly at Timo standing at a distance before saying that she still has a few things left to do before leaving.
    • Playing as Kassandra? It's been noted that there are a lot more women around to romance than men. It gives the feeling that the romances - which have very little bearing on the story - are there mainly for the male playerbase, especially since Alexios is the one more prominently featured in advertising.
  • Magnificent Bastard: In Ancient Greece these two prove themselves to be bright predecessors to the most brilliant and charismatic of the Templar Order:
    • Aspasia was once the leader of the Cult of Kosmos who controlled the Peloponnesian War between Athens and Sparta through Athenian Politics and Greek mythology. Becoming the lover of Perikles, she abandoned her original plan of killing him after developing genuine feelings for the ruler of Athens and instead manipulated him into supporting her agenda. After having her leadership position removed in favor of Deimos and the Cult killing Perikles, Aspasia would use Deimos' sibling, The Eagle Bearer, to kill off all the members of the Cult before revealing her true identity to the Eagle Bearer and offering them a chance to join her goal in creating a prosperous future where humanity would finally be united by a wise and philosophical king of Aspasia's choosing.
    • Legacy of the First Blade DLC: Amorges, The Tusk of Persia, was once friends with Darius before foiling Darius plans to assassinate King Artaxerxes and join the Order of the Ancients. Becoming the order's leader, Amorges would send men to hunt down Darius and his family, while he would travel to Greece himself to establish the Order's presence greatly expanding it's influence throughout Greece, by allying with the Cult of Kosmos hijacking their role in manipulating the Peloponnesian War to where Greece would be united under an Order-controlled Sparta, all while under the guise of the stranded merchant Orontas, fooling even his former friend. Amorges would then lead an attack on the village Dyme killing Darius' remaining child and kidnapping The Eagle Bearer's infant son in hopes of raising him to become a loyal soldier to his order.
  • Memetic Mutation: "My friendship with Bioware is over. Now Ubisoft is my friend". Explanation 
  • Moral Event Horizon:
    • Deimos crosses it in the "worst" ending by killing Myrrine - their own mother - in cold blood.
    • Chrysis crossed it long before the game began, by torturing Deimos as an infant to break them into the Cult's mindset. She crosses it again during the game by setting fire to a temple with a baby inside as a distraction to make her escape (and if you take the bait, she later murders an innocent man to set a trap for you!))
    • While long-time Assassin's Creed players knew the characters were already monstrous bastards to begin with, Juno and Aita are shown to have merrily blasted across the line by abducting dozens, if not thousands of humans, fatally experimenting on them to create the Olympos creatures, in Juno's case out of sheer fanatic racism.
  • Most Annoying Sound:
    • The loud horn that sounds when a bounty hunter is nearby. Particularly annoying if you’re attempting to take over a Fort through stealth; bounty hunters can rarely be taken out through assassination (unless you get lucky) they don't stand still or sleep like soldiers, and they don't follow patrols.
    • The low "bell" sound, slow motion, and monochrome effect that indicates you've been spotted, especially when you're trying to stealth a Fort, or when a hostile Mercenary spots you while you're simply shopping or exploring a town.
    • "Ezio's Family" may be the signature theme of the series, and Odyssey has a good rendition of the piece, but hearing it on end each and every time you access the menu will get on your nerves.
  • Most Wonderful Sound:
    • The chord of ascending/descending jingles that plays when Revelation picks up multiple signatures. You either found a lot of lootables triggering your magpie instinct, or got the heads-up on a bunch of enemies. The bounty hunter horn can also become this if you actively enjoy seeking them out to loot their gear (assuming you aren't currently in a fortress).
    • The "roar" and horn that sounds whenever you kill a Mercenary or Cultist; you've just earned a ton of great loot, XP and, in the latter case, made Ancient Greece a slightly-better place.
  • Narm:
    • Since the game introduces and places importance on dialogue choices and trees, some conversations are overly extended past the point of credulity; the finale of the Cult of Kosmos story for instance has a long conversation with Aspasia where she blathers on about her justifications and motivations, which takes away from the drama of the two characters.
    • Odessa's romance is extremely poorly written, such as the protagonist flirting with her constantly even as her father is dying from some sickness, or she just got attacked and almost killed by mercenaries after their home. Odessa calls the player out some for their poor timing, but attempting to be a decent person and not flirting with her until all is said and done has Odessa rejecting the Eagle Bearer's advances by the end of it.
      • In a broader sense, while the game allows you to romance anybody, unless more than one option is available in the same quest line, they don't interact or intersect at all. This means that every romance arc is self-contained as if the others never existed, allowing the Eagle Bearer to sleep their way across Ancient Greece without consequence, with their partners being none the wiser. This includes the Legacy of the First Blade DLC, where it's entirely possible to get into a committed relationship, have a child, then in the middle of it all sail off for side quests and enter another romance.
    • The Eagle Bearer's reaction to being on fire basically consists of shouting at the fire to stop burning them. They sound more like an annoyed parent chiding their child for bad behavior instead of, you know, a person who's rapidly burning to death.
    • As pants weren't really a thing back when the game takes place, any underwater scene or lengthy Leap of Faith turns into an extended panty shot.note  Thank Zeus the Eagle Bearer is wearing underwear.
    • The timeskip that occurs in Legacy of the First Blade can directly invoke this. The skip will be at least nine months, yet if you still have story or sidequest arcs in progress, the people involved won't admonish you for disappearing for nearly a year.
    • The repeatable side quests make use of full-sentence Mad Libs Dialogue. The individual lines themselves don't sound bad, but can lead to absurd scenarios; a hetarae who is also apparently a musician wants you to kill a random Spartan because he insulted her music? How about the priestess of Hera who was attacked by wolves...so wants you to kill some unrelated bandits instead? Or how about the merchant who can't sell his goods to a neighboring city because of hostile Mercenaries after him, so he...asks you forfor a handout? Made worse because some of these will also have arbitrary dialogue choices that mean nothing and have no impact on the quest, making the whole thing feel even less natural. Most players will probably skip the dialogue in these quests after finishing them once or twice.
    • At the end of episode 2 of The Fate of Atlantis, Layla killing Victoria in a sudden fit of rage is supposed to be her edging dangerously close to the MEH... but given Victoria's behaviour, stealing the item Layla apparently needs to save the world from destruction, and demanding Layla chose between her or it, the whole comes across more like Victoria just being a childish idiot throwing a strop.
  • Narm Charm: The climax of the side quest 'Family Values' is quite ham-fisted, complete with Supideo giving a Big "NO!" and blinding himself with some nearby salt. It is also hilarious.
  • Older Than They Think:
    • Through the marketing, you'd be led to believe that this is the first game with a female assassin. There have been female assassin characters in main console releases like Evie in Syndicate. Evie is even in the game as a Lieutenant for your ship via the Ubisoft Club rewards. Likewise, if we consider minor console releases, the first playable female character was Aveline de Grandpre in 2012. Her game, Assassin's Creed: Liberation was originally on the PS Vita. However, Kassandra is the first playable female character you can play from beginning to end in a major console release unlike Evie (a few of the main story missions has to be done as Jacob, her brother) or Aya in Origins (only playable in naval battles and her personal assassination segment).
    • Some players are complaining about the parkour mechanics making the game too easy because you can scale pretty much anything with next to no restrictions. However, this system is barely any different from the one in Assassin's Creed Origins, where no such complaints arose for some reason.
    • The fact that the protagonist ends up having children does have some roots in the lore, as originally the Animus could only access the historical Assassin's memories through the genetic memory of said Assassin's descendants, meaning they must have had children. However, the Unfortunate Implications still remain since this limitation was removed in later games, and nowadays all you need is the Assassin's DNA.
  • Padding: One of the biggest criticisms of the game is that it feels very long and progressing through the story can drag on. The biggest culprit is the sharp level scaling in the main story missions, which necessitate Level Grinding the side content (or Bribing Your Way to Victory, if that's your thing.)
  • Play the Game, Skip the Story: Many consider the story rather disjointed at best, if not outright bad, since it's incredibly easy to have multiple hours between major story missions thanks to side quests and just plain long travel times. The gameplay seems to fare better. That being said, the story itself isn't bad, per se, just has a lot of time spread across it and can come across as a bit cliche at times.
  • Player Punch:
    • Some of your consequences can be quite dire, and unexpected. An early example is learning that the family you've saved from being executed for Blood Fever went on to infect and kill most of the island of Kephallonia.
    • The return to Athens certainly counts. If you're not well-versed in history, the Athens plague and take you completely off-guard, where the city looks more like Silent Hill than the shining beacon of democracy with corpses everywhere and the populace in despair while Hippokrates is powerless to do anything about it. This is also the section where Deimos kills Pericles and the Cult murders Phoibe.
      • Speaking of. Phoibe's death counts regardless of how you treated her. If you were overprotective of her, it comes off as her defying you and getting killed for it; if you were supportive of her desires to help, it comes off as you directly putting her in harm's way. Either way, it definitely feels shitty.
    • By the end game, it's possible that your sibling, your love interest and your biological father are revealed to be evil forcing you to kill them.
    • Save a rebel on Delos Islands who shows no gratitude and open hostility to all outsiders (including you?) He'll repay you by murdering your Spartan ally (and possibly your lover) during the victory celebration.
    • In the Fields of Elysium DLC episode, the Eagle Bearer is first tasked with recruiting King Leonidas himself for Adonis' rebellion, only for Persephone to demand that same person's death a bit later. Going through with the latter not only means literally stabbing one of Ancient Greek's most badass heroes In the Back, followed by the Eagle Bearer suffering a massive My God, What Have I Done? moment for good reason (they just sent their own grandfather from heaven to hell, after all), it's also completely pointless in every respect. Persephone postpones giving you your promised reward indefinitely, so you don't get anything out of killing a very popular character in cold blood, and the whole affair isn't even mentioned again at any point that follows, thus having no impact on anything whatsoever despite the severity of the deed. Good luck with not feeling horrible after going through that.
  • The Scrappy: Some like Markos' bumbling mannerisms. Others hate his guts for being an idiot and an exploitative jackass who abuses the one act of kindness he performed in his life to guilt-trip the Player Character into a lifetime of servitude as his Hypercompetent Sidekick. It takes far too long until you can finally tell him to shove it when he comes up with yet another stupid plan to save his worthless life after he screwed himself over... again. Fortunately, a side-quest does exist where you bump into him again, which at the end explicitly lets you abstain from helping him so he can be killed by his own hubris.
    • The only options when saying goodbye to him are "Hug him" or "Shake his hand". "Punch Markos in the face" is never presented as a farewell option, disappointing those who consider him this game's version of Cousin Roman.
      • And then the Discovery Tour mode brought the delusional idiot back to host several of its tours...
    • Alkibiades, to some. At first glance, he comes off as a flighty, perverted drunk who hits on absolutely everyone, regardless of gender or orientation, and can feel pretty Squicky to a player with Incompatible Orientation, or just for his deviant tastes. Then you see his deceitful and manipulative side, and his willingness to use you as essentially a tool to deal with his problems (despite his assurances that he only does so because he trusts you), and it can be pretty hard to like the guy.
    • Sokrates can fall here too, for players that have no interest in philosophy or debate. Every conversation with him inevitably leads to him roping you into some sort of moral quandary or debate, and most times you have to go along with it - and, no matter your choice, he'll politely grill you on it. Thankfully, you do get the opportunity once or twice to tell him off rather than participate in his "games."
    • Good luck finding a Legacy of the First Blade player who has anything positive to say about Natakas/Neema.
    • In the real-world segments of the Atlantis DLC, Victoria quickly becomes incredibly annoying because, although she certainly means well and cares for Layla's wellbeing, her action constantly get in the way of Layla's work and, most importantly, the player's attempt at playing the game. Few tears were shed when Layla accidentally kills her at the end of the second episode.
  • Scrappy Mechanic:
    • Animal attacks have a habit of occurring at extremely inconvenient times. You can be lurking in some bushes, waiting for an opportunity to assassinate a target, when suddenly a wolf or wild boar will jump out of nowhere and attack you, most likely taking a big chunk out of your health and alerting every enemy in the area to your presence.
      • If an animal can't derail your carefully crafted attack plan, it'll happily kill the mood instead. It's depressingly common to be en route to a romantic spot with your current Love Interest, exchanging playful banter along the way, only for a pack of boars or wolves to appear out of nowhere and force you into combat mode, which interrupts the banter. Also, nothing like a bunch of rabid wildlife crashing your solemn trip to Athens' cemetery to honour your fallen friends at the end of the main story.
      • Animals attacking quest-related NPCs. Especially since they have a habit of doing it just as you're getting close, and killing them. Or, if you try to help these people shake off whatever animal is attacking them, you'll most likely hit them by accident, result in them turning on you for trying to save them.
      • Killing sharks. If you try to fight them underwater, you'll have a really annoying time of it. You can only really hit them right before they bite you, and timing your swings for that quarter-second window is not all that easy. If you miss, they'll take roughly a third of your health off. You can shoot them with your bow from above the water (something the game never indicates is possible), but while you're safe this way, actually hitting the constantly-moving targets is a real pain.
    • The Bounty System. Mercenaries just simply, instantly teleport to your position as soon as someone posts a bounty, and they can come in up to five at once. That the mercenaries are challenging mini-bosses alone makes them utterly lethal in groups. Somewhat mitigated by the fact that you can always go into the map and pay off your notoriety instantly, the effect is immediate, and drachmae becomes extremely abundant in the late-game. An additional mitigation is their (surprising) effectiveness against the two legendary boars whose pelts you need to acquire.
      • Even players who don't mind the bounty system in general occasionally take offence when a quest sics a horde of enemies at you and then slaps you with a hefty fine for murder despite acting in self-defence. A single fight like this can easily kick you from anonymous to a level 3 or 4 bounty in a matter of seconds, and the more bounty hunters are after you at the same time, the higher their levels gets until they seriously out-level you. Prepare for a Curbstomp Battle brought on you by something completely beyond your control.
    • Strict level requirements on main story missions are a particular sore point among players who just want to focus on the plot and not waste time on the side content, but are forced to grind the side missions anyways in order to reach the minimum required level.
    • Sailing north. Waves always travel from north to south, and since taking waves head-on slows the Adrestia to a crawl, sailing north takes at least twice as long as going any other direction.
    • The level scaling in the game is rather aggressive. Unlike in Origins where only a few locations were top-level by the time the player reached top level, in Odyssey every location scales with you, meaning by the time you're level 50 the entire map is level 47 and up. This means that a player who isn't specifically kitted out to prioritize Assassin damage can only actually assassinate archers and light infantry, with other infantry requiring a Critical Assassinate to one-hit kill from stealth and any elite can only be damaged from stealth, starting combat. Nearly every actual named non-random enemy in the game, such as cultists and other targets, are elites with large health pools. It's fair to say that this is an Assassin's Creed game where you can't really assassinate anyone important, at least not by the in-game assassination move. It's nearly always destined to be a boss fight, even for characters who don't really make sense as boss fights, such as politicians.
    • An opponent searching for you can't be assassinated until some time has passed, so even if you escape, hide and sneak behind them without them knowing, you can't take them out because the prompt fails to even show up. Thanks to the aforementioned level scaling, higher difficulties become an exercise in frustration, as assassination doesn't One-Hit Kill high level officers, melee combat is extremely dangerous and you have to wait before performing an another assassination move on them. Gets especially fun if they randomly turn around and alert everyone nearby after you've moved behind them to see if you can attempt to assassinate them.
    • For players who value efficiency and like to do everything, some of the randomly-generated sidequests taken from the Message Board arbitrarily ask you to talk to a random NPC somewhere in the world before starting the quest itself. Annoying because other, identical quests DON'T ask you to do this, and instead just point you to the objective, so it can add needless busywork, especially when the quest's ending can require you to turn it in to the same NPC, who can be quite far from the objective.
    • Horses, though welcome in general for crossing long distances, still suffer from several annoying flaws that can disincentivize some players from using them. They have notoriously bad pathfinding abilities in rough terrain, often getting stuck in insignificant obstacles that a character on foot can just walk through. They also really don't like climbing moderately steep slopes that pose no obstacle on foot, often forcing lengthy detours. Worst of all, coming anywhere near a settlement or fort slows their normally high speed down to barely above walking pace, making them next to useless in many, many areas of the game world.
  • Self-Imposed Challenge: There are countless ways to make this game harder without changing the difficulty or level scaling settings, but abstaining from the use of legendary items/perks and never paying off a bounty seem to be among the most popular ones.
  • Signature Scene: The Goat Scene in the prologue.
  • Squick: The quest "Age is Just a Number," where an elderly woman, Ausexia... vividly recounts her passionate sex life. Made particularly bad if the protagonist tells her not to expound on it, and she does so anyway.
    • Alkibiades can fall here. His introductory scene is an orgy with both men, women, and a goat...which he invites the player to, regardless of gender. (He insists the goat was just watching, though.) Every appearance is filled with innuendos and flirtations directed at everything that moves, which can be pretty uncomfortable for some players.
  • Strangled by the Red String: At the end of the Shadow Heritage DLC, regardless of your final choice regarding Natakas/Neema as well as your relationship with them, the game still ends with your character having a child with them.
  • That One Achievement:
    • "Stink Eye" requires you to reacquire the eye of the Cylops which you stuff into the goat's rear end in the cutscene on Kephallonia. It involves randomly hunting down a multitude of goats on the island until you just manage to land on the goat with the eye by random accident. The only upside is that the obsidian eye actually does raise the price of the trade goods.
    • "Top of the Food Chain" is another luck and grind based achievement that needs you to reach Mercenary Tier-I. Going up the mercenary tiers (which can only be done by steadily killing mercenaries on a higher level than your current position) can only be done when you find and locate mercenaries by randomly stumbling across them in the game world while also picking up mercenary clues from fallen foes. This isn't a problem if you find the mercenary names on a tier, but it's a pain when you are one step to Number 1 trying to find clues on the one randomly processed mercenary who's escaped your part. To make things worse, if you kill or recruit mercs it takes them out of the food chain, leading to new names to be added, further adding hay on to the pile as you find the one mercenary out of a constantly updating random stream of new and unknown names.
  • That One Boss:
    • The Kalydonian Boar, the first of the Daughters of Artemis sidequest line. Many a thread has been dedicated to raging about how many times they've died to it. It's not really its own attacks that are the problem, but it being a Flunky Boss who summons mooks that hit just as hard as it, charge from out of the view of the camera, and constantly. This can be mitigated somewhat by hanging around on its cave and sniping it, or alternatively, knocking out the summoned boars by Sparta Kick, Paralyzing Arrows, or bare-handed strikes to keep them from respawning.
    • The Erymanthian Boar. This time, instead of being a Flunky Boss, it drops poisonous clouds that can easily kill the Eagle Bearer in moments, the frequency of the attack making even the highest level of the heal skill a means to just buy you more time to try and kill it quickly. That said, the fight can be won without ever taking damage by simply evading the boar's charges while pelting it with arrows until it drops (it spawns the gas cloud only when attacked in melee). Takes a while, but is safe and easy to pull off.
    • The third episode of the Legacy of the First Blade DLC introduces another one: the Immortals, a pair of Persian elite warriors with ludicrous amounts of health and many extremely dangerous abilities. One is a rogue-type enemy, quick in melee and even more lethal with his bow. The other is a shield-bearing Brutenote  with all that entails. You first fight the rogue down to half his health, then the Brute takes over until he's down to half health, and then you must fight both simultaneously. The Brute in particular spends the entire third part of the battle unleashing nothing but devastating, unblockable attacks with considerable area of effect, making it very hard to get even a single hit in without taking heavy damage. He's also fairly fast and has very quick pounce attacks that are hard to dodge, so taking him down with arrows isn't particularly viable either. This comes after a long string of much easier battles (in fact, the entire base game doesn't put you up against anything this difficult) and right at the beginning of the DLC episode, so you can be forgiven for getting your ass handed to you simply because you didn't expect such a ridiculous difficulty spike out of nowhere.
    • The Medusa in the Atlantis questline is often regarded as the hardest fight in the entire game. She starts the fight with an invincible shield, has laser eyes that slow you if they hit (making you easier to hit) and send pulses that damage you, forcing you to get behind a pillar. After she fires this, she uses a blast attack that comes straight from the sky, meaning you can't just stand still - but if you're too far she'll use the blast attack multiple times. Get up close and she uses a grab that can take away a huge amount of health, and a knockback. Oh, and she teleports A LOT, and so is easy to lose track of. Oh, and at each third of her battle, she summons six heavy-hitting stone warriors while surrounding herself in an invincible shield and alternating her range attacks. Your ONLY approach is a medium range strategy, so that she alternates her attacks predictably and you can take out those stone soldiers - but if you try to melee them you'll be surrounded and die. While occasionally dashing in with Overpower or Hero Strike is not out of the question, are you good with status arrows? You will be by the end of this fight.
  • That One Level: Near the end of the game there are two (potentially three, depending on your choices) sections of the main questline during which the Eagle Bearer has an unclearable bounty on their head for as long as they are in an entire country until a certain cultist is eliminated during the story. This can make completing quests considerably more challenging, and very frustrating, because you are constantly being tracked by multiple bounty hunters, who always seem to figure out exactly where you need to be doing things and decide to patrol that exact area, and killing them only briefly relieves the pressure since the bounty can't be paid off and doesn't decay over time. On the plus side, there's no down side to killing Mercenaries.
  • That One Sidequest:
    • "Free Their Minds, The Rest Will Follow" from the Fields of Elysium DLC requires the Eagle Bearer to recruit eight new resistance members from each of the map's three main regions. In other words: you're forced to non-lethally take down 24 Elite Mooks, followed by going through the animation of the Eagle Bearer freeing them from Persephone's mind control with the Staff of Hermes Trismegistus every time. It's not particularly dangerous nor difficult with the right tactics, but very tedious to pull off. At least you get an achievement for it, and the conquest battle right before the Final Battle becomes a lot easier thanks to all the manpower on your side.
      • At this time, any mooks recruited prior to the sidequest don't count towards the numbers in the sidequest itself. Which is irritating since you can learn about liberating Elysian soldiers from the loading screen long before you get the sidequest itself(and there's an achievement that outright mentions it).
    • The base game has something similar, only worse: the Polemarch Seals quest chains handed out by Lysander in Sparta and Demosthenes in Athens. Both send you to kill the polemarchs commanding enemy forts, three times per quest, and both give out five of these quests before they're content. In other words, you have to infiltrate the most heavily defended locations on the map to kill and loot the most powerful enemy within, a total of 30 times, all for negligible rewards (although the XP gain isn't bad for fresh characters). This is especially painful in a fresh game because the quest givers are located in level-locked regions you won't be able to get to for a while, and polemarchs don't drop their seals unless these quests are active. So, if you OCD'd the entire map before you start doing sidequests, prepare for a terribly boring grind. New Game+ players have it slightly better if they knew/remembered to pick up the quests before clearing the whole map because the seals stack indefinitely, allowing you to collect them all during regular exploration.
  • They Changed It, Now It Sucks!: An example that overlaps quite a bit with It's the Same, Now It Sucks!. Odyssey doubles down on the new formula of leveled enemies and equipment introduced with Origins, meaning those fans who enjoyed the gameplay of the older games in the franchise and didn't like the inclusion of additional RPG mechanics and lowered emphasis on stealth in Origins are not going to like Odyssey either.
  • They Wasted a Perfectly Good Character: The Eagle Bearer, having become immortal proceeds to spend the next 2500 years doing fuck all and not at all being involved in the Assassin/Templar war or in the later periods of Greek histoy. While that at least could be justified due to either a lack of knowledge or lack of interest, their rather abrupt death after giving Layla the Staff of Hermes Trismegistus can not. You have a being with well over two thousand years of life and combat experience fall over themselves praising the newcomer in a rather OOC fashion and then handing them their artifact. The fact that the Eagle Bearer was in a position to witness and participate in later events of Greek history, such as the Trial of Sokrates and the Rise of Alexander, and presumably did nothing also beggars disbelief. Nothing against Layla, but this is a definite waste of a character, especially the second one since Ezio to transcend the Animus and interact with the person viewing the memories
    • In Legacy of the First Blade, the child of Darius is effectively there for no further purpose than to be the breeding stock for the infamous child, then gets Stuffed in the Fridge a short ways into the final episode, all to explain why the Eagle Bearer is giving up their child.
  • Unfortunate Implications: As though the ending of the Legacy of the First Blade DLC's second episode wasn't bad enough, the achievement for completing the episode was called "Growing Up" (though unlike the actual events, this was later renamed "Blood of Leonidas".
    "In the new DLC, you are forced to have a baby with another character, unlocking the Achievement ‘Growing Up’. Not only does this suggest having a child is the default state of an adult – some end goal to aspire to – it also undermines anyone who has thus far roleplayed as a gay character." - VG247
    • The whole of Legacy of the First Blade has been repeatedly beaten up for the fact that it forces the Eagle Bearer to have a child with Darius's child, who changes based on gender. This comes after the marketing up to the release of the game proper said that all romances would be optional, and you could play as characters completely uninterested in one gender or the other - which, considering that drew in the LGBT Fanbase mentioned above, was not received well. To say nothing of the undertones of corrective rape with regards to forcing a Kassandra being played as a lesbian to sleep with and conceive a child with a man.
  • What an Idiot!:
    • The Cult of Cosmos is in a meeting. During this meeting, Deimos arrives with Elpenor's dead body and tells them that one of them is a traitor. Coincidentally, a new recruit who has not given a name nor has been heard of by the other Cult members has arrived at exactly the same time, has been talking to pretty much every cultist in the area, and if you chose Kassandra, they're a woman wearing the male Cult uniform.
      • You'd Expect: The Cult immediately starts questioning the new recruit due to this number of coincidences.
      • Instead: They let Deimos kill a loyal Cult member as the Eagle Bearer walks out with nobody the wiser as to what happens.
      • Even Worse: In the end, the Eagle Bearer either kills every member or leaves the organisation with only The Ghost of Kosmos still standing.
    • From the modern day part of Fate of Atlantis, Dr. Victoria Biebeau has objections to Layla's use of the Staff of Hermes Trigemestus and associating with Alethia. Okay, fair enough, since the Staff has already been shown to have a One Ring-like effect on folk (this being the entire point Layla's going through Alethia's simulations), and Layla isn't exactly the most rule-abiding gal ever.
      • You'd Expect: That between sessions Victoria try to find a way to get it through to Layla she doesn't like the effect these events are having on her in a calm and constructive fashion.
      • Instead: Victoria disconnects Layla from the Animus when she's in a bad mood and takes aforementioned corruptive staff, demanding Layla chose then and there between her or the item she needs to save the world from certain destruction. While Abstergo are closing in on them, and have already made two attempts on their cell in recent days.
      • As a result: Layla lashes out with the Staff and accidentally kills her.

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