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Left: Modern Egypt—Right: Modern Gotham
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When people say the word "Egyptian" in popular culture, what pops into mind?

The Pyramids? Cleopatra? Animal-headed gods? Mummies? The Eye Of Horus?

All of these answers refer to the the ancient civilization of Kemet, and overlook its more modern cultures; for example, Egypt has been Islamicized for over 1200 years and before that Egypt was a Christian nation with a Hellenistic (Greek) culture. For reference, England adopted Christianity at roughly the same time as the Arab conquests of Egypt, and that's twice the amount of time that Christianity has existed in the Americas. At present, over ninety percent of the Egyptian populace is Muslim.note  Egypt has undergone numerous radical changes since its Ancient period and ruled by many foreign powers, yet, in fiction, it seems as if Islam, or any of the other influences from the last two millennia, never touched the country at all.

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A Western variation of this would be associating Greece with its ancient roots as if they still worship the pagan Olympian pantheon, in spite of the nation being Orthodox Christian today and having been an part of an Islamic empire for centuries.

Most commonly, Egypt exists in a form of pop cultural stasis where the wardrobe, themes, or even religion of Ancient Egypt are all anyone knows about it. In a Five-Token Band, or a cast full of National Stereotypes, the character with the gimmick of "Egyptian" has those attributes as their most prominent character trait. In other cases, the character is "modern", but still has no influences from Muslim culture (or that of any prominent ethnic group, such as the Copts). Any references to these modern cultures are either severely downplayed or totally non-existent. Characters will usually not even speak Egyptian Arabic (nor Coptic which is actually the modern day descendant of the Egyptian language) but pepper their speech with Ancient Egyptian phrases.

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The only thing that is considered "modern" is the music, either using "The Streets of Cairo" in the case of older media, or with riffs that consist of ouds, qanun zithers, and ney flutes; instruments that wouldn't have existed in ancient Egypt.

This trope is NOT when one character in a plentiful cast of Egyptians happens to utilize an Ancient Egypt gimmick. It's also NOT for when the story actually takes place in Ancient Egypt. It's for when Islam—or any other important part of modern Egypt's identity—is absent from portrayals of the modern population in whole or part, or when the sole "Token Egyptian" character has very few of those influences. If the character is a Fish out of Temporal Water, lack of Muslim influences is a given, so the character must be one of the few (if not the only) "Token Egyptians".


Examples:

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    Anime & Manga 
  • Yu-Gi-Oh!: The Ancient Egyptians are central to the plot of the original manga and anime series. They and their gods created the monsters and dueling system that would later be converted into the Duel Monsters card game. Thus, all important Egyptian characters like The Pharaoh, Marik, Ishizu, and others are all Fish out of Temporal Water or descended from those figures. When other Egyptians appear, there are few other cultural references to be seen.
  • Mobile Fighter G Gundam: Dahal is a modern Egyptian who wears an Arab-style keffiyeh but carries an Egyptian-style crook, is mummified after his death, and his Gundam, the Pharaoh/Mummy Gundam, is themed entirely around ancient Egypt.

    Comic Books 
  • DC Universe:
    • Black Adam is the most famous Egyptian character in DC, and he is an immortal demigod that was originally born in Ancient Egypt before being given the power of Shazam and becoming a modern day supervillain.
    • Black Adam's queen, Isis, and her brother, Osiris, are modern-day Egyptians obviously themed around the Egyptian gods. Neither their powers nor cultural influences reference anything related to modern Egypt.
    • Hawkman and Hawkgirl were both originally an Ancient Egyptian prince and princess that are reincarnated as the titular hero and heroine in the modern day. Neither hero is actually Egyptian, so the aforementioned royalty are the only form of Egyptian culture present, modern or otherwise.
    • Doctor Fate is an Ancient Egyptian sorceror named Nabu that inhabits the helmet of modern American protagonist Kent Nelson. Neither Nelson nor Nabu have anything to do with modern Egypt.
  • Marvel Universe:
    • Apocalypse is En Sabah Nur, an ancient Egyptian that gained power from the cosmic Celestials and thus became an immortal, despotic supervillain in the modern day.
    • Ahmet Abdol, the Living Monolith, is a modern day Egyptian professor of Egyptology who gained immense power and thus changed his appearance to resemble that of an Egyptian pharaoh in the modern day. Whether or not Abdol shared any cultural elements of modern Egypt before his transformation is never explored.

     Film - Live Action 

     Literature 
  • Discworld: A Fantasy Counterpart Culture example is present in the novel Pyramids. Djelibeybi at first seems to have experienced negligible change over the past millennium, thanks to an immortal high priest. But it is later shown that they've had linguistic shifts when a bunch of mummies wake up and the various gods worshipped over the centuries start wrestling over the sun.
  • Rick Riordan's mythology novels all play this straight. Despite focusing on mythology of a specific place and being set in the modern day, they never delve into what kind of society the culture is now like:
    • The Camp Half-Blood Series handwaves this by saying that the classical world moves alongside the center of Western civilization (which currently is the USA), implying that Greece is only a birthplace and not the center of the universe. The Olympians stay classical and don't change alongside Greece. In fact, Greece doesn't make an appearance until the fifth book of the second series and is treated like any other country. The fact that it is Orthodox Christian (or just plain Christian) is never mentioned.
    • The Kane Chronicles: The series never touches society and politics of post-Pharaonic Egypt. One Egyptian character has an obviously Arabic name (Zia Rashid) and a backstory about the Pharaoh of the House of Life position is that it remains vacant since Alexander the Great conquered Egypt in the 3th century BCE, but that's it.
    • Magnus Chase and the Gods of Asgard downplays this. It does not detail the Christianization of Scandinavia and its aftermath, focusing everything on the Norse mythology and the Vikings. However, it does mention about the Kievan Rus', a Slavic polity founded by a Nordic ruling class in the 9th century CE. One major character, Samirah al Abbas, is a descendant of Ahmad ibn Fadlan, an Arab who traveled to and wrote extensively about the Kievan Rus'.

     Live-Action TV 
  • Discussed in American Gods: When Egyptian-American Immigrant and devoted muslim Mrs. Fadhil dies she expresses some concern when Anubis comes to guide her to the afterlife, rather than some muslim entity. He explains that when she was a child "she listened to their stories and kept them alive in her heart". Anubis, a starving Psychopomp due to Gods Need Prayer Badly couldn't exactly wait for a devoted believer in Ra or Isis to die.
  • Inverted by The Jews Are Coming: Almost all Ancient Egyptian characters speak in Arab Beoble Talk, and the one exception — an Austrian-accented dream interpreter who claims Pharaoh's "seven thin cows eating seven fat ones" dream stands for a desire to kill his father and sleep with his mother — is stated to come from Sharm El Sheikh.

    Tabletop Games 
  • Justified in TORG, since the High Lord ruling over the Nile Empire, is superimposing his 1930's pulp-style world over much of northeastern Africa, so of course ancient Egyptian stylings are everywhere, alonside other pulp adventure tropes.

    Video Games 
  • Darkstalkers: Justified because the story is based on classic monsters and creatures from folklore and mythology. The Egyptian character, Anakaris, is thus an Egyptian mummy.
  • Overwatch: The Amari family are a mother-daughter pair from Egypt, with their home stage called "the Temple of Anubis", showcasing an Egyptian temple 20 Minutes into the Future (albeit, it's demonstrated to only be one location in Egypt—but still the main one for the game). The first character introduced, Pharah, has absolutely no Islamic references about her whatsoever. Even her voice actress is an American doing a very non-Arabic accent, and her alternate costumes are very heavily based on either Egyptian Mythology or Native American culture (the latter being the other side of her parentage). The second character, Ana, is voiced by a real-life Egyptian woman that speaks Arabic, but beyond that also lacks any Islamic influences.
  • Street Fighter:
    • Street Fighter III: In Second Impact, the home stages of the brothers Urien and Gill are in Egypt, with the former's located in the desert surrounded by Ancient Egyptian ruins and a sphinx, and the latter's located inside an ancient tomb or pyramid.
    • Street Fighter V: The franchise's first Egyptian character, Menat, is heavily based on Egyptian Mythology. Most of her abilities and moves are named after Egyptian deities, and all of her costumes are ancient Egyptian-themed (she’s even dressed as a very sexy mummy in one of her alts.) In the Street Fighter series’ contemporary setting, Menat displays no modern-Egyptian attributes at all.
  • Empire Earth II: Territory and city names for the Egypt civilization come from all over Egyptian history (including Ancient Egypt, Alexander The Great's conquest, and post-Islam) no matter the time period, so it's possible to have Al Qahirah (Cairo) and Al-Iskandariyah (Alexandria) in 2000 BC or Bubastis and Abu Simbel in 2000 AD. There is no mention of Islam either way, and their buildings share models with the other Middle Eastern civilizations (Turkey and Babylon), so no Build Like an Egyptian except in the campaign.
  • Rome: Total War: This trope is played with, in a much earlier fashion than normal. A common point of criticism is that, despite being set in the time of the ride of the Roman Empire, the Egyptian models are still shown to be based on New Kingdom Egypt, looking like they did over a thousand years before the time of the game. When Total War: Rome II came out, it fixed this, as Egyptians now look markedly more Hellenistic.
  • The Sims 3: Zigzagged on the World Adventures expansion pack, where your sim(s) travel to Al Simhara, a world based on Egypt, where you could visit the Pyramids, discover tombs, acquire relics, get cursed by mummies, and buy items for your home that are ancient Egyptian-themed. The modern elements include residents that have Arabic names, music played with Middle Eastern instruments, food such as falafel and shawarma, the hidden skill of snake charming, and caftans and fezzes.
  • Skullgirls: The character Eliza is a modern diva who, according to Word of God, is from an unspecified Fantasy Counterpart Culture similar to Egypt. She is bonded to a Parasite organism named Sekhmet, named for the Egyptian god, and it's hinted that she also uses the alias Neferu, which means "Beauty" in the Kemet language and was the name of several Eqyptian queens. She even has a deep fondness for cats, much like the Ancient Egyptian reverence for them.
  • In Slipstream 5000, one of the drivers is Egyptian, and she uses ancient Egyptian symbolism — her racing name is Isis ("the Crisis"), she wears an ankh pendant, and so forth. However, this could just be a branding gimmick employed by the character (who, like other racers, is an international celebrity).
  • Tekken is guilty of this with its first Egyptian character, Zafina. Sure, her nationality is officially unknown, but she lives close to Azazel's Temple, which is explicitly located in Egypt. Sure, she has an Arabic name, but her association with modern Egyptian culture stops there. Her attire is very Ancient Egyptian (and extremely Stripperiffic, when doing so in predominantly conservative Egypt would be a bad idea) and her backstory concerns her being the descendant of ancient warriors who monitor Azazel's Temple since pharaonic times. Her moves are patterned after ancient Middle Eastern beings and is inspired by Kalaripayattu, of all things. And she speaks English with a strange, but certainly not Arabic, accent.
  • Virtue's Last Reward: Alice is part Egyptian and wears Ancient Egyptian themed costume with a large aquamarine gem that is meant to be a scarab.

    Western Animation 
  • Alfred J. Kwak: Alfred visits modern-day Egypt to find a cure for his friend, a professor of Egyptology, inside one of the Pyramids. It turns out that the ancient Egyptians have preserved their culture into the present day and are maintaining The Masquerade.
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