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Characters: Big Finish Doctor Who Companions
Companions of the Doctor appearing in Big Finish Doctor Who, the Audio Play series based on Doctor Who.

Please keep in mind that, although the series is officially part of the Whoniverse, it encompasses many different timelines/continuities and includes adaptations of existing works from the Doctor Who Expanded Universe. Due to Big Finish's sheer size and complexity, it also plays by the rules of the Doctor Who Expanded Universe: the TV series can at times contradict or overwrite the timelines described here, or adapt them for the televised continuity.

For a still-growing recap list of the audio dramas featuring these characters, feel free to look here.

For the other cast pages relating to Big Finish Doctor Who, see:


The vast majority of the companions who showed up in the Doctor Who TV series have returned for the Big Finish audio adventures, played by the original actors. (With the notable exception of Dodo, who has not appeared at all.) Although they usually travel with the Doctor, some just appear together in Companion Chronicles for their own adventures, or in their own separate series. For general character tropes about these returning companions, see the classic series companions page.

The companions listed here are sorted in chronological order, by their first time meeting the Doctor in the TV series.

    open/close all folders 

     Susan Campbell 

Susan Campbell (First and Eighth Doctors)

Voiced by: Carole Ann Ford

Aside from appearing in plenty of Companion Chronicles with the First Doctor, Susan returns as a companion to the Eighth. She's had a busy 20-odd years since her grandfather left her with freedom fighter David Campbell — raising her half-human son, Alex, and eventually rising quite high in Earth's fledgling government. Later winds up helping the Earth adjust to the concept of working alongside aliens again... and fighting Daleks. Again.

  • Break the Cutie: A second Dalek invasion, just like the first... but far worse, losing her son to the Daleks in said invasion and her entire life is ruined in the span of two audio dramas. But despite all she's lost, Susan is more worried about her grandfather's mental state than herself.
  • Give Him a Normal Life: Susan doesn't give up her son, but she does pretend to be human for his sake.
  • Mama Bear
  • Reasonable Authority Figure
  • Shipper on Deck: The Companion Chronicle "Here There Be Monsters" opens with her talking about how she thinks that Ian and Barbara truly belong together.

     The TARDIS 

The TARDIS (All Doctors)

Voiced by: Nicholas Courtney (2003)

Sexy Thing gets A Day in the Limelight on occasion in Big Finish, and saves the world a few times over in the process.

     Ian Chesterton 

Ian Chesterton

Voiced by: William Russell

Having spent a long time travelling with the First Doctor, Ian has many, many stories to tell. Now much older, he fondly looks back on his adventures.

  • Flash Back: His stories in general, since William Russell's voice wouldn't be able to pass for young Ian anymore.
  • Relationship Upgrade: "The Rocketmen" chronicles the exact moment he fell in love with Barbara. Literally. Out of a World in the Sky at terminal velocity.
  • The Slow Path: Averted in "The Revenants", when he and Barbara manage to reach the 1950's, but can't bring themselves to live out the years in quiet solitude until they'd reach their own timeline again. They choose to go back to the TARDIS instead.

     General Sir Alistair Gordon Lethbridge-Stewart 

General Sir Alistair Gordon Lethbridge-Stewart (Sixth and Eighth Doctors)

Voiced by: Nicholas Courtney

Now retired and Happily Married to Doris, the Brigadier (or the General, although he prefers being called the former) still works with UNIT at times. He notably also stars in several Unbound stories, many Companion Chronicles, and in a few Big Finish UNIT episodes (without the Doctor).

  • 10-Minute Retirement: He signs back on with UNIT, as a scientific advisor, when he realises he can never truly bring himself to leave.
  • Cool Old Guy
  • Genre Savvy: He's able to recognise Six very quickly. Though Eight takes him a bit longer.
  • Happily Married
  • Jumped at the Call: In two "what if?" Unbound stories, he's very happy to become the Doctor's companion.
  • Retired Badass: The UNIT series see him leading a covert operation to save Britain from total anarchy.
  • Vitriolic Best Buds: Interestingly averted: due to Six's straightforward attitude and Eight's kindness, he gets along noticably better with Six and Eight than he ever did with Two, Three, Four and Seven in the TV series.

     Zoe Heriot 

Zoe Heriot (Second Doctor)

Voiced by: Wendy Padbury

When Zoe parted from the Second Doctor, the Time Lords erased Zoe's memory of her adventures. But certain parties have evidence that she travelled in time, and have tracked her down in search of the information she doesn't know she knows.

     Jo Grant 

Josephine "Jo" Grant (Third Doctor)

Voiced by: Katy Manning

Jo has plenty of Companion Chronicles with the Third Doctor set during their time at UNIT, and a few set many decades later.

     Captain Mike Yates 

Captain Mike Yates (Third Doctor)

Voiced by: Richard Franklin

Mike appears in a few Companion Chronicles, and in the third installment of Destiny Of The Doctor.

  • Badass Normal
  • Naïve Newcomer: "Vengeance Of The Stones" is the story of how he met the Doctor, stopped an alien invasion and joined UNIT.
  • Rank Up: He starts off his introduction story as a Lieutenant.

     Sarah Jane Smith 

Sarah Jane Smith

Voiced by: Elisabeth Sladen

Before The Sarah Jane Adventures, Big Finish gave Sarah Jane her own two-season miniseries. Has its own trope page: Sarah Jane Smith.

     Leela of the Sevateem 

Leela Of The Sevateem (Fourth, Sixth and Eighth Doctors)

Voiced by: Louise Jameson

Leela travels with the Fourth Doctor in stories set between their TV series episodes. Later, living on Gallifrey, she meets the Eighth Doctor and Romana during their battle with Eldritch Abomination Zagreus. She and Romana subsequently get their own Big Finish spinoff, Gallifrey — which has its own character sheet — and during that time, she travels back to Victorian London to team up with Jago and Litefoot for many adventures.

  • Awesomeness by Analysis: Leela only has to use a weapon once to be an expert and she handles a gun proficiently after using one to protect her friends Jago and Litefoot in "The Talons of Weng-Chiang."
  • Constantly Curious
  • Weak-Willed: Relatively speaking. As a human, she's much weaker against Mind Control than Gallifreyans, which her enemies gladly make use of.
  • Unusually Uninteresting Sight: She's not even remotely surprised when, at one point, the day is saved literally by the use of applied nonsense. After all, everything the Doctor does looks like nonsense to her.

     Professor George Litefoot 

Professor George Litefoot (Fourth and Sixth Doctors)

Voiced by: Trevor Baxter

The pathologist from "The Talons Of Weng-Chiang" got his own Companion Chronicle together with Jago, followed by many seasons of their own spinoff, which end up also starring Leela. They also encounter the Doctor again on occasion.

     Henry Gordon Jago 

Henry Gordon Jago (Fourth and Sixth Doctors)

Voiced by: Christopher Benjamin

The impresario from "The Talons Of Weng-Chiang" got his own Companion Chronicle together with Professor Litefoot, followed by many seasons of their own spinoff, which end up also starring Leela. They also encounter the Doctor again on occasion.

     Romana 

Romanadvoratrelundar (Fourth, Fifth, Sixth and Eighth Doctors)

Voiced by: Mary Tamm, Lalla Ward, Juliet Landau

Romana travels with the Fourth Doctor when she's in her first body, exploring the universe together with him. In her second regeneration, she becomes the Lady President of Gallifrey, just like in the novels. After a few stories with the Eighth Doctor, Romana II got her own spin-off (Gallifrey) together with Leela, which has a separate character sheet. A new incarnation of Romana (voiced by Buffy alumnus Juliet Landau) was introduced in 2013.

  • Actor Existence Failure: Mary Tamm died before her audios with Tom Baker were published.
  • Break the Cutie: Gets thoroughly broken while she's imprisoned by the Daleks, though she recovers marvellously.
  • Fan Fic: Spends her spare time as Lady President writing a rather transparent Doctor Fan Fic, about a man named "Sigma".
  • Mercy Kill: In "Zagreus", Romana is fully prepared to perform one on Eight.
  • The Slow Path: She spends twenty years as a slave for the Daleks.

     Adric 

Adric

Voiced by: Matthew Waterhouse, and briefly by Andrew Sachs (2008)

Matthew Waterhouse initially refused to return for Big Finish, so for a re-interpretation of the character post-"Earthshock", a much older Adric was played by Andrew Sachs. It would take another five years before Waterhouse eventually joined the cast, and many stories with Adric set during his TARDIS travels have been produced since then.

  • A God Am I: God-king of the prehistoric bug people.
  • Back for the Dead: He spends his final moments helping Thomas Brewster.
  • Only Mostly Dead: Turns out he survived the end of "Earthshock".
  • Stalker with a Crush: Spending decades of his life on prehistoric earth, without any humanoid women around, led him to become a bit... preoccupied with the memory of Nyssa.

     Nyssa of Traken 

Nyssa of Traken (Fifth Doctor)

Voiced by: Sarah Sutton

The most prolific companion of the Big Finish line, Nyssa has many, many adventures with the Doctor that are set between "Time-Flight" and "Arc of Infinity". She would also encounter the Doctor and her friends again much, much later on in her life — despite it being only two days later for them. Luckily, as she's not human, this isn't as much of a problem as it could be.

  • Action Mom: She ends up settling down, and having three children, while still going out on adventures to stop the Company.
  • The Bus Came Back: She rejoins Five, Tegan, and Turlough 50 years later (for her) and two days after the events of "Enlightenment" (for them).
  • Big Damn Kiss: She has her first kiss with an English bloke in Stockbridge. The moment shocks her — all her life, she'd imagined it as a logical thing, something that might happen and that she would have to deal with as part of a larger process, but the moment comes and goes very quickly and naturally. She gives the relationship a go, but soon realises that she has a lot to learn and she hasn't found the right person yet.
  • Burn the Witch!: As one of few people to ever leave their Arcadia, Nyssa falls under suspicion by the old world Trakenites who believe she's tainted by their version of the devil. Not that she was that safe on Earth: In Winter For the Adept, the headmistress of Tremayne Academy is insistent that Nyssa is a succubus. In Land of the Dead, she picks up a psychic impression from still-living dinosaur skeletons in Alaska; the superstitious dig team mistakes it for a genuine premonition, and Nyssa is tied up and offered to the "spirits" as sacrifice.
  • Calling Me a Logarithm: She once has this reaction to the Tremayne headmistress labeling her a "harlot". "Whore of Babylon" draws yet another blank. (Winter For the Adept)
  • Can't Stay Normal: Defied in Nyssa's case. She considers pursuing a simple life with Andrew, the boy she met in Stockbridge. Torn between her responsibilities as a scientist and the anxieties of a linear existence, Nyssa decides she can't cope and leaves in the TARDIS. However, Circular Time reveals that she does eventually marry a professor named Lasarti, with whom she has a son and daughter.
  • Character Aged with the Actor: Nyssa's Plot-Relevant Age-Up was essentially done so Sarah Sutton could play a Nyssa who was much closer to her own current voice rather than a voice she had in the eighties. A rejuvenation was also given to the character a few adventures later so her running around with the rest of the TARDIS crew would be much more plausible.
  • Character Focus: "Circular Time" is a sweet, almost dreamy character study of Nyssa.
  • Dead Guy Junior: Her youngest son is named Adric Traken, after her friend and planet both.
  • Died in Your Arms Tonight: In Tegan's. (She gets better.)
  • Exposed to the Elements: Nyssa gets a rude awakening one night when the Doctor's teleport experiment sends her somersaulting down the Swiss Alps in her nightgown. She didn't see the humor in it.
  • Finishing Each Other's Sentences: Hey, just who is the Time Lord and who is the companion around here? Then again, The Land of the Dead suggests that Five just brings it out in people.
    Doctor: You know, I chide Nyssa for finishing other peoples' sentences but—
    Monica: It's quite fun, isn't it?
  • Germanic Depressives: Like all Trakenites, she tends toward humorlessness, blank expressions, and pop culture isolation. Stuck in Hamburg without the TARDIS translating for her, she begins to grow fond of the German language. (Fanfare For the Common Men)
  • How Unscientific!: Alien activity Nyssa can accept. Telekinesis and energy waveforms, for that matter. But ghosts? Sorry, there's just no scientific basis for that. (Winter For the Adept)
  • Hugh Mann: Nyssa never gets the hang of the whole 'incognito' thing. In Spare Parts, a cyber-nurse (or "Sisterman") radios in to report a suspect, and lists her "possibly bogus" alias as Nyssa O'Traken. Similarly, when Nyssa tells Andrew Harper that she is from Traken, he assumes from her hair that it's in Ireland. (Circular Time)
  • Ill Girl: For brief intervals in Primeval and The Land of the Dead.
  • Innocent Fanservice Girl: Very reluctantly so in Primeval. The Doctor eventually caves in and lends her his coat to cover up with.
  • Killer Rabbit: Spare Parts reveals that the Cybermats originated as toys/pets for children on Mondas, since animals couldn't survive in the cavern environment. Nyssa mistakenly brings one home to the TARDIS, causing it to leech off the ship's engines. When Five finds out, his meltdown makes the Sixth Doctor look positively staid by comparison.
  • Letting Her Hair Down: She briefly tries a simple human life, even wearing jeans for a while. The Doctor gently encourages her to explore it. (Circular Time)
  • A Little Something We Call "Rock and Roll": In Primeval's best scene, Nyssa teaches a bemused Trakenite how to dance the Charleston to the accompaniment of Atari music (It's the best their computers can manage, as there're no music recordings on Trakken). She invites the Doctor to dance as well, but he politely begs off.
    "The mark of a true gentleman is to know how to Charleston and not do it."
  • Poison and Cure Gambit: Shortly after leaving home in "Keeper of Traken", she unknowingly became a puppet for Kwundaar, one of the Old Ones who ran the universe back in the bad old days. When Nyssa falls ill, the Doctor thinks it's because she has no built-in immunities (since Trakenites have long since eliminated disease), when it's actually a ploy to lure them there.
  • Poke in the Third Eye: Nyssa's powerful brain is a doubled-edged sword. Like the Doctor, she shrugs off most psychic influence, but she's actually more vulnerable to negative auras than humans are.
  • Real Life Writes the Plot: Due to Janet Fielding and Matthew Waterhouse's long abstinence from participating in Big Finish — as well as Author Appeal from Peter Davison, a longtime Nyssa fanboy — Nyssa's character was expanded as a matter of utility.
  • Science Hero: Can keep up with the Doctor, and does much autonomous research while he's busy with other plotlines. He even trusts her to repair the TARDIS all by herself at times.
  • The Spock: She does show a flicker of dry wit whenever the Doctor's plans go tits up on him again. Earth humor goes completely over her head.
    Nyssa: I am not a princess.
    Korky: Aye, but yer close 'nough that you couldn't tell that was a joke.
  • Sweet Polly Oliver: She spends the last act of Primeval in the Doctor's cricketer coat, and not much else.
  • Tastes Like Diabetes:invoked Conversed about in "Circular Time" Nyssa takes advantage of her and the Doctor's downtime to write a memoir (framed as a fantasy book) about her home before it was destroyed. Playfully, Andrew needles her about the tedious blissfulness of Traken and lack of any meaningful antagonist. Nyssa confesses that, once the true villain enters her story, the book will end—and she will no longer be able to entertain the fantasy that her world exists somewhere.
  • Technical Pacifist: In Spare Parts, Nyssa becomes trapped in the TARDIS as it's being swarmed by Cybermats. Finally, she has enough and electrifies the outer hull, which she describes as "worryingly satisfying."
  • You Can't Go Home Again: Well, the Doctor does take her back to Traken... a few thousand years into her past, before her people exchanged fanaticism for science. The Trakenites are as litigious as ever, though, severely testing the Doctor's temper as he's forced to jump through bureaucratic hoops to prove they're not heretics.

     Tegan Jovanka 

Tegan Jovanka (Fifth Doctor)

Voiced by: Janet Fielding

Janet Fielding agreed to do one, and exactly one, audio for Big Finish. She liked it so much, though, that she continued doing them. Tegan now rather regularly travels with the Fifth Doctor and his other companions in tales taking place during their time on the show together, both in the monthlies and in the Lost Stories.

  • Contrived Coincidence: A Harsher in Hindsight example. "The Gathering" features Tegan showing up again, for what Janet Fielding said would be here only episode (at the time) taking place after she had decided to leave the TARDIS (much longer from her perspective than the Doctor's, though). The Fifth Doctor offered to take her traveling again, but Tegan declined. Because she was suffering from apparently terminal cancer. Later, in September of 2012, Janet Fielding revealed that she's currently fighting cancer.
  • Deadpan Snarker: Actually amplified in some episodes compared to the old days in The Eighties.
  • Demonic Possession: Since Tegan's back, so is the Mara. Well. Sorta.
  • Emergency Impersonation & You Will Be Beethoven: Manages to pose as a 10th century warrior queen by virtue of being scary and loud. (The Lady of Mercia)
  • Killed Off for Real: After "The Gathering".
  • Open Mouth, Insert Foot: Much like in the old days, and in those tales taking place during her TARDIS travels, Tegan's mouth still gets her into trouble.
  • Sarcastic Devotee
  • The Knights Who Say Squee: When meeting Harry Houdini.
  • Taking the Veil: An amateur-built time machine simultaneously sends Tegan back to 918 A.D. and replaces her with Æthelfrid of Mercia. Worryingly, the real Æthelfrid is due to fight a decisive (and doomed) battle with the Danes that same morning. At the end, the Doctor manages to safety deposit Æthelfrid at a convent, where she will vanish into the mists of history. Before he returns in the TARDIS, though, Tegan is stuck pottering around the convent for a few days.

     Vislor Turlough 

Vislor Turlough (Fifth Doctor)

Voiced by: Mark Strickson

Travelling with the Fifth Doctor, Turlough is typically not in the mood to deal with humans, with Earth, or with having to play the hero sometimes.

  • Belated Backstory: Kiss of Death explains more in detail about Turlough's past, and why he never changes out of his Limited Wardrobe. 30 years after he was last on TV.
  • Butt Monkey: The majority of his adventures take place on Earth, his absolute least favourite planet in the galaxy. He keeps begging the Doctor to go for a holiday on the planet of warm beaches and cute girls. The Doctor ignores him.
  • Deadpan Snarker:
    Fifth Doctor: Where is your sense of adventure?
    Turlough: In my room in the TARDIS, in a box marked "sense of adventure".
  • Enemy Without: In "Loups-Garoux", a group of werewolves hynotises him into seeing a visual manifestation of his dark side. It really scares him.
  • Fish out of Water: The Doctor tries to show him all the best parts of Earth and to teach him cricket. It doesn't take.
  • Girl of the Week
  • New Old Flame: Meets up with an old girlfriend of his in "Kiss of Death". Subverted when she's actually working with the bad guys of the story, and dies in his arms when she rejects them.
  • Not So Different: With a (faultily cloned) Sontaran in "Heroes of Sontar".
  • Not What It Looks Like: In "The Lady of Mercia", the Doctor and Turlough bear witness to some illicit affairs going on in the Frodsam U. physics department: A lively couple is shagging their students and faculty both. A jealous preppie barges into the lab and spots the wife with Turlough, who is also wearing a school uniform. Things being what they are — and Turlough being, Turlough — it isn't long before Turlough gets socked right in the nose.
  • Sour Supporter: Any time he realises he has to be heroic, it's with a weary sigh.
  • You Can't Go Home Again: He's tremendously homesick at times.

     Perpugilliam "Peri" Brown 

Perpugilliam "Peri" Brown (Fifth and Sixth Doctors)

Voiced by: Nicola Bryant

Peri has a lot of adventures with the Fifth Doctor set before "The Caves Of Androzani", and a few with the Sixth Doctor as well.

     Melanie "Mel" Jane Bush 

Melanie "Mel" Jane Bush (Sixth and Seventh Doctors)

Voiced by: Bonnie Langford

Mel's timeline got a bit wobbly as soon as she was introduced in the TV series, which Big Finish delights in making even more complicated. Stories starring her tend to be light-hearted and fun. Since the Seventh Doctor isn't quite The Chessmaster yet during their travels together (as he would eventually become with Ace), the two of them become quite adept at the Indy Ploy.

  • Acting for Two: Like Colin Baker, Bonnie Langford gets to play with this in The Wrong Doctors, where two Mels are running around the story at the same time. However, unlike the Sixth Doctors, the two Mels are night and day.
  • Beware the Nice Ones: Melanie Bush made Davros beg for mercy. She spent months believing he was a kind old crippled professor. Once it turns out Davros is a lying sack of crap and reverts to form, Melanie decides to leave him at the so-called mercy of his own creations: the Juggernauts. Who are Mechanoids enhanced with human remains. Just don't piss her off, really.
  • Determinator
  • Ditzy Genius:
    Mel: But, Doctor, we know they can't change history because we've seen the future already.
    Seventh Doctor: No. Unfortunately there is an awkward thing called "free will".
    Mel: Oh. You mean that predeterminism is merely a philosophical abstract and that the physical reality of the universe is the one in which all potential actions are permitted, including those whose effect cancel out their own logical cause?
    Seventh Doctor: ... Yes, Mel.
  • Fish Out of Temporal Water: She gets very annoyed at anything that's not The Eighties.
  • Fun Personified: Although she can be plenty glum and snarky, she's almost always brought in when a story needs to be Lighter and Softer. To the point where two of her episodes are full-on Panto.
    • And when her stories do get serious, you know something's very, very wrong.
  • I Need a Freaking Drink: After a while, she starts just disappearing in the middle of Six's lectures and wandering off to the nearest bar (exactly like Peri before her).
  • Love Freak: In the audio play "The Juggernauts" she tries to redeem Davros. Of course, she doesn't exactly have the long history with him the Doctor has, and she only just learned what Daleks are, but still...
  • Reality Warper: In the 2013 Sixth Doctor story "The Wrong Doctors", its revealed that Mel's powerful memory and contradictory timeline actually gives her, under the right conditions, the power to pick and choose among countless alternate realities and timelines, pulling them into being in a pocket universe version of Pease Pottage created by a demonic entity from the Time Vortex.
  • The Slow Path: She gets stuck in 1782 for six months.
  • Straight Man: Increasingly relegated to the role of the Doctor's keeper. Six is always indignant (forcing Mel to smooth things over), and Seven never shuts up (he can't craft a halfway-decent alibi without Mel backing him up).
    Mel: Doctor, do you know what happened to Holmes in the end?
    Seven: What?
    Mel: Watson bashed him in the head with his own violin for being so aggravating.

     Dorothy "Ace" McShane  

Dorothy "Ace" Gale McShane (Seventh Doctor)

Voiced by: Sophie Aldred

Ace is just a bit older, now even more awesome, and travelling with the Seventh Doctor with no intention of ever stopping. She also appears in a few "Side Step" stories, which take place during the Doctor Who New Adventures.

  • Affectionate Gesture to the Head: She eventually kisses the Doctor, once, as a very sweet gesture of friendship. Since it's audio, feel free to imagine it as a Big Damn Kiss.
  • Break the Cutie: From her very first Big Finish episode onwards, she gets broken over, and over, and over.
  • Can't Stay Normal: The Doctor martyrs himself to save existence from the Word Lord. But his future self has enough energy to deposit Pex and Ace on Earth circa 2027 A.D., urging them to go lead normal, self-fulfilled lives. In no time at all, Ace is climbing the walls and back where she belongs — the TARDIS with Pex and the revived Doctor, who unknowingly erases all evidence of her time there. Though there was never any consideration that Ace would quit adventuring, she weeps over the future self (a 'professor' in her own right) she might have been.
  • The Chessmaster: Shows off hers skills extensively in "A Death In The Family", slowly but steadily outwitting a Reality Warper. She's shocked, in the end, by how well she did, considering it's usually the Doctor who does that sort of thing.
  • Determinator: In "The Shadow Of The Scourge", she faces an Eldritch Abomination that talks its victims into crippling despair. Her solution? To have someone destroy her eardrums, because she knows the TARDIS medbay can just fix her up later. She spends over half the story completely deaf and with blood running out of her ears, and she's not even bothered.
  • Give Him a Normal Life: The Doctor regularly rotates out his companions, and Ace is a living demonstration of why. She's unstuck in time: no relationships, losing track of how long she's been traveled in the TARDIS, more and more willing to resort to unsavory methods. If the Doctor wanted a chessmaster for a companion, he'd talk to himself.
    Doctor: Picking up a gun? Launching a missile? Destroying a planet?
    Ace: (Coldly) You've done it.
    Doctor: You're not me! You were never meant to be!
  • Guile Hero: Taking a few levels in the trope, and trying to be more like the Doctor. She's not extremely good at it at first.
  • Hidden Depths: Her first adventure ("The Fearmonger") shows both her extreme fear of, and her total devotion to, the Seventh Doctor.
  • I Have You Now, My Pretty: David Tennant's character in "Colditz" has some very unsavory intentions towards her.
  • In Love with the Mark: She immediately sets to work resurrecting the Doctor in "Death in the Family." Stranded as she is with a dying TARDIS, Ace spends several months dating a man named Henry Noone, a relationship that grows serious enough that Henry eventually pops the question. Ace ultimately abandons Henry, having taking advantage of his surname to compete with Nobody No-One. But it’s clear that there was genuine affection for him, which greatly pleases Nobody No-One.
    Nobody No-One: Better keep an eye on your monkeys, Mister Organ Grinder. They're learning to play music without you.
  • Long-Lost Relative: Her brother Liam.
  • The Nicknamer: "Oldman Whitehair, Beatles Haircut, Frilly Shirt, Longscarf Bigeyes, Cricket Boy, Joseph And His Amazing Technicolor Dreamcoat, and Lord Byron..."
  • Ship Tease: Quite a bit of it with Hex, though she mostly just sees him as a little brother.
  • Story Arc: Almost uniquely for a returning TV series companion, she gets a distinct story arc in the monthlies. The early episodes tend to also be understandable as standalone stories, though.


Big Finish also introduces many new companions, who travel with the Doctor and often end up having adventures without him as well. Several of these have made it into TV series canon as of "The Night Of The Doctor".

The companions listed here are sorted in chronological order, by their first appearance in Big Finish.

Several companions from other Doctor Who media also appear in Big Finish. For tropes relating to Bernice Summerfield and Bev Tarrant, see here; for Frobisher, Maxwell Edison and Izzy Sinclair, see here; for Fitz Kreiner, see here; for Iris Wildthyme, see here; for Chris Cwej and Roslyn "Roz" Forrester, see here.

See also the Doctor Who Expanded Universe character sheet for Jimmy Forbes and Jenny Wilson and for miscellaneous characters, and the index of Doctor Who character sheets for a general overview.

    open/close all folders 

     Dr. Evelyn Smythe 

Dr. Evelyn Smythe later Evelyn Rossiter (Sixth and Seventh Doctors)

I'm a historian. This is a time machine. You can take me anywhere... and I'll still be home in time for tea.

Voiced by: Maggie Stables (2000-2011)

One of the Doctor's rare older companions, 55-year-old history professor Evelyn Smythe could also match the Sixth Doctor's acid tongue — a rare bird indeed. Evelyn is by far one of the warmest, friendliest and most emotionally involved companions that the Doctor has ever had. On the one hand, this mellows him out considerably, and the two of them become incredibly close. On the other hand, though, Evelyn can't even begin to cope with the amount of pain and death that a TARDIS traveller sees, and although she tries to stay brave, every friend she loses breaks her heart.

  • Anachronic Order: From "Thicker Than Water" onwards, her episodes get released out of order.
  • Anguished Declaration of Love: A platonic one to the Doctor.
  • Badass Teacher: She's a history teacher. And she's badass. She also knits sweaters for her students.
  • Break the Cutie: She tries to stay brave throughout her adventures, but the cracks begin to form at the end of "Jubilee". She starts to properly break in the middle of "Doctor Who And The Pirates". "Project: Lazarus" sees her finally unable to cope with the Doctor's lifestyle.
  • Christmas Cake: One of the oldest companions the Doctor has ever had.
  • Cool Old Lady: Cool enough to chill out Six. (A little.)
  • Cybernetics Will Eat Your Soul: In "Real Time".
  • Deadpan Snarker: She is naturally quite straightforward, but the Doctor's more boastful rants tend to bring out this side of her.
  • Fore Shadowing: Thanks to Big Finish releasing episodes in whatever Anachronic Order they like, the Doctor often fondly remembers Evelyn in episodes taking place after she leaves team TARDIS... which are released long before we know why she leaves team TARDIS.
  • Genius Sweet Tooth
  • Happily Married: To Rossiter.
  • Hard-Drinking Party Girl: Evelyn regularly parties with her students, and recalls taking part in a gin drinking contest with them. (The gin won.)
  • The Heart: A serious contender for the warmest, kindest, most emotionally involved companion the Doctor's ever had. She slowly learns that those qualities are not at all suitable for the amount of death and pain a TARDIS traveller tends to see.
  • Heroic Sacrifice: Helping the Doctor take out a being of nearly ultimate power, at the cost of her own life... as she was already dying, Evelyn was more than willing to ensure her end happened on her terms.
  • I Choose to Stay: With Rossiter.
  • It Gets Easier / It Never Gets Any Easier: Evelyn's main arc revolves around her coping with all the death that follows in the Doctor's wake. He seems to take it all in his stride, while she, well, doesn't. What she takes away from it is that there is no happily ever after, because life has no ever after, just days that are happy and days that are sad. And as long as one person cares, you can keep on living until the next day.
  • It Is Pronounced Tro PAY: EVE-eh-lyn. She poses as "Evil Evelyn, the Pirate Queen" at one point.
  • Jumped at the Call: Six doesn't get any say in whether or not she gets to be a companion, since she's already made up her mind just minutes after they first meet. As we find out much later, it's partly because she suffered a heart attack not too long before, and the university wanted to try and force her into retirement.
  • Married to the Job: Quite literally, in that she divorced her husband so she could spend more time at work.
  • Medical Horror: Especially in "Real Time" and "Thicker Than Water".
  • Morality Chain: She really brings out Six's softer side, and he grows to care tremendously for her. She also calls him out hard when he puts on a brave face and pretends that everything's fine when it very clearly isn't.
  • Non-Action Snarker
  • Not That Kind of Doctor: She often has the same problem as the Doctor when describing herself.
  • Older Sidekick: She seems noticeably older than the 40ish Sixth Doctor, though she technically isn't.
  • Parental Substitute: Eventually becomes one for Hex.
  • Screw Politeness, I'm a Senior!: Usually, Evelyn's a perfectly friendly old dear, but when she needs to get her way...
  • Your Days Are Numbered: She's hiding a serious heart condition from Six, and part of the reason she wants to travel in the TARDIS is to live life to the fullest while she still can.

     Erimem 

Princess Erimemushinteperem (Fifth Doctor)

I believe in real things. I have heard of men who study the stars.

Voiced by: Caroline Morris (2001-2008)

Erimem is a daughter of Pharaoh Amenhotep II. Rescued by the Fifth Doctor and Peri from Ancient Egypt 1400BC after some complications involving her impending coronation, she travelled the galaxy with the Doctor to learn about different times and places. Also appears in a number of prose stories and novellas, as well as the full-length novel The Coming of the Queen.

  • Abusive Parents: Comes with the time period, but it's revealed in "The Roof Of The World" that her father planned to have her tossed to the lepers for accidentally seeing something she wasn't supposed to. And she only finds out about this in limbo. But as it turns out, it was all to protect her and the rest of the world.
  • Action Girl: She was trained in sword(wo)manship by the Captain of the Royal Guard. Comes in handy when they visit Three Musketeer-era France.
  • Ambadassador: She's extremely adept at political negotiations... but not mature enough to judge when to stand up for her convictions and when to simply keep silent. When push comes to shove, she can also fight her way out.
  • Ancient Egypt
  • Atheism: She was never in line to become Pharaoh until her brothers all suddenly died, and people immediately started worshiping her as a living God when it was announced she would take the throne. This made her realise that religion just wasn't for her. (Considering what Egyptian Gods tend to be like in Doctor Who, she has a point.) However, she still strongly values (and clings to) her traditions, and she finds it very hard to separate her culture and her religion. Seeing the stars convinces her that there must be miracles in the world.
  • Attempted Rape: In "Nekromanteia", in an attempt to make the series a bit Darker and Edgier, Erimem is almost raped but manages to fight off her attacker. (Fan reception of the episode was overwhelmingly negative, and the author was never hired to write for Doctor Who again.)
  • Badass Normal: Erimem never just sits back when there's trouble.
  • Bald of Awesome: She shaves her head at the start of "The Church And The Crown" just because she feels like it, and keeps her hair that way for a while.
  • Beware the Nice Ones: Has a habit of casually breaking people's arms when they try to touch her in less pleasant ways.
  • Blue Blood
  • Deliberate Values Dissonance: She sees nothing wrong with corporal punishment and a moderate level of fascism, if it's for the good of the people. This becomes very interesting when she gets into a sort of romance with Vlad III, Prince of Wallachia... a.k.a. Dracula.
  • Driven to Suicide: In "The Kingmaker", although seeing Peri's reaction to the idea stops her. She pretends it was all just a joke, but later reveals to the Doctor that she was deadly serious, and that she feels tremendously guilty for lying about it to Peri.
  • Everything's Better with Princesses
  • Guile Hero: Years of court etiquette gives her a lot of skill in manipulating people. She effortlessly talks her way into the King of France's court.
  • Faking the Dead
  • Fish Out of Temporal Water: Frequently. "The Veiled Leopard" has her in a bodice and high heels, wanting to try 1960's French fashion. She immediately regrets that decision when she realises she can't properly move anymore.
  • Friendship Moment: In "No Place Like Home", she and the Doctor quickly bond over how dreadfully stuffy and ceremonial their respective civilisations are. She also learns that he's technically the President of Gallifrey, and that he's on the run from it, just like she is.
  • Heterosexual Life-Partners: Mainly with Peri. They're the equivalent of gossiping girls when around each other.
  • Incest Is Relative: Was engaged to her brother before his untimely death, and rather excited about the prospect.
  • Rebellious Princess: A textbook example.
  • Royals Who Actually Do Something
  • Screw Destiny: Over and over.
  • The Slow Path: In "The Kingmaker".
  • Team Pet: Antranak, a stray cat she dragged along during her hasty escape from ancient Egypt. The Doctor really doesn't get along with Antranak, but tolerates the cat for Erimem's sake.
  • Tomboy and Girly Girl: With Peri. Peri's the girly girl, Erimem is a warrior who spends much of her Story Arc with a shaved head.
  • The World Is Just Awesome: When she first joins up with the Fifth Doctor, she's never ever heard of tea. The Doctor promises to take her out for snowball fights and ice cream and anything else she's never seen before. Her travels leave her in a perpetual state of wonder, though due to her excellent etiquette, she's never too much of a Fish out of Water.

     Charley Pollard 

Charlotte "Charley" Elspeth Pollard (Eighth Doctor and Sixth Doctor)

Charley: Did they have orgies?
Eighth Doctor: CHARLOTTE POLLARD!!
Charley: I went to an orgy once... I didn't stay.

Voiced by: India Fisher (2001-2010, 2013-present)

Edwardian adventuress Charlotte Pollard ran away from her boring life among the upper crust in 1930, only to be nearly killed in an airship crash. Fortunately, the Eighth Doctor was around. Charley is a pragmatic and very adventurous young lady who strongly values Brutal Honesty, making up for her lack of life experience with a willingness to try anything once. Got her own spin-off.

  • Alice Allusion: In "Zagreus", she's forced to take on the role of Alice, take up the Vorpal sword, and fight the Jabberwock. It turns out that the TARDIS was trying to save reality itself by confusing Zagreus into submission, using the most nonsensical thing she could possibly find in Charley's head: her memories of reading Alice in Wonderland.
  • Anguished Declaration of Love: She and the Doctor exchange one, though they both mean different things by it, in "Neverland". Things get extremely out of hand after that in "Scherzo".
  • Atheism: And proud of it.
  • Be Careful What You Wish For: She very much wants to become a mother. The idea is explored in a variety of creative ways, none of which are at all fun for Charley.
  • Big Damn Kiss: With the Doctor in "Scherzo". It's played for terrifying, indescribably gruesome Body Horror.
  • Brainwashed and Crazy: Seemingly falls victim to it every second story, may actually have toppled Sarah Jane and Leela as the most brainwashed companion.
  • Breakout Character: One of the most popular Doctor Who companions ever, lasting four entire story arcs: her initial run with Eight, the Divergent Universe arc, her second arc with Eight, and her run with Six. Also the only original Big Finish character to come back for the Big Finish 50th anniversary, and the first Big Finish companion to be mentioned by the Eighth Doctor in his return to the screen. After which she promptly got her own spinoff. Word of Moffat has it that she was also with Eight during the climax of "The Day of the Doctor", standing just offscreen.
  • British Accent: Classic Received Pronunciation.
  • Brutal Honesty: A big fan of it.
  • Buffy Speak:
    A 'thingamy' was a tool, one hit someone else with a 'dooda', and a 'whatsit' bleeped. One could always combine them, of course. 'Thingamydooda' would suit a space spanner, for example. Once, for variety, she had tried out 'oojamaflip', but she’d found it rather common.
  • Canon Immigrant: Mentioned in "The Night of the Doctor".
  • Catch Phrase: "My friends call me Charley". Quite a bit of drama is gotten from characters adamantly calling her "Charlotte" regardless, especially the Sixth Doctor.
  • Characters as Device: Enjoys lampshading her Sidekick status:
    C'rizz: Doctor, what's happening?
    Eighth Doctor: Hmm?
    C'rizz: I said "what's happening?"
    Charley: No, not like that. Ahem. "Doctor, what's happening, Doctor?!!"
    C'rizz: Oh, that's good.
    Charley: Practice, you see.
  • Death by Disfigurement: Strongly invoked in "The Last", but ultimately turned on its head.
  • Double Consciousness: Develops one after "The Chimes Of Midnight", and remembers both dying in the R101 and being rescued by the Doctor.
  • Edwardian Adventuress: She even calls herself this.
  • English Rose: She was raised to become one, but said Screw This, I'm Outta Here! as soon as she had the chance to. Occasionally invoked:
    Keep: There's a tint to your skin.
    Charley: [dripping with sarcasm] It's called English Rose.
  • Faking the Dead
  • Genre Savvy: Is generally very quick to figure out when she's being manipulated with hallucinations, who'd doing the manipulating and why, and what's real and what's fake.
  • Gorgeous Period Dress: A huge fan of it. Jane Austen is one of her favourite authors, and she's very much in love with the past. She also sees historical adventures as an excuse to put her endless etiquette lessons to good use, which typically makes the Doctor groan.
  • Grand Theft Me: Is victim of this for a two parter.
  • Lady of Adventure: Will try anything once, and very quickly and eagerly adapts to future culture and technology. Loves wielding giant swords, even if she has zero skill with them. Ran away from home to dress up as a boy, sneak into an international experimental zeppelin flight, and get to Singapore on time for a romantic rooftop rendezvous.
  • Law of Inverse Fertility: Played With. She really, really wants to become a mother, but the universe seems to conspire against her in that regard... making her give birth to monsters over and over.
  • Ignored Enamored Underling: The Doctor knows full well that Charley's madly in love with him. He ignores it until it's much, much too late, at which point they're stuck in the living hell of "Scherzo". Much later, Charley tells the Sixth Doctor that Eight had been in love with her, too — although he'd never have admitted to being in love, per se.
  • MacGyvering: Comes up occasionally. Her excellent upper-class education gives her a few levels in Science Hero, which she uses whenever it's necessary. In "Solitaire", she's able to fashion a rudimentary electromagnet out of its base components.
  • Mercy Kill: In one truly heartbreaking scene in "Zagreus", she puts the Doctor out of his misery after he begs her to run him through with her sword.
  • Reality Ensues: Several episodes have her dealing with the realization that she will never see her family again. (She does, eventually, in "The Fall Of The House Of Pollard". It goes From Bad to Worse.)
  • Rebellious Spirit: As a child, she let Roma sleep in her family's attic. She only got more rebellious as she got older.
  • Ripple-Effect-Proof Memory: Develops one after a while.
  • Screw This, I'm Outta Here!: When the Eighth Doctor is relieved about C'rizz' death, Charley realises that life with him is too alien and horrifying for her.
  • Ship Sinking: After the Divergent Universe arc, the Doctor makes her promise to stop yearning for him.
  • Smitten Teenage Girl: Falls madly in love with the Eighth Doctor, which is completely Played for Drama. Eight is extremely uncomfortable with it.
  • Sophisticated as Hell: Charley narrowly avoids a Precision F-Strike when the Celestial Toymaker forces her to think of a four-letter password.
    Celestial Toymaker: Do you know how many four-letter words there are in the English language, miss Pollard?
    Charley: I can think of a few right now.
  • Temporal Paradox: Was saved from the crash of the R101 by the Doctor, and went on to travel with him. Time appears to proceed normally, until we find out that the Doctor saving her from certain firey doom caused a ripple in the Web of Time. History wrote that Charley was supposed to go down with the ship, but because of her survival, the ripple lead to all sorts of paradoxes and tons of "things-that-shouldn't-have-happened" to happen throughout the whole of history. All this, plus causing the Web of Time to slowly unravel itself due to her merely existing.
  • Time Crash: Is a living one, thanks to something going mighty wrong when the Doctor rescued her. Nearly every story in her initial arc involves time itself warping around her and history developing continuity errors. Although there's nothing particularly special about her or her rescue, she accidentally becomes the "patient zero" of a grand scale disaster.
  • Timey-Wimey Ball: Thanks to the fun of time travel in Doctor Who, Charley is one of the very few companions to know the Doctor before he knows her. Sorta. Long story short, she was a companion of the 8th Doctor, assumed he died in an adventure and wound up later being a companion to the 6th Doctor. Whose memory of Charley was wiped so the timeline would be preserved when he was the 8th Doctor. Wibbly wobbly, timey wimey indeed.
  • Tomboyish Name
  • Torture Porn: With some frequency, and most notably in "Creed Of The Kromon".
  • Uncanny Family Resemblance: Her sister Cecilia, who appears in Gallifrey'', is also played by India Fisher. India's likeness is used for Cecilia on the cover art, although made to look slightly different from Charley.
  • You Are Worth Hell: Will never abandon the Doctor, no matter how many time he tries to make a Heroic Sacrifice so she can live a normal life. He's very seriously not happy with it.
  • You Can't Go Home Again: See Reality Ensues.

     Hex Schofield 

Thomas Hector "Hex" Schofield (Seventh Doctor)

OH MY GOD!

Voiced by: Philip Olivier (2004-2012)

Hex was introduced as a character well before his first proper appearance, during the Sixth Doctor's encounters with the Forge. He later became a staff nurse and was encountered by the Seventh Doctor and Ace in 2021. Hex is compassionate and good at keeping a cool head, even during his Oh My God freakouts.

  • Adorkable
  • Badass Normal: Considering the fact that he's just a nurse and is more than often in over his head, Hex does some pretty awesome stuff. Especially taking out two elder Gods in one day, admittedly at the cost of his own life. Not bad for someone without Nitro-9.
  • Big "Oh My God!": Not always big, but a bit of a Catch Phrase. Used to dramatic effect in "The Settling" with Oliver Cromwell.
  • Break the Cutie: Villains love to torture poor Hex. Especially Nimrod, telling him enough of the truth about how his mother died to make him distrust the Doctor and then tricking him into resurrecting her as a mindless vampire monster. This would have been bad enough had he not just recovered from being shot. He's also been gratuitously tortured in an English Military Hospital, and nearly burned as a witch by Oliver Cromwell.
    • Indeed, the writers at Big Finish would often joke about what crap they could shove on Hex with each new script.
  • British Accents: Very thick Scouse. This almost gets him into trouble a few times when he's undercover, especially since the TARDIS helpfully uses her Translator Microbes to give him a strong accent no matter what planet he's on.
  • Despair Event Horizon: When he thinks the Doctor and Ace are dead and he's stranded in the Siege of Wexford, he leads the townspeople into battle and becomes a little bit of a Blood Knight.
  • Did Not Get the Girl: He falls in love with Ace pretty early on. She's not interested (not to mention incapable of having a functional romantic relationship with anyone), and he gets over it eventually when he realises she'd "have [him] for breakfast". They just become close friends instead.
  • Eye Gouge: He manages to get himself permanently blinded — turns out looking directly at a nuclear explosion is a very bad idea. Luckily for him, it was part of a "Groundhog Day" Loop, and he gets his eyesight back once the loop resets.
  • The Heart: He's sensitive, caring, honest, and instantly falls into the role of The Chick once the team gets larger.
  • Heroic BSOD:
    • After the events of "The Settling", which Ace considers his very own "Ghost Light".
    • After finding out the fate of his mother, not to mention the fact that the Doctor had chosen to lie by omission about her fate for so long.
  • Heroic Sacrifice: A twofold one for Hex, actually. Hex uses the ultimate power of the universe in a game of proverbial chess with Fenric (yes, THAT Fenric) to take out Fenric's opponent, who wanted to destroy the universe. With the game over, and Fenric still having lost despite his opponent being banished, Fenric takes over Hex out of spite. Hex restrains Fenric (an elder freaking god, mind you) and throws himself out into the Space-Time Vortex to make sure Fenric is dealt with once and for all. While bleeding out from a fatal wound he'd received months ago that Fenric's opponent was holding back so he could use Hex as a pawn against Fenric in the first place. Holy crap.
  • Hospital Hottie: Actor Philip Olivier is a professional (nude) model.
  • Its Pronounced Tro Pay: Skoe-field.
  • Nice Job Breaking It, Hero: In "The Settling", he accidentally causes the Siege of Wexford.
  • Parental Substitute: He's eventually adopted by Evelyn. Who then promptly dies.
  • The Reveal: In the middle of the Sixth Doctor story "Thicker Than Water", the Seventh Doctor shows up completely out of nowhere, uncredited and unannounced, to reveal to Evelyn that Hex is Tommie, Cassie's son from the Forge Story Arc.
  • Ship Tease: Plenty of it with Ace. He fancies her quite a bit and would love to have a nice shag or maybe a date, but Ace just sees him as a little brother.
  • Taking You with Me
  • These Hands Have Killed: He does not cope well with being made to fight in a war.
  • The World Is Just Awesome: Hex is a bit of a sci-fi dork — and in many ways a precursor to Rory Williams — and isn't sure at first whether he's cut out for the reality of space/time adventures. He quickly warms up to it and delights in seeing new things, and Ace (who's much more jaded) loves to watch him enjoy his adventures.

     C'rizz 

C'rizz (Eighth Doctor)

The dead don't sleep.

Voiced by: Conrad Westmaas (2004-07)

Pronounced KER-izz. C'rizz is a chameleonic monk from the Divergent universe who got kidnapped during his wedding, used as a guinea pig, and subsequently broken over and over and over again by everything that crosses his path. He tries to put on a brave face and becomes close friends with Charley. C'rizz never gets much Character Development during his first Story Arc, and as we find out eventually, there's a very good reason for that...

  • Artificial Human: Well, Eutermesan. And he has no idea.
  • The Assimilator: As revealed in "Something Inside", he can permanently absorb people's powers by murdering them. He also takes on little bits of the personality of every person he meets, a fact he actively hates.
  • The Atoner: For killing L'da.
  • Anti-Hero: Most of the Doctor's companions share at least the basics of their moral code with that of the Doctor. C'rizz... really, really doesn't.
  • Beware the Nice Ones: C'rizz is kind, helpful, even valiant at times, and will ruthlessly murder you or grant you a Fate Worse than Death if you hurt him.
  • Blessed with Suck: He strongly dislikes his own powers.
  • Blue and Orange Morality: The way C'rizz sees the world is very alien and intensely frightening at times.
  • Break the Cutie: Something the Expanded Universe excels at, it seems.
  • Broken Masquerade: He keeps up the façade for a good long time. Until he can't anymore.
  • Canon Immigrant: Mentioned in "The Night of the Doctor".
  • Characters as Device: C'rizz is an experiment in what happens when a companion just doesn't fit in team TARDIS all that well. After his final episode, the Doctor is actually relieved that things can go back to normal again. His response horrifies Charley so much that she breaks off their friendship and leaves Eight forever.
  • Creepy Good: "Good" being a very relative term, thanks to his Blue and Orange Morality.
  • The Empath: Adapts to whomever he's around. The reason he has no Character Development to speak of at first is because he simply doesn't have much of an identity of his own. Entirely Played for Drama.
  • Heroic Sacrifice
  • Humiliation Conga: In "Other Lives", he decides to leave the TARDIS and go look for the Doctor... on 19th century earth. He's pretty much immediately captured, chained up, forced to rip off his clothes and put on a thong, and displayed as a sideshow freak.
  • I See Dead People: Originally played straight at the start of "The Last", where C'rizz is but one of a few who see the spirits of the dead surrounding them. Later actually twisted somewhat at the end of "Terror Firma", where it's revealed that C'rizz sees each and every person he's killed, or rather "saved", as a ghost around him.
  • Lizard Folk: With an exoskeleton.
  • Mercy Kill: Originally played painfully straight in his first story, where C'rizz is forced to kill his loved one to alleviate her suffering and release her from what is essentially an undeath. However, the repeated trauma that C'rizz undergoes twists that inside him, eventually revealing that he believes each person that he's killed is also one that he's "saved". This includes a Dalek. His church's credo revolves almost entirely around killing, and he was one of their most adept assassins.
  • Path of Inspiration: Unbeknownst to him (or to anyone, really), his church was founded by Rassilon.
  • Petting Zoo People: He's a humanoid chameleon.
  • Power Copying: From the people he "saves".
  • Power Nullifier: He becomes quite adept at shutting his mind (and others' minds) off from scrying and hallucinations, since he picked up moderate telepathy from someone he murdered.
  • Punctuation Shaker: Just like his fiancée, L'da.
  • Psychopomp: What turns out to be the purpose of his existence.
  • Reality Warper: In "Absolution".
  • Rebel Prince: His father is the leader of the Foundation. Although it's later revealed that things are a little more complicated.
  • Sealed Inside a Person-Shaped Can: The people he saves become trapped inside him forever. It's eventually revealed that this is exactly what he was created for.
  • Telepathy: He picked up a bit of it once from someone he killed.
  • This Looks Like a Job for Aquaman: In "Memory Lane", the heroes fight a nanotech substance that latches onto people's personalities. C'rizz is able to confuse it into a neutral state by letting it into his mind, since he has no clear-cut personality.
  • Token Evil Teammate: Sort of. He's certainly this during the Divergent arc, but gradually becomes more like the Doctor and Charley, thanks to his natural ability to copy people's moods and personalities. He still occasionally maims and murders, though, and the Doctor and Charley stay completely unaware of it for a very long time.
  • Torture Porn: He gets severely physically tortured in "Something Inside", and nearly dies from his internal injuries.
  • Trauma Conga Line: First, his beloved is horrendously mutated before his eyes, forcing C'rizz to kill her off out of mercy. As he begins to travel to other worlds, though, it seems like each subsequent author and story was continually trying to out-do the previous one.
  • Weak-Willed: His chameleonic skin isn't the only thing that adapts to his environment. As it turns out, his race also subconsciously adjusts emotionally to people around them.
  • You Wouldn't Like Me When I'm Angry: He'll break your spine and rip your eyes out.

     Lucie Miller 

Lucie Miller (Eighth Doctor)

Just look at you. A right frock-coated ponce.

Voiced by: Sheridan Smith (2007-2011)

Lucie bleedin' Miller is dumped on the TARDIS by the Time Lords without explanation (at first), and completely fails to be impressed by the alien ponce in front of her. Over the years, she and the Doctor end up becoming best friends.

  • Anguished Declaration of Love: In a welcome subversion of the trope, her big damn "I love you" to the Doctor is completely non-romantic. Apart from some very mild flirting, they really are just friends.
  • Big Damn Heroes: Just when it looks like the Daleks are about to win, here comes Lucie with a spaceship and a really handy nuke.
  • Book Dumb: Gets rather annoyed whenever the Doctor points this out.
  • Break the Cutie: Severely.
  • Brutal Honesty: Values it to the point where the Doctor lying to her causes her to break off their friendship.
  • Canon Immigrant: Mentioned in "The Night of the Doctor".
  • Catch Phrase: "What's that when it's at home?"
  • Combat Pragmatist
  • Commuting on a Bus: She was absent for the first half of the fourth season (see Put on a Bus below). Though Sheridan Smith played two androids the Doctor had programmed to have her voice in "Prisoner of the Sun", the January 2011 episode.
  • Deadpan Snarker: Extra emphasis on "snarker". Describes herself as "Sarcasmo, the Lord of Sarcasm".
  • Death by Disfigurement
  • Dying Moment of Awesome: Her Heroic Sacrifice literally saves the world.
  • Future Me Scares Me: Subverted. It's suggested that Lucie is destined to become a ruthless dictator, but then it turns out it was someone else.
  • Gratuitous French: She and the Doctor pull this at the beginning of "Scapegoat". Her French is hilariously terrible.
  • Handicapped Badass: As of "Lucie Miller", she contracted a plague while on holiday with Alex, which left her blind in one eye and dependent on leg braces. In spite of this, she, Alex, and Susan staged several raids on Dalek forces. With nuclear submarines.
  • Heroic Sacrifice: Taking a doomsday nuke into the heart of a Dalek time engine while shouting out "LUCIE BLEEDIN' MILLER!" so the Daleks knew just who screwed them over.
    • Notably, earlier on, she's a rare case of Heroic Sacrifice survivor. Once things started going to hell, she expected to die on a mission, and didn't particularly care... until she found out Susan's TARDIS key was active, and the Doctor was (finally) coming. But, lest you think Big Finish was only kidding with the title, she ends up dying anyway.
  • Killed Off for Real
  • The Lad-ette: Particularly in her first episode.
  • Lady Swears A Lot: And has a lot of fun with it. Freely mixes up "bleedin' hell" with "oh, sugar!".
  • Noodle Incident: More of a Jelly Incident, in her case.
    Lucie: "... It's just I've got a thing about jelly. Incident at a children's party, 1992. Trust me, you don't wanna know."
  • Not Herself: Is very easily hypnotised and possessed, to her constant frustration. Is also extremely adept at staying conscious during mind control, though, and fighting back from the inside.
  • Of Corsets Sexy: Subverted in "Scapegoat", in which Lucie, having donned Gorgeous Period Dress for what is meant to be a night at the Moulin Rouge, has this exchange with the Doctor:
    Doctor: "You look very... uh... very... uh..."
    Lucie: "Say 'cheap' and I'll have you."
  • Oop North: Lucie is from Blackpool.
  • Punctuated Pounding: On several occasions. In "Orbis", the Doctor has gone amnesiac (again) and forgotten her, so she literally slaps him into remembering her, spelling her name and smacking him after every letter. It works.
  • Put on a Bus: She voluntarily leaves the Doctor and returns home after an incident that makes her believe she can't trust him anymore. Her aunt Pat, whom she first met in 1974, was killed on their second visit to her and replaced by the shape-shifting alien who had been Pat's husband. The Doctor knew this and opted not to tell Lucie, against his better judgment, and she eventually found out. This broke her trust in him, until she ran into him again on a moonbase on Deimos, where she had been abandoned by the Meddling Monk, with whom she'd been traveling. She then spends Christmas with him, Susan, and Susan's son Alex, though rather than resume traveling with him she opts to explore 22nd-century Earth with Alex. He's somewhat amusingly alarmed by that, telling Alex to look after her in one breath, and warning him not to let her teach him any bad habits in the next. She eventually forgives him for the aunt Pat things... soon before she dies.
  • Shell-Shocked Veteran: Spends two years living through the Dalek occupation. The Doctor is horrified when he sees her picking up a gun and threatening to shoot the Monk.
  • Ship Tease: Has a few moments with the Doctor throughout season 3, and with Alex in season 4.
  • Vitriolic Best Buds: With the Doctor. For all they snark at one another, they're self-admittedly each other's best friend. She does accuse him of staring at her bum a lot.
  • Why Did It Have To Be Crocodiles?
  • You Put the X in XY: In "The Skull of Sobek", she starts seeing strange visions. The Doctor's comment: "You put the Lucie in hallucination."

     Jason 

The Marquis Jason de Saint Epiman de Sinee de la Tour (Sixth Doctor)

Voiced by: Noel Sullivan (2008, 2011)

From the Big Finish version of the stage play "The Ultimate Adventure" and its Companion Chronicle sequel, "Beyond The Ultimate Adventure". A teenaged French aristocrat, rescued from the French revolution by the Sixth Doctor. Jason's a cheerful and adventurous young man.

     Crystal 

Crystal (Sixth Doctor)

Voiced by: Claire Huckle (2008, 2011)

From the Big Finish version of the stage play "The Ultimate Adventure" and its Companion Chronicle sequel, "Beyond The Ultimate Adventure". An up-and-coming nightclub singer who accidentally joins team TARDIS.

     Thomas Brewster 

Thomas Brewster (Fifth and Sixth Doctors)

Voiced by: John Pickard (2008-2011)

A Dickensian little git who had the misfortune of getting caught up in the Doctor's life at the tender age of four. Orphaned, abandoned and raised in a workhouse, he never had a chance to get a proper education (let alone love and care from anyone), and inevitably got stuck on the path of villainy. The Doctor, feeling at least partially responsible for Brewster's ruined childhood, comes to see him as a companion eventually and tries his best to make adult Brewster's life somewhat normal again.

  • Artful Dodger: After escaping from his abusive boss, he spends a few years as a teenager living the life of a Dickens-style little thief.
  • Even Bad Men Love Their Mamas: Well, hypothetical future Stable Time Loop ghosts pretending to be his mama.
  • Heel-Face Revolving Door: In part due to being somewhat of a Doom Magnet, and in part because being a thief is the only life he knows.
  • Love Redeems: He's willing to settle down with Connie and live a normal life. Too bad she gets into a traffic accident soon after.
  • Sequel Hook: Last seen ditching Earth altogether to go set up an interstellar company.
  • Token Evil Teammate: Although he makes a few genuine efforts to better himself. The Doctor's companions and friends are more willing to see Brewster's good side than the Doctor himself — Evelyn genuinely wants to help the boy, and Patricia Menzies just sees him as an Ineffectual Sympathetic Villain and runs circles around him intellectually.

     Alex Campbell 

Alexander David "Alex" Campbell (Eighth Doctor)

Voiced by: Jake McGann (2009-2011)

Susan's son and the Doctor's great-grandson. Seems to have taken the whole "Surprise! You're half-alien!" thing quite well after the initial shock, considering Earth was pretty xenophobic while he was growing up.

  • Book Dumb: Alex isn't doing especially well in school.
  • Half-Human Hybrid: A very rare example of nonhuman Mom, human Dad.
  • Heroic Sacrifice: Alex performed one of these, planning for the Daleks to destroy the very important console he was "trying" to sabotage when they shot him to stop him. It worked.
  • It Runs in the Family
  • Tell Me About My Father
  • Wonder Child: Shades of this. Doctor Who media varies on whether or not Time Lords are interfertile; at the very least, human/Time Lord children are unusual enough that Eight asks Susan exactly how she managed it. (She's a bit embarrassed by the question.)

     Dr. Elizabeth Klein 

Dr. Elizabeth Klein [Restored Universe] (Seventh Doctor)

Voiced by: Tracey Childs (2012, 2013)

UNIT's scientific advisor, and the regular-universe counterpart of a very nasty alternate-universe Nazi officer. The Seventh Doctor's been keeping an eye on her just to make sure she's nothing like her alternate self, and she's absolutely not happy about it. But while being similar in temperament to her "other" self, this Klein is far more personable than her former incarnation, and most importantly not evil. For tropes pertaining to the alternate Klein, see her entry under Big Finish Doctor Who Villains.

     Tamsin Drew 

Tamsin Drew (Eighth Doctor)

Voiced by: Niky Wardley (2010-2011)

A failed actress who wants to leave her dreary life on Earth. Travels with the Doctor after Lucie leaves, but never really manages to get along with him. He outright rejects her as a companion when they first meet. Turns out taking her along anyway was a bad idea.

     Mary Godwin 

Mary Godwin (Eighth Doctor)

Voiced by: Julie Cox (2009-2011)

One of the Eighth Doctor's first companions, long before the regular timeline of the monthlies. Mary Godwin meets the Doctor at Lake Geneva, just before she would go on to write Frankenstein and, soon after, get married and become Mary Shelley. (Although she's already going by her fiancé's name most of the time) She's having difficulties in her relationship with Percy and his friends and jumps at the chance to escape it all for a bit.

  • All Girls Want Bad Boys: She likes her men urbane yet wild, which is what attracts her to both Percy Shelley and the Doctor.
  • Anachronic Order: Her adventures with young Eight take place mid-way through his travels with Gemma and Samson Griffin, long before those of Charley Pollard and Lucie Miller. This was done to put a bit of a breather between "To The Death" and "Dark Eyes", and to explore what Eight's life was like before "Storm Warning" (and "Terror Firma"). The older Eighth Doctor, whom she encounters first, is straight from the Time War era.
  • Anguished Declaration of Love: To Eight, eventually. He just sort of stammers.
  • Brown Eyes: With the symbolism it denotes.
  • Constantly Curious: She is a would-be science fiction writer, after all. And some of the advanced things she sees would be even more outlandish to her than to the average companion.
  • Crazy-Prepared: She may be naive about the realities of time travel, but she does carry a small knife and a number of other useful things with her.
  • Deliberate Values Dissonance: She has a bit of a laudanum habit. The Doctor doesn't exactly approve.
  • Diary: Keeps one.
  • Famed in Story: The Doctor is especially concerned about not getting her killed, having plucked her out just before fame set in.
  • Have We Met Yet?: She and the Doctor meet in the wrong order.
  • Heroic BSOD: On her first trip, wondering what she was thinking coming to a place she didn't belong.
  • The Maiden Name Debate: Whether or not she's using "Shelley" varies several times per episode, depending on how connected she feels to Percy at the time. Her hesitation in this regard is shown especially once she (inevitably) falls head over heels in love with Eight.
  • Nightmare Fetishist: Slightly. She's morbidly impressed by some horrifying things.
  • Silk Hiding Steel: She's very composed.
  • Speculative Fiction: Considered, in story, as the mother of science fiction.
  • Sympathy for the Devil: She became friends with a Cyberman. The Doctor later remarks that she tends to "side with the monster." It sets her up for the mindset behind the writing of Frankenstein.
  • Wise Beyond Their Years: At eighteen, she's already had two kids and outlived one of them. She's take-charge and maternal and slapped a girl (apparently) her age for her childish insolence.

     Flip Jackson 

Philippa "Flip" Jackson (Sixth Doctor)

Voiced by: Lisa Greenwood (2011-present)

Flip is a supermarket checkout girl, a "late teens, fluffy handbag, Essex girl" hungry for a more exciting life. She's definitely not the sharpest tool in the shed, but incredibly brave, and willing to throw herself into any kind of danger just to help people. First meets the Sixth Doctor during a misadventure with Thomas Brewster (see above) and eventually becomes his companion.

  • Book Dumb: She failed her driver's test, doesn't know the first thing about history, doesn't speak a word of French, and gets a little bit annoyed at Six's vocabulary.
  • British Accents: Broad Estuary.
  • Chronic Hero Syndrome: She doesn't get scared easily, and even when she does, she still jumps in with both feet.
  • Genre Savvy: Not especially intelligent, but she can tell when something just doesn't make sense. Leads to a dramatic case of Wrong Genre Savvy when at one point she figures out that she's not in reality, but fails to notice that Your Mind Makes It Real. (Luckily, Six manages to get her Back from the Dead.)
  • Jumped at the Call: Very enthusiastically.
  • Nice Girl: She may be a little snarky, but she's tremendously sweet.
  • Pop Cultured Badass:
    Flip: Well, um, I know that at Waterloo... Napoleon did surrender.
    Napoleon: And who told you that, may I ask?
    Flip: ...ABBA?

     Oliver Harper 

Oliver Harper (First Doctor)

Voiced by: Tom Allen (2011)

The first companion to be created exclusively for the Companion Chronicles, Oliver travels with the First Doctor and Steven Taylor.

     Raine Creevy 

Raine Creevy (Seventh Doctor)

Voiced by: Beth Chalmers (2011, 2012)

Originally created for the TV series before it was cancelled, Raine teams up with the Seventh Doctor and Ace. She's a young burglar from a lower-class family who, armed with an affected posh accent and a healthy dose of sarcasm, decides to see what time and space are all about.

     Dr. Liv Chenka 

Dr. Liv Chenka (Seventh and Eighth Doctors)

Voiced by: Nicola Walker (2011, 2014)

A medtech from the year 2865, who first meets the Seventh Doctor a few months after the Kaldor sandminer incident and — one Dalek war later — ends up as a companion to the Eighth.

  • Broken Bird: The war with the Dalek Empire leaves her so broken, she ends up fleeing to the literal end of the universe — something she's got in common with Eight at that point.
  • Gay Best Friend: Bas.
  • Grand Theft Me: She's not the only one in her body.
  • Human Popsicle: Her body gets frozen during her long voyage on the Sleeper Starship, and her mind is stored on a microchip.
  • I Did What I Had to Do: Becomes a willing "traitor" for the Daleks when the Dalek Empire shows up to colonise the planet she's on, just so she can continue to do her job as a doctor.
  • Single Woman Seeks Good Man: And the one guy she sort of fancies doesn't stick around for long.
  • Space Clothes: She follows the Kaldor fashion and makeup trends before getting caught up in the Dalek war.
  • Virtual Ghost: In an especially bizarre example of the trope, someone else's Virtual Ghost gets copied onto her memory chip, allowing that person to occasionally wake up her body from cryosleep and sabotage the ship without her realising it.
  • Your Days Are Numbered: Due to having run away from the Dalek Empire under very unhealthy conditions.

     Molly O'Sullivan 

Molly O'Sullivan (Eighth Doctor)

Somewhere, behind the German lines, there were German girls, like me, looking at the terrible things our boys at done to their boys. Was I right? Eh? Was I right?

Voiced by: Ruth Bradley (2012-present)

An Irish medical volunteer, working in France during World War I. She encounters the Doctor when he's rather suddenly found dying on the battlefield, and is quickly roped up in a full-scale Dalek invasion.


Several other characters have been introduced which, although not technically companions, meet the Doctor on occasion:

     Patricia Menzies 

DI Patricia Menzies

Voiced by: Anna Hope (2008-2011)

A Mancunian detective-inspector who keeps encountering the Sixth Doctor.

  • Have We Met Yet?: She and Six meet in the wrong order, and realizing the implications for the Web of Time, they both decide to keep it a secret from each other.
  • Bavarian Fire Drill: She spends a large chunk of one adventure pretending to be the Doctor's next regeneration.
  • Deadpan Snarker: Seriously.
  • Great Detective: She's really very good at her job.
  • Oop North: From Manchester.
  • Nerves of Steel: She pretty much treats the Doctor's adventures as just another day at work.
  • Reasonable Authority Figure: She's very willing to listen to the Doctor's story, once she figures out that he's telling the truth.
  • Unfazed Everyman: She grasps the basics of time and space travel very quickly, and doesn't let it keep her from getting the job done. She even starts policing the aliens among us because she knows they can't go knocking on the door of regular authorities. Pro bono.

     Sally Armstrong 

Sally Armstrong

Voiced by: Natalie Burt (2012-present)

An inventor from the 1970's and almost-companion of the Eighth Doctor, until she got blown up by Daleks in an aborted timeline. In the restored timeline, she was supposed to be hit by a car instead, but got rescued — by the Master, of all people, who promptly took her on as his brainwashed companion.

  • Brainwashed and Crazy: As the Master's puppet.
  • Eye Scream: The Master uses her as his assistant when he's posing as an optometrist, and merrily collecting people's eyes.
  • Gadgeteer Genius: For the Ides Scientific Institute.
  • Have We Met Yet?: She first hears of the Doctor when he sends a message back into the past for her, long after he's met her, and in a timeline that never happened anyway.
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